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Bradford County telegraph
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027795/00098
 Material Information
Title: Bradford County telegraph
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: L.C. Webb
Place of Publication: Starke Fla
Creation Date: December 28, 2006
Publication Date: 1888-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Starke (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bradford County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bradford -- Starke
Coordinates: 29.947222 x -82.108056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 9, no. 41 (Apr. 13, 1888)-
General Note: Publishers: Mathews & Farmer, <1893-1897>; E.S. Mathews, <1900-1926>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579551
oclc - 33886096
notis - ADA7397
lccn - sn 95047406
System ID: UF00027795:00098
 Related Items
Preceded by: Starke telegraph

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
        page A 10
    Section B: Regional News
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
    Section B: Regional News: Editorial/Opinion
        page B 4
    Section B: Regional News continued
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
    Section B: Regional News: Classified Ads
        page B 8
        page B 9
        page B 10
    Section C: Features and Sports
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
        page C 5
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
Full Text










1107770 BC


1107770
L LIBRARY
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

-_GAINESVILLE FL32611
^i^iv~k xi t^'v^^V.^-^-^


USPS 062-700 Three Sections Starke, Florida


Thursday, Dec. 28, 2006


127th Year 22nd Issue 50 CENTS


wwwSbct *eS.S S 'S S 'eS .6


Noteworthy


Office closed
New Year's
The office of the Bradford County
Telegraph will be closed on New
Year's Day, Monday, Jan. 1. The
deadline for classified and display
ads.has been extended to 3 p.m. on
Tuesday, Jan. 2.

Sign your kids
up for etiquette
class
The Santa Fe Patrons of the Arts
and the Woman's Club of Starke are
hosting an etiquette class for children
in January taught by Robin Steele,
founder and director of the Florida
Academy of Etiquette and Protocol.
Topics covered include dining and
phone etiquette, thank you letters,
introductions and more. In all, 11
hours of training will be offered over
three days, Jan. 26-28. The class will
culminate in a five-course dinner.
There are 50 seats available,,and
tickets go on sale Nov. 1. Registration
is open to girls and boys, age 7-12
years old. Cost is $100 for the first
child and $50 for each additional
child.
For reservations, call Bonnie
Green at (904) 964-2082 or Brenda
O'Brien at (904) 769-6531.

Conservation
district moves
meeting
The Bradford Soil and Water
Conservation District holds regular.
meetings the first Tuesday of each
month at 9 a.m. at the Bradford
County Cooperative Extension
Office.
Because of the holidays, the
January meeting has been moved to
Tuesday, Jan. 9.
For more information, call (352)
376-7414.

Focus on the
future
If you are 35 years or older and
have lost financial support, the
Displaced Homemaker Program can
help you make the transition to the
job market.
Free classes and workshops are
offered monthly. The next classes
start Jan. 16.
Develop self-sufficiency.., and
confidence, learn job search and
interview skills; create a master
application and resume, and gain
basic computer skills. Finding
supportive friends is a plus.
Special topic workshops are also
offered covering health, legal and
employer issues.
Call the Displaced Homemaker'
Program at Santa Fe Community
College at (352) 395-5047 to make
'an intake screening appointment.

Panic relief
group forming
Achieve control, a positive self-
image, and constructive thinking,
and overcome your fear, anxiety, end,
agoraphobia.
This new program provides the
necessary tools and training to help
participants learn to manage and
control their panic and anxiety.
To determine a location, start date
and time in this area, organizers
need a minimum of four initial
participants. Meeting information
will be announced once the group is
* established.
To participate, please call (732)
940-9658. For more information
regarding this program, please
call or visit our Web site www.
panicreliefinc.com.


Number of new homes


up from year to year


BY MARK J. CRAWFORD
Telegrdph Editor
Much of the countywide growth
discussed in and out of cornmissitn
meetings may still be on the drawing
board, but the number of new housing
permits did see a bump from 184 last
year to 222 this year.
Of 'that' number, 133 permits
were issued for new single-family
homes in 2006, up from 106 in
2005. Eighty-one new homes were
permitted in 2004; 95 in 2003. The
average of several years before that
was just 70.
Most homes are still being built in
unincorporated Bradford County, 98
permits were issued there. Twenty-


three new homes were permitted in
Starke, compared to 13 last year.
,Three homes were permitted in
Brooker, four in Lawtey and five in
Hampton.
Even the number of new mobile
home installations was on the rise
again this year. Eighty-nine -weie
permitted in 2006, while 2005 saw
only 78 permits.pulled. Ninety-seven
were permitted in 2004.
The only two new commercial
structures built were the Whataburger
fast food restaurant on south U.S. 301
and the Walgreens pharmacy, still
under construction at the corner of
301 and S.R. 100. This new addition
to downtown replaces the car lot that


occupied the property for some time
and is slated to open after the first of
the year.
,Dormitories permitted at the
Salvation Army's campsite near
Keystone Heights constitute
additional nonresidential growth,
as does the county's new public
library, which was permitted and is
under construction on Pratt Street in
Starke,
SPermitting delays and an extensive
storm water management project'
have pushed the opening'of the new
facility to the latter part of 2007, but
once it is oppn it will quintuple the
space available at the present library,
See GROWTH, p. 2A


BY MARK J. CRAWFORD
STelegraph Editor
The graduation rate tumbled
throughout the state and in Bradford
County. for 2006, according to
numbers released by Education
Commissioner John L. Winn last
week.
In addition, the number of high
school dropouts was up.
Bradford's graduation rate was
50th in the state out of 67 counties.
Fifty-two counties had a lower
dropout rate than Bradford, which
tied with Hamilton County to have
the 14th highest dropout rate in the
state.
Statewide, the average graduation
rate fell from 71.9 to 71 percent.
Bradford was one of the counties


bringing down the average. The
graduation rate fell from 76.1 percent
in 2005 to 69.5 percent in 2006.
Since 1999, the graduation rate,
ih Bradford County has fluctuated
between 60.4 percent and last year's
high of 76.1 percent.


Year Graduation rate
1999 60.4%
2000 67.4%
2001 70.8%
2002 75.2%
2003 74.7%
2004 70.5%
2005 76.1%
2006 69.5%


Downtown

facelift

under way
BY TERESA STONE-IRWIN
Telegraph Staff Writer
Anyone who has been through
downtown Starke lately has noticed
that something's abuzz.
Along with the construction taking
place at the new Walgreen's location,
many shops along Call Street are
undergoing renovations.
CrossingWalnutStreet, renovations
are taking place for the addition of a
future restaurant next door to the
chamber of commerce building.
Owner Kim Skidmore, also the
manager of Main Street Starke Inc.,
said thit he's hoping for an Italian
restaurant, but knows in her heart that
whatever type of restaurant business
comes to the area, the people of
Starke will be glad that it's there.
Immediately adjacenttoSkidmore's
building is S&J Fitness Center.
The fitness center is making
interior alterations of their. own to
allow for the addition of a dance
and aerobics studio to open there in
January 2007.
Across Call Street from S&J,
Caf6 Terrace is getting some final
touches on its two-story renovation.
Hometown First Realty .is in the
process of revitalizing the downstairs
for a restaurant business as well
as putting the finishing touches on
the upstairs transformation into four
studio apartments.
Located between Scarlet's and
Suncoast Driver Educatidr.nPrograms,
the building was originally the Starke
post office and a watch repdiiY.ih,:.p.
It was later remodeled and became
Mitchell's Rexall Drug Store.
Owner Dwight Hewett said that
the. downstairs 3,500square-foot
building is being restored, back to
its original exterior design, with
the interior ready for a restaurant
entrepreneur to build out.
"The exterior front of the building
has been restored back to the way it
looked when it was the post office.
We put back an awning just like the
one that was once there as well as
returning the front of the building
Back to its original design, which
includes the architectural window
frames," said Hewett.
"We are also planning to put up a
large timepiece, just like the one that
used to hang outside the old watch
repair store."
Curtis Crawford, also of Hometown
First Realty, said that the brick used
for the front of Caf6 Terrace actually
came off of an old building that was
demolished in Chicago
An additional surprise was found
in the building during the interior
framing stage.
"When we were framing up the
interior walls, we found that the
original brick is still there on the east
See DOWNTOWN, p. 4A


2.8%



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Florida Dfistect with


Dropout Rates At, Above.0
anl Below State Rate of

3.5% for 2005-06


*-Cla
log


4:JU. '(


The neighboring counties of
See RATES, p. 10A


Stay informed. Get involved. Be entertained. Keep in touch. Express yourself. Know your community. I 1111 i

Deadline 3 p.m. Tuesday before publication 904-964-6305 (phone) 904-964-8628 (fax) 6 89076 63869 2


Graduation rate slips,

dropout rate increases in BC


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Page 2A TELEGRAPH Dec. 28, 2006


GROWTH
Continued from p. 1A

adding ne" otlice space.
computer stations. classroom,
stud\ and community\ meeting
spaces, as ell as dedicated
areas for children and teens.
Thecount alsoundertook the
reno action of a former church.
turning it into a conference
center. which h could also be the
site of a ne\\ hotel. iSee related
store I
To other high-profile
commercial additions took o\ er
abandoned spaces. Sa\e-A-Lot
moved into the long empty\
storefront in Bradtord Square
once occupied b \Winn-Di\ie.
Tractor Suppl\ made use of
hall of the space once occupied
by W'al-Mart in the Deerfoot


- I


Shopping Center.
Future groic th leaders
are discussing is primarily
residential in nature. Zoning
changes made %ta\ for a new
subdivision off of Market
Road and a new to\\nhouse
development off of Thomas
Street in Starke.
This came after the citl's
engineer predicted other
discussed developments,
including two subdi\isions on
C.R. 229. one on S R. 100,
apartments on S.R. 16 and
100. and a possible retirement
community off of Ed\ards
Road. all of \\ which could double.
the cits's population in the next
10 ears.
Room for growth \\as also
made in Brooker and Law\te.,
with both cities anne\ing
property for residential
de% elopment.


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A string of new homes, pictured above, is being built in Fox Hollow in Hampton.
At right, the conference center, named for late Gov. Charley E. Johns, will sit
alongside a future hotel.


2 hotels planned near conference center


BY MARK J. CRAWFORD
Telegraph Editor
Housing development is up,
but two hoteliers are hoping
travelers find Bradford County
as nice a place to stay as others
have to live.
Ron Lilly, CEO of the North.
Florida Regional Chamber of
Commerce, said the developers
are taking their cues on the need
for additional hotel rooms from
an already high occupancy rate
in the area.
Ray Amin, a hotel developer
from Georgia, is planning a 90-
room Holiday Inn on north U.S.
,301 diagonally across from the
conference center.
The land deal should be
settled in early February, Lilly
said. Construction would begin
shortly thereafter, as plans
have already been prepared for
submission to the county. A
total of four acres is involved,
though only around an acre and
a half will be developed for the
hotel.
S The ,remaining property
could be used for restaurant
development. .
Paresh "Paz" Patel will be
talking to the county after the
first of the year to negotiate a
price for three acres of property
next to the conference center.
This Comfort Suites hotel


BY MARK J. CRAWFORD
Telegraph Editor
School board members, who
recently accepted the salary
recommendation for board
members issued by the Florida
School Board Association,
aren't the only elected county
officials to receive pay
increases this year.
The Florida Legislative
Committee on
Intergovernmental Relations
produces an annual salary
schedule for constitutional
officers that is based largely
on each county's population
estimates.
(Figures on the salary
schedule don't necessarily
apply to constitutional officers
in charter counties, whose
electors can alter the form
of county government and
the status of constitutional
officers.)
The law does not require the
committee to compute these
salaries, and the committee
encourages county officials
to individually compute and
verify the finalized salaries. But
it is a somewhat complicated
formula that has been written
into Chapter 145 FS.
Bradford's population is
estimated at 28,118 by the
Bureau .of Economic and
Business Research at the
University of Florida. Factors


Subscription Rate
$30.00 per year:
$16.00 six months
Outside Trade Are
$30.00 per year:
$16.00 six months


would be built in two phases-
two four-story, 90-room towers
that would add a total of 180
new hotel rooms.
Lilly says interest in building
hotels shows that development
is moving forward in the county
and he credited the conference
center for helping to ignite that
interest.
While the center has
primarily seen use from
individuals and. community
groups since opening this year,
the chamber has booked its first
actual conference at the center.
CSX Transportation is planning
a two-day conference, and 85
local hotel rooms have already
been booked.
Those hotels-the Days Inn
and Best Western-already
enjoy an 87 percent occupancy
rate, according to Lilly, and
developers see in that figure a
market for additional rooms.
In using the conference center,
as a draw for 100 or more people
at a time, Lilly said the county's
Tourism Development Council
Sis fulfilling its mission tobring
"heads" and fill "beds."
Revenue from the sale of
land next to the conference
center will be used to pay down
the county's remaining debt on
the property. A donation from
the family of the late Charley
E. Johns will help finish up


other than county population
included in the calculation_
are the base--salary of a given
position, the average percentage
increase given to state career
service employees and, a cost
of living increase authorized by
the Legislature.
The clerk of circuit court,
property appraiser, tax collector
and school superintendent
receive equal salaries.
According to the salary
schedule, each received a 3.6
percent increase from $92,613
to $95,939.
The supervisor of elections
salary rose 3.6 percent from
$76,307 to $79,063.
The 3.6 percent increase in
the sheriff's salary took it from
$100,912 to $104,525.
Finally, county
commissioners saw a 3.9
percent increase, moving
their salaries from $28,970 to
$30,088.
Officials may receive a salary
supplement of several thousand
dollars depending on their level
of certification. The cost of
life, health and other insurance
is also paid.
Salary increases are effective
Oct. 1 for county officials except
for elected superintendents who
receive the increase on July 1.
(The county and school district
operate according to different
fiscal years.)


Brabtorb County lletegaplj
USPS 062-700
Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage
Paid at Starke, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.
SPOSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Bradford County Telegraph
131 West Call Street Starke, Florida 32091
Web address: BCTelegraph.com
Phone: 964-6305 P.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091
in Trade Area John M. Miller, Publisher
in Trade Area Editor: Mark Crawford
Sports Editor: Cliff Smelley
Advertising: Kevin Miller
Don Sams
Darlene Douglass
'a: Typesetting Joalyce Graham


Advertising and
Newspaper Prod.
Classified Adv.
Rnnkkaeeinn:


renovations to the .center,
including a paved parking lot
and exterior facelift.
Additional revenue from a
planned increase in the bed
tax on hotel. rooms will help
fund operations at the center
as well as promote the center
and other community events in
an attempt to bring tourists and
their dollars to the community.
"These people will have
opportunities when they're here
.to go out into our community
and shop," Lilly said. "Even
if they just go out and grab a
bite to eat somewhere, that's
found money that wasn't here
before."
The new hotels will
add a wider variety, of
accommodations and speak to
a more diverse clientele.
"With those two hotels
coming in, we will now have a
hotel for anybody that wants to
come through our community,
whether they have a lot of
money or very little money,
because we'll have top end
Hotels down to the little tra% el
i lodges," said Lilly:. r. ,;


It's Time to
celebrate, the
New Year is here!


Ferguson
FeT
= Homes,,,.

Jonathan D. Ferguson
Owner
133 W. Call St.
Starke
(904) 966-2178
(904) 626-4550
Lie. No. CBC1250311


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Earl W. Ray
Virginia Daugherty
SKathl Bennett


Other elected officials

receive pay raises


-


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\







Dec. 28, 2006 TELEGRAPH Page 3A


Four acres diagonally across from the conference center on U.S. 301 (top left)
will be the site of a new Holiday Inn as well as a possible new restaurant. Above,


A 15 ,?Th.:-]" 21


Zoning changes reflect

preparation for growth in BC


BY MARK J. CRAWFORD
Telegraph Editor
Local leaders had their eye
on growth this year, asking
*themselves how best to
accommodate it and how best
to pay for it.
The county tackled expanding
its urban service areas around
the city of Starke and Santa Fe
Lake to allow for more intense
development in these growing
areas, reducing at the same,
time .the urban ;er ice treas
near Lawtey and Hampton.
The move camiein recognition
of the potential for growth in
these areas. The expansion
north of Starke, for example,
includes around 30 acres
across from C.R. 233 (Morgan
Road) where a developer has
discussed building a residential
and commercial mixed use
development.
The county commission
.made, way for developments
along those lines by writing
provisions for planned unit
developments, or PUDs, into
its comprehensive plan.
A PUD would allow
residential and nonresidential
uses in areas classified as
residential on the future land
use map of the comprehensive
plan. Typically PUDs are used
to accommodate mixed-use
developments or developments
with multiple types of housing.
Several goals relating to
PUD development include
encouraging the development
of well-planned communities
as well as commercial
and industrial complexes;
encouraging creative and
flexible design concepts; and
preserving natural resources


4LOWN1COUNTml)


and scenic areas through the
establishment of common and
functional open spaces.
However, the county
resisted adding language to
its comprehensive plan that
commissioners feared would.
restrict development within
three miles of Camp Blanding.
Inside the city of Starke,
zoning changes made way foi
two future developments, 180-
plus homes off of Market Road
and a to%.nhousc development
on Thomaj Street
A second site plan for
another phase of yet-to-be built
apartments next to Southern
Villas off of S.R. 16 received
commission approval, and the
city sold the old armory on
U.S. 301 to an individual who
plans to renovate the building
and convert it into a museum.
Revenue from the sale will
go toward a new city recreation
facility on Edwards Road,
construction of which should
get under way in the coming
year.
South of Starke, a special
exception for recreational uses
could allow for the construction
of a race track on more than 700
acres if a deal can be .reached
between the landowner and
developers.
A state grant allowed
Causseaux and Ellington Inc.
to begin revisions to the city
of Hampton's comprehensive
plan, which hasn't been touched
since 1989. Revising the future
land use map to encourage more
orderly patterns for growth will
be one result of this process.
Another will be the
refinement of zoning categories
in the city, with how intensely
development will be able to


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See CHANGES, p. 8A
iU


Wishing you all thejoys
of the season and a
prosperous new year.


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964-5288


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i -- i


i im, - -- -- -- M








Page 4A TELEGRAPH Dec. 28, 2006


(Clockwise from top left) A view of West Call Street "..
showing the old post office and watch repair -'
buildings; The old post office and watch repair
shop after it was reimodelbd as Mitchell's Drugs:
The same building is now being restored back to ,
its original look; A kitchen almost completed in 'i .
one studio apartment on the second floor of Cafe
Terrace.


CIS mentors
local students
Communities in Schools of
Bradford Co'unt is ala.\s
seeking citizens \\ho wouldd be
interested in mentorine a child.
Mentors in\olled in the
program meet \%ith a student
from si\ih to 12th grade three
times a month for about 30
minutes a \isit, usually\ during
lunch hour. These mentored
students are able to qualify for
Florida 'Prepaid Scholarship
Program.
II \ou would d like more
information, \ou can contact'
.im Le" is at I90-4i 964-"7"76.


DOWNTOWN
Continued from p. 1A

wall, mostly covered with
mortar," said Crawford.
Although there is no definite
word on the type of restaurant
which will be moving into the
building, there have been a few
interested parties, but nothing
has finalized just yet.
The apartments, two with
views overlooking the Call
Street district, are expected to
be ready for move in by mid
January 2007. The units are
between 675 and 750 square
feet each, and will include
granite countertops, oak
cabinetry, and stainless steel
appliances including washer,'
dryer, refrigerator, range and
oven. Each unit will rent for
around $725 a month.
Although many. of the
original hardwood floors in the
upstairs area are being restored,
some had io be replaced.
SAdding his own unique
portion of history to the
building, Richard Furman of
- Luxury Floors of Middleburg
was able to purchase 70-year-
old wood beams removed from


w(


a subway station in New York
City, cut and sized to replace
the unusable flooring.
Going back down Call Street
and across Thompson, Granny's
Sandwich and Ice Cream Shop
has an addition underway to
make room for both a larger
kitchen and dining area.
Immediately next to the
shop, a vacant building owned
by Telegraph publisher John
Miller is currently undergoing
interior renovations.
Cross the railroad tracks to the
old Burkhalter's Architectural
Antiques. This building,
too, is currently undergoing
restorations.
Owner. Pete Osgard plans
to open a sports entertainment
restaurant in that location.
The two-story building
contains approximately 6,000
square feet downstairs and
another 3,000 square feet
upstairs.
Osgard plans to use this
ample space to open a restaurant
serving lunch and dinner as
well as jddine amenities such
as' a 100-inch wide-screen
television, pool tables and even
a children's section.
See MORE, next page


Friday, Dec.29

10 a.m.-2p.m.


at


o,1friteka


103 Edwards Rd. B ank
Starke
(across from Community Bank)


Bradford Preschool


Linda Bryant opened
Bradford Preschool on July
20, 1987,' and the. former
'family home which became '
the site of the preschool has
been filled with learning and' .
laughter ever since. '
The preschool is located on." .
Washington Street in Starke '
across from. Bradford High i .h "
School.
A highly qualifiedstaffof -
-preschiool teachers is led by .a;'-"" .; '
Bryant who, along with Dale
Redding, has earned the T.--
national-level degree as a
Child Development Associate
(CDA). All of the teaching
staff at Bradford. Preschool
has their state-level CDA,
with one exception-and that
new staff member will soon be
seeking the degree de as well. Bradford Presc
Staff member Kris Alvarez assists (l-r) Ra
also has a. two-year degree in Bradley and Kata
early childhood education and one of the edi
Bryant and her daughter, _. through
_..Rohyin-Bryant-,---are- -both--
certified by the state as
childcare center directors,
In addition to preschool for
children ages one to school age, I
Bradford Preschool also .-.
provides voluntary pre- ': "
kindergarten and after school
care.
Voluntary prekindergarten is .
offered in the mornings and
participants can either leave '
after the session each day, or
remain and take part in the after
school program.
Voluntary pre-K students f 4f, ....
participate in a wide variety of a.- "
educational activities, including (L-)
instruction in reading, writing, (L-R) Jesse
science, manipulatives and Jordan Pittman
computer learning. Special art
activities, music and free play periods are daily
occurences. Field trips to places like area nursing
centers to visit "adopted" grandparents are also regular
events. "Both the kids and the adults really love that,"
said Linda Bryant. "Everyone has a great time."
Bryant said Bradford Preschool has a "hands-on"
philosophy of learning for preschool and
prekindergarten. Children learn best by doing, so
there are few xeroxed coloring sheets and lots of,
learning tables filled with things to touch and
manipulate. Painting and other art activities play a
big role, since Bryant said encouraging creativity is
important. "I adopted the motto 'prepare the child for
the path, not the path for the child'," she said.
The student-teacher ratio is kept low at Bradford
Preschool so each child receives plenty of attention.
Bradford Preschool provides service from 6:30
a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. Hot meals are


f~j4:

...~-p-
c---I: :
-~~
----
_," a ?


hool teacher Zoya Easley
shaad Jones, Mackenzie
ra Moody with their work at
ucational centers set up
ihout the school.


served at
breakfast and
lunch and a snack
is provided. Rates
are reasonable and
discounts are
offered to
siblings..
Episcopal
Subsidized Child
Care is available
to parents who
qualify for the
program. The
preschool is.
licensed for 80
children and there
are still some
spots available.
The center has
large play areas
that are divided
according to the
age of the
children. Smaller
children can play
together without


CI
i:
i.
.-L ~
~
~~4;,.


alyers, Tirinity Etchison, Jaycob Voiles and
play with blocks as they develop motor skills.
fear of being bumped into by the bigger kids.
"Our goals for your children are to develop in them
a positive self concept, to teach them to get along well
with their peers, to teach them to share, to be creative
and to respect differences in others," said Bryant. "We
want them to develop an excitement for learning. We
will allow them to explore things every day with their
senses. They will dance and sing and rhyme and, most
importantly, they will be loved and they will know
that they are special!"

Bradford Preschool
407 W. Washington Street
Starke *(904) 964-4361


"Chi(ren want the same thing we want: To (auoh, to be cha((en.e4,
to be en+er+aine4 and de(4ished."
-Theodore Genra(, a/(/a D. Seuss


/






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CJ

.


FACTS AND MYTHS ABOUT

HOME FLOODING
If you have never had water damage in your home, well, you're lucky. The facts are, it
happens quite often and the damage can be quite severe. I want to take time in this article
and clarify some issues about water damages. Most residential water damages come
from inside the home, such as washing machine overflows, slab leaks, burst pipes, or
dishwasher supply line leaks, just to name a few.
However, the majority of residents who have experienced water damage in their
homes are faced with several questions. How do I get the water removed? What is the
extent of the damage? DOES MY INSURANCE COVER THIS? Most all cases are
covered if the flood happens inside the home.
There a several myths floating around about water damaged materials.
1. MYTH #1; the carpet and padding have to be replaced. FALSE, carpet and
padding can berdried in-place and restored to its normal state in 95% of clean
water flood situations. (Carpets always need to be replaced if the water is
sewage, or the water remained on the carpet for several days).
2. MYTH #2; carpet and padding can be replaced for less money than drying and
dehumidification. FALSE, the difference is minimal, and you still have a wet
structure..(i.e..; baseplates, baseboards, studs, and behind wall cavities) just
replacing the carpet and padding leaves you susceptible for an enormous
amount of mold growth, and once materials such as wood and sheetrock
become saturated with moisture they cannot air dry.
3. MYTH #3;.Sheetrock is ruined after is has been wet. FALSE, when sheetrock
becomes saturated with water it becomes very soft, however, when it's dried
rapidly by proper dehumidification techniques it becomes harder than when it
was originally made.( when sheetrock gets wet and is not dried/by
dehumidification itbecomes brittle).
4. MYTH #4; Carpet backing becomes weaker and will pull apart if it has been
wet and dried. FALSE, the primary and secondary backing on carpet actually
becomes stronger after it's been wet, only if it's dried properly. The reason,
carpet is made through a water process. However, carpet backing becomes 50-
85% weaker whik it's wet. (Hint, don't attempt to move carpet and padding
while it's soaked, you not only can damage the carpet but you can damage
your back as well). ('Wet carpet and pad weighs a ton!')
I hope this information will be helpful to you in the future, and just keep in mind that
you have a certified structural drying/mold prevention company that serves the tri-county
area. It is also important to note that in an after hours situation (i.e.; weekends or after 5
pm on weekdays) if you choose to call your insurance companies 800 # there are
uncertainties. #1: HOW LONG WILL IT TAKE FOR SOMEONE TO RESPOND?. #2:
IS THE COMPANY BEING SENT CERTIFIED .BY THE INSTITUTE OF
CLEANING AND RESTORATION COMPANIES, WHICH IS THE I.I.C.R.C. (Ask
them for their license), and #3: DO THEY HAVE THE PROPER EQUIPMENT AND
KNOWLEDGE TO DO IN-PLACE DRYING?, OR ARE THEY GOING TO SIMPLY
-RIP OUT ALL YOUR CARPETS. PADDING. SHEETROCK, ETC. AND PLACE
EQUIPMENT IN YOU RESIDENCE AND LEAVE YOUR HOME IN SHAMBLES
FOR WEEKS TO COME? We are at your service
24 HOURS SEVEN DAYS A WEEK FOR EMERGENCIES and are also
located in your LOCAL YELLOW PAGES UNDER CARPET. If you have any
questions you can call me during normal business hours or E-mail me at
drycore@nefcom.net Thank you, and I look forward to serving the;people of Starke,
Lake Butler, and the surrounding areas for years to come. MENTION THIS ARTICLE
AND I WILL REIMBURSE 20% PERCENT OF YOUR HOMEOWNERS
DEDUCTIBLE.


DRY-CORE
WATER DAMAGE SOLUTIONS
Emergency Water Removal/Structural Drying/Mold Prevention

R DAMAGE S1-800-319-1885
E-mail: drycore@nefcom.net


\

































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Ib








;a



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I







, Dec. 28, 2006 TELEGRAPH Page 5A


announces TKs for second 9-wks.


Lawtey Community School recently announced its Kiwanis Terrific Kids for the
second nine-weeks of school. They are (I-r): first row, Darrell Card, Jacob Manning,
John Creighton, Jr., James Bennett, Robert'Alvarez, Savannah Mallinson, Colton
White; second row, Jameaze McNeal, Ashley Pope, Baxton Yowell, Yasmeen Martin,
Christina Sanders, Austin Binczak; third row, Scotty Peirce, Logan Kent, Chris
Rhoden, Kasey Sadler and Angel Bennett.


At top is an inside view of first floor of Cafe Terrace, which is ready for a
restaurant business to design the layout to suit its needs. Below, a possible
new restaurant currently under construction next to the North Florida Regional
Chamber of Commerce.


MORE
Continued from p. 4A

It is expected that the
restaurant ill be completed
sometime in early 2007.
Osgard said that he is
restoring the original building.


preserving as much history as
he can. He is reusing some
wood timbers and as much of
the flooring and wood ceilings
as he can.
The back area of the building
still has its original brick which
will stay in place.
Osgard located an old


elevator shaft and trap door
in the ceiling area that he also
hopes to be able to restore.
"I'm keeping as much as is
salvageable. Save for updating
the electric and, plumbing to
code, I want to maintain the
integrity and honor of the
building," said Osgard.


Ask a
Librarian
Students throughout Florida
-are taking advantage of Ask a
Librarian-Florida'sfreeonline
chat.service that connects them
to librarians for .assistance
with research and instructikn
on locating information on the
Web.
Librarians using instant
me..aging and co-browsing
technology provide students
with the assistance and
resources that the\ need to
complete assignments from
home, school, or anywhere that-
has an Internet connection. Live
librarian assistance is available
at www.askalibrarian.org
between 10 a.m. and 10 p.m.,
Sunday through Friday, and 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday.
Students can also submit
questions via e-mail 24 hours a
day, seven days a week.


CHURCH
St. John Missionary Baptist.
Church, 21670 N.E. C.R. 200B
in Lawtey, will have a "Watch
Night Service," beginning at
9:30 p.m. on Sunday. Dec. 31,
2006. The public is invited. The
Rev. J.E. Rackley is pastor.
Highland First Baptist
Church, I-109 U.S. 301 N. in
Lawtey, will hold its fifth
Sunday\ Sing at 11 a.m., on
Sunday, Dec. 31. Dinner on the
grounds n ill follow. The public
is invited fo ffellb\%ship and
food. Call 90)-1) 289-9798 for
information.
Issacher International
Ministries Inc., 14256 S.E.
48th Place in Starke, and
apostle/pastor J. Cohen are
having a revival to bring in the
new year. Guest speaker will be
prophetess Thomas from
Tallahassee. Dec. 27-31 at 7:30
p.m. each night.
For information call (352) 231-
9893.


;The Body of Christ Assembly
in Lake Butler ~ ill host a
Watch Night service on Sunday,
Dec. 31, beginning at 9 p.m.
The public is invited.
Ebenezer Missionary Baptist
Church, on Steel Mill Rd.,
will host Watch Night services
on Sunday, Dec. 31, from 10
p.m. until midnight. Breakfast
will be served by the host
church immediately following
the service. The public is
invited. For information, call
(904) 964-4936



HSCT set for
Jan. 3-12
Math and communication
sections of the High School-
Competency test will be held'
Wednesday-Friday, Jan. 3-12,
at the Family Service Center,
on the corner of Orange Street
and Weldon Street.
Call Carol Clyatt to make an
appointment, (904) 966-6816.


[ .- VISITED ONE'



OF 7HESE LOCAL


Southern Professional Title Services
Experience, Reliability, Customer Service


Southern Profess-
ional Title Services,
Inc. is a business that
is dedicated to
providing excellent
service for title


searches, real estate .. -._
closings, refinances,
UCC searches and
all your land title
needs.
The business
opened the doors of
its first office in Look for the red t
Lake Butler on June on S.R. 16 in
14, 2004. The Starke
office opened as a second location on
Oct. 1 of that year.
Beginning with a staff of three, the
business has now grown to nine
employees with Kay Colson Waters as
president and Darlene Foreman Lugin as
vice president.
On Dec. 31, 2005, the company
moved into the new Starke location at
704 N. Lake St. (two blocks off U.S. 301
on S.R. 16). On Dec. 18, 2006, the
company moved into its new Lake
Butler location at 185 SE First Street
(behind Radio Shack).
Southern Professional has five closer
with more than 72 years of combined
experience. The company has two in-
house abstracters, so a title in Bradford
or Union counties can be searched
within 12-24 hours. Quick and reliable
service can also be provided for titles in
Alachua, Baker, Clay, Columbia,
Gilchrist, Hamilton or Putnam counties.
The company has the ability to handle
closings in any county in Florida.
Staff members have backgrounds in
finance, mortgage brokering and real
estate, so a wide range of experience is
available. One closer is even bilingual.


- ',


door on the distinctively decorated offices
Starke and 185 SE First Street in LB.
Southern Professional deals with two
underwriters-First American Title
Insurance Company and
Commonwealth Title Insurance
Company/LandAmerica.
According to Waters, the reason for
the company's success is a Christian
attitude. "We've put the Lord first in our
business and we give Him all the glory
and credit for our success." she said.
Waters said that Christian attitude is
enhanced by the staff's desire to provide
excellent customer service.
"We also have a wonderful staff that is
dedicated and has a 'whatever it takes'
attitude," she said. "We appreciate our staff
so much. We are more like a family than a
business. We love and care for each other
and that spills over to our clients."
Waters said providing excellent
customer service is a must for her staff.
"The minute we make that first initial
call, or meet that dlient for the first time,
we try to treat them the way that we
would like to be treated. We strive to
give the best customer service possible,"
she said.
To sum up Southern Professional Title
Services, Inc.... "You can say that we are
truly blessed," said Waters.


Merry Christmas and I

SJackson B
W.T. "Billy" Jackson Sr. and his wife, Margaret, or
"Pat" as some people knew her, started with a vacant lot,
a vision, and a desire to build something lasting for their
five children...and so began Wm. T. Jackson Building
Material and Machinery Supply in 1955.
"Billy"-while operating a landfill, land clearing and
building demolition business-accumulated various
materials consisting of lumber, windows, blocks, doors,
tin, pipe, plumbing and electrical supplies, etc.
He put these materials on his vacant lot at the comer of
Cherry and Weldon streets in Starke where people saw
these "bargains" and wanted to buy them, thus it became
necessary to have a salesman on the lot Gradually by
public demand, and of necessity, new materials were
added and more buildings had to be built.
By 1966, the company was incorporated as Jackson
Building Supply of Starke, Florida, Inc. As growth
continued steadily, property on U.S. 301 south was
acquired for possible future expansion.
Also, land and buildings at the comer of S.R. 100 and
S.R. 21 in Keystone Heights were purchased and, in July
of 1973, the Jacksons opened for business in that area:
Early in 1976, the building program on U.S. 301 began
and in January of 1977, the.Starke store packed up and
moved from its Cherry and Weldon streets location into
the new facility.
In 1980, after purchasing the former Crews Building
Supply, the Jacksons opened for business in Lake Butler.
Many years ago, W.T. Jackson Sr. and his wife Margaret
sold their interest in the company to the "kids" with high
hopes of their early vision continuing for years to come.
On Labor Day, Sept. 3, 1990, the patriarch of the
Jackson family, W.T. "Billy" Jackson Sr., died suddenly
doing what he loved best, riding atop a heavy piece of,
machinery clearing land for one of his loved ones,
The "Jackson Five" take comfort in the fact that their
father lived to see them all reach adulthood and to see his
salvage yard moved to a new site on U.S. 301 in Starke,
with branch stores in Keystone Heights and Lake Butler.
"Mama Jackson" passed away in 2005 and her "Jackson
Five" have carried on the family business and the family
tradition.
Son Marc Jackson, who was the first to get his feet wet
in the family business at the tender age of 12, served as
"chief nail puller" and general flunkey. He is now
president of the company and has been married for 41
years to the former Haniette Smith of Williston. He and
Harriette have four grown children, one son and three
daughters, and six grandchildren.
Christopher Bruce Jackson, another of the "Jackson
Five", was second to enter the family business. He started
out working in the Starke store until the Keystone Heights
branch was opened in 1973. "Big Bruce" worked on and
off at the Keystone store for more than 25 years until it
closed in December 2004. Big Bruce is executive vice
president and is affectionately called "Big Bruce" because
of his 6-foot, 9-inch stature and the fact that his brother-in-
law is also .named Bruce and also works for Jackson
Building Supply. Bruce and his wife, Teresa, have been
married for 16 years. Teresa works at Shands Starke.
Becky Jackson Scott., the only girl in the "Jackson
Five", worked in the bookkeeping department of the
Starke store every Saturday and during the summer, a
position she held until she graduated from St. Johns River

Stake


Happy New Year from the folks at

building Supply
Junior College in 1974. After graduation, she became a
full-time employee and married Bruce Scott the same
year. Becky serves as secretary-treasurer of the company.
Becky's husband Bruce, whose middle name is
ironically Jackson, started to work for Jackson Building
Supply in 1970, while still a Bradford High School
student. He has been a nail-puller, truck driver, building
painter, yardman and counter salesman. He now manages
the Starke store, however he still likes to drive a truck arid
still gets to go on deliveries quite often. Bruce and Becky
have been married 32 years and have two sons and one
grandson.
SThe eldest of the "Jackson Five", Tom, sometimes
called "Billy-Tom", started out working with his father in
the landfill, land clearing and building demolition
business. In 1963, he began work in a railroad
construction business known as W.T. Jackson, Inc. After
11 years in that business, and being on the road most of
that time, Tom was ready to come home. He began
working in the Starke store and then managed the Lake
Butler location when it opened in 1980. He has been there
ever since and makes a pretty good cup of coffee, we are
told. Tom is a company vice president. He and his wife,
the former Valerie Stewart of Raiford, have been married
for 25 years and have two grown sons and four
grandchildren.
The youngest of the "Jackson Five" is Rick. He is
currently the pastor of Bradford Baptist Church in Starke.
He lived in Chattanooga, Tenn., for more than 13 years,
where he attended seminary at Tennessee Temple
University, preached in several chapels and taught at
Tennessee Temple High School.
Rick and his family moved back to Starke after his
father, W.T., died in 1990. Rick and his wife, Clydie, have
been married for 30 years and have two daughters.
At present, two of the children of the "Jackson Five"-
grandchildren of W.T. Jackson Sr.-work in the family
business. Marc's son Eric and daughter Priscilla both
work in the Starke store.
All of the Jackson family say they feel very fortunate to
have been blessed with many loyal, hard-working
employees over the years. The present staff and their years
of service to the company are as follows:
Marc Jackson, 46 years; Bruce Jackson, 38 years;
Bruce Scott, 35 years; Becky Scott, 33 years; Solomon
Herring Jr., 32 years; W.T. Tom" Jackson, 32 years; Mike
Shemer, 30 years; Tom Gross, 27 years; W.B. "Dub"
McKinney, 25 years; Billy Rehberg, 22 years; Eric
Jackson, 13 years; Wayne Vinson, 13 years; Harriette
Jackson, 12 years; Priscilla Jackson, 11 years; E.W.
Hodges, three years; Randy Hodges, three years; James
Balkcom, two years; Josh Hodges, one year, Clint
Lockhart, one year.
We, the entire Jackson family, thank God for sending
us His Son, Jesus Christ, to be our Lord and Savior. We
also thank Him for His bourity in allowing us to grow and
prosper through the years.
We also thank you, our good friends and customers, for
your patronage, which has helped to make us what we are
today. We thank you for letting us serve you and hope to
be here until Jesus comes. We pray, as a family, that God
will continue to bless us and allow us to use our business
and our personal lives to reach others for our Lord and
Savior, Jesus Christ.

Lake Butler


Where quality and service are a family tradition.


704 N. Lake Street, Starke .* (904) 964-6872
185 SE First Street, Lake Butler (386) 496-0089
E-mail: southernprofessional@earthlink.net -or-
southernprofessionaltitle @ alltel.net


~-

1










Page 6A TELEGRAPH Dec. 28, 2006 j


-,.. IrIBl-B ", C'.
'* ?


"1'-* ,t'- ''" .._ :, .: .
p. .


i". ...
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.. ... .. .';i.; .Y


-Support helping

YMCA grow


BY MARK J. CRAWFORD
Teleraplh EJiior
The VMCtA of Bradford
Count has outgron"n the
storefront facility it currently\
occupies across from the
Deerfoot Village shopping
center,; and the move it's
planning will accompany an
expansion of fitness programs,
including the addition of a
swimming program.
YMCA closed on property
on U.S. 301 across from St.
Edward Catholic Church
earlier this month. It will take
over the southernmost portion
of the strip center, which is also
occupied by the Army Career
.Center and Home Respiratory
Care Inc.
"We love our current facility
but have simply outgrown it.
Fortunately, we were able to
find a permanent home in a
great location," said YMCA's
Amanda Bray.
Bray said they. plan to
renovate that portion of the
building, adding locker rooms
and showers for members on
the go. There will be a larger
childwatch room where children


are entertained I
while their parents
\\orkout.and it ill
he equipped \\ith
its on n restroom.
"'The new
facility will allow
us to increase our YMCA will
membership and building a
add new equipment promises
and programs," expanded
Bray said.
For example, the
new YMCA center will contain
a larger Wellness floor 'with
more equipment, and for the
first time, a group exercise
room where classes in yoga,
step, Pilates and circuit training
will be held, adding variety
to the activities members can
enjoy. There will also be special
classes for both senior citizens
and children.
YMCA staff is equally, if not
more, excited about the two lots
directly behind the new location
that have also been purchased.
There the organization will be
building a swimming pool.
"Swimming' opportunities
are so limited in Bradford
and Union counties, and we
feel this is one of the most


Pictured above (not necessarily in order) are first-place winners Mark Baggarly,
Greg Martin, Ed Douglas and Bo Harrison. Below are second-place finishers
David Tew, Larry Mercer, Jerry Hulsey and Dean Brown.


I be moving into the
ibove and the staff
greater convenience and
programs.
worthwhile contributions the Y
can bring to the conimunit.."
Bray said. "Over the next 24 to
36 months, our focus % ill be to
raise money to build the pool."
She sincerely thanked all
of those who have already
contributed to the success of
YMCA in Bradford County and
made the dream of this new.
facility a reality.
"We hope to exceed your
expectations and continue to
provide whatever it is that this
community needs," said Bray.
"Our fund-raising efforts over
the last 17 months, along with
.the support of our membership
and programs. have helped
position the YMCA to make
See YMCA, p. 8A


MR A D F 0 allD C 0 LI J' 'I .-.IT
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~. .. .. . . ...... ,-, ,4,'." rzlr =I 11ll t%."r. 1"" ... .. .. T
-U


JUMPSTART


Jennings Insulation

Where the customer is treated like family


It isn't unusual to
see the Jennings
Insulation crew
seated around the
table in the
Jennings home for .
muffins and coffee
before getting an
early start on a job..
"We treat our ..
employees like
family and we treat .,,.
our customers like -
family as well," .
said Heather -f -
Jennings. "We have The Jennings Insulation
lifelong friendships Anthony Wentzky, Pa
with many of our Jennings, Chris Jennil
customers. We are Parkman dr
concerned about
them and about the
community they live in. We may be located just
over the county line in Alachua County, but we
are definitely part of the community in.Bradford
and Union counties."
Jennings Insulation was founded in 1995 by
Chris and Heather and operates out' of a shop
located on their property near Waldo. Chris
brought 15 years of insulation experience into
the business with him at that time. Heather is the
office manager.
The business is entirely mobile, however, and
Jennings Insulation serves the entire area with
insulation services for existing buildings and.
new construction.
The Jennings crew is highly skilled, well
trained and supervised by Chris, who has a vast
amount of application and product knowledge.
Most of the crew members have been with
Jennings for several years.
The crew can blow insulation into an existing
home to cut electrical bills up to 30 percent.
"The insulation process is an investment that is
typically paid back to the customer in one to two
years in lower electric bills," said Heather.
"Once you insulate, your air conditioning, or
heating systems work less and last longer."
Insulating a new home with either batted or
.blown insulation can reduce the traditional
electrical bill for that area and that type of
construction by about 50 percent. Jennings
Insulation also has Demilec expanding foam
insulation, which provides an even more


:''

~~i~~L; ~ ;,V 9r s 1 'f
3S0~~I ,:


.1


main crew consists of (I-r) Joseph Beavins,
ul Barber, Rose Wall, Dan Drake, Heather
ngs, Mike McGinnis, Justin Birchfield, Bob
id (not shown) Richard Phillips.
complete seal.
When insulating new construction, Heather
said the company can consult with the customer
from the beginning and provide advice and
expertise throughout the construction process. In
addition to cutting the cost of heating and
cooling a new home, insulation also has sound-
blocking ability.
Jennings uses rates based on square footage,
so estimates can be given over the phone, based
on the square footage listed on the Web page of
the county property appraiser. Customers can
also access the Jennings Web site listed below
.and use the insulation calculator to get an
estimate.
"All of our customers are of equal importance
to us," said Heather. "Whether you're going to
build one house or 100, you receive the same
reasonable rates and the same high-quality
service."
The customer will also find that reliability is
the watch-word at Jennings Insulation. "When a
customer calls on the phone, they speak to
someone who can answer their questions and
provide an estimate," said Heather. "We are very
conscientious about providing reliable service.
When we say we will be there, we will be there.
Our name is on the side of that vehicle and we
know that our business success is all about our
reputation for providing a good and reliable
service."
Jennings also provides a painting
Service for new construction.


Jennings Insulation serves the entire area from a base near Waldo
Phone (352) 373-9744 Fax (352) 379-9290
E-mail: insulg8r@bellsouth.net
Check out our Web site at www.jenningsinsulation.com


Bret Hines and Anne Maas are business
owners who literally care about every breath you
take. Hines and Maas have owned Home
Respiratory Care, Inc. of Starke for almost six
years and the' mother-and-son team say they
have enjoyed every minute of it.,
Hines is a licensed respiratory therapist with
30 years of experience in the field. He used to
work in Jacksonville and drove through Starke
on a regular basis. He said he always wanted to
make Starke his home.
"I love Starke," said Hines. "I love the small
town feel. When I walk in a store here, chances
are, I'm going to see someone I know ,In
Jacksonville, you could go in and out of stores
for weeks without seeing anyone you know."
When he decided to open his own business in
2001, Starke was his first choice for a location.
Home Respiratory Care is a full-service
medical equipment provider and one'of the few
in the area, that is locally owned and operated.
The people who make all the decisions for the
company are the people you will meet if you
walk into the store on Temple Avenue (U.S.
301). Hines and Maas own the business while
Audra Brantley acts as intake coordinator and
Fate Harper is the oxygen technician.
"Full service means we provide all levels of
medical equipment needs," said Hines, "from
home oxygen systems, to simple aerosol
compressors for nebulizers, to diabetic supplies,
to hospital beds, specialty mattresses, motorized
wheel chairs, medical scooters, you name it."
The business also stocks items like medical
support stockings, knee braces, wrist splints, etc.
Home Respiratory Care accepts Medicare,


Medicaid and most other insurances.
Home Repiratory Care is a provider for
Homefill home oxygen systems by Invacare, as
well as Invacare hospital beds, walkers, manual
wheelchairs, and a long list of other medical
equipment and supply items.
The business is a provider of motorized
wheelchairs and medical scooters from Pride
Mobility Products and Golden Technologies.,
The company provides every medical
equipment item that is provided by any other
company in the area, but Home Respiratory Care
tends to stock a larger supply of items and it also
services everything it sells, said Hines.
Hines said providing service is very important
because medical equipment is vital to the person
who uses it. Repairs to that equipment should be
quick and convenient.
"You wouldn't buy a car from a dealership
that required you to drive to Daytona to get it
serviced, would you?" asked Hines. Dealing
with a medical equipment company that offers
local service can prevent a lot of headaches
caused by the inconvenience of taking the
equipment to another city to get it serviced and
then making another trip to pick it up.
Most patients who need motorized
wheelchairs or medical scooters can get them
from Home Respiratory Care for little or no out-
of-pocket expense. Home Respiratory Care bills
most major insurances.
Home Repiratory Care is open
Monday through Friday from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m., but service people are on
call 24 hours a day for emergencies.


Home Respiratory Care, Inc.
452 N. Temple Ave. Starke Toll Free (866) 966-0520
Starke Area (904) 966-0520 E-mail: audra@homerespiratorycare.com


Ii


Home Respiratory Care

... local owners, local service


)111:


. I. . .


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.


-











-. Santas foi
Anonymous donor;
SKiwanis and Mate's
through for senior
Santa and purchase
through requests p
Street ii Wal-Mart. Vo
together to help wr
15, and local law ei
delivered those gifl
The Be a Santa to
sponsored by Hom
and a number of ot
community groups




.. ii
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.-.. _.-r ..f,-;.* i:,
.. -:t -40


-._: -,Y ., :7. ".


r Seniors
s as well as Starke
Billabong came
citizens by playing
ing 100-plus presents
placed on a special
)lunteers came
'ap the gifts on Dec.
enforcement officers
Is the following week.
a Senior Program is
ne Instead Senior Care
:her businesses and
l


P3 sea'~.;


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~.-
~--. :~,~



-- .;
~~.: EB~
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~a~b~PII~


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Pictured (clockwise from
the top) are Jennifer
Colley, Wendy Spierer, ,
Winifred Holland and ,
mother and daughter Tina
and Tiffany Wilerkson. .s-


4:


Above are
Pam Whittle
and Cheryl
Canova. At
right is June
Neats.


r; '' .


_______ BUS5SZ
OF THESE LOCA


Digital Solutions of Starke

.. a mobile computer service business


:"Have expertise, will travel",
could be the motto of Tracy
GQeorge, owner of Digital
Solutions of Starke, Inc.
;George runs a mobile computer
service business that provides -
computer repair, networking for.
small businesses, Web" page
services and consulting services
fdr people purchasing computers
or computer systems.
!Whether you are a student
taking online courses, a retired
person who likes to e-mail family
ard friends, or a business whose
lifeblood is its technology, Digital
Solutions can provide a solution
for you.
:George operates out of her car,
sQ she packs up her supplies and
beings her knowledge to the place
where the. problem is-and that Digital Solutic
place could be anywhere in the computer ne
area. Computer owners don't have ear
tdo worry about disconnecting things and I
bringing them into the repair shop. With Digital "I'
Solutions, the shop comes to the computer co,
owner.
!"I like to deal with the problem on site," said ke,
George. "Sometimes there are factors in the is
environment that are contributing to the problem do
ard it's easier to discover that if I am in that
con
environment." be
;She said she also enjoys teaching people
something new about their computers. "On site, thi
I get to interact with the computer owner. I don't Sir
mind them looking over my shoulder while I the
wprk and I don't mind answering questions. I cha
may be able to give them some knowledge they sor
can use the next time they have a problem."


George also understands that technology can
be frustrating for people who need to use it, but
don't understand it.
"I see myself as a technical interpreter for the
lay person," said George. "Many technicians
don't explain things in a way that non-
technicians can understand. I try to explain
things in everyday language so that the average
person can understand what is going on."
George has operated Digital Solutions for five
years and has worked for clients in Bradford,
Union and Clay counties. The mobile style of
her operation is not limited by geography.
She has built a reputation for being reliable,
honest and fair. "If I don't do anything else but


cu!
the
an
bu:
sup


-. .-~


a


)ns owner, Tracy George troubleshoots a
networking problem for a local business.
rn a reputation for being.fair and honest, then
will count myself successful," said George.
d rather lose money than do something that
sts the customer unnecessarily."
3eorge also understands the importance of
eping up with changing technology. "Change
a constant in technology," she said. "What we
over the next few 'months or next year will be
mpletely different than what we have done
Fore."
Technicians have to constantly learn new
ngs and keep up with evolving technology.
ice George has a high degree of expertise in
Current technology, learning about the
ranges comes a lot easier than it would for
meone with less knowledge and experience.
George said she would also like to thank those
stomers who have allowed her to work for
im. "I appreciate everyone who has given me
opportunity to come into their homes and
sinesses over the years. Thank you for your
pport."


BrdorUno adCay
Sonie ndbyo S


Ws brings style home


Do you watch those design shows and think,
"Wow, I wish my home looked like that!" Well, a
phone call to Windows by Lisa can make your wish
come true.
You may be like many people... You have an idea
qf how you would like your home to look, but don't
know what to do to achieve that look. Lisa Tatum,
owner of Windows by Lisa, has the knowledge and
experience to achieve that look for you. Or, you may
have no idea
at all about
the look you
want to
achieve.., you
.just know
you're not
happy with
the look your _
home has. ._
Lisa is
qualified to
create unique

every room in
your home..
"Windows
are some-
times called
the eyes of
the home,"
said Lisa.
Enhancing d w I '-7 1
that eye with
c u s t o m
draperies is ,
an investment L .
in your home.
In addition
to \ custom i :
window ; C e nw
treatments,
Lisa offers
many other products and services such as custom
shutters, wood blinds, Roman shades, custom
bedding and much more. Lisa can help to work
within your budget to help you achieve your look.
Lisa has attended interior design school and is a
member of the Windows Covering Association and
is a Window Fashion Certified Professional.
Windows by Lisa also offers professional interior
redesign for every room, including kitchens and
bathrooms.
If you are trying to sell your home and you're not
getting much interest, Lisa can provide a real estate
staging service that will dress your home up to its
best advantage. She also consults with customers on
color selection, faux finishes and upholstery.


Lisa brings samples to you so you can discuss
fabrics, finishes, colors, lighting, etc., in the comfort
of your own home or business.
You can see some of Lisa's designs in several of
her projects around this area, such as the new
conference center in Starke, Shands Medical Group
and Watson Realty in Keystone Heights.


Phone and Fax (904) 964-6947
E-mail: dsolutions6947@earthlink.net


Call (904) 782-1230 for more information or to arrange a
written estimate for your upcoming projects.


Dec. 28, 2006 TELEGRAPH Page 7A


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Page 8A TELEGRAPH Dec. 28, 2006


BMS counselor offers post-Christmas advice


YMCA
Continued from p. 6A

this move."
In just over a year, two
golf tournaments, a poker
tournament and an auction have
helped raise more than. $36,000
for the YMCA.
18 teams
compete in
golf tourney
The YMCA's second annual
golf tournament, sponsored
by Bill Adams Chevrolet, was
held earlier this month.
The dealership and the
YMCA provided gift bags to
each player on the 18 teams
competing in the tournament
that included coolers, tee packs,
golf balls and towels, drink
holders, and more.
Morning and afternoon
flights offered teams a chance
to compete in a four-man,
best-ball scramble. : Johnny's
Barbecue of Keystone Heights
catered lunch, and a drawing
awarded prizes from multiple
local businesses.
A silent auction accompanied'
the tournament, featuring items
/ like an autographed football
from Urban Meyer, a basketball
signed by Billy Donovan, and
a football signed by Heisman
winners -Jason Sehorn, Eddie
George, and Tim Brown. Bill
Adams Chevrolet also offered
a new car for a hole-in-one


C CHANGE
Continued from p. 3A

types of businesses can locate in
various commercial categories
or how many houses per acre
will be allowed in a particular
residential category.
A 14-acre annexation in
Brooker with an accompanying
residential land use change as
well as a residential change-
across from the elementary\
school there speaks to the
residential growth in that
community.
On the north end of the county,
Lawtey reestablished a zoning
board to begin dealing with
rezoning requests, including a
request for a campground, a
portion of which would lie in
the city limits.
In terms of acreage, Lawtey
grew more than any of the
county's other municipalities.
The city annexed 120 acres to
the. north where more than 200
homes are expected to be built.
Work continues to correct


prize.
The winning teams were as
follows:
First-place team: Mark
Baggarly, Greg Martin, Ed
Douglas and Bo Harrison.
Second-place team: David
Tew, Larry Mercer, Jerry'
Hulsey and Dean Brown.
* Third-place team: Jack
Hazen, Jason Davis, Bill Adams
and Charlie Baker.
First-place prices included
a YMCA duffel bag,
YMCA fleece, three-month
membership to the Starke
Golf and Country Club, one-
year YMCA membership and
other assorted prizes. Six-
month and three-month YMCA
memberships were awarded
to the second- and third-place
teams in addition to collectible
Pepsi products, country music
CDs and barbecue sauce.
The YMCA thanked sponsor
Bill Adams Chevrolet as
well as the Starke Golf and
Country Club,, Hillandale.
Quality Feeds, Bradford
CountyTelegraph, American
Dream Realtors, Pat Welch
and. Associates, Causseaux
and Ellington, Contractors
Supply, Capital City Bank
and the many other businesses
who sponsored the event, in
addition',to the volunteers and
staff who helped organize and
man the tournament and its
participants.
Editor's note: Many thanks
to Amanda Bray for her
assistance with this story and
the photographs she provided.


Discrepancies between assigned
land use and assigned zoning
categories in the city of Starke, a
project officials have estimated.
would take around two years.
One comp plan revision
that will change the pattern
of development in downtown
Starke was the decision to allow
offsite parking for residents,
a move that makes way for
additional apartment style
living as downtown moves
more and more toward a mixed
use community.
SLocal leaders have been told
that their ability to allow future
development is tied to their
ability to fund the demands
placed on infrastructure by that
development.
In November and Ddcember,
the county and. Starke
commissions held public
hearings on impact fees,
although a decision on the
final amount of those fees-or
whether or not the city and
county would work together on
impact fee implementation-
had not been reached.


BY TERESA STONE-IRWIN
Telegraph Staff Writer
From the expensive new
game systems like Nintendo
Wii and Sony PlayStation 3 to
designer jeans and Vera Bradley
handbags, many parents are
dealing with children who
did not get exactly what they
wanted this Christmas.
Cynthia Ross, guidance
counselor at Bradford Middle-
School, wants to remind parents
and children alike that no gift
out there is more valuable than
having a relationship with your
child and spending quality
family time together.
For months leading up
to Christmas, children are
asked, '"What do you want
for Christmas?" and "What is
Santa going to bring you this
year?"
This continuous build up of
anticipation can often lead to
Christmas morning let-down as
kids rip through gifts without
even remembering who gave
them what.
"To compensate for a lack of
quality time' together, parents
can sometimes overindulge,
spending way over their budget
or cave-in on gifts they feel
are not appropriate for their
children.
"By, doing this, we are
inadvertently teaching our
children that parents will
compromise family values to.
avoid upsetting them," said
Ross.
This year, Ross said she
would like to.encourage parents
to make resolutions that start
new traditions within n the family\
that are notiself-indulgent.
Have a meal without the
television on. Talk to-not at-
your children.. Listen to your
children. It hurts their feelings
just like it does your own when
someone is too busy to listen
to you.


415 East Call St., Starke

(9041964-9222


"Another great thing to
resolve to do is start a family
night. There are scores of
things families can do as they
set aside time to be together,"
Ross said.
Start a scrapbook, look at
photo albums, research family
history or make a family
calendar.
Other ideas include making
a collage from cut-out pictures
in magazines. Play a game of
cards, chess or checkers. Start a
culture night. Put together ideas
to make a meal and teach each
other about different cultures.
Ross believes that the reason
so many children do not excel
in school or desire to reach their
potential is because they do not
get enough encouragement to
do so.
She said that more parents
should really take the time
to sit down and. go over their
children's homework with
them.
You don't have to be a math
major or the world's best speller
to take the time to be involved
in your child's education. Just
-show them that you care what
they are doing.
"Children learn behaviorby
watching .w.-their parents do.
All it takes is one parent or
adult authority figure to make a
complete world of difference in
a.child's life," Ross said.
Ross further encourages
youngg people to approach the
new year with a health) dose of
self-respect.
She ask young people to
commtL,themsel es to a simple
things lie'just showing respect
for the school dress, code.
"Believe it or not, we all can
gain so much inner self-worth
by committing to something
that we should be< doing
anN\%a\. and then remaining
faithful to it," said Ross.
She would like to challenge
students to be leaders of good


examples when they return to
school. When passing each
other in hallways at school,
make eye contact or even give
a nod.
Just show yourself friendly
because you never know just
how much someone else may
need that. "We can all influence
the atmosphere around us by
the way wie treat each other,"


PUBLIC NOTICE
THE BRADFORD COUNTY
SCHOOL BOARD will be hold a
Public Hearing to discuss'changes to
the 2006-2007 Student Code of
Conduct with regard to the treatment
of tardies. The public is invited to
attend this meeting which will be held
on Monday, January 8, 2007, at 5:01
p.m.; at the Bradford County School
Boardi;vMeeting Room at 501 W.
Washington Street, Starke, Florida.
12/14 3tchg. 12/28
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE.IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to the Florida Self Storage
Facility Act Statutes (Section 83.801-
83 809): SANTA FE STORAGE will
sell for CASH to the highest bidder at
1630 N. Temple Avenue, Slarke.
County of Bradford, Florida. at 2 00
p.m. on Thursday, the 11th day ot
JaaQ 0Z. l. a continuing day-9.
dah lrjete'after until sold. lie
ho hold gdods and misc contents
of the following:
UNIT 01022, SHAWN COLEMAN
UNIT 01009, GARY PERRY JR.
UNIT 01002, JOHNETTE DAVIS
UNIT OG031, KENNETH APARICIO
UNIT 01001, SHEILA SMITH
UNIT OK001,
QUINQUE ROBINSON,
UNIT 01018, PATRICIA GOODMAN
UNIT 01023, JALANDA
HANKERSON



Sapapy

NevW YearI


f. -


V C1111 Quality Service
WESTERN WiEAR Since 1964

964-4810 DURRANCE PUMP

IUS-301 South, Starkel & WELL DRILLING


State License #1305

US-301 N., Starke

964-7061


Ross said.
Parents should keep the lines
of communication open with
their children. And if young
people don't feel they have an
adult they can communicate
with at home, there are other
school employees such as
herself that are there for them,
and careiabout them, too.
Ross also offers some tips on-


0EYE CENTER of North Florida
General Eye Care & Surgery

EYE EXAMS CATARACT SURGERY GLAUCOMA
DIABETES LASERS* GLASSES
Eduardo M. Bedoya, MD
Board Certified, American Board of Ophthalmology
Medicare, Medicaid. Avmed. Blue Cross/Blue Shield & other insurance accepted.
Se habla espanol.
Lake City Macclenny 1-866-755-0040




Rifles Shotguns Handguns

100 uns in Stock!

IAMMO REGULAR & SPECIALTY

4 Bradford 60-Day Layaway
Gun & Pawn = i w
Debit Cards Accepted
US-301 N, Starke 904-964-5440 M-F 9-5; Sat. 10-2


Driving the snack cart were Sarah-Renner, executive
assistant, and Shawn Patch, CEO of North Central
Florida YMCA.


,M LEGAL

4 NOTICES

Sbcm "The more that government
- becomes secret, the less it remains


FARM SUPPLY

964-4809


DENMARK


4(cm


free."
James Russell Wiggins

UNIT 0G039,LINDA GERRY
UNIT OC015, ELIZABETH LEE
UNITOE002,
HARNOLD FRANSWORTH .
UNIT OK009, CAROLYN
ROWLAND
UNITOK006, NORMA JEFFERY
SANTA FE STORAGE;
1630 N. TEMPLE AVE.
STARKE, FL 32091'
904-964-3400i
12/21 2tchg. 12/28
PUBLIC AUCTION
SPRATLIN TOWING AND;
RECOVERY, INC. GIVES NOTICE'
OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND;
INTENT TO SELL THE;
FOLLOWING VEHICLES ON.
JANUARY 4, 2007, AT 10:00 A M
AT 18536 W. U.S. HWY. 301 N.,
STARKE, FLA. PURSUANT TO:
SUBSECTION 713.78 OF FLORIDA'
STATUTES. SPRATLIN TOWING!
'9ESERVES "THE RIGH'T TO
ACCEPT OR REJECT ANY ANDi
ALL BIDS.
1993 CHEVY, IGCCS14R9P8179351
1988 CHEVY,
1GNER16KXJF158653
12/21 2tchg. 12/28
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, EIGHTH'
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR:
BRADFORD COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 04-2006- CA-568:
DUDLEY P. HARDY,
CHARLES R. EDWARDS,,
and DARYL L. EDWARDS,.
Plaintiffs,
vs.
CLARA MAE KNIGHT,
Defendant
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Any and all parties claiming by,
through, under, or against CLARA
MAE KNIGHT, deceased, her heirs,,
administrators and assigns as well
as all parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or interest in the
real property herein described. YOU
ARE NOTIFIED that an action to
quiet tax title to the following real
property located in Bradford County, ,-
Florida, to-wit:
Lot Seven (7) and West Half of Lot
Eight (8) of Block E, Pinehurst
Subdivision in Section 29, Township
6 South, Range 22 East, as per map
or plat recorded in Plat Book 2 at 5
page 35, in the Clerk's office, public s
records of Bradford County, Florida.
Tax Parcel No. 03950-0-00000
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your i
written defenses, if any, to it on "
Dudley P. Hardy, P.A., the Plaintiff's ,
attorney, whose address is P.O.
Drawer 1030, Starke, FL 32091, on or
before Jan. 26, 2007, and file the -:
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on the Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately thereafter:.
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in -
the Complaint. -
DATED this 20th day of December,
2006.
RAY NORMA'N,
Clerk of the Court
By: Tasher Allen
Deputy Clerk
-12/28,2tchg! 1/4:


"~~ `rr~e~65'
t






Dec. 28, 2006 TELEGRAPH Page 9A


'Straight A students at Lawtey Baptist Academy for the first grading period were
(I-r) Brooklyn Hardee, Manda Bergman, Cassie Salsgiver, Katie Herman, Taylor
Hardee, and in front, Josiah Barnette.


First- and second-grade straight A students for the first grading period at
Northside Christian Academy were (front, I-r) Amberlyn Pilcher, Mackenzie Brown
(back) Jensen Gay, Dawson Rosier, Noah Jones and Seth Harrison.


OA meeting
in Starke
Compulsive overeaters are
in ited oa ne% weekl\ meeting
of OCereaters.A.non mous held
each Wednesday from 6:30-
7:30 p.m. at Shands Starke,
922 E. Call St.
,-Overeaters Anonymous, is
a 12-step program patterned


Third- through seventh-graders at Northside Christian Academy for the first
grading period were (front, I-r) Ethan Falstreaux, Montrez Ellerson, Brett Hildreth,
Trenton Austin, (back) Ashlyn Pilcher and Kearsten Cruce.

'May 2007 bring you health,

h ope and happiness.
: ho .e


2007

We wish you

all the bestin

the new year.


Archie Tanner
funeral' tlome
S. Hwy. 301
Starke
864-5757


after Alcoholics Anonymous.
The program is for compulsive
overeaters who desire to stop
eating compulsively. It is not
a diet club. There are no dues,
fees or weigh-ins.. The only
requirement for membership
is ja desire to stop eating
compulsively.
OA is not affiliated with any
public or private organization,
political movement, ideology


SMITH .
BROTHERS
BODY SHOP
US-301 N. *Starke
904-964-5267


or religious doctrine. Members
seek recovery on all three
levels by following the 12-step
program.
For information, contact
Sid at (978) 210-6340 or the
Gainesville Hotline at (352)
491-5069. The grbup is on
the Web at www.oanortheast
florida.com. ,






Happy
New -
Year! I
from

Starke
Golf &
... Country

904.964-5441
S.R. 230 E.
Starke


Drinking and
driving can
destroy more
than your holiday.


mAY YOUR
AIe64/ea4
BE BOU fTIFUL.

1 Ray Daugherty
Land Surveyor, Inc.
405 W. Georgia St.,
Starke, FL
(904) 964-6708
1-800-671-6708


Sun State
Collision Center
Owners
Randy & Kimberly
Alldredge
904-964-4239
SR-16 W
Starke
MV-40354


wii' 2f t kf y &Y 4A' wca4Veue Ie a4
aCddya c nd lji4 in 2007

Bralfo'd Samily Dentistry
315 W. Call St., Starke
(904) 964-7501


Before you drink and drive this holiday season,
consider the consequences: financial penalties,
loss of your driver's license, destruction of your
vehicle, injury, death or responsibility for the injury
or death of another. It's a no-win situation. During
the holiday season and throughout the year, show
appreciation and respect for the health and
happiness of yourself and others. Choose a
designated driver when attending a party and,
when hosting a party, be sure to supply non-
alcoholic beverages for guests who are driving.


Law Office of
DAN SIKES, P.A.
817 MacMahon Street Starke, FL 32091
(904) 964-2020 Fax: (904) 964-9400 /



MATE'S BILLABONG

is rocking in the
New Year on Australian time
Saturday, Dec. 30, New Year's Eve Eve!


Live Musi hampagn
with toast at
Wildfire~midnight




FOOD, FUN & DRINKS FOR EVERYONE
(age 21 years & over)
(904) 964-6104 Hwy. 301 N (Temple Ave.), Starke


- l






t.1

I


------------- ----------


~~-~~---- -~I-~--~-~-


r I I


--- Il I I ~C~7~P~


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P







Page 10A TELEGRAPH Dec. 28, 2006


.RATES
Continued from p. 1A
Alachua (69.8 -.. percent),
SBaker (73.1 percent), Clay
(73.8 percent) and Union
(76.7 percent) all had higher
graduation rates than Bradford
1in2006.
The highest graduation rate in
the state was in Martin County,
which graduated 93.2 percent
of its students. The lowest rate,


Health
insurance
counseling
held monthly
. SHINE (Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders)
is sponsoring free health
insurance counseling sessions
for elders and their families
who have questions or problems
with Medicare and other health
insurance programs.
: The sessions are scheduled
for the third Tuesday of each
month at the Bradford County
Health Department on north
U.S.'301 in Starke. The next


43.9 percent, was in Gadsden
County.
Only once since 2000 has
Bradford County had a higher
dropout rate than in 2006.


Year
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006


Dropout rate
3.2%
2.4%
5.0%
3:6%
3.9%
5.8%
4.5%
5.4%


session is Jan. 16. The sessions
Last from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and
counseling will take place by
appointment only.
SHINE is a statewide
program sponsored by the
Department of Elder Affairs.
It helps empower elders, to
make informed decisions about
health insurance. During the
sessions, SHINE counselors
offerinformation and assistance
with Medicare, Medicare
supplemental insurance,
Medicare prescription discount
cards and prescription drug
savings programs.
To make' an appointment,
or if you cannot travel to the
counseling session site, call the
lder hed hlpline at (800)"262-'


Alachua County (6.1 percent
h.ad a higher drop out rate
than Bradford, but Baker (3.7
percent), Clay (1.9 percent and
Union (2.6 percent) each had a
lower dropout rate.
Martin County scored the'
lowest dropout rate' with just
0.4 percent, while Franklin's
13.3 percent was the highest.
The average dropout
rate across the state was 3.5
..percent;.


2243.

Want a
high-paying
career?
If you want a chance to earn
high wages, you need to check
out the various career-training
opportunities available at the
Bradford-Union Career and
Technical Center in. Starke.
Masonry, commercial truck
driving, diesel engine repair,
welding and many other career
choices are available.
Call'(904) 966-6764 to find
out more.


B radford


#OPIA'6'


Happy

New Year


Good luck. Good health.
May you prosper
in every way.

Bradford

Pre-SchooI
407 W. Washington St.
Starke.
964-4361


MASTERS
CONSTRUCTION CO.



State Certified Building Contractor
CB-C059483
Owner- Arthur W Masters

964-4009
706 MacMahon St.
Starke, FL


With warm wishes and sincere
thanks to all our valued
customers and friends..
we truly appreciate your patronage.


Happy

New Year
from

Julia's Florist
218 N. Temple Ave.
Starke
964-7711

Wishing you and
your family only
the best in 2007

Happy New
YearI


U.S. 301 South
Starke
964-7099


Rim







Therapy and Readinglk


MS., CCC-SLP
Speech/Language
Therapy and Reading
Intervention
(904) 964-4464
www.kidtalk.info


We hope your
Holidays
are wonderfully
happy.

Hayjes Electric
and
Air Conditioning
Corner of U.S. 301 & S.R. 16
Starke
964-8744


Shands
Starke
922 E. Call St.
904.368.2300
Shands.org


OUR FEE IS $5 to $10
"PY ME NO--


HIS FE
'a


COULD BE
$ I O,oo00

$20,000
"PAY THEM LATER"


CALL US...
Please don't try to drive home after drinking.



SVeteran Cab
964-9117
James Jones Town Rtes Starke, FL
Owner/Operator locall Out of Town Rates Starke, FL


ON EARTH


Dr. Gregory Allen & Staff

We would like to thank all of our
patients for their continued support
during our relocation.


I My Dentist

We wish all a Verylappyg Vew ear!

Starke: 904-964-7004 Lake City: 386-752-2480


Alaohua 000


8 Aove tate rate
S$slow state iii
(No tistritO wmra tstatt ratet)



Florida Districts with Graduation
Rates Above and Below State
Rate of 71.0% for 20061aQ


Win ATV and
help Dreams
Come True
A drawing is being held to
benefit Dreams Come True and
the prize is awH onda AT\
Proceeds from each $5
ticket sold will help fulfill the
dreams of children battlin
life-threatening illnesses b i
supporting Dreams Come n
True.
The ATV, which sports a
90cc Honda engine and mans
safety features, is on display. at 4
J&J Motorcycle Acces-ories, at
1250 S. Walnut St. in Starke.
Drawing tickets- ma be
purchased there or from Shands
Starke laboratory\ employ ees
hust be at leas. I8 years oLf age V
to -purchase a ticket. Cal 119041) M"
368-2300, ext. 150, 188 or 189. ,
for more information.

Youth
Challenge
receives grant
The Florida Youth Challenge
Academy has announced it
recei\ ed a $450 .000 grant from N
the Department of Julenile E :'.
Justice to contfirinu supporting
the %oluntare program geared
it- .iard at-rikk 3outh.
"The Elorida routh
"Challenge program offers at This ATV could be yours if you purchase the
Challenge, program offers at
risk youth the opportunity to winning ticket, and your $5 donation will go toward
complete their high school making a sick child's dream come true.
education, and receiving state
funds is vital to the program's resolve problems? Are you Select a Medicare
success," said retired Sgt. Maj. looking for a flexible volunteer prescription drug. plan that is
Danny l rabham, director of the r ppn i it, enables y I, h.f r the' I,
academy. tI .j!ae.-a, real difference in *Applyforfreeorreducedcost
The academy, which teachers the lives of seniors in your drugs through pharmaceutical
academics, leadership skills, community? Do you have company Patient Assistance
self-esteem aid physical fitness, basic computer skills? If you Programs.
provides a highly disciplined. answered yes to these questions, Learn about Medicare,
environment for .16-tol8-year- then the Florida Department eligibility and coverage issues,
old at-risk youth free from, of Elder Affairs. may have the supplemental policies, and:
outside distractions. perfect volunteer position for long-term care options.
Since its inception in 2001, you. Free comprehensive training
the academy has graduated Volunteers are needed in is provided in January 2007;
1,200, cadets. The cost to Bradford County for the award- mileage is reimbursed and
the state for a cadet at the winning SHINE (Serv~ing lunch is included. Please
academy. ,is $14,000. The Health Insurance Needs of -contact the Elder Help Line and
cost to incarcerate a juvenile Elders) Program. SHINE is a tell them you'd like to find out
offender is $40,000 annually. free, unbiased Medicare and more about becoming a SHINE
It is estimated the academy has health insurance information volunteer. Call (800) 262-2243
saved the state more than $26 and counseling program that today.
million in juvenile incarceration helps seniors:
costs.

SHINE needs '-",
volunteers .... I
Do you like to-help others A









Section B: Thursday, Dec. 28, 2006





News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake Region area
W -ld,0


Bringing in the new year also brings out old traditions


BY TERESA
STONE-IRWIN
Telegraph Staff Writer
Happy New Year!.Those
words are frequently heard on
the first day of January each
year. However, the new year
has not always been celebrated
on Jan.l.
Over' 4,000 years ago,
ancient Babylonians began the
tradition of celebrating the new
year on March 23 with
festivities lasting for eleven
days.
Historians say that the
Babylonians chose this time of
the year to celebrate a new
year because it was the
beginning of the new spring.
With each spring, new crops


CRIME


Clay area

arrests
The following people were
arrested by the Clay County
Sheriff's Office over the past
week from the Keystone-
Melrose area of Clay County:
Shauni Goetzman, 22, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
by CCSO Dec. 22 on two
charges of simple battery.
Luis Santiago, 39, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Dec. 22 by CCSO on one
charge of grand theft.
Ross Travis, 37, of Keystone
Heights, was arrested Dec. 24
by CCSO for driving under the
influence and possession of
less than 20 grams of
marijuana.
Helen Matthews, 35, of
Starke was arrested Dec. 23 by
CCSO on two warrants, one
for failure tc appear in court on
an original charge of dri ing
while license is suspended or
revoked, and one for issuing a
worthless check.
Steveh. Sherouse, 20, of
Keystone Heights, was
arrested Dec. 23 by CCSO for
disorderly intoxication.
Kelly Ellsworth, 43, of
Keystone Heights, was
arrested Dec. 21 by CCSO for
retail theft after he allegedly
.took two bottles of mouthwash
from the shelves ofC-VS -in
Keystone, concealed them in
his clothing, and left the store,
without paying.
Joseph Goodwin, 50, of
Keystone Heights, was
arrested Dec. 21 by CCSO for
driving while license is
suspended or revoked.
Bret ; Wyman, 23, of
Keystone Heights, was
arrested Dec. 21 by CCSO for
possession of drug
paraphernalia.

Donna Frey, 51, of Melrose
was arrested Dec. 20 by CCSO
on two warrants for worthless
check charges.
Rosalinda McArtor, 29, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Dec. 20 by CCSO for driving
under the influence.
Michael Rich, .23, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Dec. 20 by CCSO on a warrant
for failure to appear in court on
a charge of violating Florida
Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
regulations.
Cristy Adams, 29, of
Melrose was arrested Dec. 19
by CCSO on three
warants-one- for failure to
appear in court on a charge of
theft of gas, one for violation
of probation on an original
charge of DUI, and one for
failure to appear in court for a
charge of driving while license
is suspended or revoked.
Jeffrey Gaudette, 23, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Dec. 19 by CCSO on a warrant
for violation of probation on
an original charge of felony
DWLSR.
Ashley Smith, 23, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Dec. 19 by CCSO on a warrant


for violation of probation on
an original charge of petit
theft.


were planted, and so this time
of the year symbolized new
growth and a time to look
forward to the future.
Throughout time, the
Romans continued to observe
the new year in late March, but
the calendar was often changed ,


by new emperors so much so
thct it finally became out of
synchronization with the sun.
In 46 B.C., Julius Caesar
established Jan. 1 as the date
of a new year when he created_
the Julian calendar. In order to
.synchronize the calendar with


the sun, Caesar made a
declaration that the previous
year was to drag on for 445
days. ,
dMaking New
Year's resolutions
Around 153 B.C., the month


of January was named after the
god Janus.
The image of Janus-still
-found today on many Roman
coins-is represented by two
heads back to back, one
looking to the past and the
other looking forward to the


future.
Janus became the symbol for
resolutions as many Romans
began the tradition of seeking
See YEAR, p.3B


AT NOECELS


AUTO SALES YOU WILL RECEIVE THAT SMALLTOWN SERVICE YOU DESIRE.
NO, GIMMICKS! NO HYPE :


f1996t.' "Amw


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*ALL SA X'TAG, LE & REGISTRATION FEE S.*WITH APPROVEDCREIT.


w


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AUTO SALES 2


U-,R


LET NOEGEL'S FIND THE CAR THAT FITS YOU, YOUR FAMILY,
YOUR BUDGET,: AND EVEN YOUR CREDIT CONCERNS!


1 1997 .







Page 2B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Dec. 28, 2006


It was another year of


upgrades for Blanding
also.. .a..responsibility of. the .... ...


Blanding continues to get
upgrades in 2006

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
One big-money project was
completed and another one got
under way in 2006 as Camp
Blinding continued to
uprgrade its facilities as funds.
are made available.
A ribbon-cutting ceremony
was held April 8 to officially
open the camp's new
combined support maintenance
shop-a federally funded
project that was completed at a
cost of $24.5 million.
Several people spoke at the
opening ceremony of the
condition of the old CSMS,
which was operating out of
World War II-era facilities.
Retired Sgt. Maj. Ray Quinn,
one of the ceremony's guest
speakers,. said he visited the
CSMS in 1973 and could not
believe the people were
working, in -such conditions
then.
Now. CSMS personnel have
110,054 square feet on 35.
acres at their disposal, along
with 'ai conditioning and
restrooirds.
Also.'noney \%as used to
purchase new tools and state-
of-the-art equipment.
"We did the right thing,"
Maj. Gen. Douglas Burnett,
the adjutant generalof Florida,
said;:upon surveying the new
facilities.
April 8 proved to be a busy
day at Camp Blanding. Not


only was the new 1SMS
officially opened, but a
groundbreaking ceremony was
held for a $56.8 million
federally funded project-a
new regional training institute.
Maj, Lloyd "Bob" Thomas,
facility manager at Camp
Blanding, said phase one of the
project is 70 percent complete,
.with phase two having just
started. He anticipates phase
three starting in September
2007.
"That project's going very
well," Thomas said.
The new regional training
institute, which is projected to
be complete in the fall of 2009,
will encompass 288,900 square
feet and consist of education,
billeting, dining,
administration and storage and
supply buildings.
The education area of the
complex will include
classrooms, an auditorium,
library, training/simulation
center, distance learning
center, break area and a
physical fitness center.
Barracks facilities will
accommodate 500 beds, and
the dining area will seat 200.
'"It will be beautiful .when
it's done," Thomas said.
The RTI.is responsible'for
training non-commissioned
officers as well as providing
training in combat arms,
leadership and military
occupational specialty.
General studies training for
the Army National Guard,
Army Reserve and the active
duty service components is


also a responsibility of the
school.
Moody Hall getting
new look
Camp Blanding's service
club, Moody Hall, is currently
undergoing a transformation-
it will become a conference
center that will include a
dining facility.
It is a state-funded project
that is expected. to be
completed in April-May 2007.
Clay County received a grant
from the Florida Defense
Alliance to:assist with 'the
project.
"We've matched that grant
money with some state funds
to build that center," Thomas
said. "That's about a $1.3
million total project."
The conference center is
approximately 10,000 square
feet and should be a plus for
both military units and
community organizations from
the surrounding area, Thomas
said.
"It will be as nice as any
hotel conference room'you can
find," he said. "It's being done
very elaborately, decorated
very well with hard-wood
floors, crown molding and'so
forth."
Past fiscal year ha s
been a benefit to
Camp Blanding
There are other projects that
are ongoing or have been
See UPGRADE, p. 6B



,,A ; :. ',' -
..-, ,.,. .

,. .-, "
.4 ,: .-
: ..,


Nook Crawford skims the top of the cane syrup to remove foam that is formed
when the cane stalk residue floats to the top of the sugar cane juice.


Bradford family keeps


on grinding for tradition


BY LINDSEY KIRKLAND
Times Editor
Cane grindings are headed
the way of dinosaurs,
typewriters and the traditional
farm life
To keep this from
happening, one Bradford
County family.tries to keep
this tradition alive.
The Crawford family
recently held their annual cane
grinding at the home of Cecil
Jr.-known simply as
Junior-and Lulamae
Craw ford. which is about five
miles west of Lawte).
Junior grows the sugar cane
each year and his brother,
Nook Crawford, does the
cooking. Guests and other
family members bring food to
serve and help bottle the syrup
once it is made.
Junior and Nook. are the sons


Hospice is in need of volunteers.
- There will be a volunteer training
' 'program soon, and if interested in
this important \ volunteer
opportunity, call Carolyn Long,
386-328-7100.


of .the late Cecil and Dora
Crawford. Out of Cecil's seven
siblings, the only surviving
member of his generation,
Effie Patrick, of Jacksonville,
also attended the event.
Not limited to only family,
friends from Bradford and
Union counties showed up, as
well.
Nook said his dad, known as


the Collard King of Bradford
County, began the cane
grindings in 1963. His mom
drove the tractor that powered
the mill, and Cecil's brother,
Stanley Crawford, helped him
feed the sugar cane into the
mill until his death in 1993.
When.Cecil died in 1999,
See CANE, p. 4B


Is alcohol making your life




if your answer to this question is VYE there is help

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS!
Meetings every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday at
SL Edwards Catholic Church
(next'to the high school)
S ." p.miH iloWShiPfHall ,: lo
352468-1i840 w386-623-2564 904-769-b95i1
www.ncfintergrouo.com


It may look like a mess now, but Moody Hall, the service club at Camp Blanding, will
soon become a conference center, which Maj. Lloyd "Bob" Thomas, facility
manager at Blanding, said "will be as nice as any hotel conference room you can
find.










iE. I'.M4Z 4MI
Jrgcap~p,+ pJ

3I
~~% .U~~ 2.


Pictured (I-r): Jackie Cunningham, Dr. Talisha Cunningham with children,
Harrison and Brooklyn Cunningham, Shannon Elder, Vicky Paramore,
Heather Bennett, Dr. Melanie Kemmerer, Rhonell Wilkins, Denise Moore.
Inset left, Kaci Tetstone; right, Lisa Hutto.


a Happy New Year!!!


Dr Talisha Cunningham & Staff


459 West Call Street, Starke
904-964-5152


C ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS }


* I


Northside


Baptist Church


presents


Eeraldine & Ricky
7 yeaturin VeraiWine afan, VentrilkyTzst

Sunday, January 7
II a.m. and 6:30 p.m.

Geraldine Ragan was born in Orange, Texas, and was raised in southwest
Louisiana. As a teenager, she accepted Jesus Christ as her Savior. She then
asked God to use her life to glorify Him. Overnight, Geraldine became a
ventriloquist and believes her talent is a gift from God. She began using a.
Jerry Mahoney figure and wvon many honors with her ventriloquism.
After graduation from high school, Geraldine was offered a fantastic career
with Disneyland of California, but declined in order to dedicate her life and
talent full time to Christian service. She joined the E.J. Daniels Evangelistic
Association and traveled with his team for six years, performing in large
citywide crusades.
In 1972, Geraldine married PGA professional golfer, Dave Ragan, who was a
member of the Jerry Spencer Evangelistic Association. Geraldine and Dave
traveled with the Spencer team for five years.. Dave later served in two
churches in Texas and Georgia and was a golf coach at two universities.
Geraldine and Dave are currently living in Birmingham, Ala. They have two
sons, Chuck and Paul.
Geraldine and "Ricky" minister to young children and old alike as they go to
banquets, conferences, church, city and area wide meetings all over America.
SShe has shared and entertained on special tours to the Holy Land, Europe,
South America, Canada, Mexico and Jamaica. Geraldine and "Ricky" perform
.on Templeton Tours Bible Cruises and have blessed millions through Christian
television programs, Praise Gatherings and National Southern Gospel Music
Quartet Conventions.


( Nursery is provided for birth to 3 years.

COME JOIN US AS WE UNITE IN THIS
SPECIAL TIME OF SEEKING THE LORD.
Everyone Welcomel

Corner of SR-16 W. & CR-225, Starke
904-964-7124

X ZI A'ZAL\Ak


Z
4.
t I
*%


m


i






Dec. 28, 2006 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Page 3B


YEAR
Continued from p.' 1B

out forgiveness from their
enemies, resolving past
conflicts.
A resolution made by
ancient Babylonians was to do
something like return
borrowed farm equipment.
Today, popular New Year's
resolutions generally involve
kicking a bad habit such as
smoking or resolving to go on
a diet.
Luck in the New
Year
It was also tradition for early
Romans to hold a festival each
new year in honor of the god
Janus.
They often exchanged gifts
such as gold-covered nuts or
coins imprinted with pictures
of the god Janus with wishes
of good luck.
Today, many cultures have
traditional beliefs that they can
bring good luck in the coming
year by performing a ritual or
by eating.a certain food on the
first day of the new year.
Vietnam
Vietnamese tradition holds
that they live with different
gods in their homes keeping
track of their deeds as well as
protecting the family from
harm.
The Vietnamese celebration
is called Tet, which means the
morning of the first day of the
new year, and lasts for 7 days.
They begin by giving
presents to their gods so when
those gods report to -Heaven,
they will look favorably upon
the family. Everyone must
remain happy during Tet to
ward off bad luck in the
upcoming new year.
hina
Homes throughout China,
Taiwan and Southeast Asia,
display a picture of their
kitchen god, Tsao Chun, that
hangs over the stove.
It is a Chinese belief that
Tsao Chun is a moral force in
the lives of their family
members, watching over them
and what goes on inside the
home.
Much like the Vietramese
tradition, the Chinese believe
that Tsao Chun reports to
Heaven at the time of their
new year celebration as to the
good or bad behavior of each'
family member. ,,
Customarily, family
members bribe Chun into
giving a much sweeter version
of their deeds or misdeeds by
smearing sugar or honey on his
mouth in the picture.
Another Chinese tradition is
cleaning their homes from top
to bottom, sweeping away any
traces of bad luck.
Greece
In Greece, Jan. 1 is
celebrated as not only the new
year, but also as St. Basil's
Day.
One of the forefathers of the
Greek Orthodox Church, they
believe that he died on this day
and remember him for his
kindness and generosity to the
poor.
Part of the tradition. is St.
Basil filling the shoes of
children with presents as
midnight.,
Denmark
Throughout the year, old
dishes are saved to throw at the
homes of friends on New
Year's Eve. To receive a heap
of broken dishes on your
doorstep on New Year's is
considered a sign that one has
many friends.
Japan
Japanese children receive
"otoshidamas" which are small
gifts .with money inside them.
To ward off evil spirits,
Japanese families hang a rope
of straw across the front of'
their houses, which stands for
happiness and good luck.
At midnight Dec. 31, the
bells of the temples are rung
108 times to chase away 108
troubles or earthly desires in
the Buddhist canon.
Known as joyano-kane, the
Japanese tradition holds that
laughter following the bell
tolls will help drive away the
bad spirits.
Other countries have various


good luck traditions practiced
each new year.
Bolivian families hang
wood or straw dolls outside
their homes to bring good luck
and the Swiss allow a drop of
cream to land on the floor for
good luck on New Year's Day.
At midnight on New Year's
:Eve, people in France kiss
under the mistletoe and offer
best wishes for the coming
New Year.
Children in Northern
Portugal are given treats and
coins as they go caroling,
singing old songs known as
Janeiro's, a custom said to
bring them all good luck.
Ukrainians throw rice at


others on New Year's Day to
bring them good luck.
United States
An early American custom
was making as much noise as
"possible to scare sway evil
spirits in the new year.
In the 1700s, American
colonists were continuing the
tradition with shouting,
cheering and noisemakers on
New Year's Eve.
This tradition, along with
shooting off fireworks
continues as an American
tradition today.
Many people attend parties
on Dec. 31 and at midnight,
they make noise, cheer, clap,
kiss each other and sing the
Scottish song "Auld Lang
Syne."
It is said that "Auld Lang
Syne" is probably the most
popular song that no one
actually knows the lyrics to.
The phrase auld lang syne
literally translates as old long
since, meaning good old days
gone by.
Bandleader Guy Lombardo
popularized the song and
turned it into a New Year's
tradition. Lombardo first heard
"Auld Lang Syne" in his
hometown of London, Ontario,
where it was sung by Scottish
immigrants.
His band, known as Guy
Lombardo and His Royal'
Canadians, performed the song
regularly and in 1929, played it
at midnight at a New Year's
Eve party .at the Roosevelt
Hotel in New York City, thus
beginning the tradition.
Probably the most famous
tradition in the United States is
the countdown to the new year
held in New York City's Time
Square.
A minute long lowering of
the New Year ball begins at.
11:59 p.m. on Dec. 31 and
comes to rest at exactly
midnight.
Thousands of people crowd
into Times Square to watch the
event unfold and millions of
.others view the live broadcast
from their television sets.
The tradition first began in
1907, with the original ball
being made of iron and wood.
The current ball is made of
Waterford crystal, six feet in
diameter and weighing 1,070
pounds.
Food traditions
for good luck
-Some countries have
':triditirog' of eating certain
"fooods''iwi NewYear's Day in'
order to bring good luck.
A tradition that started in
Spain but picked up by many
other counties is the eating of
12 grapes during the last 12
seconds just before the new
year begins.
It is said that those who are
able to finish the grapes by
midnight are given good luck
for the rest of the new year.
While in France people eat a
stack of pancakes for luck and
good health, eating noodles at
midnight is customary at
Buddhist temples in Japan.
A German tradition is to eat
pork and sauerkraut on New
Year's Day for good luck.
Eating pickled herring as the
very first food of the New
Year is said to bring good luck
to the Polish.
In the Philippines, having a
large meal that contains a
variety of foods on the table at
midnight ensures the
abundance of food in the
upcoming year.
Boiled cod is tradition on
New Year's Eve in Denmark
and olie-bollen, a donut-like
fritter, is popular in Holland.
In many parts of the United
States, especially the South,.
there is a tradition of eating
black-eyed peas on New
Year's Day.
Black-eyed peas are thought
to ,.ring good luck and
prosperity. Cabbage is another
food traditionally consumed on
New Year's Day, thought to
bring money for the new year.
Some believe the custom of
eating black-eyed peas for luck
started during the Civil War
when Southern troops had to
eat what was available to them.
They considered the peas
lucky because they prevented
soldiers from starvation.
In some ares of the United
States, black-eyed peas are
referred to as cowpeas because
they were once only used as
food for cattle.
Even back in the days of


Pharaoh, black-eyed peas-
which are actually not peas,
but lentils-were a symbol of
luck and good fortune.
The belief was that those
who ate the inexpensive black-
eyed peas were humbling
themselves and being saved
from the wrath of heaven
because of their vanity.
Either way, black-eyed peas
are an excellent source of
calcium, vitamin A and folate.
The popular dish of black-
eyed peas and rice served on
New Year's Day is Hoppin'
John.


There are many stories about
where the name originated, but
it likely comes from the
French creole pois 6 pigeon
which means pigeon peas.
Quick Hoppin' John with
canned black-eyed peas:
1 cup chopped onion
1 tbsp. bacon drippings
2-16 oz. cans of black-eyed
peas, slightly drained
1 cup chopped cooked ham
1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper
3 cups hot cooked rice
salt to taste
In a large saucepan, saut6
chopped onion in bacon
drippings until tender. Stir in
black-eyed peas, ham, and
cayenne pepper. Simmer for
about 10 minutes; stir in hot
cooked rice and salt. Serves 4,
to 6.
Hoppin' John made from
fresh dried black-eyed peas:
2 cups dried black eyed peas
3/4 cup chopped onion
1/4 cup chopped celery
2 lbs. ham hocks
2 cup uncooked brown rice
1/4 tsp. pepper
Soak peas in 6 cups of water' ,:
overnight. Put the peas with ''
the juice in a large pot and add
riions, celery, and ham, hocks.
Cover and cook over medium
heat until peas are tender but
still whole, about 45 minutes.
Add rice and pepper, cover,
and simmer for about 1 hour,
or until rice is tender.
Remove bones and
unwanted fat from ham hocks
and throw away. Mix meat
back into peas and rice. Serves
4 to 6.


WORTH NOTING
Starke and Lake Butler Head
Start is now enrolling students.
The free federally funded program
is now taking applications for the
2006-2007 school year.
The program is open to preschool
children who turn 3 years old on or
before Sept. 1. Head Start offers
educational activities, health and
family services. To apply in Starke,
call Kyle Bonesteel at (904) 964-
8280 to set up an appointment.
Parents may also stop by the Starke
Center, located at 1080 N. Pine St.,
or contact ECS Resource and
Referral at (904) 964-1543. To
apply in Lake Butler, call Alberta
Hampton at (386) 496-2160 or visit
495 Southeast 5th St. Bring the
Ichild'sBitth Cetificite and'jr6of f'
,income when applying .. :
A meditation and stress control
workshop is held every Thursday at
6:30 p.m. at the Senior Health Care
Center. Call to register (904) 782-
1069.
Do you have any concerns about
your child's development? Free
information and/or screenings are
available for ages birth to 5 years.
To schedule an appointment, call
Child Find at (800) 227-6036 or go
to www. nefec.org/fdlrs (click on
Child Find).


Starke
Kiwanis to
host sporting
clays, poker
tournaments
Jan. 6
The Kiwanis Club of Starke
will be hosting a sporting clays
tournament at the Bradford
Sportsmen's Farm in Graham
on Saturday, Jan. 6, beginning
at 8:45 a.m. with a safety
meeting.
Each entry costs $100
(which includes lunch), with
all profits going toward tle
Santa Fe Community College
scholarship fund (children are
welcorhe to participate if
accompanied by an adult).
The tournament, which
begins at 9 a.m. following the
safety meeting, is a 100-tirget
Lewis Class event (three
classes, A-C). Payouts are as
follows: HOA-$300, first
place-$200, second place-$1.50
and third place-$100.
More than 20 door prizes
will also be awarded.
Ear and eye protection is
required of all participants.
Immediately following
lunch, the Kiwanis Club will
host a Texas Hold 'Em poker
tournament, which has. an
entry fee of $50. The cash
prizes are as follows: first,
place-40 percent of the total
entry fees, second place-23
percent, third place-13 percent,
fourth place-10 percent, fifth
place-eight percent and sixth


place-six percent.
To rese've'a spot in the
sporting clays tournament,
send a check in the amount of
$100 ($150 if you plan to
shoot and play poker), payable


to Starke Kiwanis, to 434 W.
Call St., Starke, FL 32091.
For more information,
please call Steve Denmark at
(904) 964-5827 or Warren
Carver at (904) 964-7434.


A substance abuse support group workaholics, compulsive spenders
is held every Wednesday at 7 p.m. at and unhealthy relationships. The
Lawtey Church of Christ, CR-200- public is welcome. Call (904) 782-
B, for those who suffer from 3771 or (904) 782-3086 for
alcohol- or drug-related problems, information.



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IdlitortialG inion

Thursday, Dec. 28, 2006 Page 4B




The birth of freedom in America


It seems that in times of crisis
someone always rises to meet the test,
and the architects of the American
Constitution are a prime example.
Those noble men rose to the occasion
at a critical time in history, and like
writers of the Bible, prepared a manu-
script that has never been surpassed
for guidance of men and women in
good times and bad.
In the latter half of the 18th century,
times were tough in the Colonies,
perched on the Eastern coast of North
America, fighting the Indians and
French and suffering under the tax
yoke of Great Britain, the most pow-
erful nation in the world at the time.
The mother country was taxing the
colonists for everything, including a
tax to support the Church of England.
a cost normally supported b\ mem-
bers of each church.
.,But it wasn't the church tax that
led .hle colonists to revolt; it was the
Stamp Act of 1765 and the To% nsh-
end Act of 1767, imposed by the Brit-
ish government. (There were other
issues, but these two irritated the
colonists more than others.)
The Stamp Act, the fourth in a
series, added tax for the support of
British troops in the colonies, tax-
ing all legal documents. commercial
contracts, newspapers, wills, pam-
phlets and playing cards. Law vers and
notaries had to pay $10 American for
certification, while English counter-
parts paid only $2. and because of the_
paperwork producedlby attertreysthe
tax on them was especially galling.
British Treasurer Charles Townsh-
end proposed the tax that carried'his
name (and the king liked the plan) to
tax the colonists in ordeiT to reduce
real estate tax on landowners in Eng-
land, and to maintain forts in America
protecting fur traders rather than set-
ilAti. The tax. proposed ad passed
-in 176'. w as repealed in.j-"'0, but
corTo6ffI 'rert ot appease. :
The' root of the problem with the
American taxpayers was their lack of
representation in the House of Com-
mons and appeasement by the Brit-
ish in lowering taxes didn't reduce


Florida
strawberries ,
add style to
winter
As Florida's strak terry
season mo\es into full
production, shoppers
throughout North America are
brightening their cold winter
days with this delicious and
colorful treat from the
Sunshine State.
The Florida Strawberry
Growers Association is
teaming up with grocers to
promote the state's signature
berry through its new "Drop
Red Gorgeous" campaign-that
" ehfbodiesthe idea that "you are
what you eat." Wal-Mart and
other retailers are featuring
fresh Florida strawberries and
the eye-catching "Drop Red
Gorgeous" point-of-sale
signage in their produce


tensions between the two sides. The
policy of "taxation without represen-
tation" in parliamentary procedures
did not fit into the mindset of freedom
envisioned by residents' of the New
World, who left the comforts of home
to begin a new life in a new land.
Although few in number, the peo-
ple of England and Western Europe
who braved the rigors of crossing the
Atlantic Ocean didn't plan to establish
another England on the Eastern shore
of North America.
While two of the most irritating leg-
islative acts were rescinded, the Eng-
lish struck a fatal nerve in attempting.
to force colonists to buy tea only from
British merchants at inflated prices.
To understand the situation, in the
late 18th century tea was the interna-
tional nonalcoholic drink, especially)
among the English populace. With
British ships plying the oceans ;of
the world, England became the pri-
mar) buyer and seller of tea. In their
attempt to control the tea market,
they made the grave mistake of rais-
ing taxes and prices, and attempting
to control the amount of tea entering
American harbors.
In December 1773, a small group
of Bostonians boarded three English
ships in Boston Harbor and dumped
the cargo of tea into the sea. This
action became known in American
history as The Boston Tea Part'. The
already strained relations between
-Engflafd and the colonies deteriorated
even further and contributed to the
colonists' determination for indepen- .-
dence.
Not everyone living in the colonies
was happy about boarding ships and
destroying cargo. There was a large
contingent of Americans who contin-
ued to be loyal to the crown, includ-
ing the renowned Benjamin Franklin,
who reportedly offered to pay for the
destroyed tea from his own pocket.
"dii e, tihe-, i ya lists,; as'the e)w re-
called, were unable to prevent the
Revolutionary War.
By Buster Rahn,
Telegraph Editorialist


sections from now. through
February. The marketing
campaign touts the nutritional
benefits of Florida strawberries,
which are low in calories and
free of sodium and fat, and
packed with vitamin C,
potassium, fiber, folic acid, and
powerful, disease-fighting
antioxidants.
"The strawberry is America's
most popular berry," Florida'
Agriculture Commissioner
Charles' H. Bronson said.
"People know it's delicious,
but the good news is it is also
one of our most nutritious food
choices."

Plant City is the "Winter
Strawberry Capital of the
World," and from December
through February, Florida
strawberries dominate the U.S.
market. Florida is the nation's
second-largest producer of
strawberries, with eastern-
Hillsborough County the
center of Florida's strawberry
production


Substantial commercial
acreage can also be found in
Alachua, Pasco,'and Polk
counties. Florida's strawberry
farmers receive about $129
million in cash receipts
annually for their harvest.
'Bronson offered the
following strawberry buying
tips for shoppers:
Look for strawberries that
are fully and deeply -red. Be
sure the color has spread from
one end of the berry to the
other. Don't choose a berry
with white or' green spots in
hopes it will ripen up on your
windowsill; strawberries stop
ripening as soon as they are
picked.
If you can touch the
berries, check tosee 'that they
are firm but not hard. The
calyx, the strawberry's leafy
cap, should be fresh and green.
Don't wash strawberries
until you are ready to eat them.
Refrigerate strawberries if
you're not'going to eat them
within a day or two.


CANE
Continued from p. 2B
Nook and Junior took over the
operation and moved it from
their dad's homeplace to
Junior's farm.
Edward Crawford, cousin to
' Nook and Junior, said the cane
grinding was once larger with
more kettle cookers, but things
have changed % ith time.
"It's almost a thing of the
.past," he said. "Very few
people do this any more."
While it's easy to go to the
f grocery store and buy a bottle
of s\rup, this family tradition
sho\%s how hard work was a
as of life and a necessity.
After the sugar cane is
grown and cut down, it is fed
through a mill. The Crawfords
use a tractor attached to the
mill to squeeze the juice out of
the cane.
The juice is then boiled until
it reaches 34 on the Baume
scale, where it has crystallized
into syrup.
As Nook stirred the liquid in
the 55-gallon kettle cooker,he,-
"'sad -itherole process, took
about three hours, producing 7
and a half gallons of syrup. '
Guests are sent home riot
only with a fresh bottle of cane
syrup, but an appreciation: of
how things were done, by past
generations; ,,


Shyrel Crawford bottles the cane syrup with the help
of Molly Zapp, a student at Lake Butler Elementary


*


"Schdo 1




r, Cl 4j
Z- Oil;-I
r;71;


I1i

-.


TOP LEFT: Union
County resident Alvin
Griffis (left) and Ricky
Moorhouse catch up
while cooling off with
iced tea. BOTTOM
LEFT: Bradford County
resident Doyle Thomas
(left) discusses issues
facing.the county with
Union County resident
Marvin Tucker (right).


Streit's Motorsports
4820 NW 13th Street Gainesville
Gainesville, FL Motorcl
352-376-2637 Motorcycles
WWW.STREITS.COM Professionals

4- .' ; .'4i *


A tractor is used to power the mill. In less modern times, a mule or other farm
animal would be used to power the mill.








Dec. 28, 2006 TELEGRAPH; TIMES & MONITOR-B-SECTION Page 5B


OBITUARIES .


Rosa Brunson
SMS.ROSE Rosa Lee Howze
Brunsonri 94, of Melrose died
Friday, Dec. 22, 2006, at the
home of her son. Henry Alvin
"Al". Brunson, in Melrose
following an extended illness.
Born on Aug. 18, 1912, to
Darius Nelson Howze and .Birdie
Lee Roe Howze of Stockton' Ga.,
Mrs. Brunson lived much of her
life in Savannah, Ga. and
Jacksonville before moving to.
Nassau County 30 years ago. She
attended First Baptist Church of
Callahan. She was a welder at the
Jacksonville Shipyards during
World War II, helping to build
liberty ships. In 1972, she
retired and moved to Callahan
where she worked at the Nassau
Senior Citizens Center near
Hilliard for many years.
Mrs. Brunson is survived by:
two sons, Grover Leslie Brunson
Jr. of Callaha6:and Henry Alvin
Brunson of Melrose; a sister,
Audrey Mac Ho. ze Bass of Lake
Park. Ga six grandchildren. 11
great-grandchildren, and seven
-geat-great-grandchildren She
was preceded in death by seven
brothers, Walter, Fred, Clyde,
Gruver, Daries; Donald and
Bruce; and two sisters, Nora Mae
and Evelyn.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Brunson will be held at 10 a.m.
on Thursday, Dec. 28, 2006, in
the DeWitt C. Jones Chapel in'
Keystone Heights with pastor
Jim Prose officiating. Graveside
services will follow at 1 30 p.m
at Jones 'Cemetery in Nassau
County with the Re%. Lynn H.att
oificiating.

Jesse Crawford
LAKE BUTLER Jesse Lee
Crawford, 95, of Lake Butler died
Wednesday, Dec. 20, 2006, at
Shands Starke following an
extended illness.
A lifelong resident of Union
County, Mr. Crawford was the
son of the late John Daniel
Crawford and Daisey Brannon
Crawford. He retired from the
U.S. Department of Agriculture
as a district.director. He served in
the Army Air Corps during World
War H and %\as a member of the
Lake Butler Church of Chnst
Mr. Cra\'ford is survived by:
his wife of 65 years, Margaret
Catheryne Rainey Crawford; two
daughters, Peggy Crawford
Hollingsworth and Louanne
Wessner, both of Lake Butler; a
sister, Louise Alston of
Zephyrhills; and three
grandchildren. He was preceded
in death by a brother, Seeber
Buck Crawford, and three sisters,
Edna Brannen, Agnes Keller and
Milo Roberts.
Funeral services for Mr.,
Crawford were Dec. 23, 2006, in
Lake Butler Church of Christ
with brother Scott Fisher
officiating. .Burial followed in
Midway Cemetery under the care
of Archer Funeral Home of Lake
Butler.

Milton Dukes
LAKE BUTLER Milton
Robert Dukes, 96, of Lake Butler
died Monday, Dec. 25, 2006, at
his residence following a brief
illness.
A lifelong resident of Union
.County, Mr. Dukes was the son
of the late Jonathan Matthew
Dukes and Lucinda Douglas
Dukes. He was a farmer most of
his life and also was a game
warden early in his life. He
retired from the Department of.
Corrections 30 years ago and-was
a member of Little Springs
.Primitive .Baptist Church in
Worthington Springs.
Mr. Dukes is survived by: his
wife of 75 years, Carland Harden
Dukes; four daughters, Hilda
Robinson of Orlando, Delaris
Cavanaugh of Atlanta, Glenda
Thigpen of Alachua and Pam
Roberts of Jacksonville; three
sons, Wayne Dukes, J.R. Dukes
and Faren Dukes, all of Lake
Butler; 14 grandchildren and
several great-grandchildren.
Funeral services for Mr. Dukes
will be held on Thursday, Dec.
28, 2006, at Little Springs
Primitive Baptist Church with
Elder Roger Pinkston
officiating. Burial will follow in
Old Providence Cemetery under
the care of Archer Funeral Home
of Lake Butler.
Family will receive friends at
the funeral home on Wednesday,
Dec. 27, 2006, from 6-8 p.m.

Vernie Forsyth
RAIFORD Vernie M.
Forsyth, 92, of Raiford died
Monday, Dec. 25, 2006, at the
home of her daughter, Jewel
Pittman in Willow Springs;, Mo.,
following an extended illness.E
Born in Flemington, Ga., the
daughter of the 'late Daniel
Maulden and Kat Gordon
Maulden, Mrs. Forsyth was a
homemaker and member of Mt.
Zion Primitive Baptist Church in
Lake Butler.


In addition to her daughter,
Mrs. Forsyth is survived by: a
son, T.J. Forsyth of Raiford; a
sister, Mildred Gordon of
Savannah, Ga.; six
grandchildren, 13 great-
grandchildren and 10. great-great-
grandchildren. She was preceded
in death by her husband of more
than 60 years, Oscar Forsyth,
and a granddaughter, Janet
Forsyth.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Forsyth will be held on Friday,
Dec. 29, 2006, at LI, a.m., in the
chapel of Archer Funeral Home of
Lake Butler with elder Jimmy
Thornton officiating. Burial will
follow in Sapp Cemetery.
"Family will receive friends at'
the funeral home on' Thursday,
Dec 28, 2006, from 6-8 p.m.

Janet Griffis
STARKE -.Janet Katherine
Brown Griffis, 6. I of Starke died.
Monday, Dec. 25, 2006, in'
Augusta, Ga.
Born in Portland. Maine and
raised in Jacksonville, MNls.
Griffis moved to Starke in'1975.
She was a CNA and member of
Pine Grove Methodist Church.'
Mrs. Griffis is survived by: a
daughter, Penny Cowart of
Starke; a son, Les Brown of
Birmingham, Ala.; two brothers,
Joseph "Joe" Metcalf of Atlanta
and Howard Metcalf of Glen St.
Mary; a sister, Sandra Clyatt of
Glenn Bernie, Md.; 'her
companion, Jennings Griffis of
Lake Butler; /'and four
grandchildren She was preceded
in death b) her another, Louise'
Gilmore.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Griffis will be held at 11 a.m. on
Friday, Dec: 29, 2006, at Pine
'Grove Methodist Church with the
Rev. David Thomas officiating
Burial followed in Pine Grove
Cemetery under the care of Archie
Tanner Funeral Home of Staike.
SThe family will receive inends
.Thursday, Dec. 28, 2006, from 7-
9 p.m., at the funeral home.

Gladys IHill
STARKE Gladys Aaron Hill
of Starke died Tuesday, Dec. 19,.
2006, at Shands AGH in
Gainesville following an
extended illness.
Born in Fruitland Park, Mrs;
Hill was a member of Mt. Pisgah,
AME Church of Starke. She was a
homemaker and member of the
Gospel Assembly at various.
organizations;
Mrs. Hill is' survived by: her
husband of 61 years, Arthur Hill
Jr. of Starke; daughters, Nettie
Keith of Ft. Lauderdale, Johnnie
M. DeSue. Mar.)\ Hankerson.
Mir\ L Johnson, all of Starke ...,
Mildred Perrs of L)ons. Ga,
Mercy Wakefield of
Jacksonville; sons, George Early
of Paterson, N.J., Frank. Hill,
Doris Hill and Raymond Hill, all
of Starke; sisters, Ora Mae Aaron
of Riviera Beach,, Mildred
Petteway, Annie B. Tyson, both
of Starke, 48 grandchildren, 75
great-grandchildren and 16 great-
great-grandchildren.
Funeral services for Mrs. Hill
will be held at 11 a.m. on
Saturday, Dec. 30, 2006, at Mt.
Pisgah AME Church in Starke
with the Rev. Quintinn Parker
officiating and the Rev. Glen
Dani'as, eulogist. Interment will
follow in Oddfellow Cemetery
under the direction of Haile
Funeral Home of Starke.
Visitation will be held on-
Friday, Dec. 29, 2006. Family
hour will be from 3-4 ,p.m.and
friends may call from 4-8 p.m.
and on Saturday at,-he church one

In Memory

In Loving Memory
of
Michael J. Manning
Jan. 29, 1945 Dec. 26, 2005

Gone Fishin'
I've finished life's chores assigned
to me, so put me on a boat headed
out to sea.
Please send along my fishing pole
For I've been invited to the fishing'
hole.
Where every day is a day to fish,
to fill your heart with every wish.
Don 't worry, or feel sad for me,
I'm fishin'with the Master of the
sea.
We will miss each other for
awhile, but you will come and
bring your smile.
That won't be long you will see,
till we're together you and me.
To all of those that think of me.
Be happy as I go out to sea.
If others wonder why I'm mission ,
Just tell 'em I've gone fishin'.
We love you and miss you very
much.
Forever in our hearts,
Virginia, Chuck, Alisha and
Hunter, Alaina & Jimmy and
Michael, Sharon and Clara


hour pldir to the service.


Norman Jones
LAKE BUTLER- Norman Dale'
Jones of Lake Butler died
Wednesday. Dec. 20, 2006, at
Shands UF in Gainesville
following a brief illness.
S.Born, in BAker CQunty, Mr.;
Jones lived most of his life in;
Baker and Duval counties. He \ as
a retired police office and was of:
the Baptist Faith.
Mr. Jones is survived by: four
sons, Norman Dale Jones Jr. and-
Richard Jones, both of
Jackson ille. Bryan Keith Jones;
of Lake City and Joseph Jones of
Lake. Butler; a. brother, Barry.
Jones of Griffin, Ga : two
sisters, Wanda Jacobs of'
Jacksonville and BettV Reider of
Houston, Texas; eight:
grandchildren and five great-
grandchildren. He was preceded
in death by his parents, Charlie
Jones and Effie Thompson
Jones.
Funeral services for, Mr. Jones
yere- Dec 27, 2006, in the:
chapel ol Archer Funeral Home
with the Rev. Barry Jones:
oticiating Burial followed in
Woodlawn Cemetery in
Macclenny.


Robert Kitzman
LAKE BUTLER :- .Robert
Theodore Kitzman, 72, of Lake
Butler died Tuesday,: Dec. 12,
2006, at the \A Hospital in Lake
City following an extended
illness.
:Born in Faribault, Mifin., Mr.
Kiizman lied most of his life in
Gainesille He served in the
U.S. Air Force and was a
businessman.
Mr. Kitzman is survived by:
three sons. Robert J. Kitzman of
Lake Butler, William Kitzman of
High Springs and Richard
Kitzman of Hollister; his
mother, Leona Kitzman; a sister,
Joan Batchelder of Faribault.
Minn.; and eight grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by his
father, Steve Kitzman and his
wife, Carolyn Kitzman.

S"Wih You SayIt With Flowers
It's Bautfully Said"
S In, l '1q78




FlonPsf

(904) 964-7711
218 N. Temple Ave.
Starke


SMemorial services for Mr.
Kitzman were Dec. 20, 2006, in
Melrose.


Sarah Mobley
LAKE BUTLER Sarah F.
Mobley, 85, of Lake Butler died
Friday, Dec. 22, 2006, at Shands
Starke following an extended
illness.
The daughter of the late
Jefferson W. and Tommie A.
Flitrelle, Mrs. Mobley lived her
early life in Marshall, Texas, and
moved to Lake Butler in 1959.
She awas a teacher's aide with the
Union Count) School Board and
worked tor Head Start. She .as a
member of First Baptist Church
of Lake Butler.
Mrs Nlobtes is survived by:
tw\o daughters. Patricia A.
\\ esson of Orange Park and Kay
M. Humphrey of Fairfield, Ala.;
three sons, Thomas G. Mobley
and James A. Mobley, both of
Lake Bdtler, and Richard Mobley
of .Montgomery, Ala.; Ihree
brothers. Charles Futrelle of
Shreveport, La., \ ictor\ E
Futrelle of Marshall, Texas, and ,
James Futrelle of Sedro Woolie,
Wash.; a sister, Bobbie Jackson
of Orange, Texas; four


grandchildren and eight great-
grandchildren. ,She Was preceded
in death by her husband, Thomas
L. Mobley. .
Funeral services for Mrs.
Mobley were Dec. 26, 2006, in
the chapel of Archer Funeral
.Home of Lake Butler with the
Rev. Bobby Clyatt officiating.
Burial followed in Dekle
Cemetery. .

Avain Smith
GREEN COVE-SPRINGS -
Al am Elizabeth "Coot" Smith,
63, of Green Cove Springs died'
Thursday; Dec. l14, 2006, in
Green Cove Springs.
Born to George and Geraldine
Clafflin on Nov. 20, 1943, in
Starke, Mrs. Smith was a
lifelong resident of'Starke. She
was a retired nurse and member of
the Church of God faith.
Mrs. Smith is survived by: two
sons, William Smith and David
Smith, both of Starke; a. sister;
three brothers; and two
grandchildren.
Memorial' services for Mrs
Smith will be held at'l 1 a.m., on
Thursday, Jan. 4, 2007, at
Sampson City Church of God in
Starke with the Rev. Gene Bass
officiating.


Family and friends may sign
Mrs.: Smith's online register
book at www.broadusraines.com.
Arrangements are under the
care of Broadus-Raines Funeral
Home of Green Cove Springs.




Thefamily of George Davis of
Hampton would like to extend their
heartfelt thanks and appreciation
to friends, family and neighbors for
all of the support you provided
during the illness andloss of our
beloved husband, father and
grandfather..
Your visits to our home and to the
Ihoti pital to see our mother m iea a
lot Theflowers sent wer beaunlul
and ihejood bounthril and
delicious.
We thank you allforyour
condolences andforsharingyour
wonderful.memories four beloved
patriarch.
Adiv youl all Iihav a blis'sed liidav

SSincerely,
Thefamily of
George E. Davis


ceaoMeY O b PTacN





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Page 6B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR-B-SECTION Dec. 28, 2006


Santa stops to greet (I-r) Jim Whitehead, Suwannee River Economic Council
director E.W. Hodges and Lake Butler City Manager Richard Tillis.


Lake Butler City
Manager
Richard Tillis
reads another
name of a
deserving SREC
volunteer.


Kathy Drawdy (left) and Jeanette Prescott enjoy their
meals catered by the Western Steer in Stark6er l:: '


SREC

takes time

to thank

volunteers

BY LINDSEY KIRKLAND.
Times Editor


Suwannee, River Economic
Council Inc. held its 2006
Annual Volunteer
Appreciation Dinner on
Friday. Dec. 15.
More than 100 people
volunteer with SREC
throughout the year- in
Bradford and Union counties,
and -many of them were.
honored at the dinner for their
countless hours of service.
The volunteers were treated
to Christmas carols, dinner, a
certificate and plenty of gifts
to go around. The dinner was
catered by Western Steer of
Starke.
SREC director E.W: Hodges
welcomed the volunteers and
board member the Reverend
Herman Johnson gave. the
invocation.
Lake Butler City. Manager
Richard Tillis joined in by
reading the name of, each
See THANKS,, p,. 7


UPGRADE
Continued from p. 2B
completed in 2006. Thomas
sa'd approximately $300,000
was made available to Camp
Blanding last fiscal year for
various projects on post.
"That doesn't happen every
year," Thomas said. of the.
amount of money obtained.
"That's not the norm for us."
The credit for that goes to
the state's adjutant
general-Burnett. Thomas said
Burnett has been a
"phenomenal" asset to the
Guard. His work has led to the
Florida Armory Revitalization
Program, which will upgrade
the state's armories, as well as
being able to obtain more
federal funds than several
states put together.
"Maj. Gen. Burnett is very
good at going out and talking
to the representatives .in. the
state legislation, as well as on
the federal side," Thomas:said.
"That'. how we get these
projects-his ability tqo goout
there, talk to these folks and
.. explain to theri the heeds that
we have." :
SSome of the projects that are
currently under 'ay, or
complete are: two military
quarters are under construction
right now and approximately
20 percent complete; a dock
was built at the family picnic
area, while two existing docks
are being renovated; the home
of the state forester who lives
on post was renovated; and a
section of the post's power
system was uprgraded. .
Thomas said a lot:of work


0%01.[ L I I U


LAKE AREA PROFESSIONALS ~


.......... .. ... .. ..,.. .
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ntu. Keystone Heights, Fl

03-r
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r .
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k. il..r ,\.1-


5686 CHRISTIAN CAMP ROAD
HIGH AND DRY
High and dt property for your home or mobile home on 1.06 acres.
Beautiful oaks to shade your home. Cleared \ ith fencine.
$35,000


Nelda Smith Hoffmeyer
R.;J|I..I u.V^%


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erllr A U>-..


7669 CACTUS STREET
NICE RESIDENTIAL LOT
Nice residential lot in homes-only area. Close to Lake largie recreation
park. Beautiful live oak trees. Has LAKE ACCESS to Lake large just
1 block ayv.


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36inch wide metal in various colors.
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352-473-7417


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f f[ 1



JENNINGS INSULATION
JENNINGS PAINTERS, INC.
S. 352-3739744. <. .
1,477229-419O''0 0uL n r ii


done in 2006 consisted of
general maintenance and
repairs.
"When we get (funds), we
fix up the things that we can,"
Thomas said.
A future project will be the
construction of a new
ammunition supply point.
Thomas said it will be a $9-
$10 million project, with
construction starting some
time in 2008.
As with many of the
facilities on Camp Blanding,
the current ASP is operating
out of an inadequate facility
from World War II.
"The doors are only wide'
enough for a person to get
through, so when a tractor-
trailer pulls up and you have to
unload it, it's all done by
hand," Thomas said.
The new ASP Will allow
access to forkliftsTwhich will
create a m,'re efficient
operation andause less .strain
on person ~Thomas said.
Thisjoject and others are a
wa.'.v of Camp. Blanding
continuing to best meet the


needs of those who train a
there. Personnel throughout there
country train there, as well as2
personnel from outside of the .
country. ,
"Camp Blanding is;
becoming more and more a
premier training site for not
only the National Guard; but,
for active omponents and all;
their other components,
Thomas said.

Health Start of North Central r,
Florida Coalition is seeking a :
volunteer board member. Healthy o;
,Startprovides services for high-risk:.
women and children up to 3 years i
old. The coalition is seeking a ,.;
volunteer to serve on the board wh9'
either has been pregnant and
accessed prenatal care or who has
small children and has accessed
health care for his or her children. '
The member will attend once-a- P'
month board meetings in
Gainesville: Contact Celia PaynterfI
S(352) 313-6500, ext. 118, for
additional information '
Bradford High School, class of i'
2006 videos are now available. The'-
cost is $15 each. Contact Nancy u:.
Odom at (90-1)966-6086 for more
information.


II I ---- -L I I


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De 28, 2006 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Page7B


this faciliy under quarantine.. Washing hands with soap
n0V Sti "atlion A horse that was exposed io and water or using a dry
Sthe virus during the shipment disinfectant after handling each
into equine into Florida was treated at the horse.
Palm Beach Equine Clinic and Minimizing the use of
VirUS is believed to have been a shared equipment Equipment
possible link to the- horse in such as after buckets. lead
COntinues Ocala, which was at the 4inic ropes. grooming equipment.
F:Florida Agriculture and at the same time. The Ocala etc should not be shared
Consumer Services horse has tested positive for between horses. These items
Commissioner Charles H. EHV-I and was transported to should be labeled as belonging
B onson says the Department's Ocala on Dec. 11. The horse to an indi dual horse. Other
Division of Animal Industry is was ill when it arrived and was equipment such as ,tv itches.
continuing the investigation immediately isolated from all shovels, forks and bits should
into the presence of Equine other horses at the Ocala be dislnteced daily and between
Herpesvirus type I (EHV-I) location, Tuxedo Farmns. The each use
in several areas of the state horse continues to be isolated Care should be taken %hen
including Wellington, Jupiter and a portion of that.facility is filling afterr buckets and feed
and-theOcala area. EHV-l can also under quarantine. troughs. Neither the ho.e nor
be a serious-disease of horses The Palm Beach Equine the teed scoop should ha~e
and the virus d nansptead Clinic indicated it is contacting contact w ith an indt idual
through the air from the the owners of all horses that horse's bucket or trough.
respiratory route of affected were there at the same time as Multi-dose oral medications
horses. Transmission can also the index horse-.to make them should not be shared between
occur through contaminated aware of the situation and find horses
equipment, clothing and hands. out if any of the horses are. An) additional biosecurity
There is no record of a human exhibiting any signs of EHV- precautions the stable
health threat from the virus. 1. So far the department has veterinarian or stable manager
So far, seven horses have received no reports of any other recommend.
tested positive for the virus horses that were at the clinic
through lab. tests. All showing disease signs.
confirmed cases -are under A horse at Pinehurst Sabls, FC D needs
quarantine. in Jupiter, has also been for
Here is a -chronology of reported with. neurological n tin
events: symptoms of the disease and a
Five horses imported from sample has been submitted for community
Europe were brought to.Florida a lab test. o
from the New York animal The DiVision of Animal' projf CtS
iAport. station, a quarantine Industry is workingI closely .; ec
s&tion for imported horses; with veterinarians and equine Chapter 5 of the Florida
tlree more horses were picked facilities in the impacted ;:Council on Crime and
up en route in Huntington, locations to monitor the Delinquency has a busy year
-LY., and one in Darlington, animals and assist \.ith testing. planned in the area of
Maryland. When the truck Owners with sick horses community service.
Sarived on Nov.- 29 in should contact 'their private Several upcoming projects
Wellington, one of the horses veterinarian to e\amine and that FCCD has need
ftim the import station was treat their horses. Veterinarians communitysupport, by way of
ilI. That horse is now ..suspecting EHV-I with time and donations.
recovering but twe-horses that neurological signs are advised FCCD, s will be working with
were stabled with the index to contact state officials and area schools to assist needy
hsrse at the original facility follow protocols for collecting f.thea Dreams Come True
_ became ill and died. A lab test and submitting ,appropriate Foundation and many more
on one of those horses samples for laboratory worthwhile projects.
confirmed EHV-1. The facility, diagnosis. Chapter 5 is requesting any
and Compan.y is currently Horse owners in the assistance on the following:
der state quarantine and the impacted areas are being asked School supply donations
rses are being closely to follow biosecurity measures -. ongoing paper,
dnitored. No horses are until the virus is controlled pencils., pens, glue.
owed to enter or leave the The measures are: 'crayons, notebooks,
premises. Have temperatures taken a markers, backpacks. etc.
The Maryland horse had been minimum of twice daily, with Ronald McDonald
t ansported. to .another a temperature log, being House -.ongoing pop
Nellington location, maintained on each horse, tops, travel size hygiene
Sputhfields Training facility, Horses with fevers >101.9 or products (shampoo.
ar died on Dec. 2, While no >1 degree above their normal toothpaste, etc.)
lab test % as done, because of temperature should be reported If you have questions. please
its;exposure to the disease, the to the stable's veterinarian. The contact Terrasa Wood,
Scubthfields facility voluntarily horse should be isolated and community ser v ice
reStricted all movement of EHV-I samples should be chairperson, at (904) 368-3277
horses. A lab test has taken by the stable (work), (904) 964-4726
confirmed a positive case veterinarian. (home), (352) 494-2249 (cell)
wihin that facility at the Palm Limiting admittance of or by e-mail at
BdAch Equine Sports Complex. people intQ. therbaw area to wood.terresai@mail.dc.siate fl.
w ch is par-s.Tlie-Southfields only ne]X;Sgari_;e4"g.gjrel. us. '''
Tr ,ming "facilhrS.-T~he e ,- Where .--f W he.n -ermLeT rrrg-or.rp .i it i.n- a -.-r ..7 1 .. -. i .
second suspect case there stable or barn, use foot baths
awaiting lab test confirmation, to disinfect outer footwear and
The department is also placing wash hands.


THANKS
Continued from p. 6B

volunteer and passing out their
certificates.
Tillis, who has participated
in the event for several years;
said to the volunteers, "There
would be no wa) that the
people served would be served
without the help of volunteers.
"On the behalf of the board
of the Suwannee River
Economic Council, we want to
express our appreciation."
Tillis said, if the hours were
added up that all the volunteers
had served in 2006. at a rate of
minimum \wage. they would be
more than S200.000.
"And I know (the
volunteers) are worth more
than minimum wage," he said.
Santa and SREC employees
Lala Redmond. Christina
Miller, S} l\ia Patterson and
Becky Haddix:helped hand out
gifts. to all the volunteers and
their guests to show SREC's
appreciation for their service.

A free class for adults who want
to improve reading skills and basic
math computational skills will be
held at Bradford-Union Area
Career and Technical Center.
For additional information, call
(904) 966-6773 or (904) 966-6764.


Adults.are needed to work with
"Girl Scouts of all ages in Bradford
nd WthroacpuarCQDt iat ..n C
_"arolyn Eaes, (904) 964-5812, or
Laurie Mullins, (904) 964-5646.
Training is provided.


The Reverend Herman Johnson (right) gave the
prayer for the dinner. He has served the SREC for
more than 30 years. He is pictured with Janice
.Johnson.


S. Read our Classifieds on the -Where one call


lassiiedd Ads World Wide Web doesit all
a s www.BCTelegraph.com 964-305 *3-220496-2261 ..g

Id~spc --; receptI Ii o


40 Notices
EQUAL HOUSING OP-
PORTUNITY. All real
estate advertising in
tlis newspaper is sub-
ject to the Federal Fair
Ijousing Act of 1968
which makes it illegal
to advertise"any pref-
e'rence, limitation or
discrimination based
on race, color, reli-
gion sex or national
origin, or an Inler'lon
to m3ke any Sucn
Ireference, limitation
r--r discrimination."
Familial status in-
cludes children under
tr e age of 18 living
with parents or legal
". cstodians, pregnant
Women and 'people
securing custody of
children under 18-..-
Ihis newspaper will
rnot knowingly accept
0ny advertising for
real estate which is in
violation of the law.
Our readers are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on


an equal opportunity
basis..To complain of
discrimination, call
HUD toll-free at 1-
800-669-9777, the
toll-free telephone
number for the hear-
ing impaired is 1-800-
927-9275. For further
information call
Florida Commission
on- Human Relations,
Lisa Sutherland 850-
488-7082 ext #1005.
CLASSIFIED ADVER-
TISING should be
submitted to the
Starke office in writing
& paid in advance un-
less credit has already
been established with
this office. A $3.00
SERVICE CHARGE
will be added to all bill-


ings to cover postage
& hanoling THE
CLASSIFIED STAFF
CANNOT BE HELD
RESPONSIBLE FOR
MISTAKES IN CLAS-
S I F I E D
ADVERTIS.INGS
TAKEN OVER THE
PHONE. Deadline is
Tuesday at 12 noon.
prior to that
Thursday's publica-
tion. Minimum charge
is $8.00forthe first 20
words, then 20 cents
per word thereafter.
42 Motor
Vehicles
2001 FORD F250 XLT,
4X4, BLACK, 5.4,
auto, 103K, 4" lift -


35's. Excellent condi-
tion. $16,500 OBO.'
Call 904-219-1536 or
904-854-3226.
1988 DODGE DAKOTA,
$975. MAZDAB2300,
5sp, cold ac, dings,
runs good, now re-
duced to $1500. Also
94 Chevy Lumina
Van, cold ac, runs, re-
duced to $595, trans
problems. Call 904-
964-4111.
96 MONTE CARLO Z-
34, extra: clean, one
family owner, non
smoker, highway mile-
age. Call 352-473-
7967.


43 RV's and
Campers -
2000 JAYCO DE-
SIGNER RV, SERIES
5th WHEEL. Excel-
lent condition, solid
oak cabinets, island
kitchen, 3 slideouts,
many other- options.
$28,000, 904-964-
6488.
45 Land for
Sale
2.5 ACRES CLEARED
with new driveway on
N.W. 180th Street in
Starke. $52,000. Call
904-964-6708, leave
message.


MIDDLEBURG/KEY-
STONE/PUTNAM..
Lots for sale, 1/3 acre
and up, low down.
Owner financing avail-
able. Call 1-800-616-
8373.
47
Commercial
Property
FOR LEASE OR sale.
Ideal location 2 par-
celi 2800 SOFT
ouIdr.g with office,
bair, ryrni storage, 5
arres oll of South
301. Also 8 acres, par-
tially cleared. Both lots
3/10th of a mile from
new Walmart. Call


Alvarez Land Clearing
Demolition, stump removal;
septic tank installation, top soil

904-219-5027


904-964-3827 for
more information:
DOWNTOWN STARKE
professional offices
for rent. Conference
room, kitchen, utilities
and more provided.
Call 904-964-2616.
TWO COMMERCIAL
BUILDINGS down-
town Starke. One set


up for restaurant.
Huge square footage.
One needs roof. Only
$376,500 for both.
Call 904-964-4111.
NEWLY REMODELED
RETAIL SPACE ON
CALL STREET. Can
be retail or office
space, $650. First,
last and security.
Also, combo rental


space reception
area, bath, 3 offices
with new carpet aid
paint. Another space
is connected with
doors. Has over
1,000 sq ft of open
space. Can be ware-
house, retail, confer-
ence rooms.
Separate bathrooms
' and upstairs storage.


www.visionrealtyofflorida.com
S i 595 West Main St, lake Butler, FL 32054
s i o0 n (386) 496-4950
R E A L T Y (866) 496-4950
- ('OF InnDTHI Fl'nmIFDnA IN("


10 ACRE PARCEL in homes-nly subdivision 20 ACRES/ 2000 3/2 SKYUNE, like new.
paved road frontage, open pasture great for Open split plan, fireplace, huge island kitchen
horses. Pod 8 live oaks. $142,900. RftOs high and dry, wooded. $375,000. REF 053






HOME 5 5 ACRES, Union County. THIS LOT has paved road frontage, city
Private, only minutes tot own. '04 4/2 water & sewer. Mins. to Lake City, Starke
MH, 2,300 sq. ft. $159,900. REF #oso or G'ville. Offered at $25,000. REF 076


.. ,i| S I-_. N ""iA O
A Ns-I. HEI FAUnW iU EI

69,995'
." CUSTOM BUILT 3/2, Union Co. Brand new. BUILD
*Spit plan, upgraded kitchen, private master, frontag
"0'If .1/2 acre comer lot. $242,900. REF #071 I Homes

352-671-9210 "-
TOLL FREE -
1-800-544-6429 JfHi

Fax 352-671-9217 ga
ake 175 to exi 352 bile Ha rn NICE PARCEL W/CREEK. Homes, MHs 2005-
ake 175 to exit 352, go east to US e allowed. Worthington Springs, easy drive down
4411301, go south to location on right 2410 S. Pine A enue: to Ginesville. $55,000. REF#007 ni
before bridge. Ocala, FL 34471
Visit our weftsite at: .e h aeo 3 i
,www.SoutPineMobileHomeSales.fhretailer.com
s :b-.-, oWilliam "Bill Woodin or


ING LOTS, three 2-acre parcels. CR
ge, Union County, mins. to Ganesvle,
only, deed restricted. REF#ol






sq. ft., 3BR/2BA brik home,
wn Lake Butler, 3/4 acre lot. Private,
ent to amenities. $23,900. REF #066


Tri-Count Classifieds

SBradford *Union Clay


Reach over 20,500 Readers Every Week!l

CLASSIFIED DEADLINES
Word Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon
Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon






To place a Classified use your phone


964-6305 473-2210 496-2261

NOTICE
(lassified Advertising should he paid in advance unless credit h1as
lrcatldv heen clabhlished with the newspaper. A $30()0 service charge
will he aldded to all hilline 1to cover postae ;and handling. All ads
placed hl pi1l'ne Ic rei a hack to the ailvertiser at the time of
phlacecnent. Ilowever. the classified stall cannot be held responsible
Ior miitakes ill clkssil'ied advertisinge taken by phone. The newspaper
I'r\es'\ C ile l () o rccl corrctly ci assiv d dl ad ll copy or to reject or
ccll ,mv ;id s aerti'icmcns It any ime. Only standard ahhrevations
%,ill lc ac('cerled. M"


I I


Lecrita King receives a gift from SREC case worker Christina Miller.








P.sge 8B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Dec. 28, 2006

1 Read our Classifieds on the Where one call

C classified A ds World Wide Web doesitail!
ai A www.BCTelegraph.com 964-6305 473-2210 496-2261

''- I -11 -


Both spaces for
$1,100/mth Spaces
can be rented
separate. First, last
and security. Call
904-964-6305, ask for
John.
NEW PROFESSIONAL
offices on West Call
Street for lease. Ideal
for medical, legal, ac-
counting or business
offices. Call 352-275-
8531.

48 Homes for
Sale
CONCRETE BLOCK 3/
1, NEWLY REMOD-
ELED. New roof, win-
dows kitchen, hot
water heater.. 1400 sq
ft, appraised at
$139K, selling for
$129K. All new appli-
ances. Call 352-481-
3002.
3/3 BRICK HOME ON
BEDFORD LAKE -
2500 sq ft, lots of
amenities. $395,000,
will consider any offer.
Call 352-473-7769 or
352-235-1294.
BRAND NEW 3/2 SITE
BUILT HOME Lake
Butler on. 1 acre,
paved road. Possible
* owner finance, 352-
258-0865.
BRAND NEW 3/2 SITE
BUILT HOME- Beau-
.tiful 1/3 acre corner lot
on paved road. Walk-
ing distance to Key-
stone Heights
schools. Possible
owner financing avail-


able. Call 352-258-
0865, newhouse
411.com.
49 Mobile
Homes for
Sale
2006, HOMES OF
MERIT 32X80 4/3.
Fully upgraded, only
$79,995. Yes, in-
cludes set-up and de-
livery. Call Doyle at
386-867-1772.
16X80 3/2 2006, ONLY
ONE LEFT, $33,995.
Includes set-up and
delivery. Call Doyle at
386-867-1772.
BRAND NEW MODEL -
28X44 3/2, 2007.
Only $37,995. Unbe-
lievable price. In-
cludes set-up and de-.
livery. Call Doyle at
386-867-1772.
DON'T MISS OUT ON
THIS DEAL, 3/2,
beautiful home, priced
to get rid of for
$48,900. Includes
set-up, delivery, A/C
and heat, skirting and
steps. Call Marion at
386-366-5490.


IR




I348


GREAT DEAL ON A
16X80SINGLEWIDE,
perfect for invest-
ments, rentals or just
affordable housing.
Priced to go for
$32,500. Includes
set-up, delivery, A/C
and heat, skirting and
steps. Call Marion at
386-366-5490.
BEAUTIFUL 28X64 3/2
living room and fam-
ily room.' Will sell at
invoice for $55,500.
Includes set-up, deliv-
ery, A/C and heat,
skirting and steps.
Call Marion at 386-
366-5490.
BRAND NEW 32 WIDE
INCLUDES SET-UP
and delivery for
$39,995. Introductory
special, short time,
only Call Matt at 386-
867-3347.
WILL OWNER FI-
NANCE MY 16X80

FOR SALE
2 Parcels
13+ Acres in all
500 ft frontage on 301
South- only 3/10 mile
from Super Walmart.
Office
2800 sq ft Building
Mini-storage and Barn
Ideal Location *
Call (904) 964-3827


Bobby Campbell

Roofing, Inc.


Licensed & Insured

(904) 964-8304

FREE

ESTIMATES!
l.i. #rCC-ll2672'
Employment opportunities available.
Call for more information.


LEWIS WALKER ROOFING INC.
"AFFORDABLE QUALITY"
ORH R DI 9 Mu 1 131 MM kIH 1Mbim..


ROOF FREE REPAIRS

FLAT ROOF LICENSED TILE WOOD SHINGLES
LOW SLOPED & MAINTENANCE
GRAVEL INSURED STORM DAMAGE.


"'THE BEST POSSIBLE ROOF AT THE BEST POSSIBLE PRICE"
PO B 8Office: 386-497-1419
P Box 82 Toll Free 1-866-9LW-ROOF
Ft. White, FL 32038 Fax: 386-497-1452


* Pumps
* Sales
* Parts
* Service

Myers"
-GPDA _


i ~ 1j 'IRq 10ILem
QUALITY SERVICE SINCE 1964




I = 964-7061
STATE LICENSE # 1305


Rotary Well Drilling 2-6" .,.,
864 N. Temple Ave. US Hwy 301 N.
864 ,NStarke. F 1


We Cart it

CONCRETE


www.wecartit.com


OPEN 24/7
'")wner: Bluddy Browder


19563 NW SR 16
Starke, FL

We Haul Redi-Mixed Concrete
in our 1-Yard Mixing Trailerfrom
our plant to your redi-forms.
$149 per yd + tax... dellveredto you!
I -yard = 80 sq. ft. at 4" deep


FLEETWOOD for
$16K down, no credit
needed. Call Matt at
386-867-3347.
WHY BUY A USED
DOUBLEWIDE when
you can get this brand
new 4/2 1600 sq ft
with set-up and deliv-
ery, A/C, skirting and
steps for $42,400.
Call Matt at 386-867-
8347.
GENE, JIMAND ROY'S
tN GAINESVILLE
now has factory direct
pricing on Homes of
Merit. Built in Lake
City, will beat any
competitor prices, call
Matt at 386-867-3347.
HANDYMAN SPECIAL
14X52 2BR for


$3,000. Will deliver to
your lot, only serious
inquiries please. Call
Matt at 386-867-3347.
SKYLINE, PALM HAR-
BOR, SCOTTBUILT,
NO. TownhomesTLC
is the best built manu-
factured home in the
industry. Call Matt for
a plant tour and let me
prove it. Custom floor
plans also available.
Call 386-867-3347.
50 For Rent
FURNISHED ROOMS
FOR RENT! COM-
PLETE with CH/A,
cable provided, all
utilities paid! Central
location. 10% dis-
count on first months


rent for senior citi-
Zens. Rooms with pri-
vate bath, $110 -
$130. /wk. Room
without bath, $95.
Laundry facilities
available. Close to
churches, stores,
downtown shopping,
.theatre, and more!
See Manager at the
Magnolia Hotel,
across from the
Starke Post Office.
904-964-4303.
WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bed-
room MH, clean, close
to prison: Call 352-
468-1323.
SOUTHERN VILLAS
OFStarkeApts. 2BR
HC & non HC apart-
ments. Central AC/


PINE FOREST APARTMENTS
1530 W. Madison St. Starke Hwy 100 W
NOW AVAILABLE
3 Bedroom Apartments
Affordable living for low to middle income families
CH/A, blinds, carpet, stove, fridge
Seniors welcome
24 hr. Emergency Maintenance
OFFICE OPEN: Mon-Fri 9-5
rK Call Today a
uli (904) 964-6312 LJRT
>f^ ~ .OPP5RmTUaY


Smith & Smith
Realty


RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE
(904) 964-9222 BUSINESS


(904)
(904)


Sheila Daugherty
Realtor
ReSidnTiA l
$19,000!


4m15 EASTI CA R 9ET


Commercial
Lot
1/2 ac.
Adjacent to
Courthouse
Georgia St.



HMPTON


Residential
Acreage
49.87 aC.
Wooded
Fronts CR
18 & SE
49th Ave.


Residential
Acreage
3.73 ac.
Wooded
SE 49th
Avenue


Acre e


hreet
reet


HS-TMI S SI
$M1300 $72,500 $819500!


Residential Residential 3/2 Frame 3/2
Acreage Acreage House Frame
6.08 ac. 10 ac. 1276 Hou
Wooded Wooded
.County Rd tS:E:i rter!or w eo
18 49th Investment Lafayette
Avenue Lafa etfte S Street
t Each Office is independently Owned and Operated.





O c 0Comed stra&i to the Source"


CALL TODAY!


w


Stacy Hendrix
Sales-Associale


Erica Norman
Sales-Associate


(904) 964-9222

TOLL FREE:
1-877-269-6577

415 E. Call St., Starke


heat, on site laundry,
playground, private
and quiet atmo-
sphere. Located on
SR16, 1001 Southern
Villas Drive, Starke, FI
or call 904-964-7295,
TDD/TTY 711. Equal
Housing Opportunity.
SPECIAL-RENT 2 &
3BR homes, newly
renovated. Deposit
required. No pets.
First month free. Call
678-438-6828 or 678-
438-2865, for more
information.
DOWNTOWN EFFI-
CIENCY APART-
MENT. Brand new
renovations, new
kitchen, new tiled
bathroom. Located


T.H.E. Apartments

922 E. Brownlee St. Starke, Florida

Newly Remodeled
2 & 3 Bedrooms Available
Rent is based on,lnconme
Water, Sewer
On-Site Laundry Facility & Play Areas
Office Open: Monday Friday 8:00 to 4:30 p.m.
Call (904) 964-7133 1
Voice TTY Access 1-800-545-1833. Ext. 381


IVANHOE MORTGAGE


904-9644000 A Division of Central Pacific Mortga.
904o964-4000


866-964-4207
1107 S. Walnut St
Starke, Florida
(Located Behind Bradford
County Eyes Center)


MORTGAGE
BANKERS
ASSOCIATION
.!* ,*ii"! ? : l C 7.r!Uf l'<


Jenny W. Mann
Branch Manager/
Mortgage Consultant


Purchases


ge


-FHA-VA
-~ Conventional
~ New Construction
~ Home Equity Loans
No Income Verification
Loans
Visit a at.
www.ivanhoemortagestarke.com


e re


Suzanne Gordon
Mortgage Consultant


Smith & Smith Realty


-i F
.. .. .
Sam Gibson lenniler Lourcey
Sales-Associale Sales-Associate






Jack Hendrix Jenae Whitemire
Sales-Associate Sales-Associale


Jennfer Vaughan
Sales-Associate


Ingrid Smith
Broker


Shella Daugherty
Sales-Associate


near downtown at 226
South Thompson St.
$225/mth plus utilities
and deposit. Year
lease. Call Mr.
Corbin, 904-563-
5410.
BRAND NEW 3/2 SITE
BUILT HOME 1/3
acre, Keystone
Heights area, se-
cluded. $795/mth
plus deposit. Call
352-473-2185.
2/1 MOBILE HOME ON
1/3 ACRE. $325/mth
plus $200/dep. Pets
OK. Call 352-473-
2185.
HAVE LAKE'GENEVA
ACCESS. Two units,
2/1.5, newly refur-
bished: $525/mth,


$525/sec deposit: Ef-
ficiency apartment,
$400/mth plus $400/
sec deposit. Includes
electric. Call between
1pm-6pm, 352-473-
2919.
2/2 MOBILE HOME-
WORTHINGTON
SPRINGS area. Lo-
cated on Santa Fe
River. Available now.
Call 386-496-2776.
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS
2BR/2BA house on
large fenced lot, great
condition, ceremic tile,
open floor plan, large
shop, no pets. $750
per month, call 352-
475-6260.
WASHINGTON
SQUARE Apts, in
Hawthorne Florida.


904-964-8111
; .TOLL FREE 866-964-8111

" :105Edwards Rd., Starke
www.TrinityMortgageFL.com




American

A Dream
0to No rthcnst Florida Inc.'
R EA L TOKR So
205 N. Temple Ave.
Starke
[904] 964-5424


S STARKE. New construction,
3BR/2BA with indoor laundry room,
vaulted ceilings, wall-to-wall carpet
and quality vinyl flooring. Appliances -
S included. $159,900. MLS#335354.





-, -i --. -- .



S KEYSTONE HEIGHTS. Brick
2BR/1BA, fenced yard, pool with
deck, workshop, craft room, hurricane-
shelter. Two wells, all on 1-acre lot.
$144,900. MLS#330255.









STARKE. Nice 3BR/1BA concrete
block. Very well maintained and has
well established trees, pear, plum,
pecan, fig and blueberry bushes.
$129,800. MLS#329142.




'',' r- .
'^VSSfS~l~ia-S t'


Charelle Whiltemore
Sales-Associate


Brenda Liurcey
Sales-Associale


STARKE. Perfect starter home,
3BR/IBA concrete block home in city
limits. Spacious fenced rear yard. Very
convenient location. $118,000.
MLS#332560.


WANTED I
a'-n


Small or Large Parcels
With or Without
M^- Homes


Call Glen Lourcey
352-485-1818-


964-6708 DAYTIME
964-7802 EVENING


True 30-year fixed rate
commercial loans
(WITH GUARANTEED RATE REDUCTION EVERY
5 YEARS WITH GOOD PAYMENT HISTORY&..


.7


n aT.'


B Y,
I IIMAL BUINESO TEV


S,. We Sell Property Fast
Let us sell yours!
S.E WANT

l YOUR LISTING
Commercial & Residential
Tom F.Smith Realat
Broker Real Estat


Ir


I


I I


wom- -ow


I, I ,


Im-


,11I ~( ~.1~11


Pool"


,qqq


--MR








Dec. 2t -EGRAPH, i va-cS & MONI irn--t3-SECTION Page 9B


Classified Ads -


Read our Classifieds on the

World Wide Web

www.BCTelearaDh.com


Y~U


where one call I.
does it all
964-6305 473-2210*496-2261


Lovely, quiet commu-
nity. 1.2, & 3 bedroom
apartments. Rental
assistance available.
.Laundry on site, CH/
A, energy efficient
units, playground,
lose in town location.
,Equal opportunity pro-
vider. Office hours
,8am to 12pm and 1pm
to 5pm, 352-481-9388
3/2 MOBILE HOME,
NORTH ON 301.
Lawn service and
monthly pest control
provided. $625/mith,
first, last and $300/
dep. Call 904-964-
3359 or 352-745-
:2506.
LOVELY QUIET com-
munity. Beautiful 1 &
2 bedroom apart-
-ments, with rental as-
sistance available,
laundry facility on site,
cable & phone hook
ups, all electric, en-
ergy efficient units,
CH/A, convent in
town location. Call for
appointment, 386-
496-3439, office
hours Tues & Thurs
8am to 12pm & 1pm
to 5pm.
SBR/2BA ON LAKE
GENEVA CH/A, 3
Blocks from schools,
S895 per month. Call
352-222-9111.
52 Animals
and Pets
GATOR CLASSIC
HORSE SALE New
" Year's Day,, Monday,
SJanuary 1st, 11am.
t Bradford County Fair-
grounds, Starke, FL
V Consign now, 660-
S258-4040 or 660-734-
S1288..FLN 2122.
IEKINGESE PUP-
PIES. CKC REGIS-


TERED. Health cer-
tificates, home grown
with lots of TLC. Male
and female, $350.
Call 352-475-2428,
352-468-1045.
CHIHUAHUA PUPS
Shots and wormed,
health certificate,
$300 cash, Starke.
Call 904-364-7152.
55 Wanted.
LOOKING TO BUY
PLANTED PINE
TREES. Slash,
loblolly, long leaf, 3-5
years old, 10-16 feet
tall. We pay top dol-
lar, references avail-
able. Call 352-494-
6653.
DISABLED MAN
"NEEDS USABLE/-
GOOD REFRIGERA-
TOR. Call 352-473-
8243.
57 For Sale
JIM'S CATFISH FARM
AND U-FISH. Open
Saturday and Sun-
day, 7am-7pm. Free
admission. Baby
channel catfish -$20/
100, $150/1000. De-
livery available. Lo-


cated north of Lawtey.
Fill dirt also available.
Call 904-782-1694 or
904-591-1450, Ron.
KENMORE WASHER
and dryer, new type
$100 and up each,
electric stove, written
guarantee, delivery
available. For ap-
pointments, call 904-
964-8801.
BED KING SIZE
Pillowtop mattress
and boxspring with
manufactures war-
ranty. Brand new still
in plastic. Can deliver.
Sell for $170. Call
352-372-7490.
BEDROOM SET 7
piece Gorgeous
cherry queen/king
bed, dresser, mirror, 2
nightstands, chest
available dovetail
construction. New still
in boxes. Retail
$6100, sacrifice for
$1100. 352-377-
9846.
DINING ROOM SUITE-
beautiful cherry table,
6 chippendale chairs
anrd ighled huich ar.
butrel Brand new slilI


.BANANA BAY
LANDSCAPE INC.
Specializing in.
PALMS and TROPICAL
Residential ~ Commercial


dscapewith Sophistication & Attitude
downed & operaled by Charlie Revay

352-214-1320


," Bll ,t..-, ., und .lJ /, P/.:.4
Phone: 904-964-7399
g i3085 SE 113'" Way Starke, FL 32091
Ligt S Licensed & Insured .


-i Help Wanted:

SDental Assistant

I Yr. Experience Required
Fax Resume to: 904-396-4924

Don't Have Experience Yet?

the .,d for Jacksonville Dental
,i..min School in the Education Section
I the Classified Ads of this paper. It starts
jth the Headline: "IN JUST 71 DAYS
ou can Have The Skills You Need To Get
.Joh As A Dental Assistant."


j.am-T.e & Linda Dailey
CO_:.,rer & Operators
-Licensed & Insured
7-?


UMP GRINDING INc.


(904) 769-9641
(352) 284-1977 Cell


'Keystone Hauling &
handyman Service, LL
- arpentry BushHogMowing
" Home Repair *'rTreeTrimming&Remov
Snssure Wasing *Siten CeanUp
-(>dd.I& *"'TrashRemoval
* Yard Work Pine Bark & Cyprss Mul
Q arden Roto-Tilling Irvimwod ForSale
SEicensed & Insured FIrm Estimates
Owner: Ke'rr Wlhirb/rd
.1 % MI.1


-

Val







m


Driveways Sidewalks
SSlabs Footings
*Decorative Concrete
Coatinfrg in manl color s
I Pumping & Finishing
FREE ESTIMATES
| Bus: (904) 964-3827
Mobile: (904) 364-7153


Cabinets Doors
'* Windows Sinks

We Buy & Sell New & Used
Building Materials
352-379-4600
622 S.E. 2nd St. Gainesville, FL


KOOMS
FOR RENT
Economy Inn
Lawtey, FL
Low Daily & Weekly Rates.
Daily Rm Service
Microwave CablelHBO
Refrigerator- Local Phone
(904) 782-3332





ttNNIIit CTLLEt .
-~tiCITY fettYE.

STAFF ASSISrAN I
Grant Funded Position
Assist the Coordinator of
Student Activities with
clerical ahd budget
management duties.
High -shool diploma or
equi.leni.with 2 ,ears
7 1Sl'riC elperencS
and knowledge of0
Word & Excel.
Special consideration given
to applicants with an
associate degree or
certificate in related area.
Salary: $18,669 annually
plus benefits
Application Deadline:
January 15, 2007
.College application
required. Position details
and application available
on the web at:
www.lakecitycc.edu
Inquiries: Human
Resource Development
Lake City Community
College
149 SE College Place
Lake City, FL 32025
Phone:.(386) 754-4314
Fax: (386) 754-4594
E-mail:
boettcherg@lakecitycc.edu
LCCC is accredited by the
Southern Association
of Colleges and'Schools
VP/ADAEA/EO College in
Education & Employment.


WHITEHEAD


boxed. Can deliver.
Retail $5800, sacri-
fice $1100. 352-377-
9846.
MATTRESS TWIN sets
$89, full sets $129,
Queen sets $159,
King sets $189. Mat-
tress Factory, 441
East Brownlee St.
.Save a lot. Cash and
carry. Call Sonia at'
352-473-7173or904-
964-3888.
BED-QUEEN orthope-
dic Pillowtop mattress
and box. Name
brand, new in plastic,
with warranty. Can
deliver. Sacrifice
$100. Call 352-372-
8588. '
KITCHEN CABINETS,
COUNTER TOP,
electric stove, double
SS sink, 2 toddler
beds with mattress.
Call 904-964-5748.
5203 JOHN DEERE'W/
510 LOADER. 782
hrs, like new,
$16,000. Call 352-
485-2302. ;'
WASHERS DRYERS,
S150 FOR SET will
seperaie Relhgera.
torsara sloJes Free
delivery and setup, 90
day wrilie-r, Warranty
Call 904 964526E.
A WOODEN CON.
FERENCE lartC. anr
chairs. Tabletop mea-
sures 41.5" x 96 5"
Asking $300, call
904-964-7404.
59 Personal
Services
BRADFORD
LIMEROCK SALES.
Limerock, crush
Screte, asphalt
killings building
sands, gravels i'ac
tor work. We haul, we
spread. Business
904-782-3172; mo-
bile 904-509-9126.
Monday through Sat-
urday. .
CLARK FOUNDATION
REPAIRS, INC Cot.
rection.of lermile &
waier damaged wood
& sills. Leveling &
raising Hobses/Bldgs
Pier Replacemreri 8i
Alignment. Free Esti-
mates: -Danny'
(Buddy) Clark, (904)-
284-2333 or 1-800-
288-0633.
FLORIDA CREDIT
UNION has money to
lend for M.H. & land
,packages. 1 800.
284-1144
-CUSTOM CUTS Lawn
8 Landscape, cus-
tomized lawn care
sod, trimming, !arnd.
scape design. Rea-


sonable rates, free
estimates. Commer-
cial & residential. Li-
censed and insured.
Call 386-496-2820, if
no answer please
leave message.
SECRETARIAL SER-
VICES Typesetting,
resumes, envelopes,
poems, etc. Call 904-
964-6305, ask for
Melisa. Or call 386-
431-1741, leave mes-
sage.
CLOCKS REPAIRED -
ANTIQUE AND
MODERN. Call 352.
214-1992.
JOHN'S. SITE PREP,
INC. FILLDIRTFOR
SALE. Call 800-871-
7525.
LICENSED HOME DAY
CARE, Lic #
F04CL0102. Located
-off 315C, 1/2 mile
from Hwy'21. Mon-
day-Friday, 6am-
6pm: Great rates:
Call Dana at 352-473-
2263.
KENDO S YARD SER.
VICE Mower
weedeater, pressure
,washing and pick-up,
truck hauling. Qual-
ry work at 3 lair price.
Ire- estirrales Call
. 904.964.3704
65 Help
Wanted
'HAIR STYLIST ,500
SIGN-ON BONUS
Top pay and commis.
si-,n Pan or lull Ime
berneflit and vaciaor.
No clenieler needed
2 Gainevlle salons
Easy access by I 75
$500 sign-on bonus.
1-877 222 1456
HELPER NEEDED for;
norre repair work
Call 352. 475-1596
leave a mess age


CARE GIVER 2 years
experience working
with elderly or dis-
abled clients. 2 or3
days per week. Su-
El's Retirement
Home, Hampton.
Phone 352-468-
2619.
COMPANY SPECIAL-.
IZING in Erosion con-
trol now hiring the fol-
lowing positions:
Crew leaders, equip-
ment operators, la-
borers, Class A CDL
drivers- valid Drivers
license a Must! Fax
resume to 904-275-
3292 or call.904-275-
4960, EOE. Drug
SFree Workplace.
LOCAL CLEANING
SERVICE looking
for part-time help 20-
30 hrs Weekly. Must
have references and
a background check.
MuS t e nor-.i lell.
aDI- iand mlin~ led
Conlacl Eiens at 904.
3:64 .6455
COME JOIN THE FAM.
ILY-LIKEatmosphere
and work at Windsor


Manor. Open posi-
tions for CNA's (3-11,
11-7 shifts), part-time
housekeeper and di-
etary aids, RN or LPN
for staff development
coordinator. Fill out ap-
picraton- at 602 E
Laura St, Starke
32091 or fax resume
to 904-964-6621. Call
904-964-3383 for ap-
pointment. EEOC/
DFWP.
WAREHOUSE POSI-
TION available, 40
hour minimum per
week. Gator II Farm
Supply South of
Slarke on HWY 301.
HS diploma required.
LOOKING FOR A
NANNY to take care
of my 2 small children
ih my Keystone
Heights home. Mon-
day-Friday, 7am-
5:30pm. $180/wk,
must have refer-
ences. No teenagers,
please. Call3 Shelly at
352-362-2325 for an
inlelvr-* (leave a
mnresage) ,
SHOP ASSISTANT:
FLEXIBLE, part-time


Driver- Dedicated Regional




Avg. $825 $1025/wk
S'65% preloaded/pretarped

Jacksonville, FL Terminal
CDL-A req'd 877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com


In Just 71 Days...
you canl ha'e the ,kills you
need to get a lob as a

Dental Assistant
10-week coumie. SatSurday only
Tuition $2.450 Payment Plans
Call ChItSli @
.lacksonville Dental Assistant School
Ili ilro packet
904-398-3401
next class starts: March 3, 2007'
Reg. by FL Comnissioih Ibr
Independent EdLIucaion


BROS.,INC. LAKE CITY LOGISTICS


I :AYM LA3 M = I ki I l


Over-The-Road Drivers Needed!
New Irucks with T'hermoKing APU s. 1800 walt inverters. top of the line leather seats. walk-in condo sleepers. and new air-
ride front suspension for ai smoother ride than you have ever experienced. Home several nights most weeks as we have a
good mixture of regional and.over the rtad. Home most weekends. Personalized dispatchilng that comes from only
dispatchling 25 trucks locally. Eairn utp to 301 of revenue immediately. NO WAITING!! New increased layover pay. Up to
$1().(X) per day. 2 weeks vacation. $12(M).00 per year Safety IBonius. Driver of the Year honlts. Driver recruitment holtis.
Medical and dental insurance. Need 2 years experience.
CALL JIM OR DEBBIE LAWRENCE 904-368-0777 or 888-919-8898









Community State Bank


NOW HAS OPENINGS FOR



TELLERS

Full- and Part-Time Positions
at our Starke & Lake Butler offices

Lots of Full-Time Benefits


Apply at either location:


STARKE |

811 S. Walnut St.

(904) 964-7830

t MEMBER FDIC


i'm lovin' it"


hours to clean shop,
office, equipment and
vehicles. Please call
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Section C: Thursday, Dec. 28, 2006 Telegraph Times Monitor



Tigers end tournament r?



with win over Chiefland


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Franikie Caldwell got the
Union County boys basketball
team off to a good start as the


Bradford, Keystone,
Union have more
than 20 players
honored

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Keystone .Heights High
School head football coach
Chuck Dickinson was honored
by the Gainesville Sun as its
Class A-2A coach of the year,
while 22 players from
Keystone, Bradford and Union
County received honors.
Dickinson guided the
Indians to their best season
since 1992. They went 9-2,
finishing .as District 3-2A
runners-up and advancing to
the postseason for the second
straight year. Keystone's only
loss of the regular season was
against district opponent, and
eventual state champion,
Bolles.
Four Keystone players were
named to the first-team
offense, while one made the
defensive squad.


Tigers were able to salvage
seventh place in the Hitchock's
Challenge at Santa Fe. High
School by defeating Chiefland.
56-35 on Dec. 23.
The Tigers -(6-5) were


SChris Edentield (left) dribbles past Newberry's Matt
Robinson on his way to the basket.


Offensive lineman Brandon
Boettcher, a junior, made the
first team along with senior
tight end Josh Mangus, junior
utility player Greg Taylo6 and
senior : kicker Michael
McLeod.
Mangus had 15 receptions
for 219 yards and three
touchdowns, while Taylor, a
running back, scored 23
touchdowns. Taylor rushed for
1,095 yards and had 565 yards


lalel ; i =1 m


looking at the prospect of-
going 0-for-3 in the eight-team
tournament, but they never let
Chiefland make a game of it:
controlling the boards, and
having three players score in
double figures.
Caldwell scored seven
points and grabbed, nine
rebounds in the first half as the
Tigers took a 21-9 lead.
Chiefland only made three
field goals in the half-all in
the second quarter.
Union led 7-2 after the first
quarter, then opened the
second quarter with a 7-4 run.
Chris Edenfield made a 3-
pointer at the start of the
quarter, then had a steal that
led td a layup by Justin Griffin
that put the Tigers up 17-6.
Marcus Albritton had a score
prior to that.
A 12-point lead at the half
turned into a -23-point lead in
the third quarter. Edenfield and
Griffin each- scored seven
points in the quarter and
finished with 17 and 15 points
overall.
Caldwell finished the game
with 16 points to go along with
his team-high 12 rebounds.
Edenfield -acid '-Jaqn a-n --:
Simmons each had eight
rebounds.
SColumbia won- the
'Hitchock's Challenge, which
began Dec. 21, by defeating
host Santa Fe.
Union returns to action
Friday, Jan. 5, hosting district
opponent Interlachen at 7:30
p.m. The Tigers are currently
S3-0 in the district.
On Saturday, Jan.: 6,-Union
will participate, in the Vince

.. -See TIGERS, p- 2C


receiving.
McLeod. made 25 PATs and
three field -"goals.
Approximately 70 percent of
his kickoffs were touchbacks.
Senior linebacker 'Jack
Taylor was a first-team pick
with 136 tackles, four fumble
recoveries, two forced fumbles
and one interception.
The only other player from

See SUN, p. 2C


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IF n n n IS
Fri. 7:05, 9:00
Sat. 5:00, 7:05, 9:00
Sun. 2:45, 4:45
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Frankie
Caldwell
(center) finds
himself in a
battle in the
post against
two Newberry
players in the
Tigers' 70-61
loss during the
second day of
action in the
eight-team
Hitchcock's
Challenge,
which was held
at Santa Fe
High School.


Bradford Union

r--Area Career Technical Center
S Winter/Spring 2007
Clarence DeSue Cluck Ebert, Coordinator
Director Randy Starling, Coordinator

Adult and High School Night Programs'
Class Instructor Date Day Hours Fee Lb/BK Bldg/Rm
Adult Basic Ed., Underage Nichols 1/3 M,T,W,R 4:50-7:00 Free NA 3/5
Adult Basic Ed., Adults' Nichols 1/4 M,T,R .6:50-9:00 Free NA 3/5
Adt Basic-Ed &GED Day-Class Budoi 1/3 -- M-F Sch.Day Free NA 3/11
GED Prep. Adulhs Nichols 1/3 M,T,R 6:50-9:00 Free NA 3/5
GED Prep, Underage Nichols 1/3 MT,W,R 4:50-7:00 Free NA 3/5
Bradford County Jail Harrington 1/3 M,W,F 4:00-7:00 Free NA BCJ
Bradford County Jail Martin 1/4 M,W 6:30-8:30 Free NA BCJ
Technical, Industrial'Education
Class Instructor Date Day Hours Fee Lb/BK Bldg/Rm
Welding, Day Geiger 1/3 5/25 NM-F Sch. Day 1 75 per hr 125.00
Commercial Vehicle Driving Pate 13 5/25 N-F Sch Day $1,67500 NA Range
Bus Dnmer Training Smith TBA TBA Scb Day I 75 perhr 52500 Range
Diesel Mechanics Reasberger 1/3 5/25 M-F Sch. Da I 75 per hr $25.00 10/1
Masonry Bevdle 1/3 5/25 M-F Sch. Dav 75perhr $25.00 10/2A
Cosmeiology Kikland 1/3 5/25 M-F Sch Day 1.75 per hr $25.00 9/15
Computer Technology Ledger 1/3 5/25 M-F Sch. Day 75 per hr $25/5129 9/24
Community Education
Class Instructor Date Day Hours PM Fee Lab/BK Bldg/Rm
BeginningQuilting(16hr) Redding 1/22-3/19 Ml 6:30-840 $2160 .NA. FSC
Advaced.Quilung(16hr) -- Redding 1/23 -3/13 T 630-8.40 $2160 NA FSC
Quick Books (12 hr) Douglas 2127 3/15 T R 6:30 8.40 524 00 S35
Competitive Co-ed Volleyball Rensberger 1/8-5/21 M 7:00- 9:00 $10.00 BMS Gym
Shop For Women Only (12) Thompson 1/16 3/6 T 6:30 8:30 $32.00 $15 9/26
Home Repairs-(Coed) (12) Thompson 1/18-3/8 R 6:30- 8:30 $32.00 $15 9/26
Computers For Beginners Tollick 1/22- 3/19 M 6:30- 8:30 $32.00 NA

Contracted Classes
Class Time January February March April May Bldg/Rm
Hunter Safety 20,22,27 1
BDI (SMART) 6:00-10:00 PM 8 12 19 16 14 9-20
BDI (NFSC) 6:00-10:00 PM 22 6,26. 6,26 3,23 1,21 9-20
DATE (SMART) 5:00-9:00 PM 11 8 8 19 10 9-20
NEFEC, ESE In-service 5:00-7:00 PM 11 8,22 15 Comp Lab
Continuing Work Force
Class Instructor Jan/Feb Mar/Apr May/June Fee Lab/BK Bldg/Rm
Intermed. MaintenanceOf Traffic Sanders 1/30,31 4/23,24 $28.00 $16/$70 TBA
IMOT Refresher Sanders 5/31 $14.00 $16/$70 TBA
Pilot Escort Tenly 2/16 3/12 6/4 $14.00 $18.80/$25 7
Child Care
Class Instructor Hr Date Daiy- Hours PM- Fee- Lab/BK Bldg/Rm
Child Growth/Development Harmon 6 1/16,18 T,R 6:20-9:30 $9.60 $12 WI--
BOS Harmon 6 3/13,15 T,R 6:20-9:30 $9.60 $12 9/14
Child Abuse, Neglect Harmon 4 3/27,29 T,R 6:20-9:30 $6.40 $12 9/14
Health, Safety ,Nutrition Harmon 8 4/17,19,24 T,R 6:20-9:30 $12.80 $12 9/14
Child CareFacility. Harmon 6 5/15,17 .. TR 6:20-9:30 $9.60 $12 9/14
Rules/Regs
Child Care Family Rules/Regs Harmon 6 5/29,31 T,R 6:20-9:30 $9.60 $6 9/14
Special Needs..-- '- Devalerio 10 T 5:30-8:40 $16.00 TBA 9/14
Preschool Child Devalerio 10 T 5:30-8:40 $16.00 TBA 9/14
CDA Eqiivalent Norman 9/11-5/21/07 and M and 5:50-9:00 600 hrs.@ $1.75/hr.+$25/sem. 9/14
Saturday. Sai. Lab fee + $51.36 Book
9/23,10/14,11/1 1
1/13,2/10
Develop. Approp. Prac Devalano 10 1/23,1/30,2/6 T 5 30-840 $16.00 $SIT
Infants
Business Education
Class Instructor Date Day Hours Fee Lab/BK Bldg/Rm
Administrative Office Assistant Harrington M-F School Day $1.75/hr. $25/varies 4/3
Accounting Operations Hairington M-F School Day $1.75/hr. $25/varies 4/3
Microsoft Office .Harrington M-F School Day $1.75/hr. $25/varies 4/3
High School Evening \
Class Instructor Date Day Hours PM Fee Lab/BK Bldg/Rm
GeneralEd for 11 & 12 Grade Donald./Wms.1/3 T-R :00-6:10Free NA 3/1

Health Care
Class Instructor Date Day Hours PM Fee ILab/BK Bldg/Rm
CORE (90) (S1) Edwards 8/15-10/31 T,R 4:50-9:00 .$653.52 per 1 semester 3/2
CNA (75) (S1) King-Garland 8/21-10/25 M,W 4:50-9:00 $550.00 per 2" semester' 3/2
Home Health Aide (50) (S1) Ryder 4:50-9:00 Total $1203.52 includes lab 3/2
fee and book
PCA Ryder 4:50- 9:00
AHA(Phl&EKG)(75 &75) Ryder/Winfree 4:50 9:00
AAHA(100)PCT(60) Ryder/Winfree 4:50 9:00

Testing
Class Time January Feb Mar Apr May Bldg/Rm
Evening TABE Locator 5:30 PM 9,16,23,30 13,20,27 13,26,27 17,24 1,15 7/
Evening TABE 5:30 PM 4,11,18,25 1,15,22 1,15,22,29 19,26 3,17 7/
Morning TABE Locator 8:30 AM 9,23 13,20 6,20 3,17, 1,15 7/
Morning TABE 8:30 AM 4,11,25 15,22 8,22 5;19- 3,17 7/
' PIeD-...QB(Wed..Only) 5:30PM 1/17 2/21 3/21 4/18 5/16 7/
GED Orientation 4:30 PM 5 5 2 7 7/
GED, 2006 5:30 8:30 PM 5,6,7,8 5,6,7,8 2,3,4,5 7,8,9,10 7/
GED Registration All Day 1/22 2/2 2/19-3/2 3/19-3/30 4/23-5/4 5/21-6/1 Front
Office
More Curriculum details may be viewed on our website at: www.bradfordvotech.com
Accredited by
Commission of Council on Occupational Education. An Equal Opportunity Center, without regard to race, creed, sex, or handicap.
Approved for veteran training by the State Approving Agency.


Keystone's Dickinson is


a Sun coach of the year


CI~] ;~ =I =I Z ~~


I







Page 2C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Dec. 28, 2006


Cole Kite, 10, killed this deer at the Sampson City
Hunting Club. -


SUN-

Continued from p. 1C

among the three area schools
who received first-team honors
was Bradford senior defensive
lineman Corian Garrison.
.Garrison, who already has a
scholarship offer from-West
Virginia, had 41 tackles, four
tackles for loss; three sacks
and one fumble recovery.
Each team had a player
named to the second-team
offense: Bradford freshman
Jawan Jamison (athlete),
Keystone senior Blake Lott
(utility) and Union senior
Justin Griffin (wide receiver).
Jamison, a running back,
had 908 yards on 121 carries
and 76 receiving yards. He
scored eight touchdowns.
Lott, a quarterback, threw
for 1,299 yards and 13
touchdowns with only three
interceptions.
Griffin had 46 receptions for


UF holds

second ag

workshop on

tourism
, The UF/IFAS North Florida
Research and Education
Center-Suwannee Valley, and
The Original Florida Tourism
Task Force will be offering the
second of three workshops on
Tourism Opportunities for
Farmers in Live Oak on
Tuesday Jan. 9, 2007, from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m.
-.It's entitled The Nuts and
Bolts of Starting an
Agri/Eco/Heritage Tourism
Business and is--located at
Camp Weed and Cerveny'
Conference Center in Live
Oak.
According to Walton County
Extension Agent Bruce Ward,
who presented at the first
workshop on Dec. 6, "Our


812 yards and six touchdowns.
Three Keystone players
were named to the second-
team defense: junior defensive
lineman Jacob Elliott, senior
linebacker Brandon McGuire
and junior defensive back Joel
Morgan. Elliott had 86'tackles,
one sack and one fumble
recovery, McGuire 136 tackles
and one interception, ..and
Morgan 1-26 tackles and one
interception.
Union County senior
Brandon Shoup was named to
the second-team defense as an
athlete. He made 88 tackles,
recovered two fumbles, forced
two fumbles and had one
interception and one sack.
Players receiving honorable
mention were: Rob Harris
(BHS, Jr. RB), Jernard Beard
(BHS, Jr. RB), Marcus Wilson
(BHS, Sr. LB), Matt Story
(KHHS, Jr.. RB), Clayton
Mosley (KHHS, Soph. DB),
Cameron Yarbrough (KHHS,
Soph. Wk), Austen Roberts
(UCHS, Sr. QB), Zeke Scaff
(UCHS, Jr. LB) and Aaron
Dukes (UCHS, Jr. LB).- .


economy is evolving into an
experience economy and farm-
based experiences such as
overnight farm stays, trail
rides, corn mazes and bird
watching are desired by a
growing number of visitors to
Florida."
This series of workshops
will help area farm and land
owners start or improve such
businesses.
The registration fee is $10
which includes lunch,
refreshments and program
materials. The registration
deadline is Jan. 3, 2007, at 5
p.m. Visit www.nfrec-
sv.ifas.ufl.edu, e-mail 'Karen
Hancock at khancock@ufl.edu
or call (386) 362-1725 for
more information.

Need community service hours?
Want to have a more impressive
resume or college application.
Volunteer. Find volunteer
opportunities that fit your schedule
at www.volunteergateway.org.


"~-
';
n. a?

;~
z.... --
"~:r ..:-..,..,. --


TIGERS
Continued from p. 1C

Carter Shootout in Daytona
Beach. The Tigers return home
to host district opponent
Matanzas on Tuesday, Jan. 9,
at 7:30 p.m., then travel to play
Hawthorne on Wednesday,
Jan. 10, at 7:30 p.m.
Score by Quarter
UCHS: 7 14 17 18-56
CHS: 2 7 6 20-35

Union Scoring (56): Albritton
3, Caldwell 16, Chip Clemons
1, Edenfield 17, Griffin 15,
Simmons 4. 3-pointers:
Edenfield 3. Free throws: 13-
33.

Earlier result:

Newberry 70 UC 61
It was a bit of a frustrating
start for the Tigers in the
Hitchcock's Challenge. They
let a game slip away during the
final moments during their first
game in the tournament
(Bronson converted on four
free-throw attempts at the end,
of the game after Union was
called for a loose-ball foul and
hit with a technical foul), then
squandered a 14-point lead in
the third quarter in a 70-61 loss
to Newberry on'Dec. 22.
Union went on a 16-6 run in
the third quarter, capped by
Ted Young's 3-pointer and a
basket by Caldwell that put the
Tigers up 47-33.
However, the Panthers then
outscored the Tigers 11-2. Guy
Brown banked in a 3-pointer in
the final minute of the quarter,
followed by teammate Walter
Hunt's basket that sent the
Panthers into the fourth quarter
trailing by just five.
Ryan Brown and Xavier
Woods each had a 3-pointer,
and Woods added an old-
fashioned 3-point play as
Newberry put together a 17-4
run in the fourth quarter to take
the lead.
Edenfield made a trey with
four minutes remaining that
cut Newberry's lead to five,
but that was as close as the
Tigers would get the rest of the
way. They would go on to
commit four turnovers .and
make just two field goals.
Simmons, who led the
Tigers with 15 points, had a
productive second quarter for
. Union. He scored five points"


,during a 14-3 run that put his
team up 28-21.
The run began with a 3-
pointer by Young, which was
then followed by a basket by
-Simmons. He was fouled on
the play and made the,
subsequent free throw..
Simmons later added
another basket following his
own steal.
He had four rebounds in the
quarter and finished with eight
overall.
Caldwell led the Tigers with
14 rebounds, ,while scoring 14
points.
Young and Edenfield scored
13 and 10 points, respectively.

Score by Quarter
UCHS: 13 18 18 12-61
NHS: 12 15 17 26-70

Union Scoring (61): Albritton
3, Caldwell 14, Edenfield 10,
:Griffin 6, Simmons 15, Young
13. 3-pointers: Edenfield 2;
.Young 3. Free throws: 8-24.


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Union County's Marcus Albritton (right) shoots a fall-
away jumper after battling through a line of Newberry
defenders.


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BACK TO 1
Are you among the college
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It's safe, it's secure, and it's
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Fortunately, many parents
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First, set a deadline for mov-
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Dec. 28, 2006 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Page 3C


BHS shows well


in weightlifting,


track in '06 *,,


The following is a look at
the -athletic teams and
individuals who won
championships at the district,
regional or state levels, or who
qualified to participate in
regional or state competition as
covered by the newspaper in
2006.

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Two weightlifters from
Bradford High School earned
state medals, while the boys
and girls track and field teams
accounted for all four of the
school's championships in
2006.

0 1,






.
;.('


Chris Plemons earned
a state medal for
Bradford with a fourth-
place finish at the boys
weightlifting finals.


,Girls weightlifter Kelly
Leigh earned the first state
medal for the Tornadoes.when
she placed fifth in the 139-
pound class at the Florida High
School Athletic Association
Finals. She had a bench press
of 135 pounds and a clean and
jerk of 160 pounds for a 295-
pound total.
Her clean and jerk total tied
a personal record.
Leigh earned the trip to the
state finials by compiling a 305
total (a PR) at a sectional
qualifying meet. She also set a
PR with her bench press of 145
pounds at the sectional meet.
Teammates Jachael Nichols
and Cassi Padgett also
qualified for the state finals
with their performances at the
sectional meet.
Nichols (154-pound class)
set a PR of 135 pounds in the
bench press, tied a PR with a
150-pound clean and jerk and
established a, new PR with a
285-pound total.
Padgett (110) set a PR with
her 245-pound total.
Both Padgett and Nichols
placed 14t' at the state finals.
Bradford's second state
medal came courtesy of boys
weightlifter Chris Plemons.
Plemons (119) qualified for the
state finals with a 345-pound
total, then upped that to 370
pounds in the state finals with
a 205-pound bench press and a
165-pound clean and jerk. That
earned him fourth place.
See BHS, p. 5C


Tornadoes go 0-2

in Lee tournament


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
A bit of momentum heading
into. the Chritmass break could
not be suIained by. bthe
Bradford bo)s basketball team,
which dropped both games it
played in the Lee Holiday
Classic in Jacksonville.
The Tornadoes (5-4) had
won two straight games, but
failed to get a win in the
holiday tournament. Bradford
concluded play with a 66-33
loss to host Lee on Dec. 23.
Lee outscored the Tornadoes
25-5 in the first quarter and led
by 33 at the half.
Bradford's high scorer was
Antwan Brown with six points.
The Tornadoes return to
action on Tuesday, Jan. 2, at
Interlachen at 7 p.m.
Bradford then returns home
to play district opponent Baker
County on Friday, Jan. 5, at
7:30 p.m. The Tornadoes are
currently 3-1 in the district.
On Tuesday, Jan. 9,
Bradford travels to Orange
Park to play district opponent
Ridgeview at 7:30 p.m.


Score by Quarter
BHS: 5 12 7
LHS: 25 25; 9


9-33
7-66


Bradford Scoring (33): Altson.
1, Barnes 3, Brown 6, Harris 2,
Moore 3, Sheffield 5, Simmons
.4, Wiliams 4, Wilson 5. 3-
pointers: Sheffield, Williams,
Wilson. .

Earlier result:

Potter's House 85
Tornadoes 67
Potter's House outscored
Bradford 27-8 in the second
quarter en route to handing the
Tornadoes an 85-67 loss
during the first round of the
Lee Holiday Classic on Dec.
22.
It was just a two-point game
after the opening quarter, but
Potter's House was able to
take a 49-28 lead into halftime.
The Tornadoes were able to
whittle that lead down to eight
heading into the final quarter
before being outscored 20-10.

Bradford's Marcus Wilson
scored a game-high 21 points,
while Brown and Leonard
Barnes scored 18 and 15
points, respectively.


The Bradford Middle Scho91 boys track and field team Rebecca Carlton, Sarah Swords, Lindsay Haddock,
won the Floridarunners.com State Championship, while Destiny Griffith. Tyler.Prevatt, Jackie Mitchell, Carlton
the girls team placed fourth. Members of the teams Crudup, Bobby McGee, (fourth row, from left) Travis
were: (front, from left) Kanetra Jenkins, Shay Wanton, Ledger, David Weeks, Josh Cooper, Isaiah Jenkins,
Amanda Yarbrough, Meghan.Perry, Christina Jordan, Jawan Jamison, Rodney Mosley, Reggie Thomas, (back
Jessika Robinson, Lashika Bellamy, (second row, from row, from left) coach Jimmy Scott, coach Jeff Ledger
left) Rosa London, Courtney Jamison, Samantha and coach John Loper. Not pictured: Nicole Miller, Natali
Steffan, Ashley Sutherland, Emilie Meng, Synteia Powell, Seth Upthegrove and Caitlin Wade.
Postway, Demetri Postway, (third row, from left)


BMS captures state title in 2006


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
'Bradford High School may
have produced no state
champions in athletics in 2006,
but Bradford Middle School
did as its boys track and field
team proved it was the best in
Florida, winning the
Floridarunners.com Middle
School State Championship
meet.
The Hurricanes placed first
out of 35 teams.
Helping the team's cause
was Jawan Jamison, who
repeated as state champ in both
the 100m and 200m dashes.
JamiSiorn won the 100Im vith a.
time of 1li. ,;seconds and the
200m with a school-record
time of 23.65 seconds.
Jamison also anchored the


4xlO0m relay team, which
placed first with a time of
46.71 seconds. The team was
also composed of Rodney
Mosley, Isaiah Jenkins and
Bobby McGee.
.Jamison and Jenkins also
competed in the 4x400m relay,
which finished as state runner-
up with a time of 3:46, which
bettered the previous school
record by five seconds. JoSh
Cooper and Reggie Thomas
rounded out the team.
Cooper placed second in
both the triple jump (a school-
record 37'5.25") and 100m
hurdles (15;65). He earned
fifth place in the 200m hurdles
(28:41). .., I .,, ,, ,,; ,;, t i
Bradford's 4x800m relay
team of McGee, Jackie
Mitchell, Tyler Prevatt and
Carlton Crudup earned a top-


NOTICE TO PERSONS
WITH DISABILITIES
The Bradford County Courthouse elevator will be
undergoing renovations beginning December 13,
2006 through January 19, 2007.
If you are a person with a disability that requires the
use of an elevator and you are unable to utilize the
stairs to participate in a proceeding located on the
2nd floor during this time frame, please contact Jan
Phillips, ADA Coordinator, at (352) 337-6237 within
one week of the date you are required to appear to
receive assistance.


five finish, placing fourth with
a school-record time of
9:56.02.,
Bradford's girls team placed
first in one event and- finished.
fourth overall out of 32 teams.
The 4x400m relay team,


which won state last year,
topped the field %ith a time of
4:18, which bettered the school
record by six seconds. The
team was composed of Kenetra

See STATE, p. 7C


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Page 4C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Dec. 28, 2006


Indians prove to be best- district in many sports


The following is a look at
the athlejic.-tMea s-a- d--
7indviduals who won
championships at the district,
regional or state levels, or who
qualified to participate in
regional or state competition as.
covered by the newspaper in
2006.

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Keystone Heights High
School had to make room in its
trophy case for eight district
championships its various
teams and individuals won in.
2006, as well as three medals
earned in state competition.
There were no regional
championships (though the
softball and boys soccer teams
came close), but Lauren
Stobbie came close to
capturing a state
championship.
SStobbie, a member of the
girls weightlifting team,
finished as runner-up in the
169-pound class at the Florida
High School Athletic
Association Finals. She had a
bench press of 180 pounds and
a clean and jerk of 160 pounds.
That left her 10 pounds behind
Spiuce Creek's Brittany
Adamek, who compiled a 350-
pound total en route to
winningthe state title.
Rachel Lingerfelt, another
member of the weightlifting
team, earned a medal also by
placing fifth with a 335-pound
total in the 183-pound class at
the FHSAA Finals.
Kelly Michalos (1.29-pound
Classs, Danielle Hengl (199)
and.Brenda Ward (154) also
qualified for the state finals;
The boys weightlifting team
produced the school's other,
state-medal winner. Jesse
Vasquez placed sixth in the
129-pound class with a bench
press'of 215 pounds and a
clean and jerk of 215 pounds.
He was joined at. the FHSAA
Finals by two other Keystone
lifters: Randy Davids (154)
and Sam Theisen (183).
~-------- -
Boys soccer, softball
teams miss out on
regional titles
The team's. first-ever
regional title seemed within
reach, but in the end, Lake
Highland- Prep'-defeated the'


outing, lost 2:-Ito Williston in
- the Region 2 championship
game.
McCall gave up four hits
and no earned runs, but errors
doomed the Indians. A
_V uCer team 2-1,
outshooting the Indians 3-2 in
penalty kicks.
Keystone's Dustin Hayre
scored the first goal of the
match-a header off of an
assist by Hayden Rodel-in
the 50th minute. That 1-0 lead
appeared as if it would hold
until Lake Highland Prep
scored with less than a minute
remaining in regulation.
The teams then .played two
scoreless overtime periods
before the visitors came out
victorious in the penalty kicks
round.
Keystone, which finished
the year with an 11-10-6
record, advanced to the
regional finals after capturing
the program's third straight
'district championship.
The Indians defeated Pierson
Taylor 4-1 in the District 5-3A
semifinals, getting goals from
Rodel, Al Duren, Ryan
Hannah and Drew Wingate.
Brad Gober had two assists,
while Duren and Austin
Bennett each had one. Goalie
Michael. McLeod had nine
saves.
McLeod followed that up
With another nine-save
performance as the Indians
defeated Crescent City 1-0 to
win the district title. The lone
goal of the match was scored
early in the second quarter
when Bennett headed in a
corer kick by Gober.
Gober scored the lone goal
in the Indians' 1-0 win over
Mount Dora in the Region 2
quarterfinals, then played a
pivotal role in the team's 2-1
win over Trinity Prep in the
Region 2 semifinals.
Keystone trailed against
Trinity Prep until Gober scored
.in the 70th minute.
The match came down to
penalty kicks- -Keystone
-.DutshotTriinity Prep'3- with
McLeod and Branden Waters
successfully .converting on
their attempts before Gober
added the decisive kick.
Another heartbreak in
regional play would occur in
the spring when the softball
team, despite pitcher
MaryAntie "M'cC l"'s sttohg


Lauren Stobbie was a
state runner-up for
Keystone at the girls
weightlifting state
finals.


dropped infield popup and a
throwing error put Williston's
winning run on base in the top
of the eighth inning.
Keystone had two runners
on with one out in the bottom
of the inning, but failed to
score.
The Indians did little
offensively, though Kellie
Spaulding,went 3-for-4 with a
double and a triple. She scored
the team's only run after a
single by Karlyn Reddish.
Keystone, which finished
with an 18-10 record, qualified
for the regional playoffs after
defeating Union County 15-0
in the District 6-3A semifinals.
Tori Jolley had four RBI,
Sam Sibley had three and
Reddish and Dani Suit each
had two in the five-inning win.
McCall gave up just one hit
and struck out nine.
Keystone then got another
strong performance from
McCall (four hits, 10
strikeouts) and a three-run
homer from Kasey Fagan in
defeating Interlachen 5-1. for.
*the district championship.
Spaulding went 3-for-3 with an
RBI and two runs scored.
The Indians opened play in
the regional playoffs with a 9-
.1 win over Trinity Catholic in
the quarterfinals. McCall gave
up one hit and no earned runs,
while Reddish and Noel
Bartley each drove in two runs.
Reddish finished the game.
P' 3-for-4 with two RBI iti"a six-


run fifth.
Fagan hit a three-run homer
-in theIndians' 17-0 win over
P.K. Yonge in the regional
semifinals. he finished with
four RBI, while Sibley and-
Suit had three and two,
respectively.
Fagan, Spaulding and Suit
were each 3-for-4, with
Spaulding and Suit each hitting
a double. Houser was 2-for-2
and Jolley was 2-for-3.
Girls soccer,
basketball, volleyball
teams win titles
without blemish
The school's girls 'soccer,
basketball and volleyball
teams had little trouble with
district opponents in 2006.
Each team went Undefeated in
districtplay and won a district
championship.
.Rachel Crane scored a total
of six goals in two matches in
the District 5-3A girls soccer
tournament as the Indians shut
out both opponents.
Crane scored four goals in
an.8-0 win over Crescent City
in the semifinals, while Katie
McCollum, Brittany Sabo,
Kaiti Thompson and Tysee
Williams each scored one. The
Indians then got two goals
from Crane in a 5-0 win over
Interlachen for the districtitle.
Thompson, Williams and
Julie Campbell also scored
against Interlachen, while
McCollum had two assists.
Sabohad one assist.
The easy wins did not lead'
to a victory in the first round
of the regional playoffs,


however, as the Indians lost 2-
1 to Mount Dora in the
quarterfinals. Keystone was
shut out until Sabo's goal in
the 74t' minute.
Keystone finished the season
with a 14-6 record.
The girls basketball team
defeated every district
opponent it faced by 10 points
or more en route to winning its
first, district championship
since the 1998-99 season.
Karlyn Reddish scored 15
points, Kellie Spaulding 13
and Jessica Whitfield 12 as the
Indians defeated Interlachen
65-18 in the District 6-3A
semifinals. The Indians then
got 23 points from Whitfield in
a 65-45 win over Union
County for the district title.
Reddish, Spaulding and Kim
Russell each scored 12 points
in the championship game.
Keystone advanced to the
regional playoffs, defeating
Dixie County. 58-37 in the
Region 2 quarterfinals.
The Indians used a 19-6
third-quarter run to put the
game away. Reddish, who
scored a team-high 19 points,
had four field goals during the
run. .
Whifield and Russell also
scored in double figures with
15 and 12 points, respectively.
.Keystone's run came to an
.end in the regional semifinals
with-a 49-35 loss to Trinity
Prep.
The Indians held a one-point
lead at the half, but Trinity
Prep made 8-of-15 field goals
in the third quarter, including
four 3-pointers. Keystone


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The Keystone boys soccer team won its third straight district championship and
came close to winning a regional championship. Pictured (not in order) are: Juan
Arenas, Austin Bennett, Gino Coiana, Al Duren, Brad Gober, Ryan Hannah, Dustin
Hayre, Justin Hedding, Tim Herman, Michael McLeod, Ryan Miller, Sam Nadler, Greg
Oakley, Dale Riviere, Nick Salsbery, Branden Waters, Drew Wingate and head coach
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Jesse Vasquez earned
a state medal at the
boys weightlifting
finals for Keystone
with a sixth-place
finish.

made just five field goals in
the entire second half.
Whitfield and Russell led
the Indians, who finished the
season with a 17-12 record,
with 14 and 10 points,
respectively.
The volleyball team
wrapped up its district
tournament with 3-0 and 3-1
wins.
Mallory Wasik had 21 kills
and Kim Russell had 20 assists
as the Indians defeated
Interlachen 25-16, 27-25, 27-
25 in the district semifinals.
Wasik also had eight digs,

See KHHS, p. 7C


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Dec. 28,2006 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR-C-SECTION Page 5C


Jonathan Sullivan and
Erica,Lavender were married
on Oct. 21, 2006.
The ceremony was held on
the beach in St. Augustine.
The bride is the daughter
of Steve Lavender and Kim
Bush, both of New York. She


BIRTHS






:-




Annalei Faith Brown

Annalei
Brown
Kelly and Sharon Brown of
Hampton.announce the birth of
their daughter. Annalei Faith"
Brown, on Nov. 16, 2006, in
Gainesville.
Annalei weighed 10 pounds,
10 ounces and measured 20Y2
inches in length. She joins a
'brother, Andrew Brown.
Maternal grandparents are
James and Annette Tomlinson
of Starke.
Maternal great-grandparents
are Geraldine Griffis of Starke
and the late Ancil Griffis and
Maggie Tomlinson of Starke
and the late Henry Tomlinson.


is the stepdaughter of Brad
Herbert of Starke.
The groom is the son of
Tom and Susan Gorman of
Starke. He is a 2004 graduate
of Bradford High School.
The couple is currently
.station in England.


Paternal grandparents are
John and Annette Wall of Lake
Butler.
Paternal great-grandparents
are the late Carlos and Helen
Norman of Raiford and
Mitchell and Katherine Brown
of Lawtey.


Poppy and
Moore are
engaged


Robin Campbell of Hazard,'
Ky., and Stephen 'Poppy of
Raiford announce the
engagement of their daughter,
Dorothy Marlene Poppy, to
LCPL James Allen Moore. son
of James Herbert and Donna'
Jean Moore of Campton, Ky.
The bride-elect is a graduate
of Northside Christian
Academy in Starke and is
currently employed by Wal-
Mart in Hazard.
The groom-elect is a graduate
of Wolfe County High School
in Campton and serves in the
U.S. Marine Corps. He will be
deployed to Iraq on Dec. 30.
The wedding will take place
upon the groom's return from
Iraq.


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BHS
Continued from p. 3C

Track and field
athletes shine at
district, region meets
Bradford won three district
championships and one
regional championship in
2006, all of which came during
track and field season.
The boys team had three of
those championships, two of
which occurred at the District
5-2A meet.
Ryan Robinson won the
400m with a PR -of 51.46
seconds, while the 4x100m
relay team of Chuckie
Covingtorl, Jimmy Hankerson,
Rob' Harris and J.R. Petteway
won its race with a time of
42.46 seconds:
Girls team member Tiesha
Bellamy won the district title
in the discus, setting a new PR
with a throw of 86'2".
By virtue of those wins, the
Tornadoes qualified to
compete in regionals in each of
those events, but they had
more qualifiers as well (the top
four finishers in each event
advanced to regionals).
Jennifer Smyth was district
runner-up in the 400m with a
time of 1:01.09. She also
helped the girls 4xl00m relay
team finish second with a time
of 53.80 seconds. The team
was also composed of Destiny
Bass, Latayvia Henderson and
Ebony Smith.
Harris earned a second-place
finish for the boys team with a
time of 10.86 seconds in the
100m. He also placed third in
the 200m with a time of 23.08
seconds (Harris had to battle
eventual state champion C.J.
Spiller of Union County in
both 100m and 200m races).
The girls 4x800m relay team
of Tracy Ledger, Joyce-Anita
Villamil, Emma Sheppard and
Katrina Steffan placed third
with a time of 13:40.34, while
Smyth placed fourth in the


Kelly Leigh earned a
medal for Bradford
with a fifth-place finish
at the girls weightlifting
state finals.


J.R. Petteway (far left), Chuckie Covington (second from left), Jimmy Hankerson
(foreground) and Rob Harris (far right) comprised the 4x100m relay team that won
its district and region. The team advanced to the state finals, as did Harris
individually in the 100m and 200m. Also pictured are James Jamison and coach
Annie Williams.


200m with a PR of 27:08
seconds.
Jistin Hollingsworth,
Malcolm Moore, James
Jamison and Robinson
comprised the boys 4x400m
ielay team, which finished
fourth with a time of 3:39.45.
At the regional nieet,
Bradford qualified for the state
finals in three events,
including the boys 4xl00m
relay. The team had a time of
42.84 seconds to win the
regional championship.
Harris earned the other two
state berths, placing third in
the 200m with a time of 22.29
seconds and fourth in the
100m with a time of 10.88
seconds.
The boys 4x400m relay
team finished fifth, just
mission out on ,qualifying for
the state finals, while
Robinson earned seventh place
in the 400m.
For the girls team, Smyth
placed sixth and seventh,
respectively, in the 400m and
200m races, the 4xl00m relay
team placed eighth, Bellamy
placed ninth in the discus and
the girls 4x800m relay team
placed 14th.' .'
-, Bradford was unable to
advance out of the
preliminaries in the three
,events it participated in at the
state finals.


Girls basketball team
falls short of title
It was quite a successful
season that saw the team win
its first 15 games,, but the girls
basketball team could not
overcome district opponent
Santa Fe, settling for District


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SR-230 E (2 miles east of US-301) Stark


2-4A runner-up after losing
54-40 to the Raiders in the
district final.
The Tornadoes .defeated
Santa Fe the first time the
teams played during the
season, but then lost two
straight to the Raiders. 4
In the district final, Bradford
could not overcome poor
shooting. The Tornadoes made
just one field goal in the
second quarter and trailed by
10 at the half. That margin got,
wider as the Raiders opened
the second half with an 11-2
run.
Khalaa Hill led Bradford
with 16 points,, while Keita
Goodmanhad 13.
The loss put Bradford on the
road for the Region 2
quarterfinals. They had to play
top-10 Andrew Jackson, which
defeated the Tornadoes 85-51.
The game actually turned
out to be closer than the final
score. Bradford did trail 34-21
at the half, but rallied to cut
Jackson's lead to seven in the
third quarter.
Bradford's lack of depth
factored into the equation, with
two players eventually fouling
out.
Jackson went on a 15-2 run
in the final three minutes.
Hill and Tosha Griffin each
had 17 points, while Jerica
Warren added eight.


Wrestling, girls golf
teams produce
regional participants
The year saw 10 individuals
qualify for. regional.
competition, including nine
from the wrestling team.
Donny Jarrett finished third
in the 130-pound class at the
district tournament, while eight
of his fellow wrestlers placed
fourth to advance to the
regional tournament: Max:
Ennis (119), Jeremy Agin
(125), Josh ,Oliver (140),
Lemondo Lee (145), Bobby
Andrews (152), Alan Lin
(160), Mark Wininger (189)
and Clay Koehler (215).;
Andrews had perhaps the
toughest road to regionals. He
competed, against three
wrestlers who placed at the
2005 state finals, including the.
state runner-up.
Neither Andrews nor any of
the other wrestlers made it out
of regionals. Andrews and
Ennis each went 2-2 at the
regional meet, while Oliver,
Lee, Lin, Wininger and
Koehler were each 1-2. Agin
went 0-2.
In the fall'of 2006; girls golf '
team member Heather Alvarez
qualified for regionals with a
score of 96 at the District 4-A
tournament. It was the second
straight regional appearance
for Alvarez.


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Page 6C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTIbN Dec. 28, 2006


Spiller brings top honors to Union County in 2006


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Of the three area high
schools-Bradford, Keystone
Heights and Union
County-only Union County
produced a state champion in
2005.

The school can make that
same claim in 2006 as C.J.
Spiller won not one, but two
state championships, closing
out his successful athletic
career, which also saw him.
help the basketball team win
the District 6-3A
championship.
In all, the Tigers amassed 11
championships at the state,
region or district level. Most of
those were produced by. Spillef
and fellow track and field
athletes Francis Highland and
Amika Davis.
It began at the district meet
when Spiller and Highland
each claimed two titles. Spiller
won the 100m with a time;of
10.49 seconds and the 200m
with a time of 22.02 seconds.
Highland won the shot put
with a distance of 52'2.5" and
the discus with a school record,


throw of 162'2".
Girls team member Davis
.won the triple jump with a
distance of 33'2". -
Brandon Shoup was district
runner-up in the 800m with a
time of 2:08,24.
The Tigers also qualified for
the regional meet in three other
events. Davis placed third in
the 200m with a time of 27.06
seconds, while Kerrie Lynch
placed third and fourth,
respectively, in the 800m and
1600m runs with times of
2:46.78 and 6:10.68.
Spiller continued his
winning ways at the regional
meet, claiming the title in the
100m with a time of 10.46
seconds and in the'200m with
a time of 21.56 seconds.
Highland won the
championship in the shot put
with a distance of 49'9.25". He
was runner-up in the discus
with a throw of 146'5".
Shoup was also a regional
runner-up, finishing the 800m
in 2:00.54.
Davis earned a trip to the
state finals by placing. fourth in
the triple jump with a school
record distance of 34' 11".
She could not earn a trip to


state in the 200m, placing 12'.
Lynch placed ninth in the
800m and 13th in the 1600m.
Upon entering the state
finals, Spiller had not lost a
race in the 100m or 200m all
year. Nothing changed when
he won the championships in
both races with times of 10.42
and 21.50 seconds.
His 100m time was .04
seconds away from tying a
Class 2A record. It was also
the second-fastest time run in
the state that year and the fifth-
best time in the country.
Highland also earned a state
medal, placing fourth in the
shot .put with a distance of
52'6.25", which was a
personal record.
In the discus, Highland
finished 14h, while Union's
other state qualifier, Davis,
placed 13th in the girls triple
jump.

2 weightlifters hoist
state medals at-
season's conclusion
Three boys weightlifters
qualified for the state finals,
with two of them returning
home with medals in tow.
Donnie Clyatt (129-pound
class) and Kevin Alexander
(219) each earned a medal
after their third- and sixth-
place finishes, respectively.
Clyatt had a bench press of
230 pounds and a clean and
jerk of 210 pounds, while
Alexander had a bench press
of 360 pounds and a clean and
jerk of 300 pounds.
Alexander actually had the
fourth best total in his class.
However, two other lifters who
had the same total' finished
ahead of him because of body
weight. '
Ricky Westfall also
competed at the state meet in
the 169-pound class. He placed
eighth (lifters must place in the
top six to earn medals).
Each of the three lifters
qualified for the state meet
with the following totals
compiled during a sectional-
qualifying meet: Clyatt 440
pounds, Alexander 620 pounds
and Westfall 535 pounds.


I .1i Boys basketball team
Kevin Alexander (left) and Donnie Clyatt earned ends long drought
,,,.eals at the.boys weightlifting state finals. Al ander~ ho. bre tr asll eam ear
glai d xtn Eind Clyatt pi ced third."' ....-b.....the bd _, '...kee
..i.. xh and Clyatt p...ed th i.r.... district. nhaming to defeat a
... ..__...... team it had lost to three
YOUR previous times during the
TAKE BACK CONTROL OF YOUR LIFE! season:
First; the Tigers had to hold
S| off a rally by Interlachen in a
s n Weliht the Healthy Way! 69-64 win in the semifinals.


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Interlachen cut Union's lead to
a point in the fourth quarter
before Chris Perry stopped the
Rams' 8-0 run with a 3-
pointer.
It was a one-point game
again later when the Tigers'
Brendan Odom made two free
throws with less than 30
seconds remaining.
Ted Young led the team
with 14 points. C.J. Spiller had
13, Odom had 11 and Kevin
Alexander had 10.
The Tigers then wrapped up
the championship by defeating
Crescent City 58-50.
Spiller scored s4x
points-including making 4-
of-4 free throws-in the final
2:20.
As a team, the Tigers made
7-of-9 free throws in the final
quarter.
Odor0. led Union with 18
points, while Spiller and
Alexander had 16 and 10,
respectively.
The team may have shot
well from the foul line in the
district final,, but it could not
repeat that performance in the
Region 2 quarterfinals, losing
72-71 to Williston in overtime.
Union made just 1-of-8 free
throws in the fourth
quarter--including two missed
free throws in the final 13
seconds that would've put
them up by five-and 13-of-30
overall.
However, the Tigers had a
commanding lead that they
could not hold on to.
Spiller, Young, Rodencia
Austin and Justin Griffin each
had a 3-pointer in the second
quarter as the Tigers built a 31-
5 lead.
Williston's cold shooting did
not last as the Devils were able
to come back and make it a
close game.
The Tigers held a three-
point lead when Perry went to
the foul line to shoot two free
throws with 13 seconds left to
play. He missed both, and
Williston's Jarrell Hopkins
made a 3-pointer with six
seconds left to force overtime.
Griffin made a basket to tie
the game with less than 20
seconds remaining in overtime,
but a foul sent Williston to the
line with three seconds left on
the clock. One made free
throw proved to be the
difference.
,' Uhion firnished- ir se.s.t .
- witb-a 16-12 record:- -.. -

2 girls lifters make
state appearance
The girls weightlifting team
See UCHS, p.7C


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C.J. Spiller stands on the medal stand after winning
the 200m state championship. He also won the title in
the 100m and did not lose a race in all of 2006.


Francis Highland (left) and Amika Davis combined to
win four championships in track and field for Union
County. Highland also earned a medal at the state
finals with a fourth-place finish in the shot put.


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SDec. 2., TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Page 7C
-~~ -


KHHS
Continued from p. 4C
while Michelle Houser led the
team % ith 10. 1
Lori Albritton and TNsee
Williams each had II ser ice
points.
Kei stone won the
championship by defeating
Crescent Citv 28-26, 25-8, 23-
25, 25-23. Wasik had 19 kills,
19 service points, five service
aces, 14 digs and two blocks.
while Russell had 27 assists.
nine digs and seen kills.
The Indians also got 21 digs
froth Houser and I1 kills from
Katie Taylor
Albritton had 24 service
points and 19 assists to help
Keystone defeat Di\ie Count\
in the Region 2 quarterfinals.
Wasik had 20 kills. Russell
had II assists and Houser had
S11 digs.
The Indians' season ended
against eventual state
champion Lake Highland Prep.
which handed them a 3-0 (25-
7, 25-17, 25-16) loss. Houser
had 19 digs for the Indians,
who finished the season with a
record of 17-12.

Baseball team ends
title drought
Keystone earned its first
district championship since
1999, defeating Interlachen 6-
2. .
Blake Lott, who was 2-for-4,
drove in two runs to' help the
Indians claim the title, while.


Lans Hardin and Tyson Paiik
each had one RBI.
Tyler Richardson also added
to the offense, going 3-for-4
with a double.
Pitcher David Thomas gale
up seen hits and struck out
seven in earning the \win.
Interlachen had potential
scoring opportunities in the
second and third innings, but
Thomas recorded two straight
strikeouts to end each.
The Indians could not hang
onto a lead in the Region 2
quarterfinals, losing 9-7 to
Williston.
Keystone was up 5-1 at one
point and also led 7-5 heading
into the seventh inning.
Williston scored four runs in
the top of the seventh off of
fi\e hits. The Indians put t\\o
runners on in the bottom of the
inning with one out, but failed
to score.
\'il Breton hit a t'vo-run
home run and finished the
game 2-for-4 for the Indians,
who ended the season with a
16-12 record. Paulk was 2-for-
3 and Josh Mangus was 2-for-
4.

Eddins, Tillery win 2
championships
Two district titles were
earned by members of the girls
tennis and boys track and field
teams
Valerie Eddins won a title
by going 3-0 in the District 4-
2A girls tennis tournament.
She compiled an overall 13-3
record at number-two singles
in helping the Indians finish 9-


The Keystone softball team won its district and just fell Richardson, Noel Bartley, Tori Jolley, coach Ollie
short of capturing a regional championship. Pictured Powell, Kim Russell, Kellie Spaulding, Megan Poupard,
are: (front, from left) Kerrie Broadway, Karlyn Reddish, Michelle Houser, Ryan Story, Sam Sibley, Becca Heavrin-
MaryAnne McCall, Donna Wheeler, Dani Suit, Kasey and head coach Kathy Smith. Not pictured: Rachel
Fagan, (back, from left) Ashley Altman, coach Dale Rothwell.


4 and tied for third in the
district.
In track and field, Tillery
won the 3200m with a time of
10:47.86, sending him to the
regional meet. He could not
earn a berth in the state finals.
however, despite posting a
personal record of 10:33.29.
The girls track and field
team had two members qualify
for regionals: Rachel Crane in
the high jump and Liz Wheeler
in the 300m hurdles. Crane
placed fourth at districts,
clearing a height of 4'.10",
, while Wheeler was third in her
event, with a'time of 55.80
seconds.
Crane and Wheeler earned
ninth- and 13th-place finishes at
the regional meet.

Football team earns
second straight
postseason trip
The football season saw


Keystone not only finish as
District 3-2A runner-up for the
second straight 'ear. but
compile its best record since
the 1992 season.
.Keystone went 9-2, with its
only loss during the regular
season coming at the hands of
district opponent-and
eventual state champion-
Bolles.
The Indians wrapped up
second place in the district
during a three-game stretch in
which they defeated Bradford
35-21, Interlachen 28-0 and
Ribault 31-14.
Running backs Greg Taylor,
and Matt Story were a big part
of those three wins. They
combined for .13 touchdowns
in those games, including
Taylor's three-touchdown
performance in the win over
Ribault.
Taylor rushed for 185 yards
and scored on runs of 8, 21
and 46 yards. in the postseason-


clinching win over the Trojans,
while Story rushed for 104
yards and one touchdown of 8
yards.
Michael McLeod kicked a
34-yard field goal to add to the
scoring,, while Brandori Lott
and Brandon McGuire each
had an interception on defense.
Keystone's season came to
an end the same way it did in
w'05-with a loss to South
umter in the regional
semifinals.
South Sumpter running back
Richard Kelly rushed for 169
yards and four touchdowns as'
his team defeated the Indians
52-12.'
Taylor scored both Keystone
touchdowns on receptions of 9
and 15'yards. He finished -the
game with 141 yards on seven
receptions.


Girls earn region
in cross country,
Margaret Walker's


trip
golf
sixth-


place finish at the district meet--
helped propel the girls cross-
country team to a fourth-place-
finish and a berth in the-
regional meet.
Walker had a time of 6:43.1.-
Her teammates' results were:-
Liz Wheeler sixth, 6:43.1,.
Raquel Doty-O'Kelly 21"t,
7:23.7, Julie Rund 22nd, 7:24.5,
.and Jordyn Davis 45", 8:18.6. -
The team's season ended 1t:
the regional meet. Walker led-:
the team with a time of
20:44.14, which was good for
16" place.
In the District 5-A 'girls golf
tournament, Keystone placed
third to earn a trip to regionals,:
Valerie Eddins was the
medalist with a score of 95.
She would go on to shoot a
100 at the Region 2 meet.
Joining Eddins on the team
were Ashley Altman, Sierrai
Brown, Billie Jean Byrom,
Alyssa Dingman, Karleigh
Smoak and Katie Sue
Strassburger.


Brendan Odom played a key role in helping the Union
County boys basketball team win its district by sinking
two free throws late in the game in a semifinal win
over Interlachen.


UCHS
Continued from p. 6C

had two members qualify for
the state finals: Kerrie Lynch
and Cara Hannon.
Lynch (119) qualified for
the finals with a 270-pound
total amassed at a sectional-
qualifying meet. That was a
school record along with her
140-pound bench press. Her
130-pound clean and jerk tied
a school record.
Hannon (139).set two school
records as well. Her 135-
pound bench press and 280-
pound total both went into the
record books, while her 145-
pound clean and jerk tied a
personal record.
Neither lifter earned a medal
at the state finals, though
Lynch finished two spots out
of medal contention. She
finished eighth, while Hannon
placed 23rd.


Girls basketball team
qualifies for playoffs
The girls basketball team
played Keystone Heights the
closest of any other team in
District 6-3A, but the Tigers
still could not prevail against
the Indians in the district
championship game, losing 65-
45.
The Tigers earned the right
to play for the title by
defeating Crescent City 49-27
in the semifinals. Union scored
the first 12 points of the game
and never looked back.
Tiffany Holmes led the team
with 17 points, while Amber
Franzluebbers had 14.
Union then advanced to pl;y
Keystone, a team it had lost to
twice previously. The Indians
made it three in a row over the
Tigers, despite the fact Union
got doule-digit scoring from
Franzluebbers '(15), Amika


Davis (13) and Miranda Kent
(12).
Holmes had quite a game the
next time the Tigers took to the
court, but that did not help the
team advance in the layoffs.
The Tigers lost 62-41 to P.K.
Yonge in the Region 2
quarterfinals.
Holmes had 20 points and
12 rebounds for the Tigers,
who trailed by 20 at the half.
Franzluebbers added nine
points.

Osborne has quite a
season in golf
How long had it been since a
Union County boys golfer
advanced beyond the district
tournament? Head coach Duke
Emerson wasn't sure, but he
knew it had been quite a while
before Devin Osborne did it in
2606.
Osborne had a score of 84 in
the District 4-A tournament,
qualifying him for the Region
2 tournament. His season came
to an end there, where he had a
score of 86.
The boys team went 17-4
during the season, with
Osborne finishing with the
team's lowest score in all but
two matches.



STATE
Continued from p. 3C

Jenkins, Synteia Postway,
Christina Jordan and Lashika
Bellamy.
Jenkins and Jordan teamed
up with Shay Wanton and
Courtney Jamison' to finish as
state runner-up in the 4xl00m
relay v, ith a school-record time
of 53.17 seconds.
Earning fifth-place finishes
for Bradford were Bellamy in
the 400m (65.59), Jamison in
the triple jump (29'3") and
Wanton in the shot put
(31'1.5").


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