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 Title Page
 Members of the house of representatives...
 Errata
 April 1917
 May 1917
 June 1917
 Summary pay rolls legislature
 Index to the journal of the house...
 Index to senate bills and joint...
 Index to house concurrent resolutions...
 Index to house memorials in the...
 Index to senate concurrent resolutions...
 Index to senate memorials in the...
 Index to unclassified subjects...


FHR UFLAW



Journal of the House of Representatives of the session of ..
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027772/00115
 Material Information
Title: Journal of the House of Representatives of the session of ..
Alternate Title: Journal of the House of Representatives, State of Florida
Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Florida of the session of ..
Physical Description: v. : ; 23-32 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Legislature. -- House of Representatives
Publisher: State Printer
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: April 1917
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Legislative journals -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
General Note: Title varies slightly.
General Note: Description based on: 1907.
Funding: Digitized for the Florida House of Representatives, the Office of the Clerk.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida House of Representatives. Office of the Clerk.
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 003417935
oclc - 12901236
lccn - sn 85065608
System ID: UF00027772:00115
 Related Items
Preceded by: Journal of proceedings of the House of Representatives of the Legislature of the State of Florida
Succeeded by: Journal of the Florida House of Representatives

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Members of the house of representatives 1917
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    Errata
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
    April 1917
        Tuesday, April 3
            Page 1
            Page 2
            Page 3
            Page 4
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
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            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
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            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
        Wednesday, April 4
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
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        Thursday, April 5
            Page 141
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            Page 168
            Page 169
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        Monday, April 9
            Page 188
            Page 189
            Page 190
            Page 191
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            Page 207
        Friday, April 6
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        Tuesday, April 10
            Page 208
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            Page 210
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            Page 233
            Page 234
            Page 235
            Page 236
            Page 237
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            Page 239
            Page 240
            Page 241
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            Page 245
            Page 246
        Wednesday, April 11
            Page 247
            Page 248
            Page 249
            Page 250
            Page 251
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        Thursday, April 12
            Page 297
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            Page 299
            Page 300
            Page 301
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            Page 333
        Friday, April 13
            Page 334
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            Page 336
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        Tuesday, April 17
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        Monday, April 16
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        Wednesday, April 18
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        Friday, April 20
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        Thursday, April 19
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        Saturday, April 21
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        Monday, April 23
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        Tuesday, April 24
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        Thursday, April 26
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        Wednesday, April 25
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        Friday, April 27
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        Monday, April 30
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        Wednesday, May 2
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    May 1917
        Tuesday, May 4
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        Thursday, May 3
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        Friday, May 4
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        Monday, May 7
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        Tuesday, May 8
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        Wednesday, May 9
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        Friday, May 11
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        Thursday, May 10
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        Saturday, May 12
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        Friday, June 1
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    Summary pay rolls legislature
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    Index to senate bills and joint resolutions in the house
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    Index to house concurrent resolutions in the house
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    Index to house memorials in the house
        Page 2815
    Index to senate concurrent resolutions in the house
        Page 2816
    Index to senate memorials in the house
        Page 2817
    Index to unclassified subjects in the house
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Full Text










JOURNAL


OF THE



House of Representatives


OF THE



SESSION OF 1917



T. J. APPLE!ARD, STATu
PRINTER, TALLAHASSEE


















MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
1917.



Alachua-Frank Clark, Jr., Gainesville.
41aehfta-Chris. Matheson. Gainesville.
Baker-C. F. Barber, Maccleninj,
Bay-F. M. Nelson, Panama City.
Bradford-W. G. Seals, Hampton.
adforU--A. S. Crews, Starke.
Brevard-John B. Rodes, Melbourne.
Broward-W. H. Marshall, Ft. Lauderdale.
Calhoun-J. D. Trammell, Blountstoni.
Citru's-J. Y. Barnes, Lecafto.
Clay-J. S. Smith, Green Cove Springs.
Columbia-A. G. Withee, Watertown.
aI bi-W. J. Roebuck, Lake City.
Dade-J. W. Watson, Miami.
DeSoto-W. C. Langford, Arcadia.
Duval-Telfair Stockton, Jacksonville.
B.wal-Marion T. Jennings, Jacksonville.
Escambia-James M. Johnson, Pensacola.
& --M. O. Baggett, McDavid.
Franl'-E. R. L. Moore, Carrabelle.
Gadsden,-S. W. Anderson, Greensboro.
Oa4s4dn-Samuel H. Strom, Juniper.
Hamilton-W. M. Webb, Jasper.
Hamittth--C. A. Stephens, Jasper.
Hernando---M. L. Dawson, Brooksville.
Hillsborough-George H. Wilder, Plant City.
ifHsb romiough-A. C. Hamblin, Tampa.
Holmes-C. R. Mathis, Bonifay.
Jackson-Ambs E. Lewis, Marianna.
J-aekso i-E. Harris, Graceville.
Jefferson-B. J. Hamrick, Monticello.
Pefferson-D. H. Mays, Ashville.
Lafayette-McQueen Chaires, Oldtown.
Lake-J. A. Hanson, Leesburg.
L&kee-L. D. Edge, Groveland.
Lee-Francis W. Perry, Ft. Myers.
Leon-Alexander H. Williams, Tallahassee.



N











iv. MEMBERS OF HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 1917.

-e-John A. Scruggs, Lloyd.
Levy-W. J. Epperson, Bronson.
'Liberty-R. H. Weaver, Bristol.
Madison-V. E. Blanton, Lee.
Ma34 sn-W. T. Kent, Lee.
Manatee-William M. Taylor, Sarasota.
Marion-W. J. Crosby, Citra.
MarieB--L. S. Light, Reddick.
Monroe-John G. Sawyer, Key West.
Mrrfo1e-Arthur Gomez, Key West.
Nassau-James B. Stewart, Hilliard.
Nassatt-D. T. Haddock, Jr., Kings Ferry.
9 E .- J. Franklin, Baker.
Orange- Seth Woodruff, Orlando.
,Qrarge-C. A. Roberts, Winter Garden.
Osceola-N. C. Bryan, Kissimmee.
i-Plm Beach-H. C. Hood, West Palm Beach.
lTno--E: P. Wilson, Dade City.
Pi iJi:rII--S. D. Harris, St. Petersburg.
Polk--At J. Morgan, Lakeland.
+k"+k-W. Reid Robson, Kathleen.
Putnam-W. G. Tilghman, Palatka.
R4tum-H. S. McKenzie, Palatka.
-- Santa Rosa-T. J. Fenn, Milton.
Sa+ 'R-trosa-J. A. Bryant, Milton.
Seminole-F. L. Woodruff, Sanford.
St. JohnsL-William M. DeGrove, Palm Valley.
St'J-Thns-Frank M. Corbett, Moultrie.
St. Lucie-J. M. Swain, Ft. Pierce.
Simter--"N. J. Wicker, Coleman.
Suwannee-Cary A. Hardee, Live Oak.
SfiWiree-M. A. Best, Branford.
Taylor-W. T. Cash, Perry.
Volusia-David Sholtz, Daytona.
Volesia--H. G. Putnam, Oak Hill.
Wakulla-Nat R. Walker, Crawfordville.
Walton-Angus L. Anderson, DeFuniak Springs
Washington-A. A. Myers, Chipley.



2h_.c--- 4.






















OFFICERS AND ATTACHES



of the House of Representatives.



-^- Chief Clerk-R. A. Green, of Bradford.
.--f Assistant Chief Clerk-J. Irvin Walden, of DeSoto.
,--- Bill Clerk-C. C0Epperson, of Levy.
.__ -Reading Clerk-W. B. Lanier, of Duval.
-.-Assistant Reading Clerk-Miss Myrtice McCaskill, of
Taylor.
Engrossing Clerk-Eli Futch, of Alachua.
S_-- Enrolling Clerk-Miss Sue Barco, of Pinellas.
r-U--- Sergeant-at-Arms-W. R. Griffin, of Hillsborough.
-. Messenger-J N. R.odgers, of Madison.
"-------Door Keeper-K. C. Lee, of Hamilton.
- ~C~lhaplain-H. S. Howard, of Madison.
---- Janitor-Eugene Hawkins, of Jackson.
---Page-Carrol iussell, of Sumter.
--Page-Hardy C. Cro m, of Marion.
Page-R. C. Van Bunt, of Leon.
Page-Ellis irmer, of Columbia.


















ERRATA.



On page 114, just before line 7 from the bottom, should
appear, "and the resolution was read a second time." ,
On page 117, just before line 1, should appear, "House
Concurrent Resolution."
On page 118, line 3 from the bottom, "Robinson" should
be "Robson."
On page 129, after line 14, should appear, "and the
resolution was read a second time."
The motion, as made by Mr.. Withee, on bottom of page
250, should appear on bottom of page 251 instead.
The explanation of vote as made by Mr. Light, which
appears at bottom of page 274, should appear immediately
after line 8 on page 268.
On page 379, line 11, the word: "third" should read
"second."
On page 382, "was adopted" should be added to line 21.
On page 406, line 11 from the bottom, the word "fav-
orable" should read "unfavorable."
On page 406, line 3 from bottom, should read, "was laid
on the table under the rules."
On page 443, just above line 3 from bottom, should
appear, "And the resolution was read a second time."
On page 484, line 5 from bottom, the word "Tuesday"
should be "Thursday."
On page 486, line 15 from top, the figures "114" should
read "164."
On page 517, line 1, "'House Bill No. 113," should read
"House Bill No. 133."
On page 539, line 4 from bottom, the letter "m" should
be "n."
On page 552, after line 13, should be added, "And
House Bill No. 229'was read a second tiime by its title
only."
On page 574, "House Bill No. 379" should read "House
Bill No. 164."
.On page 582, line 10, "House Bill No. 84" should read
"House Bill No. 85."










ERRATA.



On page 659, line 2 from bottom, "orlered" should be
"ordered."
On page 672, line 7 from bottom, "House Bill No. 129"
should read "Senate Bill No. 129?'
On page 695, line 1, "By Mr. should read "By
Mr. Chaires."
"On page 730, line 5 from bottom, "The Speaker in the
chair," should not appear.
On page 769, line 2 from bottom, should read "of all
members present."
On page 770, line 24, should read, "of all members pres-
ent."
On page 877, line 12 from bottom, "House Bill No.
116," should read "Senate Bill No. 116."
On page 886, line 2 from bottom, "209" should read
"309."
On page 974, after line 8, should appear "Upon call
of the roll on the passage of the Bill, the vote was:".
On page 1132, line 11, "House Bill No. 66" should be
"House Bill No. 56."
On page 1056, in line 15, "Alachur" should be "Ala-
chua."
On page 1248; line 8, "34" should be "347."
On page 1269, last line, "yeas" should be nayss," and
on next page, first line, nayss" should be "yeas."
Page "1320" is numbered "1920."
On page 1403, line 8, "$250.00" should read "$2.50."
On page 1597, after line 15, should appear "Which was
agreed to."
On page 1603, line 8, "No. 42" should read "No. 142."
On page 1652, line 8 from bottom, should read "House
Bill No. 440."
On pages 1690, 1699, 1700, 1702 and 1924, "House Res-
olution No. 20" should read "House Concurrent Resolu-
tion INo. 20."
On page 1783, line 21, should read "Was taken up and
read a second time in full."
On page 1789, line 8, "nay" should be "yea" and in
line 9 "yea" should be "nay."
On page 1832, line 15 from bottom, "House Bill No.
575" should read "House Bill No. 664."
On page.2299, line 15 from bottom, "37" should read
"36."



viii.










ERRATA. ix.

On page 2303, lines 13, 14, 15 and 16, should read:
"(House Bill No. 872.)
"An Act to prescribe the qualifications of electors in
all municipal elections to be held in and for the Town
of Orange City, Volusia County, Florida."
On page 2382, line 7 from bottom, should read "By
Mr. Wicker of Sumter."
On page 2423, lines 16, 17, 18 and 19 from bottom,
should read:
"(House Bill No. 872.)
"An Act to prescribe the qualifications of electors in all
municipal elections to be held in and for the Town of
Orange City, Volusia County, Florida."
On page 2701, after line 14, should appear:
"R. A. Greene, Chief Clerk, 15 extra days, $90.".
"J. Irvin Walden, Assistant Chief Clerk, 15 extra days,
$90.00.
"R. A. Greene, Chief Clerk, preparing Calendar, $25.00.
"J. Irvin Walden, Assistant Chief Clerk, preparing
Calendar, $25.00."














JOURNAL OF THE
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.



Qf' their sixteenth regular session of the Legislature,
under the Constitution of A. D. 1885, began and held
at the Capitol, in the City of Tallahassee, the State of
Florida, on Tuesday, the 3rd day of April, A. D. 1917,
being the day fixed by the Constitution of the State of
Florida for the meeting of the Legislature.



Tuesday, April 3, 1917.



The House was called to order by Mr. J. G. Kellum, of
Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida, Chief Clerk of the
House of Representatives, at 12 o'clock m., the certified
list of the Secretary of State of members elected' to the
Legislature for the session of 1917 was called as follows.:

MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
1917.

S. W. Anderson of Gadsden County.
Angus L. Anderson of Walton County.
C. F. Barber of Baker County.
J. Y. Barnes of Citrus' County.
M. O. Baggett of Escambia County.
V. E. Blanton of Madison County.
N. C. Bryan of Osceola County.
J. A. Bryant of Santa Rosa County.
M. A. Best of Suwannee County.
Frank Clark, Jr., of Alachua County.
A. S. Crews of Bradford County.
McQueen Chaires of Lafayette County.
W. J. Crosby of Marion County:












Frank M. Corbett of St. Johns County.
W. T. Cash of Taylor County.
M. L. Dawson of Hernando County.
W. mM.M. DeGrove of St. Johns County.
L. D. Edge of Lake County.
V.J. J:. _-p -i,' i of Levy County.
T. J. Fenn of Santa Rosa County.
P. J. Franklin of Okaloosa County.
Arthur Gomez of Monroe County.
A. C. Hamblin of Hillsborough County,
Cary A. Hardee of Suwannee County.
li. Harris of Jackson County.
B. J. Hamrick of Jefferson County.
J. A. Hanson of Lake County.
I). T. Haddock, Jr. of Nassau County.
H.' C. Hood of Palm Beach County.
S. D. Harris of Pinellas County.
Marion B. Jennings of Duval County.
James M. Johnson of Escambia County.
W. T. Kent of Madison. County.
W. C. Langford of Desoto County.
Amos E. Lewis of Jackson County.
L. S. Light of Marion County.
Chris. Matheson of Alachua County.
W. H. Marshall of Broward County.
E. R. L. Moore of Franklin County.
C. R. Mathis of Hlolmes County.
1)i HMays of Jefferson County.
.. t. Moi-;an of Polk County.
H. S. McKenzie of Putnam County.
A. A. 1Myers of Washington County.
Francis W. Perry of Lee County.
H. G. Putnam of Volusia County.
John B, Rodes of Brevard County.
W. J. Roebuck of Columbia County.
C. A. Rohberts of Orange County.
W. Reid Robson of Polk County.
W. G. Seals of Bradford County.
J. S. Smith of Clay County.
Telfair Stockton of Duval County.
Samuel H. Strom of Gadsden County.
C A. Stephens of Hamilton County.
John A. Scruggs of Leon County.













John G. Sawyer of Monroe County.
James B. Stewart of Nassau County.
J. M. Swain of St. Lucie County.
David Sholtz of Volusia County.
J. I). Trammell of Calhoun County.
\V. M. Taylor of Manatee County.
W. G. Tilghman of Putnam County.
A. G. Withee of Columbia County.
J. W. Watson of Dade County.
W\. M. Webb of Hamilton County.
Geo. H. Wilder of Hillsborough County.
Alexander H. Williams of Leon County.
R. H. .Weaver of Liberty County.
Seth Woodrull' of Orange County.
I. 1P. Wilson of Pasco County.
F. L. Woodruff of Seminole County.
N. J. Wicker of Sumter.
Nat I. Walker of Wakulla.

State of Florida,
Office Secretary of State, ss.:

I, H (lay Crawford, Secretary of State of the State of
Florida, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a correct
list of lhe members of the House of Representatives of
the State of Florida, elected at the general election on
the seventh day of November, A. D. 1916, and at the
special election held in Cadsden County on the sixteenth
dny of January, 1917, as shown by the election returns on
file in this office.
Given under my hand and the Great Seal of the State
of Florida, at Tallahassee, the Capital, this the third
day of April, A. D. 1917.
(Seal) H. CLAY CRAWFORD,
Secretary of State.

"I e following members came forward and took the oath
of office prescribed by the Constitution of the State of
Florida, before Mr. Justice James B. Whitfield, of the
Supreme Court of the State of Florida:

Anderson, S. W., of Gadsden.
Anderson, Angus L., of Walton.
Barber, C. F., of Baker.









4



Barnes, J. Y., of Citrus.
Baggett, M. 0., of Escambia.
Blanton, V. E., of Maaison.
bryan, N. C., of Osceola.
Bryant, J. A., of Santa Rosa.
Best, M. A., of Suwannee.
Clark, Frank, Jr., of Alachua.
Crews, A. S., of bradford.
C(,aires, McQueen, of Lafayette.
Crosby, W. J., of Marion.
Corbett, Frank M., of St. Johns.
Cash, W. T., of Taylor.
Dawson, M. L., of Hernando.
DeGrove, Wm. M., of St. Johns.
Edge, L. D., of Lake.
Epperson, W. J., of Levy.
Femn1, T. J., of Santa Rosa.
Franklin, P. J., of Okaloosa.
Gomez, Arthur, of Monroe.
Hamblin, A. C., of Hillsborough.
Harris, E., of Jackson.
Hanrick, B .J., of Jefferson.
Hanson, J. A., of Lake.
Haddock, D. T., Jr., of Nassau.
Hood, H. C., of Palm Beach.
"Harris, S. D., of Pinnellas.
Hardee, Cary A., of Suwannee.
Jennings, Marion B., of Duval
Johnson, James M., of Escambia.
Kent, W. T., of Madison.
Langford, W. C., of DeSoto.
Lewis, Amos E., of Jackson.
Light, L. S., of Marion.
Matheson, Chris., of Alachua.
Marshall, W. H., of Broward.
Moore, E. R. L., of Franklin.
Mathis. C. R., of Holmes.
Mays, D. H., of Jefferson.
Morgan, A. J., of Polk.
McKenzie, H. S., of Putnam.
Myers, A. A.. of Washineton.
Perry, Francis W., of Lee.
Putnam. H. Q., of Volusia.
Rodes, John B., of Brevard.













5



Roebuck, W. J., of Columbia.
Roberts, C. A., of Orange.
Robson, W. Reid, of Polk.
Seals, W. G., of Bradford.
Smith, J. S., of Clay.
Stockton, Telfair, of Duval.
Strom, Samuel H., of Gadsden.
Stephens, C. A., of Hamilton.
Scruggs, John A., of Leon.
Sawyer, John G., of Monroe.
Stewart, James B., of Nassau.
Swain, J. M., of St. Lucie.
Sholtz, David, of Volusia.
Trammell, J. D., of Calhoun.
Taylor, W. M., of Manatee.
Tilghman, W. G., of Putnam.
Withee, A. G., of Columbia.
Watson. J. W., of Dade.
Webb, W. M., of Hamilton.
Wilder, Geo. H., of Hillsborough.
Williams. Alexander H., of Leon.
Weaver, R. H., of Liberty.
Woodruff, Seth, of Orange.
Wilson, E. P.. of Pasco.
Woodruff. F. L., of Seminole.
Wicker, N. J., of Sumter.
Walker, Nat. R., of Wakulhi.

Mr. J. G. Kellum, Chief Clerk, announced a qoirnr
present.
Prayer by Rev. H. S. Howard, Chiaplain.

Mr. Lewis of Jackson move7r that the House pi o'eed
with a permanent organization by Ile election of a
Speaker, a Speaker Protem, Chief Clerk, other Officers
and attaches.
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Lewis nominated Hon. Cary A. Hardee, of Snwann-
nee County, for Speaker.
Upon Call of the roll the vote was:
For Hon. Cary A. Hardee for Speaker-
Mr. Speaker.
Messrs.-
Anderson. S. W.. of Gadsden.











6



Anderson, Angus, L., of Walton.
Barber, C. F., of Baker.
Barnes, J. Y., of Citrus.
Baggett, M. 0., of Escambia.
Blanton, V. E., of Madison.
Bryan, N. C., of Osceola.
Bryant, J. A., of Santa Rosa.
Best, M. A.. of Suwannee.
Clark, Frank, Jr., of Alachua.
Crews, A. S., of Brladford.
Chaires, McQueen, of Lafayette
Crosby, W. J., of )Marion.
Corbett, Frank M., of St. Johns.
Cash, W. T., of Taylor.
Dawson, M. L., of HI'rnanlo.
DeGrove, Wmi. M., of St. Jolns.
Edge, L. D., of Lake.
Epperson, W. .., of Levy.
Fenn, T. J., of Santa Rosa.
Franklin, P. J., of Okaloosn.
Gomez, Arthur, of Monroe.
Hamblin, A. C., of Hillsborough.
Harris, E., of Jackson.
Hamrick, B. J., of Jefferson.
Hanson, J. A., of Lake.
'Haddock, D. T., Jr.. of Nassau.
Hood, H. C., of Palm Beach.
Harris, S. D., of Pinellas.
Jennings, Marion B., of Duval.
Johnson, James M., of Escambia.
Kent, W. T., of Madison.
Langford, W. C., of DeSoto.
Lewis, Amos E., of Jackson.
Light, L. S., of Marion.
Matheson, Chris., of Alachua.
Marshall, W. H., of Broward.
Moore, E. R. L., of Franklin.
Mathis, C. R., of Holmes.
Mays, D. H., of Jefferson.
Morgan, A. J., of Polk.
McKenzie, H. S., of Putnam.
Myers, A. A., of Washington.
Perry, Francis W., of Lee.











7



Putnam, H. G., of Volusia.
Rodes, John B., of Brevard.
Roebuck, W. J., of Columbia.
Roberts, C. A., of Orange.
Robson, W. Reid, of Polk.
Seals, W. G., of Bradford.
Smith, J. S., of Clay.
Stockton, Telfair, of Duval.
Strom, Samuel H., of Gadsden.
Stephens, C. A., of Hamilton.
Scruggs, John A., of Leon.
Sawyer, John G., of Monroe.
Stewart, James B., of Nassau.
Swain, J. M., of St. Lucie.
Sholtz, David, of Volusia.
Trammell, J. D., of Calhoun.
Taylor, W. M., of Manatee.
Tilghman, W. G., of Putnam.
Withee, A. G., of Columbia.
Watson, J. W., of Dade.
Webb, W. M., of Hamilton.
Wilder, Geo. H., of Hillsborough.
Williams, Alexander H., of Leon.
Weaver, R. H., of Liberty.
Woodruff, Seth, of Orange.
Wilson, E. P., of Pasco.
Woodruff, F. L., of Seminole.
Wicker, N. J., of Sumter.
Walker, Nat R., of Wakulla.
Mr. J. G. Kellum, Chief Clerk, announced the Hon
Cary A. Hardee, unanimously elected Speaker.
Mr. Wilder, of Hillsboroigh. moved that a committee
of three be appointed to escort the Speaker to the chair.
Which was agreed to.
Thereupon Mr. Kellum, Chief Clerk, appointed Messrs.
Wilder, Harris and Crews.
The Speaker being conducted to the chair extended his
thanks to the House for the honor conferred upon him.
Mr. Lewis, of Jackson, nominated Mr. W. M. Taylor
for Speakerl pro tern.












8



Upon the. call of the roll the vote was for Mr, W. M.
Taylor, Speaker pro tem.
Mr. Speaker,
Messrs.-
Anderson, S. W., of Gadsden.
Anderson, Angus L., of Walton.
Barber, C. F., of Baker.
Barnes, J. Y., of Citrus.
Baggett, M. D., of Escambia.
Blanton, V. E., of Madison.
Bryan, N. C., of Osceola.
Bryant, J. A., of Santa Rosa.
Best, M. A., of Suwannee.
Clark, Frank, Jr., of Alachua.
Crews, A. S., of Bradford.
Chairs, McQueen, of Lafayette.
Crosby W. J., of Marion.
Corbett, Frank M., of St. Johns.
Cash, W. T., of Taylor.
Dawson, M. L., of Hernando.
DeGrove, Wi., of St. Johns.
Edge, L. D., of Lake.
Epperson, W. J., of Levy.
Fenn, T. J., of Santa Rosa.
Franklin, P. J., of Okaloosa.
Gomez, Arthur, of Monroe.
Hamblin, A. C., of Hillsborough.
Harris, E., of Jackson.
Hamrick, B. J., of Jefferson.
Hanson, J. A., of Lake.
Haddock, D. T., Jr., of Nassau.
Hood, H. C., of Palm Beach.
Harris, S. D., of Pinellas.
Jennings, Marion B., of Duval.
Johnson, James M., of Escamnbia.
Kent, W. T., of Madison.
Langford, W. C., of DeSoio.
Lewis, Amos E., of Jackson.
Light, L. S., of Marion.
Matheson, Chris., of Alachua.
Marshall, W. H., of Broward.
Moore, E. R. L., of Franklin.
Mathis, C. R., of Holmes.
Mays, D. H., of Jefferson.












9

Morgan, A. J., of Polk.
McKenzie, H. S., of Putnam.
Myers, A. A., of Washington.
Perry, Francis W., of Lee.
Putnam, H G., of Volusia.
Rhodes, John B., of Brevard.
Roebuck, W. J., of Columbia.
Roberts, C. A., of Orange.
Robeson, W. Reid, of Polk.
Seals, W. G., of Bradford.
Smith, J. S., of Clay.
Stockton, Telfair, of Duval.
"Strom, Samuel H., of Garsden.
Stephens, C. A., of Hamil]ton.
Scruggs, John A., of Leon.
Sawyer, Jhin G., of Monroe.
Stewart, James B., of Nassau.
Swain, J. M., of St. Lucie.
Sholtz, David, of Volusia.
Trammell, J. I., of Calhoun.
Tilghman, W. G., of Putnam.
Withee, A. G., of Columbia.
Watson, J. W., of Dade.
Webb, W. M., of Hamilton.
Wilder, Geo. H., of Hillsborough.
Williams, Alexander H., of Leon.
Weaver, R. H., of Liberty.
Woodruff, Seth, of Orange.
Wilson, E. P., of Pasco.
Woodruff, F. L., of Seminole.
Wicker, N. J., of Sumter.
Walker, Nat R., of Wakulla.
The Speaker declared Mr. Taylor unanimously elected
speaker pro tem.
Mr. Lewis, of Jackson, nominated Mr. R. A. Green for
chief clerk.
Upon the call of the roll the vote was, for Mr. H. A.
Green for chief clerk.
Mr. Speaker:
Messrs.-
Anderson, S. W., of Gadsden.
Anderson, Angus L., of Walton.
Barber, C. F., of Baker.
Barnes, J. Y., of Citrus.











10

Baggett, M. 0., of Escambia.
Blanton, V. E., of Madison.
Bryan, N. C., of Osceola.
Bryant, J. A., of Santa Rosa.
Best, M. A., of Suwannee.
Clark, Frank, Jr., of Alachua.
Crews, A. S., of Bradford.
Chaires, McQueen, of Lafayette.
Crosbj, W. J., of Marion.
Corbett, Frank M., of St. Johns.
Cash, W. T., of Taylor.
Dawson, M. L., of Hernando.
DeGrove, Win. M., of St. Johns.
Edge, L. D., of Lake.
Epperson, W. J., of Levy.
Fenn., T. J., of Santa Rosa.
Franklin, P. J., of Okaloosa.
Gomez, Arthur, of -Monroe.
Hamblin. A. C., of Hillsborongh.
Harris, E., of Jackson.
Ham rick, B. J., of Jefferson.
Hanson, J. A., of Lake.
Haddock, D. T., Jr., of Nassau.
Hood, H. C., of Palm Beach.
Harris, S. D., of Pinellas.
Jennings, Marion B., of Duval.
Johnson, James M., of Escambia.
Kent, W. T., of Madison.
Langford, W. C., of DeSoto.
Lewis, Amos E., of Jackson.
Light, L. S., of Marion.
Matheson, Chris, of Alachua.
Marshal, W. H., of Broward.
Moore, E. R. L., of Franklin.
Mathis, C. R., of Holmes.
Mays, 1). H., of Jefferson.
Morgan, A. J., of Polk.
McKenzie, H. S., of Putnam.
Myers, A. A., of Washington.
Perry, Francis W., of Lee.
Putnam, H. G., of Volusia.
Bodes, John B., of Brevard.
Roebuck, W. J., of Columbia.











11

Roberts, C. A., of Orange.
Robson, W. Reid, of Polk.
Seals, W. G., of Bradford.
Smith, J. S., of Clay.
Stockton, Telfair, of Duval.
Strom, Samuel H., of Gadsden.
Stephens, C. A., of Hamilton.
Scruggs, John A., of Leon.
Safyer, John G., of Monroe.
Stewart, James B., of Nassau.
Swain, J. M., of St. Lucie.
Sholiz, David, of Volusia.
Trammel, J. I)., of Calhoun.
Taylor, W. M., of Manatee.
Tilghman, W. G., of Putnam.
Withee, A. Cl., of Columbia.
Watson, J. W., of Dade.
Webb, W. M., of Hamilton.
Wilder, Geo. H., of Hillsborough.
Williams, Alexander H., of Leon.
Weaver, R. H., of Liberty.
Wodruff, Seth, of Orange.
Wilson, E. P., of Pasco.
Wodruff, F. L., of Seminole.
Wicker, N. J., of Sumter.
Walker, Nat R., of Wakulla.
The Speaker declared Mr. R. A. Green unanimously
elected Chief Clerk.
Mr. R. A. Green came forward and took the oath of
office as prescribed by the Constitution of the State of
Florida before Mr. Justice James B. Whitfield of the
Supreme Court of the State of Florida.
Mr. Lewis, of Jackson, made the following nomi
nations:
Assistant Chief Clerk-J. Irvin Walden.
Bill Clerk-C. C. Epperson.
Reading Clerk-W B. Lanier.
Assistant Reading Clerk-Miss Myrtice McCaskill.
Engrossing Clerk-Eli Futch.
Enrolling Clerk-Miss Sue Barco.
Sergeant at Arms-W. R. Griffin.
Messenger-J. N. Rodgers.
Door Keeper-K. C. Lee.












12



Chaplain-H. S. Howard.
Janitor-Eugene Hawkins.
Page-Carrol Fussell.
Page-Hardy C. Croom.
Page-R. C. Van Brunt.
Page-Ellis Mortimer.
Mr. Wilder, of Hillsborough, moved that all officers
and attaches, as nominated above, be elected by acclama-
tion.
Which was agreed to.
The following attaches came forth and took the oath
of office prescribed by the Constitution of the State of
Florida, before Mr. Justice James B. Whitfield:
Assistant Chief Clerk-J. Irvin Walden.
Bill Clerk-C. C. Epperson.
Reading Clerk-W. B. Lanier.
Assistant Reading Clerk-Miss Myrtice McCaskill.
Enrolling Clerk-Miss Sue Barco.
Sergeant at Arms-W. R. Griffin.
Engrossing Clerk-Eli Futch.
Messenger-J. N. Rogers.
Mr.Wilder, of Hillsborough, moved that a Committee of
three be appointed to wait upon the Senate and inform it
that the House was organized and ready for business.
Which was agreed to.
Thereupon the Speaker appointed as such Committee
Messrs. Wilder, Stockton and Tilghman.
After 'a brief absence the committee returned and
reported that they had performed the duty assigned them
and were discharged.
A committee of three from the Senate, composed of
Messrs. MacWilliams, Davis and Carlton, appeared at
the bar of the House of Representatives and announced
that they were instructed by the Senate to inform the
House that the Senate was organized and ready to pro-
ceed to business.
On motion of Mr. Taylor, of Manatee, a committee of
three, consisting of Messrs. Taylor, of Manatee, Watson,
of Dade, Woodruff, of Orange, were appointed to wait
upon His Excellency, the Governor, and inform him that
the House was organized and ready to receive any mes-
sage or communication that he may be pleased to make.










13;



After a brief absence the committee returned and re-
ported that they had performed the duty assigned to
them and were discharged.
Mr. Barber, of Baker, moved that the-rules as adopted
and used by the House during session of 1915 be adopted
for the use ,of the House until the Committee on Rules
could report.
Which was agreed to.
The following message from the Governor was received
and upon motion of Mr. Strom was ordered spread upon
the Journal:
State of Florida,
Executive Chamber.
Tallahassee, April 3, 1917.
flon. Cary A. Hardee,
Speaker of the House of Representatives.
Sir:
I have the honor to transmit herewith in printed form
the message to the Legislature contemplated by Section
9 of Article IV. of the State Constitution.
I also transmit herewith in printed form the report
of pardons, etc., granted as required by Section 11 of
Article IV. of the Constitution.
I also transmit herewith a report submitted by the
Attorney General in pursuance of the requirement of Sec-
tion 97 of the General Statutes.
Very respectfully,
SIDNEY J. CATTS,
Governor.
The messages are as follows:










14



MESSAGE OF THE GOVERNOR


STATE OF FLORIDA.

OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR.

Tallahassee, April 3, 1917.
"To the Senate and House of Representatives:

The government of a State requires great care with its
management and demands conscientious and economical
consideration in the discharge of its official business.
In addressing this my, first message to you, there are
some things that I desire to state plainly and succinctly.
The first is that many of our laws are antiquated, tech-
nical and hard to understand and should be taken from
the statute books, and the Laws of Florida should be re-
codified and made simple and plain. There are many
new laws that should be added in the place of the old
ones, as new conditions are arising in our State at all
times.
LIQUOR AND PROHIBITION.
This is a burning issue that will come before you gen-
tlemen and will have to be threshed out in this session
of your body. It will require the best thought of the
Legislature. Nothing could be better than to have our
State join the dry column, and let us hope that this will
be done by the House and Senate submitting a State-
wide constitutional amendment at this session.
FEDERAL AID ROAD ACT.

The last session of the Congress of the United States
passed an act known as the Federal Aid Road Act. By











15



this statute Congress appropriated'a large sum of money
to be used to aid in the construction of roads in the sev-
eral States extending over a period of five years. In
order'for us to get our share of this money, it will be
necessary for the State to equip the Road Commission
with at least 300 or 400 convicts and appropriate enough
for their maintenance. Should we do this, we will get an
equal amount of money from the Federal Aid Road Act.
It would be well for us to commence this work moder-
ately, so as not to cripple the State Farm at Raiford and
yet enable us to obtain the Federal aid. I would sug-
gest that we commence with 300 convicts and from
$90,000 to $100,000 annually as a basis of operation to
begin with.
FINANCES.

This is a matter which gives us prosperity as a State
or causes the State to languish in poverty. Many of the
States surrounding ours have their finances in bad con-
dition, but I am pleased to report that Florida is not.one
of these. We must be very careful, however, in our ex-
penditure of money so that we shall not be forced to
either go upon a credit basis or raise the tax rate, for
either of these would be very ruinous to us as a State.
There will be many bills of appropriation, both in the
House and the Senate, and it is well for you legislators
to use great caution in the matter of appropriations for
the next two years, because we have lowered the tax rate
within the last two years and it will require a very econ-
omical expenditure of our resources to keep us from
spending all the money on hand and going into the credit
system.
INHERITANCE TAX.

I recommend the adoption of an inheritance tax. Such
tax is now enforced in forty-six out of the forty-eight









li6



States. This law 'uld help very materially at the pres-
ent time. If such a law should be enacted, I would sug-
gest that it would exempt the small estates and should
be so graduated in regard to the large estates that they
should pay a much heavier tax in proportion to their size.

TAXATION.

This is a matter which requires much thought and at
tention. We have for a number of years battled with this
question in every conceivable way, and there is a diversity
of opinion as to the matter of taxation now. Some con-
tend that we should have more power given to our Tax
Commission, others contend that it should be abridged,
and some contend that we should have the taxes of the
State gathered from licenses and corporations of the State
and counties, while the tax on realty should be applied to
the counties; and so we see many diversified opinions in
regard to this matter. However, my own opinion is that
we should give to the Tax Commission more power, so
that we might aid the different counties of the State in a
better solution of this matter.

STATE TAX COMMISSION.

The Tax Commission will require much of your time, as
I have stated, and if it is continued it will be necessary
for you to give it a considerable amount of power which
it has not at the present time. There is a great deal of
property in the State among the larger corporations and
estates escaping taxation. This body, in conjunction with
other taxing officers, should be given power to make such
investigations as are necessary for the purpose of locating
this property and placing its just proportion of the brr-
dens of the government. The right, also, of discovery
and secret investigation should be vested in this body in










17



order that they may discover these escaped taxes in the
various counties in the State and co-operate with the Tax
Assessor and Collector in having them assessed and col-
lected. The Commission makes several recommendations
in their report, which 1 call your attention to and ask
careful consideration of the same.

TAXATION OF RAILROAD PROPERTIES.

Under existing statutes the properties of railroad cor-
poratioIns in this State are assessed for the purpose of
taxation by the Comptroller of the State, who calls to his
assistance for this purpose the State Treasurer and the
Attorney General. This duty, in my opinion, would be
better performed by a board composed of the Comp-
tf-oier. one meiil:er of the Tax Coinmission and one
member of the Railroad Commission. In this way all of
the information which the Comptroller, the Tax Commis-
sion and the Railroad Commission has could be brought
to bear on this subject, and I recommend that the statute
be amended so as to provide a board composed of these
officers.
AUDITOR'S OFFICE.

In regard to this office, I desire to say that we have two
Auditors, who are kept constantly at work auditing the
books of the county officials throughout the State. These
men do their work seriously and conscientiously, but with
the best endeavor of them both it is absolutely impossible
for them to come nearer than a year and one-half in about
half of the counties and two years in the balance in their
aud'li(Ii;2 accounts. You can see from this condition that
the books of the county officials are very far behind in the
matter of auditing, and under present conditions it is im-
possible for them ever to catch up. While I hate very
much to insist upon it, I think that it is absolutely neces-
sary that you add one more Assistant State Auditor to
2-H J












18



the force now doing this work. The Auditor's office is in
as good condition as it can possibly be, considering the
"fact that it is from a year and one-half to two years
behind.

INSURANCE COMMISSIONER.

Up to the present our State Treasurer, Hon. J. C. Lun-
ing, has acted as Insurance Commissioner, and has done
this work faithfully. This is putting too much work on
Mr. Luning, together with his other arduous labors, and
I recommend that the Legislature pass a law giving us a
State Insurance Commissioner and fix his salary at such
a price as shall be commensurate with his duties. And
thathe also have supervision of the banks of the State.

FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE

As the insurance laws of Florida have weeded out the
smaller companies, both in the fire and life department,
I recommend that the taxes on these that do business in
this State be largely increased and that each and every
one of these companies doing business in our State be
required to have at least $50,000 in cash or good accred-
ited bonds in the hands of our Treasurer or the Insur-
ance Commissioner in case the custody of the insurance
business is changed.
In a nu'-mber of States in the Union Legislatures have
enacted laws which require both fire and life insurance
companies to publish regularly statements of their lia-
bilities and resources. This will finally be required by
every State. People buy insurance of both kinds with
their eyes shut in so far as the actual condition of the
company is concerned. By having a law that will require
this advertisement, this will put the people wise as to the
financial condition and backing of these companies. I,
therefore, recommend that you adopt such a law as this.












19"



STATE INSTITUTIONS,

I have, in company with many of the Cabinet officers,
investigated our State institutions so far as aiy limited
time would allow me.
The Boys' Industrial School at Marianna does not
seem to be in as good condition as it might be and com-
plaints constantly come to this office concerning the man-
agement of same. There seems to be a lack of discipline
upon the part of the management and things seem at
ragged edges in much that is now tolerated in that insti-
r ution.
The State Insane Asylum at Chattahoochee seems to
be vell managed, although the high price of living has
caused the expense for the maintenance of this great
plant, in which the unfortunates of the State are domi-
ciled, to run very far over the appropriations for -the
present year. There seems to be, from our examination,
a degree of order and proper management in this institu-
tion which is very gratifying to the administration and
should be to your body.
The State Farm at Raiford is one of the best manager
institutions in the State so far as order and development
is concerned, and everything seems to be carried on with
symmetry and care almost like clockwork. The prisoners
are reasonably cared for, although there have come a few
complaints of severe punishment, which have been looked
into by the Governor and which, we hope, will be cor-
rected. The management of the farm has completed a
railroad from their plant to the Seaboard just north of
Lawtey, which gives them now two railroad connections-
this one and the one at Raiford.
The School for the Deaf and the Blind at St. Augustine
is a very flourishing institution,. and upon its recent in-
vestigation by the Governor was found to be in almost
perfect condition. I refer in this report largely to the













white department, as I have not thoroughly investigated
the negro department.
The Girls' Industrial School has recently been located
at Ocala, Fla., and the Board is to be congratulated upon
having obtained a woman of splendid executive ability 'in
Mrs. Florence J. Range. At this writing very few girls
have come into the home, but many applications are
received and soon the home will outgrow its present
capacity.

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS.

The great institution of education in Florida, the
University located at Gainesville, is in a flourishing con-
,dilion and all of its departments are doing good and ser-
viceable work. There are some complaints of a crowded
condition of students on account of lack of room. There
is a demand also for an Administration building: The
student body is far in excess of the average in point of
intellect and progress, while the corps of professors im-
pressed me as being men conscientious in the discharge
of their duty and desiring the welfare of those entrusted
to their care. The Plant department of this institution
is doing great service to the State in many ways, es-
pecially in regard to citrus canker.
The Woman's College, located at Tallahassee, is also
doing good work and is crowded to its utmost, and is also
demanding another building. The student body of girls
is a very fine one and are imbued with the idea of making
a splendid corps of women for this and other States in
the future; while the corps of teachers also largely seem
to be desirous of doing their duty. I would recommend
especially the aid to the canning club work and the short
domestic courses of this school.
The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for
Negroes, located at Tallahassee, seems to be doing good
work and are fortunate in having such a head as Prof.










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N. B. Young, who wishes to develop his race'in every
possible way.

BOYS' AND GIRLS' INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL NOT
FOR THE CRIMINAL CLASS, BUT FOR
THE STUDENTS OF FLORIDA.

This is a question very close to the writer's heart, and
it would be desirable for the Legislature to locate one
each of these schools somewhere within our State where
the young, after finishing their high school training, can
go and learn how to become self-sustaining by having the
hand trained as well as the brain. It is a matter of fact
that we could appropriate an amount sufficient to make
it attractive for our communities to make bids by lands
and donations for these two institutions that we could
.soon have them with splendid homes and filled with hun-
dreds of boys and girls seeking to learn their life work.
Kissimmee has made a bid already for the establishment
of the Boys' Industrial School, and 1 am sure that many
communities would be glad to enter such a contest, giving
great amounts of land and money to have these schools
established in their confines.

ELECTION LAWS.

Our laws concerning elections should be changed. The
Bryan Primary law has proven not to be the success that
many hoped that it would. The second choice vote of
the first primary is not at all satisfactory. It seems to
me that there should be many changes made in this law,
and instead of having a first and second choice vote that
we should have the first choice vote alone and then a
second primary on the second Tuesday following without
any extra expense or canvass upon the part of the two
highest candidates; the candidate receiving the majority
of votes in the second primary beings declared the suc-








22



cessful contestant. The people of Florida will never
agree to let the second choice primary vote remain as it
is now, as it is the entering wedge of too much fraud.
The first primary should be held not later than the first
Tuesday in April.

INITIATIVE, REFERENDUM AND RECALL.

Our State has reached a point in its history where it
w6uld seem that these three laws should be incorporated
into the Constitution, the recent election in Florida
showing conclusively that there should be a recall of the
decisions of our courts. The initiative should be given
its just place in our law. The referendum should also be
considered carefully by your body and also be made a
part of our law. It is a positive fact that all law origi-
nates with the people, and the officers elected and ap-
pointed by the people should never get beyond the power
that created them. Personally, I would favor a law which
would be powerful enough to recall each and every officer
in the State, from a Justice of the Peace to the Supreme
Court. Aside from this, I would nirge not only that these
laws be passed, but also that we have a recall of judicial'
decisions. These four laws properly enacted and justly
safeguarded will be forever a defense of the people against
the encroachments of any court or class of men who
would try to oppress them. I urge upon you to consider
these matters with a great deal of gravity, because the
people demand some enactment along these lines.

TAXATION OF CHURCH PROPERTY.

I carefully call your attention to the fact that there
are some churches in the State holding great quantities
of land in their possession without taxation. Whole city
blocks are free from taxation, being rented out as stores,
and I would urge upon your body that you carefully. in-









23



vestigate the matter of taxing all church property, Catho-
lic and Protestant, in the State, except the church build-
ing itself and the pastor's or parochial's home, and the
land upon which they stand.

CLOSED. INSTITUTIONS.

The time seems to be right for us to stand out on the
broad basis of American liberty and declare that there
shall be no closed institutions of any kind in our State,
whether they be scholastic, eleemosynary or church in-
stitutions, and we would suggest that the Legislature pass
a law throwing open all school property, House of Good
Shepherd, convents, parochial schools or any other insti-
tutions now closed to our laws. Georgia has lately passed
such a law and put the matter of investigation into the
hands of the grand jury of the counties wherein these
institutions are located. It would be better put in the
hands of a commissioner.

SCHOOL LICENSES.

I would suggest that the teachers in private and de-
nominational schools, whether Protestant or Roman
Catholic, be required to stand the same examination that
our public school teachers are forced to stand before they
can teach school. It is not right to allow one class of
American citizens to have men and women who are quali-
fied to teach them and other schools not having these
examinations to be taught by people who we do not know
whether they are qualified or not.

LIBEL LAWS.
I recommend that you investigate carefully the law of
libel as it is now applied to the newspapers in the State
of Florida, and that you take away many of the serious
restrictions now pressed upon these newspapers.











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THE EVERGLADES DRAINAGE.

In regard to this mooted and restless matter desire
to recommend that the Legislature pass a law putting all
of the one million two hundred and fifty thousand acres of
land now held by the Internal Improvement Board for sale
at from five to eight dollars an acre, and that the same be
sold at private or public sale and the amount of money
gotten from these sales be, after the debts of the Board
have been paid, turned over to the State School Fund,
whereby each and every child of the State shall obtain
its pro rata share, and allow the drainage of these lands
to continue after they pass into- the hands of private
owners.

SUPREME COURT.

It is my opinion that the Supreme Court should be in-
creased to six Judges, making two working branches
thereof of three Judges each. The only expense to this
method will be the salary of another Judge. I would
also recommend that the Supreme Court be given two
good stenographers, who can help very greatly in catch-
ing up with the tremendous docket now before them.

FOREIGN CORPORATIONS.

A law should be passed whereby services of process can
be made upon foreign corporations by serving a summons
upon any agent in the State transacting business for the
corporation.

CIVIL DAMAGE ACT.

We should have a Civil Damage Act whereby a provi-
sion is made that a saloon-keeper and the person from
whom he rents property and wishes to conduct a saloon













shall be liable for any damage by a person intoxicated
where a saloon-keeper sold liquor to the intoxicated indi-
vidual. This we hol:e will be only a law f6r a brief dura-
tion, but it is badly needed until the saloon goes out of
business.

STATE PRINTER.

The question of the State owning its own printing
plant will probably come before you and should have your
careful attention, as the newspapers of the State have
been agitating this for some time. I also recommend
that you look carefully into this matter.

CONTINGENT FUND.

The contingent fund, amounting to two thousand dol-
lars per half-year or four thousand for the whole year, is
not enough for all of the demands made upon this fund.
The payment of a private detective, the expense of the
rewards to be paid for escaped criminals and other ex-
penses in this department make the Governor have to go
very slow and economical in the matter of seeing that
the laws of Florida are carried out as they should be. I
therefore recommend that with the coming in of the next
year he be allowed three thousand dollars per half-year
and six thousand dollars for the whole year.

NO LOOSE-LEAF LEDGERS FOR CIRCUIT COURT
CLERK AND OTHER OFFICERS OF RECORD.

There has come a great complaint throughout the State
in regard to the loose-leaf ledger system of the Circuit
Court Clerks and other officers keeping records, claiming
that they can take out any loose leaf and substitute the
same at any time they desire. I therefore recommend
that all loose-leaf ledgers of every kind be cut out of the









26



Circuit Court records and that no Clerk of the Circuit
Court or any Court of Record shall be allowed to use the
same, but that all books used by these officers shall have
pages consecutively numbered and fixed securely ,and in
permanently bound volumes.

PENSIONS FOR THE OLD SOLDIERS.

This is one of the things that lies nearest to the hearts
of us all when we think of the old Confederate soldiers
and the many sacrifices they made for the good of their
country, and we are eager that they should be as well
pensioned as the State finances will allow. I, therefore,
recommend that if it be possible to increase the pensions
of these soldiers as they die out and become fewer, and,
if it is impossible to increase the amount given to each
one then pay these pensions monthly, which will be a
great help to these dear old people, who are fast passing
away, and I recommend that the Legislature' authorize
the payment of pensions monthly, which will cost no more
except the making out of the vouchers and the warrants.
In this I am endorsed by the Comptroller, who recom-
mends to me that this be done. Kindly' give this your
most thoughtful attention.

DROVER'S LICENSE.

The statute now reads drovers selling at auction, trad-
ing or otherwise, shall pay a license tax of $100 in each
county. This shall include every person bringing stock
of any kind into the State for.sale. This, in my opinion,
is an unjust law and cuts out the little dealers in stock
and puts the whole matter of stock selling into the hands
of the big drovers, which is a bad condition for any coun-
try to get into. I, therefore, recommend that this law be
repealed and that you, adopt a sliding scale of license,









27



fixing the unit at tens and have it that any drover who
has droves of ten animals, mules or horses, be charged
$10.00 license, twenty be charged $20.00, and on up till
the larger drovers will pay the $100.00 license, thus giv
ing the little man an equal showing with the big one.

FEDERAL FARM AID AND BONDS.

As conditions now are in this State, Florida can not
have its quota of the Federal Farm Loan Bonds because
farm loan bonds are not legal investments for trustees
and fiduciary funds. I, therefore, recommend the enact-
ment of the necessary laws so that we, as a State, may
obtain our part of these funds.

SEMINOLE INDIAN RESERVATIONS.

As the Seminole Indians are the last vestige of the red
men left in the State of Florida, and as these aborigines
were the original settlers of the soil, and as they have
been defrauded of all the lands of this State which was
originally their fathers', I recommend that the Legisla-
ture appropriate enough of the public lands of Florida to
form a reservation for these Indians, not as per sterpes,
but as a tribe, with the title to vest in the tribe forever,
and none of them have any right to sell said land through-
out the ages to come, but for it to continue in perpetuity
a reservation for the Seminole Indians, and as Mr. Moore
of Moore Haven is very anxious to have this reservation
close to Moore Haven City, I would recommend that it be
located in that part of the country-say 10,000 acres.

EXTRA HELP FOR THE GOVERNOR'S OFFICE.

In the last two years the stenographic and clerical work
in the Governor's office has increased at such a rapid rate










28



that it is impossible for the present help to do this work,
however efficient they may be. For the purpose of assist-
ing the secretary, who is also secretary of the Board of
Commissioners of State Institutions, which Board has'in
its charge and management the various public institutions
of the State, including the State Prison Farm, the Hos-
pital for the Insane, the Industrial School for Boys, and
other institutions, it has been necessary to employ an
extra stenographer. This expense has been paid as other
expenses of these institutions are paid, and the employ-
ment has been an emergency measure adopted by the
Board for the purpose of properly serving the public in-
terest. I, therefore, recommend that the Governor's' office
have, in addition to the secretary, an executive clerk at
$100.00 per month and two stenographers at $90 per
month each. This ,will give the force two stenographers,
one executive clerk and one private secretary, and the
work will keep them all busy.

FLAG LAW.

Throughout the United States patriotism is rejuvenated
and reincarnated in the hearts of the citizens of this Na-
tion again. The noble sentiments that were felt for our
flag are now coming to the front as never before since the
Civil War, and it becomes necessary for us to respect both
the American flag and the flag of our State and give them
more reverence and devotion than we have ever expe-
rienced before: Therefore, I recommend that a law be
passed causing the American flag and the flag of our
loved State to be put upon every public school building
and every public building in the State of Florida, these
flags to be floated at the instruction of the custodian of
said building and in such weather as will not destroy
them.











2!9



PRIVILEGE TAX ON RIGHT TO HOLD LANDS OR
INTEREST IN LANDS IN LARGE BODIES.

It seems to be the policy of this State to impose a tax
in the nature of a privilege or license tax on the right to
engage in any business or occupation carried on in this
State. There is, however, no tax on the privilege of hold-
ing lands in this State in large bodies for the purpose of
speculation or for other purposes which prevent its de-
velopment or use for agricultural purposes.
With information which all of us have from actual ex-
perience that all classes of food products are exorbitantly
high, that in the large centers of population in this coun-
try women are rioting because their children are hungry
and starving, it is apparent that it is the imperative duty
of those in authority to give careful consideration to this
matter, to the end hat some rejn'.dy ; ;:.y be found for
this condition. A government which fails to meet the
needs of the people in a situation of this kind is failing
in its purpose, and the man who will speculate in food
products while women and children starve deserves the
condemnation of society, and no penalty will be too severe
ror such a crime.
It is generally believed, and is no doubt true, that
the operations of speculators contribute to the high prices
now prevailing for the necessaries of life. But laws of
this State would hardly be adequate to remedy this situa-
tion, because such operations are conducted principally
in large cities beyond the boundaries of this State.
A remedy that would contribute to the relief of this
condition is greater production of such products, but in
this the people are hampered because of high prices for
land held frequently by speculators in large tracts and in
certain instances for game preserves and the like, which
prevent its use for this purpose and deprives the people
of the opportunity and privilege of earning a livelihood
by the cultivation of such land.












30



If a tax was imposed by law upon the privilege of hold-
ing land in this State in this way for this purpose in the
same way that such a tax is imposed upon the privilege
of following any business or occupation in this State, such
tax being imposed on the privilege of holding lands for
other than agricultural or manufacturing purposes and
to apply only when the acreage so held is 640 acres or
more, and increased as the acreage held increases, it would
probably tend to remedy this condition, and I respectfully
recommend that the Legislature give serious and careful
consideration to this subject.

BANK GUARANTEE FUNDS.

There are several States which have adopted the Bank
Guarantee and Reserve Fund, whereby depositors iii
banks in the States having this law are guaranteed not
to lose any money in case of the bank's failure. The law
in Oklahoma seems to be the best, and I would carefully
urge upon your attention this law or some similar law
whereby the depositors shall be safely guaranteed from
loss in the future in bank failures.

THE FEDERATION OF LABOR.

The Federation of Labor, and laws respecting labor,
will be discussed in this session of the Legisuature pos-
sibly more than ever before in any previous session. The
coming to the front of the labor question and the solu-
tion of many vexed problems in which capitalists and
labor are involved have now reached the South, as well
as the North, and we have within this State many so-
cieties of federated labor demanding that we give them
proper recognition. I would earnestly urge that the Leg-
islature look carefully into these laws and see that the
State of Florida will offer a home to these federated labor
societies by treating labor as a part of the great body












31



politic of our State. To show their power, and that they
will continue to be such a power in our Nation, the fed-
erated labor societies of the railroads have lately forced
the eight-hour law upon the attention of the world.
Therefore, we can not treat in silence these great forces
in our national organization.

BETTER SHIPPING FACILITIES FOR THE PRO-
DUCER.

Lying as we do in a zone different from any other State
of the Union except California, and producing thousands
of commodities, vegetables, fruits, fish products, lumber,
turpentine, rosin and a great many others too numerous
to mention, it is absolutely necessary that the producer
in Florida should be in close and instant touch with the
consumer in the Northern, Eastern and Western mar-
kets. Untold thousands have been lost on account of our
laws being inadequate to transport these different prod-
ucts of the soil and waters of Floridato the markets des-
tined for them. I call your attention to these conditions
and ask that you carefully investigate them and frame
such laws as shall force the railroads and other common
carrier companies to give means of instant transit to the
markets for these goods and commodities. This will re-
quire much thought, but with the magnificent endowment
of the Senate and House at this time I am sure that laws
will be framed which will meet this contingency.

GROSS RECEIPT TAXES.

Under the laws of this State a tax in the nature of a
privilege or license tax is imposed upon sleeping and
parlor car companies doing business in this State, the
amount of such tax being .fixed by statute at $1.50 upon
each $100.00 of gross receipts derived by such companies
from business done between points in this State. A simi-










32



lar tax is imposed upon express companies and insurance
companies doing business in this State.
In suits brought by the Pullman Company this tax has
been held valid and enforeible by the-Supreme Court of
the State of Florida and the Supreme Court of the
United States.
There is no good reason why a similar tax should not
be imposed on telegraph companies, telephone companies
and railroad companies doing business in Florida, and to
the end that these companies shall be required to con-
tribute their just proportion to the burdens of the State
government, I recommuineei the :',.;ag'e of a statute im-
posing a tax of this character upon such companies.

LEGAL RATE OF INTEREST.

The monetary conditions of the United States are be-
coming so congested and the other States are demanding
a lower rate of interest it might be a good thing for the
Legislature to contemplate lowering the legal rate of
interest to six per cent, with special contracts making
,eight per cent legal where it is an agreement between
the two parties. This will bring many thousands of dol-
lars into our State for investment, for the financial world
is afraid of high rates of interest, while they, seek with
much avidity those investments based upon a low rate of
percentage, because they are safer.

THE FRIEND OF THE CONVICTS.

This is a new step taken in the laws of the world, but
the prison reform question, like that of prohibition and
other good movements, is a new question and one that
must be solved sooner or later. In order to solve this
question I have spent several sleepless nights thinking of
the condition of the prisoner or convicts, oftentimes shut
within the walls for life and having no friend except the,










33



convict inspector, who can see him but rarely. Often
times this convict has remained in. prison for so long a
rime that all the friends of his youth aie gone, either
dead or scattered. People who knew of his crime are no
longer alive; he has spent all of his money in past efforts
to gain his freedom by pardon. No one cares for him,
and shut within prison he sometimes lives and dies with-
out hope and without anyone on the outside or the in-
side of the prison walls who will make any effort for his
release, My idea, from thinking deeply about this ques-
tion, is that the State of Florida should commence a new
movement by appointing an officer known by the name
of THE FRIEND OF THE CONVICT, whose duty it
shall be to remain in prison, but allowed to come out at
stated intervals with the convicts, hear their stories.
learn their heart-throbs of sorrow and disconsolate-
ness and form a fiduciary relation with these men to
such a degree that this man will take their part as an
advocate even as the Son of Man came to earth and took
the part of a lost and ruined world with our Heavenly
Father, and in case that these prisoners are imposed upon
it will be the duty of this officer to, stand up for their
rights even as Christ will stand before the Mercy Seat of
an Almighty God in the day of judgment for you and I.
Living in the prison walls as this man will do, he will
become acquainted in due time with each and every pris-
oner, know his life stories, find out all about his idiosyn-
crasies of disposition and peculiarities of mannerism,
which will enable him to be of vast value to the Board of
Pardons when they come to consider who is worthy of
being pardoned and who is not. He can also tell those
into whose life real reforms have come and can be a great.
aid in helping the Pardoning Board and the prisoners as
well.
I realize that this is a new question and possibly will
be received with ridicule by a great many, but the time
'i! come when the world will see that I am right, and I
3-.H f











34



ask you gentlemen, while such a thing is beyond the pale
of possibility, 'o imagine yourselves within the prison
walls without a friend, without a helper, without a soul
to care for you, and think of how splendid it would be
to have this man who could come to you at any and all
times and, discuss freely with you each and every phase
of your life and at the same time render to you any help
that a merciful character, which he must be, could render
to the helpless and to the prisoner. I hope that if you
do not pass such a law as this, that it will awaken a dis-
cussion of this matter from one end of the country to the
other and that such a law or something akin to this will
be passed in the future.

STATE BUILDING.

The. crowded condition of the Shell Fish Commission,
the Road Department, Convict Department, Adjutant
General and the Arsenal, the latter twoodesiring to be
moved to Tallahassee, the Chemical Department and
several other departments, making it absolutely neces-
sary that a new State building should be erected some
time soon upon one of the squares now owned in the City
of Tallahassee by the State, I would suggest to your
honorable body that you consider this carefully, and if
possible, from the moneys now on hand, that you appro-
priate one hundred thousand or one hundred and fifty
thousand dollars for the erection of this building in case
you see that this money can be spared from our Treasury.

CONCLUSION.

There are many other matters that I could bring up
for your consideration, but suffice it to say that it seems
to me that I have already brought a sufficient number.
[ appreciate the fact that as h new Governor I may have
made many mistakes and am destined to make many












35

more, but I believe that it is the desire of each and every
Senator and Representative as well as myself to discharge
every duty and obligation that is incumbent upon us to
the best interest of our great commonwealth, in order
that we may make her one of the greatest States in the
Union.
Sincerely praying that a Merciful God may help each
and every one of you to quit yourselves like men,
Respectfully submitted,
SIDNEY J. CATTS,
Governor.



PARDONS, REPRIEVES, FINES REMITTED
AND SENTENCES COMMUTED SINCE
THE CONVENING OF THE LEGIS-
LATURE IN REGULAR
SESSION, 1915.



Total number of hearings by Board.......... 1088
Number prisoners submitting applications.... 678
Disposition-
Conditional pardons granted........... 187
Restorations to citizenship............. 21
Sentences commuted .................... 18
Bond forfeiture remitted ............... 3
Paroles granted ................. ...... 9
Death sentences commuted............ 9
Transfer to Reform School.............. 1
Applications denied .... .............. 408
Applications pending ....................22

678 678
C'onditi'onal pardons revoked ............ 4











36



STATE OF FLORIDA,

Executive Chamber.



Tallahassee, Florida, April 3, 1917.
GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATURE:
In pursuance of the reqiuiiremLent of Section 11, of
Aritcle IV, of the State Constitution, I have the honor
to transmit herewith a report covering "every case of
fine or forfeiture remitted, or reprieve, pardon or commu-
tation granted, stating the name of the convict, the
crime for,which he was convicted, the sentence, its date.
and the date of its remission, commutation, pardon or
reprieve," since the beginning of the regular session of
the Legislature of 1915.

RESTORATION TO CITIZENSHilP.

There have been twenty-one pardons granted for the
purpose of restoring to the beneficiaries the rights of
citizenship of which they were deprived by reason of
convictions for crime in the past. The pardons granted
for this purpose did not relieve the beneficiaries from the
payment of any fine from the service of any prison
sentence; but may be termed formal pardons, granted
in each case to persons who had long since satisfied the
sentences imposed upon them and who furnished satis
factory evidence to the Board that had, in the interim
lived law-abiding and useful lives, and earned by such
exemplary living, the privilege of restored citizenship.
and of a full pardon for the purpose of such restoration

CONDITIONAL PARDONS.

In every conditional pardon granted by the Board, the
following provision is incorporated: "This pardon is
granted to and accepted by the said ..................
upon- the express understanding and condition that if
at any time hereafter any person shall make complaint










.37



before the State Board of Pardons, or the Governor of
this State that the said ............... has violated any
of the above conditions, the said Board,'or the Governor,
shall have full power and authority, without notice to
the said .................... to investigate and in-
quire into such alleged breach of conditions, and if sat-
isfied, after such investigation that any of the condi-
tions hereof have been violated, may order the said
................. arrested by any Sheriff or Constable
and immediately delivered to the .................
prison authorities, and he shall thereafter suffer such
part of said original sentence of said Court as not
already been suffered by him at the date of this pardon."

SUMMARY.

Since the convening of the Legislature in regular ses-
sion in 1915 there have been presented to the Board of
Pardons applications for clemency on behalf of 678 sepa-
rate convicts. Owing to the fact that some applicants
lave caused their petitions to be re-submitted one or
more times after same had been denied, the Board of
Paidons has, during the two years, heard and passed
upon 1,088 presentations of applications for clemency.
Some measure of relief has been granted by the Board
in 248 of these applications. Nine death sentences were
.commuted to life imprisonment, the grounds for such
commutations being hereinafter stated; restorations to
citizenship were granted to 21 persons, all of whom had
previously been discharged from prison or satisfied the
penalty imposed and were shown to have been leading
useful and law-abiding lives; in 18 cases the prison sen-
tences or fines were commuted; and in 9 cases paroles
were granted upon conditions which would protect
interests of society. Conditional pardons were granted
to 187 persons, the conditions of such pardons all being
in accordance with the form above set out. Of the re-
maining 430 applications which were presented during
the two-year period, 408 were denied and 92 now pending
for further investigation and consideration by the Board
of Pardons. Three bond forfeitures were remitted, as is
hereinafter set out: one negro boy was ordered trans-









38



ferred from the State Prison to a Reform School in South
SCarolina from which he had escaped; four conditional
pardons formerly granted were revoked upon the grounds
stated in this report.
The statements which follow as to the causes in which
relief of some sort was granted are respectfully sub-
mitted. SIDNEX J. CATTS, Governor;
CONDITIONAL PARDONS.


JOSEPH DAY.-Convicted of illegal sale of liquor affd
sentenced to three months imprisonment and pay a fine
of $25.00 by the County Judge of Clay County, at'the
March term, 1915. It being shown to the Board that
this applicant is an old white man who is very feeble
and is in a pitable condition, and this application for
clemency being endorsed by a large number of repre-
sentative citizens of the community where the offense
occurred; by most of the County Officers and the rep-
resentatives in the Legislature from Clay County; and
the Sheriff having advised that this applicant has now
served two months of the term and that he cheerfully
recommends a pardon for him: Conditional pardon
upon above terms granted April 26, 1915!
MACK HAML.-Plead guilty to entering a building with
intent to commit a misdemeanor and sentenced to pay a
fine of $500.00, or serve six months imprisonment in the
County Jail at hard labor, at the Spring Term of Frank-
lin County Circuit Court, 1915. It being shown to the
Board that the applicant is a white boy who was led into
the commission of the offense for which he was sentenced
by an older man; that when arrested, he, said applicant,
freely told all of the facts constituting said offense and
was led to believe that in so doing sentence upon him
him would be suspended; and, applicant having now
served a month of the said sentence with good behavior;
and as he appears to be repentent and is shown to have
borne an excellent former reputation; and the Board be-
ing petitioned by a large majority of the white people
of Franklin County,to now release applicant upon the
ground that he has been abundantly punished for his
S connection with this offense; Conditional pardon upon
above terms April 25. 1915.









39



EDDIE MONTGOMERY,-Plead guilty to felonously enter-
ing a building with intent to commit a misdemeanor and
sentenced to pay a fine of $500.00, or serve six months
imprisonment in the County Jail at hard labor, by the
Franklin County Circuit Court, at the Spring Term.
1915. It being shown to the Board that the applicant
is a white boy who was led'into the commission of the
offense for which he was sentenced by an older man;
that when arrested; he, said applicant, freely told all of
the facts constituting said offense and was led to be-
lieve that in so doing, sentence upon him would be sus-
pended; and applicant having now served a month of
the said sentence with good behavior; and as he appears
repentent and is shown to have borne an excellent former
reputation and the Board being petitioned by a large
majority of the white people of Franklin County to now
release this applicant, upon the ground that he has been
abundantly punished for his connection with the offense.
Conditionally pardoned upon the above terms, April 25.
1915.
RAFFAEL KNOWLES.-Convicted of an assault with in-
tent to commit murder and sentenced to imprisonment
for twenty years, by the Criminal Court of Record, for
Monroe County, at the March Term, 1909. Upon the
strong recommendation of the Judge who sentenced the
applicant; the County Solicitor who prosecuted him,
all of the City Officials of Key West, and most of the
County Officials of Monroe County, all of the jurors who
convicted him and nearly a thousand representative citi-
zens of Key West, all of whom represent that prior to
this trouble applicant bore a good reputation and that
they believe he will make a good citizen if now extended
clemency and applicant having now served over six
years imprisonment in the State Prison and having been
an excellent prisoner; Conditionally pardoned on above
terms granted on. the 24th day of May, A. D., 1915.
HENRY BROWN.-Convicted of manslaughter at the
Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Duval County, A.
D., 1909, and sentenced to ten years imprisonment. Upon
the strong recommendation of the Judge who tried and
sentenced applicant, of. the State Attorney who prose-
cuted him and of the then Sheriff of Duval County, all
of whom have advised the Board that after this appli-










40



cant was convicted and sentenced evidence was discovered
which convinced them that such conviction was improper
and all of the said officers having strongly urged that this
board render justice to the applicant by extending clem-
ency; and some of the representations having been made
to the Board by responsible white citizens of Baldwin.
where the homicide occurred; and, it being shown that
the applicant bore a good former reputation and thai
his prison conduct has been excellent and that he has
now served more than six years of the ten year sentence
imposed upon him; Conditional pardon granted upon the
above terms, June 15, 1915.
EDWARD RHONE.-Convicted on a charge of obtaining
money by false pretense at the September Term of the
Court of Record for Escambia County, A. D., 1913, and
sentenced to eighteen months imprisonment and to pay
a fine of $500.00 and costs, or serve an additional one
year in prison. This applicant having now served moro
than eighteen months in the State Prison with good con-
duct and it being shown that he is wholly unable to pay
the fine and costs imposed upon him, and the Judge who
tried and sentenced him, the County Solicitor who prose
cuted him and the Assistant Prosecuting Attorney es-
pecially employed having written the Board strong rec-
ommendations representing that in consideration of all
the 'circumstances of applicant's offense, in their judg-
ment that he has been amply punished therefore, and it
being shown to the Board that this applicant is in a
very precarious state of health which is being made
worse by confinement in prison; and it appearing that
his general reputation prior to this trouble had been
good; Conditional pardon upon above terms granted
June 15, 1915.
,C. J. PARISH, alias J. M. DAVIDSON. -Convicted of forg
ery at Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Nassau County
A. D., 1914, and sentenced to nine months imprisonment
in the County Jail. This applicant having served eight
months of the nine months sentence with good conduct,
and it having come to the knowledge of the Board that
the duly appointed agents of the State of California
acting upon information received from the proper requi
sition papers for the purpose of returning said Parish to
the State of California for trial on similar charge; and










41



"it being shown that unless applicant is released at this
time the 'said authorities will be compelled to make a
second trip for the said Parish at a great expense to
them; and whereas, it is deemed advisable under the
circumstances that said Parish be delivered to the au-
thorities of the State of California; Conditional pardon
granted upon the above terms July 8th, 1915.
WILLIAM M. MooRE.-Convicted of murder at the July
Term of the Circuit Court for Dade County, A. D. 1909,
and sentenced therefore to life imprisonment. Upon the
recommendation of the trial Judge who sentenced him;
a large number of citizens of Dade County, including the
County Officials; eight of the jurors who tried him and
the recommendation from the prison officials, that he had
a good record as a prisoner; and, it being further shown
to the Board that the said applicant is now fifty-five
years of age and in poor health; Conditional pardon
granted upon above terms August 4, 1915.
L. B. OWENS.-Convicted of manslaughter at the winter
Term of the Circuit Court for Escambia County, A. D.
1912,. and sentenced therefore to four years imprisonment.
It being shown that this young white man had served a
considerable portion of his sentence; that his prison record
has been exemplary; that prior to the trouble which
brought about his conviction, he had a reputation of be-
ing a good citizen; his application for a pardon being
endorsed by a large petition of citizens and officials. Con
ditional pardon granted upon above terms August 4,
1915.
WALTER JonNsoN.-Convicted of murder at the Spring
Term of the Circuit Court for Santa Rosa County, A. D.
1912, and sentenced therefore to life imprisonment. It
being shown to the Board that the Judge who presided
at the trial and sentenced the prisoner endorsed his ap-
plication for pardon; that nine members of the jury vho
convicted him had endorsed his application for pardon,
and a petition of over nine hundred citizens accompanied
Sthe application and also it coming to the knowledge of
the Board that the applicant's family was in very needy
circumstances and believing that the ends of justice would
be best met by granting the applicant a conditional par-
don. Conditional pardon granted upon above terms Au-
gust 4, 1915.








42



D. M. JACKSON.-Convicted of having carnal intercourse
with a female under eighteen years of age at the Fall
Term of the Circuit Court for Washington County, A. D.
1913, and sentenced therefore to a term of five years imr
prisonment. It being shown to the Board that there were
grave doubts of the guilt of the applicant, and upon the
recommendation of the trial the Judge who presided at
the trial and sentenced the applicant; and of the State
Attorney who prosecuted the case. Conditional pardon
granted upon above terms August 4, 1915.

WILLIAM NORED.-Convicted of keeping a gaming room
at the March Term of the Escambia County Court of Rec-
ord, A. D. 1915, arid sentenced therefore to pay a fine of
$500.00 and cost, or to serve one year and six months, six
months of which said sentence was to be suspended dur-
ing good behavior. The Judge who presided at this trial
and who passed sentence upon him having advised the
Board of Pardons that subsequent to the time this sen-
tence was passed it came to the knowledge of the court
that said applicant was not the principal, being merely
an employee in the game room, and that the principal, or
proprietor, of said game room had been convicted and
given the same sentence above mentioned, and the other
employees were sentenced to three.months' imprisonmut
and the said William Nored having already served that
length of time, the trial Judge recommending his pardon.
Conditional pardon granted upon above terms, August 4,
1915.

Dr. J. C. AsHToN.-Convicted of issuing worthless
checks at the May Term of the Criminal Court of Record
for Hillsborough County, A. D. 1912, and, sentenced to
five years imprisonment. Upon it being shown to the
Board that his application was endorsed by the trial
Judge who sentenced the prisoner and by a large number
of citizens and officials, and an endorsement by the prison
officials that his prison record had been excellent, and
that he had been of service to the prisoners. Conditional
pardon granted upon above terms, August 4, 1915.

ESTERS NEWTON.-Convicted of reckless handling of a
deadly weapon at the May Term of the County Judge's
Court, of Jackson County, and sentenced to a term of









43



four months imprisonment or to pay a fine of $75.00.
Upon the recommendation of the trial Judge and other
officials of Jackson County, and upon the petition of more
than three hundred citizens, and upon the further show-
ing that said applicant was a white boy only eighteen
years of age, and that he had served more than two months
of the four months sentence, and it appearing that the
ends of justice would be best met by granting this appli-
cant a conditional pardon. Conditional pardon granted
upon above terms August 4, 1915.
L. H. FERRELL.-Convicted of manslaughter at the
Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Liberty County, A.
D. 1913, and sentenced to ten years imprisonment. It be-
ing shown to the Board that prior to the trouble for which
he was convicted this man had been a peaceable, law-abid-
ing citizen, and that the act was committed under particu-
larly aggravated circumstances, and upon the strong pe-
tition of practically all of the citizens and officers of the
County wherein the applicant resided, and upon the peti-
tion of all of the jurors who tried the applicant, and upon
the endorsement of the prison officials stating that the
applicant had an excellent prison record. Conditional
pardon granted upon above terms August 4,'1915.
CHARLES ANDREWs.-Convicted of murder in the second
degree at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court of Osceola
County, A. D. 1903, and sentenced to life imprisonment.
It being shown to the Board that this applicant had served
twelve years in prison; that his prison record has been
good; that he was only nineteen years of age when the
crime was committed; and having the endorsement of
the trial Judge who presided at the trial. Conditional
pardon granted upon above terms August 4, 1915.
WILLIAM KNIGHT.-Convicted of Arson at the Spring
Term of the Circuit Court for Clay C6unty, A. D. 1910,
and sentenced therefore to twenty years imprisonment.
It coming to the knowledge of the Board that there was
very grave doubt as to the guilt of this applicant and the
application being endorsed by practically all of the cit-
izens in the vicinity where the crime was supposed to have
been committed; and upon urgent appeals of prominent
white citizens of the vicinity. Conditional pardon
granted upon above terms August 4, 1915.










44



D. M. DAVIDSON.-Convicted onl a charge of murder at
the Special Term of the Circuit Court for Putnam County,
A. D. 1909, and sentenced therefore to life imprisonment.
Accompanying the application was an affidavit made by
James M. Kelley convicted of the same crime as the ap-
plicant, acknowledging his guilt and exculpating the ap-
plicant D. M. Davidson from any connection whatever
with the crime. Conditional pardon granted on above
terms August 4, 1915.

A. D. DANIELs.-Convicted of murder in the second de
gree at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, A. D. 1902, and sentenced therefore to life impris-
onment. It coming to the knowledge of the Board that
this man has served thirteen years imprisonment, all ol
which time hisprison record has been good; that he is
now physically incapacitated; that his application was
endorsed by the State Attorney who prosecuted him at
the trial. Conditional pardon granted upon above terms
August 4, 1915.

WILL BRYANT.-Convicted of manslaughter at the Fall
Term of the Circuit Court for Manatee County, A. D.
1905, and sentenced therefore to twenty years imprison-
ment. It being shown that this applicant has served
twelve years of his sentence; that his prison record has
been extra good; that he had been of service in presenting
escapes at a personal risk that his health was now broken.
Conditional pardon granted on above terms August 4,
1915.

W. G. AYER.-Convicted of murder at the Spring Term
of the Circuit Court for Marion County, A. D. 1911, and
sentenced to life imprisonment. It bing shown to the
Board that this applicant was convicted entirely upon
circumstantial evidence and that his application for par-
don was recommended by the Judge who presided at the
trial; the State Attorney who prosecuted for the 'State;
by prominent citizens of the county wherein the trial was
had, and by all members of the jury who could be reached;
and it being made further to appear that the prison record
of the applicant had been good. Conditional pardon
granted upon above terms August 4, 1915.











45



ABCH COVINGTON.-Convicted of murder at the Fall
Term of the Circuit Court for Duval County, A. D., 1900,
and sentenced therefore to life imprisonment. It being
shown to the Board that the applicant had a splendid
record, that the prison authorities recommended and
stated that the applicant had "an extra good" record in
prison, being full "trusty," and having aided in prevent-
ing escapes; and it being further shown to the Board
that this applicant had served sixteen years in prison.,
Conditional pardon granted upon above terms August
4, 1915.

JOHN H. WILLIAMS.-Convicted of murder in the sec-
ond degree, November term of the Circuit Court for
Jackson County, A. D. 1902, and sentenced to life im-
prisonment. It being shown to the Board that this ap-
plicant had a good prison record that he had served
nearly thirteen years in prison; that his health was no
longer good, but that he had learned a trade which
,would enable him to make a livelihood; that the State
Attorney who prosecuted him recommended the pardon.
Conditional pardon granted upon above terms August 4,
1915.

HENRY GAINEY.-Convicted of Manslaughter at the
Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Jackson County,
A. D. 1908, and sentenced therefore to ten years im-
prisonment. It being shown to the Board that this ap-
plicant has served more than seven years of the ten
years sentence and his application being endorsed by the
Circuit Judge who presided at the trial, and his prison
record being reported as good by the prison authorities.
Conditional pardon granted upon the above terms Au-
gust 4, 1915.

EMILY CHAVIS.-Convicted of murder in the second
degree at the Fall erm of the Circuit Court for Columbia
County A. D. 1908, and sentenced therefore to life im-
prisonment. Ie being shown to the Board that this ap-
plicant has had a good prison record and had served al-
most seven years in prison; that the Prison Physician
certifies that she is a constant sufferer from disease;
she has a son thirteen years of age in poor health and
needipg her care, and it being made to appear further












46



that her petition for a pardon was signed by a large
number of prominent white citizens, many of whom
were present at the trial and stated that it was very
doubtful if the applicant was guilty of the crime for
which she was convicted. Conditional pardon granted
upon above terms August 4, 1915.

HORACE WALKER.-Plead guilty to Manslaughter at
the Spring Term of the Circuit Court of St. Johns
County, A. D. 1908, and sentenced therefore to ten
years imprisonment. It being shown to the Board that
this man had served seven years of his ten year sentence;
that his prison record had been exceptionally good; and
his application being endorsed ,by prominent white citi-
zens who urged his release from prison and stated that in
their opinion he will make a good law abiding citizen.
Conditional pardon granted on above terms August 4.
1915.

AARON JA'coss.-Convicted on a charge of being an ac-
cessory to murder at the Spring Term of the Circuit
Court for Dade County, A. D. 1903, and sentenced to
life imprisonment. It being shown to the Board that
this man had served twelve years in prison during which
time his prison record had been good, and it being fur-
ther shown to the Board that the Judge who presided
at the tri4 of this applicant recommended the pardon
and that the principal convicted of the crime in which
the applicant was charged as accessory completely ex-
onerated this applicant from any connection with the
crime. Conditional pardon granted August 4, 1915.
DocK DAVIs.-Convicted of Manslaughter at the
Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Wakulla Count, A.
D. 1913, and sentenced therefore to ten years imprison-
ment, which application having been endorsed by County
Officers and by a large majority of the citizens of the
county in which the crime was committed, by the State
Attorney who prosecuted the applicant and by all of
the jurors who tried him, and it being further shown
that his prison record has been good and that at the
time that the crime was committed it was very likely
that the applicant had been drugged and was tem'por-
arily not responsible for his acts.. Conditional pardon
granted on above terms August 4, 1915.













47



JOHN HUNTER.-Convicted of assault to murder, at
the Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Polk County,
A. D. 1911, and sentenced therefore to five years impris-on-
ment. It coming to the knowledge of the Board that this
application was endorsed by the petitions of a large num-
ber of the citizens of the county wherein the difficulty
occurred, and that the time for which the applicant was-
sentenced will soon expire, and believing that the ends-
of justice will be best subserved thereby. Conditional.
pardon granted on above terms August 4, 1915.

RANDOLPH CADY.-Convicted of assault to murder at
the June Term of the Criminal Court of Record for
Walton County, A. D. 1911, an sentenced therefore to
five years imprisonment. It coming to the knowledge of
the Board that this applicant had served the greater
portion of his sentence, his application having been en-
dorsed by a large number of the citizens of the County
wherein the difficulty occurred, that the applicant was-
but a young man at the time, that the Judge who sen-
tenced him recommends the pardon, and his prison rec-
ord having been good. Conditional pardon granted upon
above conditions August 4, 1915.

WALTER BOUTWELL.-Convicted of changing the mark
on a marked hog at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court
for Bay County, A. D. 1914, and sentenced therefore to
twelve months imprisonment. It being brought to the
knowledge of the Board that this applicant had a good
prison record; that the Judge who sentenced him and
the State Attorney who tried him both recommended his.
pardon; and that the applicant has a dependent family,
some of whom were sick and needed his attention. Con-
ditional pardon granted upon above terms, August 4,
1915.

FLOYD BABB, JOSEPH HATCHER, LAWSON BERRY-Plead
guilty to the charge of shooting into a dwelling at the
Fall term of the Circuit Court for Holmes County, A. D.
1914, and sentenced therefore to one year imprisonment.
It being shown to the Board that the notice of intention
to apply for pardon had been duly published; that these:
applicants were minors and probably influenced by older'
men in whose company they were at the time the crime-










48



was committed;that their applications for pardon were
endorsed by more than 500 citizens of the community in
which the crime was committed. Conditional pardon
granted upon above terms, August 4, 1915.
TOM SMOTHERS.-Convicted of assault and battery at
the Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Jefferson County,
A. D. 1915, and sentenced therefore to eight months im-
prisonment. It being shown to the Board that the appli-
cant is now in bad physical condition and confined to the
jail at Monticello, his physical condition being certified to!
by a Physician; his application being endorsed and recom-
mended by the County Judge, the Prosecuting Attorney,
the Sheriff, the County Commissioners and other county
officials; and applicant having served all but six weeks
of his sentence and his prison conduct having been good.
Conditional pardon granted on above terms, November
4, 1915.
BEULAH PALMER.-Convicted of larceny of clothing, at
the November Term of the Criminal-Court of Record for
Hillsborough County, A. D. 1915, and sentenced therefore
to one year imprisonment. It being shown to the Board
that said applicant has served more than four months of
her sentence; that she was pregnant with child at the
time of incarceration and according to the physician's
certificate accompanying the application will be delivered
of child within about a month; the application being
recommended by the County Judge, Prosecuting Attorney
and other County officers and citizens, and believing that
the ends of justice would be best met by granting the
applicant, a conditional pardon. Conditional pardon
granted on above terms, November 13, 1915.
HENRY JOHNsoN.-Convicted of petty larceny in the
Justice of the Peace Court of Washington County and
.sentenced to six months in the County jail. It being
shown to the Board that the applicant is suffering from
an infectious and loathsome disease; is in bad physical
condition; the application being recommended by the
State Attorney 'and County officials aind by the grand
jury, and believing that the ends of justice would be besi
met by granting the applicant a conditional pardon.
Conditional pardon granted upon above terms. November
:3. 1915.








49



,J. E. BRlTTON.-Plead guilty to perjury at the Citrus
County Circuit Court and.,was sentenced to fourteen
months imprisonment in the"'tate Prison. It being shown
to the Board that the application was endorsed by the
fv iuglo' who spsssd. senitnce, byi 'the ISheriff, the' County
Judge and a Iblrber.of county officers and members of the
Board of County .Comnnissionet by approximately three
hundred and:fifty.citizens of the county, and it also appear-
ing to the Bdard -that the offense of which the applicant
plead guilty was probably due to a misunderstanding of
instructions from his attorney, and that the applicant
has served nine aind one-half months of his sentence; that
his prison record has been good, and the ends of justice
would be best subserved by granting a pardon. Condi-
tional pardon granted. upon above conditions November
15, 1915.

LEE MILLS.-Convicted of adultery at the Fall Term of
the Circuit Court for Holmes County, A. D. 1915, and
sentenced therefore to- six months in the County Jail. Said
application being endorsed by the County Judge, the
Sheriff, the Tax Assessor and Collector, the County Com-
missioners, the Clerk of the Court and a number of prom-
inent citizens of the county. And it appearing that this
applicant was merely technically guilty and had been suf-
:ficiently punished, and the parties being married and were
living together as husband and wife at the time the in-
dictment was returned against them and will continue to
so live together if the applicant is liberated Conditional
pardon granted upon above terms on December 8, 1915.

BEN HI. LIDDON.-Plead guilty to embezzlement at the
Spring Term of the ('itr:uit Court for Jackson County,
A. D. 1914, and sentenced to two years in the State
Prison. This applicant having served almost his entire
sentence and his application being endorsed by the Judge
of the Circuit Court, the State Attorney, a petition of
prominent citizens, and his prison record having been ex-
cellent. Conditional pardon granted upon above, terms
December 8, 1915.

JOHN IROiAND.-Plead guilty to perjury at the Fall
Term of the Circuit Court for Holmes County, A. D. 1914.
and sentenced to four years imprisonment. It being made
4-i4 1












50



known to the Board that this applicant was about sixty
years of age; very illiterate; his mentality being below
normal; and the presumption having arisen that the said
applicant did not realize fully the probable consequences
of his acts at the time that he perjured hiniself; his past
record having been good; his application being endorsed
by the county officials and a number of citizens, and his
prison record being good. Conditional pardon granted
upon above terms December 8, 1915.

M. M. DAvIs.-Convicted of murder at the Spring Term
of the Circuit Court for Calhoun County, A. D. 1914, and
sentenced to life imprisonment. It having come to the
knowledge of the Board that this applicant took no part
in the homicide for which he was convicted; that subse-
quent developments have brought the entire facts con-
nected with the killing to light; his application being en-
dorsed by nearly one thousand citizens of the county in
which the crime was committed, some prominent citizens
of the county having appealed personally to the Board in
his behalf, and the man who did the killing being now in
the State Prison serving a life sentence and. has made
affidavit that this applicant was in no wise responsible for
the homicide. Conditional pardon granted upon above
terms December 8, 1915.

B. T. ENGLIsn.-Convicted of an aggravated assault at
the April Term of the Criminal Court of Record for Vo-
lusia County, A. D. 1915, and sentenced to ten months in
the County jail. It having come to the knowledge of the
Board that this applicant is fifty-seven years of age; that
"he has served seven months of the ten months sentence;
that his application is endorsed by the Judge who pre-
sided, the Solicitor who prosecuted him, the Sheriff, the
Clerk of the Court, the Deputy Sheriff, all of whom were
familiar with the facts in the case, and it appearing that
the previous conduct of the applicant was good. Con-
ditional pardon granted on above terms, December 8, 1915.

. L, M. THOMAs.-Convicted of manslaughter at the Fall
Term of the Circuit Court for Calhoun County, A. D. 1912,
and was sentenced to four years in the State Prisont. This
applicant having served nearly three and one-half years
of the four year sentence; his prison record being good;














his prison record being endorsed.by a number of citizens
and officials. Conditional pardon granted on above terms,
December 8, 1915.
THOMAS WEEKS.-Convicted of manslaughter at the
Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Lee County, A. D.
1901, and sentenced to twenty years imprisonment. This
applicant having escaped from the prison authorities but
while at large having voluntarily returned and surrend-
ered himself to the prison authorities; his prison record
otherwise being good; that there were extenuating cir-
cumstances connected with the crime which has subse-
quently come to the knowledge of the Board; that this
applicant has a wife and children depending upon him
for support and who are now in serious need of his serv-
ices; his application being endorsed by abput eight hun-
dred citizens of the county in which the crime was com-
mitted, being county officials and others very familiar
with the facts in the case. Conditional pard6n granted on
above terms, December 8, 1915.
GEO. lHARRIs.-Convicted of murder with recommenda-
tion to mercy at the Spring Term of the Circuit Court for
Manatee County, A. D. 1902, and sentenced to life im-
prisonment. This applicant having served thirteen years
in the State prison during which time his prison record
has been excellent; his application for pardon having
been recommended by the Judge who presided at the ti ial
and sentenced him, and it appearing that the homicide
occurred because the deceased interferred with and dis-
turbed the applicant's family relations. Conditional
pardon granted on above terms, December 8, 1915.
PETER GREER.-Convicted of murder in the second de-
,gee at the-Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Dade
County and sentenced therefore to life imprisonment.
This applicant having served thirteen and one-half years
in the State prison, during which time his prison
record has been excellent and it coming to the knowledge
of the Board that during his incarceration that he not
only maintained a good prison record but has alsobeen
active in preventing escapes and at one time prevented
the escape of other prisoners: that he is now suffering
with tumor of the brain. Conditional pardon granted on
above terms, December 8. 1915.








52



FRANK JOHNSON.-Plead guilty to a charge of murder
in the second degree at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court
for Polk County. This applicant having served fourteen
years at hard labor in the State Prison, and it appearing
that his prison record has been good, that he is now crip'
pled. (',..,lli' ,i;-il pardon' granted upon above terms on
I ecember 8, 1915.

H:iNRY SMITS Convicted of larceny of a horse at the
Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Marion County, A. D.
1914, and sentenced therefore to two years imprisonment.
This application being endorsed by the Judge who pre-
sided at the trial, the owner of the horse which was
stolen, ihe County Officers and others who were promi-
nent citizens familiar with the facts in the case, the ap-
plicant having served one year of the two-year sentence
and his phy sical condition being poor. Conditional par-
dan granted upon above terms on December 8, 1915.

SAMUEL J. HALL.-Convicted of an assault to murder at
the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Manatee County,
A. D1. 1911, and sentenced therefore to ten years in the
State Prison. This application- being endorsed by the
Judge who presided at the trial, the State Attorney who
prosecuted, all of the jury who tried the applicant and
the man upon whom the assault was made, and also a
large number of resident citizens in which the crime was
committed strongly recommending the pardon, and the
applicant having served four years: Conditional pardon
granted upon above terms December 8, 1915.

lHENVR A. FRAZIER.--Convicted of having carnal inter-
coum e with a female under the age of eighteen years, at
the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Volusia County,
A. D. 1909, and sentenced to life imprisonment. This
applicant having complied with the requirements for the
publication of notice of intention to apply for a pardon,
no objection having been filed, all of the parties inter-
ested being colored, it appearing that the application was
endorsed by the Judge who presided at the trial, the ap-
plicant also having an excellent prison record and having
served six years of the original sentence, which appears
to have been unusually severe. Conditional pardon
"granted on above terms December 8, 1915.












53



FRANK HoPPER.-Convicted of breaking and entering
at the February Term of the Circuit Court for Hamilton
County, A. D. 1914, and sentenced therefore to five years
imprisonment. It coming to the knowledge of the Board
that the Judge who presided at the trial promised to
recommend this applicant to executive clemency if his
prison conduct warranted the same; his prison record
having been good, the applicant being only eighteen years
of age at the time the crime was committed, his applica-
tion being endorsed by the officers as a "youthful indis-
cretion and believed reform," his pardon being recom-
mended by the Judge, the State Attorney and the prison
officials. Conditional pardon granted upon above terms
December 8, 1915.
Gus BYERS.-Plead guilty to a charge of larceny of
cattle at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for DeSoto
County, A. D. 1914, and sentenced to two years imprison-
ment. This application being strongly endorsed by the
Judge who presided at the trial, by the main prosecuting
witness at the trial, by the State Senator and Representa-
tive who were familiar with the facts in the case and the
petition of seventy-five or one hundred citizens, his prison
record having been good; and it appearing to the Board
that the sentiment of the community in which the crime
occurred is that this applicant has been fully punished
Conditional pardon granted upon above terms December
8, 1915.
C. A. LoNG.-Convicted of having carnal intercourse
with a female under the age of eighteen years at the
Spring Term of the Circuit Court for St. Lucie County, A.
D. 1913, and sentenced therefore to the State Prison Farm
for three years. This application having been endorsed
by the Judge who presided at the trial, by the Sheriff and
Deputy Sheriff and all of the jurors except one and by a
large number of prominent white citizens of St. Lucie
County; and it further appearing to the Board that this
applicant has a good prison record, that his reputation
prior to the crime for which he was convicted was that
he was a hard-working and law-abiding citizen, and that
he has a baby dependent on him for support, and the
further fact that there was room for possible doubt of the
defendant's guilt. Conditional pardon granted upon the
above terms December 8, 1915.









54



EMILY MCDONALD. Convicted of tihe crime of abortion
at.the October Term of the, Criminal Court for Hillsbor-
ough County, A. D. 1914, and sentenced therefore to two
years in the State Prison. This application having been
endorsed by the main prosecuting witness in the case, by
the Sheriff, who is familiar with the facts in the case;
and 'it being made further to appear to the Board that
this applicant is a woman well advanced in years, and
that she assures the Board that it is her intention, if
released from prison, to immediately go to another State,
where she has relatives who will take care of her. Con.
ditional pardon granted upon above terms December 8,
1915.

WYATT GoLsoN.-Convicted of breaking and entering
at the April Term of the Court of Record for Escambia
County, A. D. 1915, and sentenced therefore to one year
in the County Jail. This application having been en-
dorsed by the Prosecuting Attorney, the Sheriff, the
Clerk of the Court of Record, by the Board of County
Commissioners and others familliar with the facts in the
case; and it appearing that this applicant has served
seven months of the one-year sentence, that he was only
seventeen years of age. Conditional pardon granted
upon above terms December 8, 1915.

REMINGTON SMITH. Convicted of murder in the first
degree, with recommendation of mercy, and sentenced to
life imprisonment at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court
.for Wakulla County, A. D. 1904. It having come to the
knowledge of the Board that this applicant was but a
fourteen-year-old boy and below normal in physical and
mental development for a boy of that age at the time the
crime was committed, and his application having been"
endorsed by all of the jury who tried him, by all of the
County Officers of the county in which the crime occurred,
by the Prosecuting Attorney who prosecuted him, by the
prison authorities, and a large number of citizens of the
county where the crime occurred; and it having come to
the knowledge of the Board further that this applicant
voluntarily returned and surrendered himself to the
prison authorities after having once escaped. Conditional
pardon granted upon above terms December 8, 1915.








55



P. L. KINCAID. Convicted of forgery at the April Term
of the Criminal Court for Monroe County, A. D. 1914,
and sentenced to two years imprisonment. It having
been made to appear to the Board that the said applicant
has served nearly all of his sentence, that,he has not been
in the past, nor now, in the fullest possession of his
mental faculties, and is now a hospital subject, it was
determined by the Board that he should be granted a
pardon. Conditional pardon granted upon above terms
December 8, 1915.
PAUL C. MORTON.-Plead guilty to a charge of issuing
a worthless check in the sum of five dollars at the June
Term of the Criminal Court for Volusia County, A. D.
1913, and sentenced to five years imprisonment. This ap-
plicant having served two and one-half years of the sen-
tence and his application having the endorsement of the
Judge, the State Attorney, and the man upon whom the
worthless check was passed and his prison record hav-
ing been good. Conditional pardon granted upon above
terms, December 8, 1915.
JAMEs D. MYEas.-Plead guilty to a charge of embez-
zlement at the July Term of the Court of Record for
Escambia County, A. D. 1915, and was sentenced to one
year in the County jail. It coming to the knowledge of
the Board that this application has been endorsed by the
Judge who sentenced the applicant, the Prosecuting At-
torney, by the city officials of the City of Pensacola, and
by a strong petition signed by the most prominent and
respectable citizens, stating that the applicant, had in
their opinion, been sufficiently punished, urging the Board
to take favorable action on this application; the appli-
cant's prison record having been excellent. Conditional
pardon granted upon above terms, December 24, 1915.
P. A. GRACE.-Convicted oh a charge of entering a
building to commit grand larceny and grand larceny at
the April Term of the Criminal Court of Record for Duval
County, A. 1). 1908, and sentenced therefore to thirteen
years imprisonment. It being shown to the Board that
on account of his youthful age at the time of his convic-
tion and his apparent reformation and determination to
lead a law abiding life that he should be pardoned. Con-
ditional pardon granted upon above terms, December 23,
A. D. 1915.












56



MARLIN J ACOBS, GEORGaE SHIVERS, WYILEY HOLLAND.-Con-
victed of shooting into a dwelling house at the Fall Term
of the Circuit Court for Holmes County and sentenced to
three years imprisonment. It being shown to the Bofard
that this application was endorselC by the State Attorney
who prosecuted him, and the present State Attorney of the
Circuit, by the Judge who presided at the trial, by the
owner of the house which was shot into; by all of the.
County officials of the County in which the crime was
committed, and by nearly five hundred citizens of the
County, and it i ;'I-" i-' that no one was injured by
the shooting. These applicants having served )about
eighteen months of their. sentence; their families being
in needy circumstances, and all of the others implicated
wilh them in the crime having been either acquitted by
the Courts or previously discharged from prison. Con-
ditional pardon granted upon above-terms, December 23,
A. D. 1915.

BESSIE CLIFTON.-Convicted of running a house of ill
fame, at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Jackson
County, A. D. 1915, and sentenced to twelve months in
the County Jail. This application was presented on the
plea that if granted the applicant would leave the State,
and remain away; and the application was endorsed by
the Judge who presided at the trial; the State Attorney
who conducted the prosecution, and by other citizens of
the town, who were desirous of having a pardon granted
on the above mentioned condition before the expiration
of the sentence. The applicant having served seven
months of the sentence. Conditional pardon granted upon
above terms, December 23, 1915.

JOHN DECKELMIAN.--Convicted jointly with Gus Byars
of the larceny of a cow, at the November term of the Cir-
cuit Court, A. D. 1914, DeSoto County, and sentenced
therefore to. two years imprisonment. This application
having been endorsed by the Judge who presided at the
trial, by the Sheriff, and the party with whom this appli-
cant was convicted having previously been pardoned, and
this applicant having served a considerable portion of his
sentence. Conditional pardon granted on above terms
March 20, 1916.











"i ; '..; 5 7 '

HERMAN MAAGAUO.-Plead guilty to a charge of bigamy
in the Criminal Court of Dade County at the June Term,
A. D. 1915, and sentenced to two years in the County
Jail. It being shown to the Board that this applicant had
married Adalaide Edwards while she had divorce proceed-
ings pending against her first husband and before said
divorce had been granted; and all of the information pre-
sented to' the Board tending to show that this applicant
was acting more through ignorance than with any crim-
inal intent; and it also coming to the knowledge of the
Board that the woman with'whom he was jointly con-
victed of bigamy has since been divorced and they have.
re-married; the application being endorsed by letters
fropq the County Judge, the County 'Solicitor and the
Sheriff; it was ordered by the Board that this applicant
be granted a conditional pardon. Granted upon above
terms March 20, 1916.

JESSE ALBIr'roN.-Convicted of an assault with intent
to murder at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Tay-
lor County, A. D. 1906, and sentenced therefore to seven
years imprisonment. It now coming to the knowledge of
the Board that the complaint on which the first pardon
was revoked was for a minor breach of the peace and this
applicant having now served two years since said revoca-
tion; his prison record during said time having been good;
his application being endorsed by more than seven hun-
dred citizens of Lafayette and Taylor Counties and by a
number of the county officers. Conditional pardon
granted upon above terms March 20, 1916.

W. C. TULLY. Jn.-Convicted of an assault with intent
to rape, and sentenced to ten years imprisonment. Said
conviction being had in the Circuit Court for Leon County,
A. D. 1914. This application being endorsed by a petition
containing the names of approximately one thousand citi-
zens of Leon and adjoining counties, and by a petition
dated June, 1915, signed by every member of the jury
who convicted him, stating that in the light of subse-
quently discovered information that they were doubtful
whether he should have been convicted of any offense, and
that they believed he had been punished sufficiently for
his youthful indiscretion; also, his application being en-
dorsed by the State Attorney; and the indictments against








58



the other party jointly indicted with him having been
nol pressed; the applicant having been incarcerated in
jail and in the State Penitentiary for about a year and a
half. Conditional pardon granted upon above terms
March 20, 1916.

W. T. CLEMONs.-Convicted of an assault to commit
murder at the October Term of the Criminal Court for
Duval County in 1905, and sentenced therefore to twenty
years imprisonment. This applicant having served eleven
years for assault and attempt to commit murder, during
which time his prison record is certified to as being ex-
cellent, he now being a full trusty; and it being shown
further that at the time of the commission of the offense
that he was a young mpn,'twenty-one years of age, and
.the Board believing that this applicant had served suffi-
ciently long to make full reparation for the crime, Con-
ditional pardon granted upon above terms March 20, 1916.

PHILLIP GRAHAM.-Convicted of murder at the Spring
Term of the Circuit Court for Leon County, A. D. 1901,
and sentenced to life imprisonment. It being shown to
the Board that this applicant has been in jail and in
prison since 1900; that he is now sixty-six years of age;
that during the sixteen years in the Penitentiary, his
prison record has been excellent; that he has twice pre-
vented escapes of convicts and has rendered on several
occasions special meritorious services in aiding in the
control of prisoners; he now being an old man in broken
health. Conditional pardon granted upon above terms
March 20, 1916.

R. E. G(REEN.-Convicted of Petty Larceny at the Fall
Term of th Circuit Court for Jefferson County, A. D.
1915, and sentenced to six months in the County Jail.
This application being endorsed by the jury who con-
victed him; all of the County Commissioners and a num-
ber of the citizens of Jefferson County; and the appli-
cant having served the major portion of his sentence.
Conditional pardon granted upon above terms March
20, 1916.
WALTER SAPP.-Convicted of Larceny of Hogs at the
Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Bradford County
and sentenced therefore to twelve months imprisonment.








59



It appearing to the Board that this applicant has a good
prison record; his application being endorsed by all of
the jury who convicted him, by a large petition of citi-
zens of the community in which he lives, and the county
in which the conviction was had, and doubts having
arisen from subsequently discovered testimony as to the
unbiased status of all of the witnesses who testified at
the trial. Conditional pardon granted upon above terms
March 20, 1916.

W. H. CULVERHOUSn.-Convicted of larceny of a cow
at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Jackson
County, A. D. 1914, and sentenced to two years impris-
onment. This applicant having served the major por-
tion of the sentence imposed and his application being en-
dorsed by the State Attorney, who prosecuted him, and
the Judge who presided at the trial, and it being shown
to the Board that the evidence being largely circumstan-
tial and the applicant stoutly maintaining his inno-
cence Conditional pardon granted upon above terms
March 20, 1916.

W. R. HAnMoN.-Convicted of Grand Larceny at the
February Term of the Criminal Court of Duval County,
A. D. 1911, and sentenced to seven years imprisonment.
This applicant having served practically his entire sen-
tence, gain time being considered; the application hav-
ing been endorsed by the Prosecuting Attorney and by
the man whose property was stolen; and it being shown
to the Board that this applicant was a white boy of only
sixteen years of age at the time of his conviction, and
his prison record being good. Conditional pardon
granted upon above terms June 13, 1916.

DAVID MICHAEL.-Convicted of Rape at the Spring
Term of the Circuit Court for Marion County, A. D.
1904, and sentenced to life imprisonment. It being
.shown to the Board that the assault for which the ap-
plicant was convicted being made upon a colored girl
and some doubt existing as to the crime actually reaching
the degree of rape; and that the applicant has served
twelve years in prison, during which time his prison
record has been good, he now being sixty years of age
and suffering from incident tuberculosis, his application














being endorsed by the Judge who presided at the ,trial
Conditional pardon granted upon above terms June 13
1916.

CURTIS NEAL.-Convicted of murder in the first degree(
with recommendation for mercy at the Fall Term of th<
Circuit Court for Jackson County, A. D. 1913, and sen
tenced to life imprisonment. It being shown to the Board
that this applicant was a young white man only nineteen
years of age at the time the crime was committed; thai
his previous character and reputation have been abovt
reproach and his conduct during the two and one-hall
years in the State Prison has been exemplary; that their(
were peculiar circumstances surrounding the commission
of the crime which were not fully brought before the jury
and evidence subsequently discovered tends to show nc
intention on the part of the applicant to kill; but his
actions were in self defense, and there being no witness
to the crime except defendants; the application for pardon
being endorsed by nine of the jury who convicted him; by
most of the relatives of the deceased and by more thar
seven hundred citizens of the County in which the crim(
occurred, and by practically the entire community. Con
ditional pardon granted upon the above terms, June 13
1916.

JOHN L. EASTERLIN.-Convicted of murder at the Jun(
Term of the Circuit Court for Alachua County, A. D. 1903
and sentenced to life imprisonment. This applicant
showing to the Board that he has been in jail and in
prison for fourteen years, during which time his prison
conduct has been certified as good, and being a young
white man only twenty years of age at the time the crime
was committed; his application for pardon being en
dorsed by all living members of the jury who convicted
him, and by a large number of the citizens of the County
in which the crime was committed. Conditional pardon
granted upon above terms, June 13, 1916.

JoU-N A. GILBERT.-Convicted of murder in the second
degree at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Wash
ington Codnty, A. D. 1909, and sentenced to life imprison-
ment. This application having been recommended by a
very large number of citizens of the County in which,the








61



crime was committed, including eleven of the jury, and
it being shown to the Board' that there were mitigating
.circumstances connected with the commission of the
crime, and the applicant's prison record has been good.;
that his punishment during the seven years he has served
.in the State Prison has caused a complete reformation;
that his family are in needy circumstances, and it appear-
ing to be the desire of practically the entire citizenship of
the county that this applicant be given his freedom; the
applicant being well advanced in years. Conditional
pardon granted upon above terms, June 13, 1916.

CHAUNCY STONE.-Convicted of highway robbery at the
October Term of the Criminal Court for Duval County,
and sentenced to five years imprisonment. It being shown
to the Board that the applicant was convicted upon the
evidence of an occupant of the restricted district of the
City of Jacksonville, that he was a young white man
whose mother resides in a distant State, who is very ill,
and desires his return. And it being further shown to
the Board that this applicant would be immediately re-
turned to his home if given his liberty; and his application
being endorsed by the Judge who presided at the trial,
and the Sheriff of the County in which the crime occurred,
and more than one-half of the sentence having been served.
Conditional pardon granted upon above sterns, June 13,
1916.

FRANK WGmTr.-Plead guilty to murder in the second
degree at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Leon
county A. D. 1),02. It being shown to the Board that
this applicant had served fourteen years in prison, during
which time his prison conduct had been good, and the
only witness to the homicide appeal-ing before the Board
ind stating tlat there was a question as to whether there
was any intention on the part of the applicant to kill;
and the applicant being recommended by the only witness
to the crime, a reputable white man. Conditional pardon
grnante.l upon above terms June 13, 1910.

EDDIE TURiNER.-Convicted of murder in the first degree
at the July Term of the Circuit Court for Gadsden Coun-
It, A. D. 1902, and who has since that time been serving
a sentence of life imprisonment. It being shown to the











62



Board that this applicant was one of a number of young
negroes who were convicted of a homicide, that he was
only seventeen years of age at the time the crime was
committed, that all of the'parties implicated in the crime
have been previously pardoned, that his fourteen years
prison record has been good. Conditional pardon grant-
ed upon above terms June 13, 1916.

RAYMOND JoNEs.-Convicted of manslaughter at the
February Term of the Circuit Court for Duval County,
A. D. 1904, and sentenced to twenty years imprisonment.
It being shown to the Board that this applicant has
served twelve and one-half years of a twenty-year sen-
tence, which with gain-time considered would expire
within the next two years, that his application was en-
dorsed by a petition of the citizens of the county in which
the crime occurred, that during his long prison service
his record has been good, his conduct being so entirely
exenfplary as to bring a report from the prison authori-
ties that he had a perfect conduct record. Conditional
pardon granted upon above terms June 13, 1916.

G. W. WTEST.-Convicted of larceny of a cow at the
Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Holmes County, A. D.
1914, and sentenced to two years imprisonment. This
applicant having served more than one and one-half
years of his sentence, being past the age of sixty years,
his wife having died and his two girl children needing the
care of a parent, the application, being endorsed by the
Judge who sentenced him, the State Attorney who prose-
cuted him and a petition of more than three hundred citi-
zens of the vicinity where the crime was committed.
Conditional pardon granted upon above terms June 13,
1916.

NAPOLEON SUTTON.-Plead guilty to the crime of man-
slaughter upon the advice of his attorney at the Spring
Term of the Circuit Court for Seminole County, A. I).
1913, and sentenced therefore to fifteen years in the State
Prison. It being shown to the Board that Napoleon
'Sutton was a humble, obedient, hard-working negro whose
intelligence was probably below the ordinary and was
one of a number implicated in the crime, and probably
less responsible than any of the number, although his co-











63



defendants were acquitted, that his prison record has
been good, his application for pardon being recommended
by a \ery large number of the prominent white citizens
of the county in which the crime occurred, including the
Judge and the Prosecuting Attorney who prosecuted.
Conditional pardon granted upon above terms June 13.
1916.

WILLIAM MILLER.-Convicted of stealing a calf in the
Criminal Court for Hillsborough County, A. D. 1915, and
sentenced therefore to two years imprisonment. It being
shown to the Board that this was a young white boy who.
was influenced by older parties, and his application being
recommended by the Judge who sentenced him and the
Solicitor who prosecuted him, each of whom states that
a lighter sentence would have been imposed were it not
that the law fixes a two-year minimum sentence in such
cases, and his application being endorsed by a number
of other substantial citizens of the county, and the youth
having served more than six months of the sentence im-
posed. Conditional pardon granted upon above terms
June 13, 1916.

WILL TOOLEY.-Plead guilty to entering in the night
time with intent to commit a felony at the Fall Term of
the Circuit Court for Putnam County, A. 1). 1912. It
being made to appear to the Board that the applicant did
not have any counsel and did not realize the meaning of
the charge to which he plead guilty, that he denies having
any intention of committing any crime, but went into the
garage, which was open, and went to sleep; and it being
made to appear further that the prosecuting witness and
the only other party at interest in the case has signed the
petition for pardon, and the applicant appearing to bear
a good reputation in the community where he lived. Con-
ditional pardon granted upon above terms June 17, 1916.

ERNEST BAIRD.-Convicted of murder in the second de-
gree at the Spring Term of the Circuit Court for. Levy
County, A. D. 1912. and sentenced to life imprisonment,
It being made to appear to the Board that this applicant's
petition for pardon was endorsed by the Judge who pre-
sided at the trial, the State Attorney. practically all the
jnrmy and lout five hundred citizens of the county where-








64



the crime was alleged to have been committed, and 1ther
being facts brought out to -;how there was grave doubt
as to the guilt of the applicant. Conditional pardon
granted upon above terms June 17, 1916.

J. W.. F. HODGES.-Convicted of manslaughter at the
Spring Term of the. Circuit Court for Putnam County,
A. 1). 1911, and sentenced to nine years imprisonment.
His application being endorsed by the Judge who pre-
sided at the trial, by the State Attorney who prosecuted,
by all the jury now living or whose whereabouts could be
ascertained and by a large number of citizens; and it
further appearing that the applicant is a white man of
previous good character and reputation, and his prison
record being good. Conditional pardon granted upon
above terms June 17, 1916.

H. M. GUINN. Convicted of murder at the Spring
Term of the Circuit Court for Nassau County, A. 1). 1911,
and sentenced therefore to life imprisonment. It being
made to appear to the Board that this application was
endorsed by the Judge who presided at the trial, the State
Attorney who prosecuted, by eleven of the jury who tried
the case and by a large number of citizens; and it further
appearin-g that the applicant's prison record has been
good. Conditional pardon granted upon above terms
June 17, 1916.

S. T. THorNToN.-Convicted in the Justice of the
Peace Court of the first Justice District of Wakulla
County on April 19th, A. D. 1916, of the offense of Petty
Larceny and sentenced therefore to six months in the
county jail and three months additional to cover costs.
It appearing to the Board that there were irregularities
in the conviction of the said applicant, there being some
doubt as to whether or not any trial was had; the value
of the goods alleged to have been stolen being only $3.00;
the sentence imposed being excessive even if the guilt
had been established and grave doubts lihaving arisen as
to the guilt of the applicant. Conditional pardon
granted upon above terms June 24, 1910.

R. PERCY JoNEs.-Convicted in Criminal Court of Rec-
o'd! for Hillsboro County at December Term. A. D. 1912,










65



of an assault with intent to commit murder in the sec-
ond degree and sentenced therefore to five years imprison-
ment in the State Prison. It appearing in this case that
the application is recommended by the prosecuting
officer and the trial Judge in the case; that the prison
conduct of the applicant as a prisoner has been good;
that he has served a considerable portion of his sentence;
that his recommendations and endorsements attest his
character and conduct prior to his conviction at all times
except under the influence of intoxicating liquors; and
that it -is now shown that all traces of alcoholism are out
of his system and his application being further recom-
mended by the Sheriff of the county in which the crime
occurred and by a petition of the citizens of his home
county and his conduct for the past two years indicating
that he has thoroughly reformed and intends to lead, if
liberated, a life in accordance therewith. Conditional
pardon granted upon above terms June 24, 191G.

D. G. M. HOWSLEY.-Convicted at the October Term
Criminal Court of Record for Hillsborough County, A.
D. 1913, of the offense of having carnal intercourse with
an unmarried female under the age of eighteen years
and sentenced l!i-:i,.,i to eighteen years in the State
Prison. It appearing that he has been confined to prison
at hard labor about three years, during which time his
prison record has been exceptionally good, and that in
addition to his customary duties lie has from time to
time given valuable assistance as Physician to his fellow
prisoners, rendering in one instance, when a typhoid
fever epidemic occurred in the prison camp, faithful and
valuable services as a Physician and Nurse for several
weeks; it appearing that he has reformed and desires to
live a proper life; it further appearing that he has a
wife and three small children who are in destitute cir-
cumstances and badly in need of his aid, and the appli-
cant having proposed that in addition to the usual con-
ditions, his pardon, if granted, be conditioned upon his
future fidelity to his family and his maintenance and
support of them; and that the said applicant having
been recommended by a number of substantial citizens
of Hillsborough County. Conditional Pardon granted
upon above terms June 24, 1916.
5-H J










66

JIM THoIlAs.-Convicted at the Spring Term of Cir-
cuit Court for Citrus County of murder in the second
degree and sentenced therefore to life imprisonment. The
application for clemency for this man being endorsed
by the State Attorney who prosecuted and who states
to the Board in writing that in his opinion it was a
harsh conviction, and further says, "For the last year I
have been making repeated efforts to have a pardon
granted on the theory that he had served a sufficient
length of time;" and it being further represented to the
Board that the applicant was of a low or weak men-
tality at the time of the crime, that he has fully re-
pented; that his prison record has been good, and those
prosecuting have come to the Capital at their own ex-
pense to urge ihe pardon of this applicant, and has re-
peatedly urged it. Conditional pardon granted upon
above terms June 24, 1916.
A. B. REDDICK.-Convicted of manslaughter at the No.
vember term of the Criminal Court for Record of Volusia
County, A. D. 1913, and sentenced therefore to three years
imprisonment. It being made to appear from the urgent
recommendation of the Superintendent of the State
Prison Farm that the prisoner's conduct and work had
been unusually meritorious, and it appearing that with
gain time allowed by law his sentence would expire within
less than one month from date, to-wit: on the 8th day
of August, A. D. 1916. Conditional pardon granted upon
above terms, July 13, 1916.
RAY REED, HAL REED.-Convicted of assault with in-
tent to commit manslaughter at the February Term of
the Criminal Court for Duval County, A. D. 1916, and
sentenced therefore to one year in the State Prison. It
being shown to the Board of Pardons that the Prosecuting
Attorney and the Sheriff of the County both recommended
that a pardon be granted; that the trial Judge stated he
had no objection to a pardon being granted; that the
pardon was also recommended by the State Senator of the
district; that the required notice of intention to apply for
pardon had been duly published, and no objections having
been filed with the Board, there being extenuating circum-
stances connected with the commission of the offense, in-
dicating lack of intent. Conditional pardon granted upon
above terms, July 13, 1916.










67



J. B. BANKSTON.-Convicted of manslaughter at the
Fall Term of the Circuit Court for DeSoto County, A. D..
1912, and sentenced therefore to twenty years imprison-
ment. It being shown to the Board that he has been im-
prisoned and in jail awaiting trial for a total of four
four years; that during his incarceration in prison his
conduct has been excellent; that his application for
pardon has been endorsed by all living members of the
jury who convicted him, and by a large number of the
representative citizens of the community in which the
homicide occurred, and newly discovered evidence having
been produced bearing materially upon the case; it being
further shown that the State Prison Physician certified
that the said applicant is now critically ill with typhoid
fever, and has become also mentally defective, and it be-
ing the desire of the brothers of the applicant to at once
remove him to a convenient sanitarium, and, as soon as
practicable, return the applicant to his home in another
State, there to reside. Conditional pardon granted upon
above terms, August 29, 1916.
GEORGE KooN.-Convicted of an assault with intent to
commit murder in the second degree at the February
Term of the Criminal Court of Record, A. D. 1915, for
Duval County, and sentenced therefore to three years im-
prisonment. It being shown to the Board that material
evidence discovered subsequent to the trial could not be
used because of the time elapsed after the conviction and
before its discovery; that the application has been en-
dorsed by practically all the county and city officials of
Duval County and the City of Jacksonville, including the
Sheriff and the State Attorney, by all the living members
of the jury who tried the case, and by approximately two
thousand citizens of the county in which the conviction
was had; and the evidence, including the subsequently dis-
covered evidence, tending to show that the applicant was
acting in self defense; and it appearing from a large num-
ber of certificates of representative citizens in position to
know that the applicant was and had previously been a
peaceable and law-abiding man. Conditional pardon
granted upon above terms, August 30, 1916.
ALBERT Cox.-Convicted of forgery at the June, 1915,
Term of the Criminal Court of Record for Dade County
and sentenced to two and one-half years imprisonment.










68'



It having been shown to the Board that this applicant was
a young man who, before this conviction, had a record of
good conduct; that he has now served a goodly portion'
of his sentence; and that he is now thought to be entirely'
cured of his drink habit; that he has a dependent family
in needly circumstances; that his application for pardon
has been endorsed by the Prosecuting Attorney, and the '
Judge of the Criminal Court of Itecord, and by a large
number of prominent citizens of the City of Miami. Con-
ditional pardon granted upon above terms, August 30,
1916.

V. L. SANDERS.-Convicted of receiving stolen property
at the February term of the Criminal Court for Dade
County, A. D. 1916, and sentenced therefore to one year
imprisonment. It having been shown to the Board that
this. applicant was convicted upon circumstantial evi-
dence; that the Judge and County Prosecuting Attorney
had recommended his release from prison, and it being
further shown to the Board that this-applicant had a de-'
pendent family needing his support, and there being
doubts as to his guilt. Conditional pardon granted upon
above terms, September 9, 1916.

IIAnnY DANsoN..-Convicted of murder in the second
degree at the Fall Term of the Corcuit Court for Duval
County, A. D. 1910, and sentenced therefore to life impris-
onment. It having been shown to the Board that this ap-
plication was recommended by the Judge who presided at
the trial; by the State Attorney who prosecuted the de-
fendant; that ten of the jurors who convicted the appli-
cant have written letters to the Board asking for the par-
dpn; that between twelve and fifteen hundred citizens of
the County where the crime occurred have petitioned the
Board of Pardons to grant this applicant a pardon; that
the prison officials certified to the good conduct of the ap-
plicant during the six years of his incarceration; that re-
latives of the deceased have signed a request for the par-
don and it being further shown to the Board that the cir-
cumstances of this homicide were that the applicant was a
young man about twenty years old at the time of the
homicide and- was led into the difficulty by the belief
that he was defending the life of his father. Conditional
pardon granted upon the above terms, September 9, 1916.,










6.9



SToa: S-MIn.-Convicted of'mirder at the November
Term of the Circuit Court for Manatee County, A. D.
S1'-', and sen tenced to life imprisonment. It having been
shown to the 1Board lthat this' applicant has served for
eight years in the Si ate i'Pisuon dlurihug which time his
prison record has been exceiieitl ihit he is now phlysi-
* call broken and his health seriously impaired; that there
has always been some question as to guilt of this appli-
cant of the crime for which he was convicted; that the
principal in the crime for which he was convicted jointly,
has repeatedly stated and made a1lidaiit that this appli-
cant had no part in the crime. Conditional pardon
granted upon the above terms, September 9, 1916.

BOB CRAWFORD.-Convicted of shooting into a dwelling
at the November Term of the Circuit Court for Bradford
County, A. D. 1915, and sentenced to two years in the
State Prison. It having been shown to the Board that
this applicant has been in the State Prison and in jail
awaiting trial for more than one year, that some of the
witnesses against him were of questionable character;
that a pardon for him has been requested by fifteen of the
grand jury who indicted hinm; by all of the petit jury who
convicted him; by the State Attorney who prosecuted him;
by the County ..ii, .. -, including the County .Commission-
ers of the County in which the crime was alleged to have
been committed, and, also, by a large petition of citizens
containing over three hundred and fifty names; and the
prison record of the applicant being exemplary. Condi-
tional pardon granted upon the above terms, September
9, 1916.

MoNARCH ASHE.-Convicted of larceny at the Fall Term
of the Circuit Court for Jackson County, A. D. 1914, and
sentenced to two years imprisonment. It having been
shown to the Board that this application for pardon has
been endorsed by the State Attorney; by the Sheriff of
the County, who was familiar with the circumstances of
the conviction, and by a number of citizens, this applicant
having only one month more of his time to serve, and it
being deemed the part of wisdom by the Board to give this
applicant his liberty under a conditional pardon at this
time. Conditional pardon granted upon the above terms,
;September 9, 1916.










70



JAMES GREEN.-Convicted of murder at the Fall Term
of the Circuit Court for Suwannee County, A. D. 1901, and
sentenced to life imprisonment. It being shown to the
Board that this applicant had been incarcerated in jail
and in the State Prison for a period of sixteen years, dur-
ing which time his prison record has been good; that eh
had aided in preventing escapes and recapturing others
entitling him to consideration for meritorious conduct in
prison; that his pardon is recommended by a petition of
citizens of the County where the crime occurred, includ-
ing the members of the jury who convicted him and the
County Officials of the County. Conditional pardon
granted upon above terms September 9, 1916.

C. T. BAILEY and THOMAs POWERs.-Convicted of hav-
ing in their possession burglarious tools for the purpose
of committing a felony and sentenced therefore to one
year imprisonment It having been shown to the Board
that all of the jury who tried these applicants had rec-
ommended that a pardon be granted; that the trial
Judge had recommended a pardon; that the Sheriff of
the County who was familiar with the facts of the case
had recommended the pardon; and that these applicants
had been incarcerated in the jail for six months await-
ing trial and pending appeals and that they have now
served six months of the twelve months sentence in the
State Prison, during which time their prison conduct
has been good and their pardon being requested by a
large number of citizens of the State. Conditional
pardon granted upon above terms September 9, 1916.

RANCE PADGETT.-Convicted of larceny of a cow at
the September Term of the Criminal Court of Record of
Duval County, A. D. 1915, and sentenced therefore to
two years imprisonment. It being shown to the Board
that this applicant is an aged white man sixty years old;
that another participant in the crime who was jointly con-
victed, appeared to be the principal and mainly respon-
sible for the same; and that this applicant has served
one year in the State Prison during which time his
prison record has been good; that his pardon has been
requested by a number of citizens of the community in
.which he lives. It being further shown to the Board
that he has a dependent family in needy circumstances










71



and the ends of justice in so far as this applicant is con-
cerned have been fully met. Conditional pardon granted
upon the above terms September 9, 1910.

LEE JoHNSON.-Convicted of Manslaughter at the
Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Calhoun County, A.
D. 1913, and sentenced to seven years in the State
Prison. It having been made known to the Board that
this applicant has served three and one-half years in the
State Prison, during which time his prison record has
been good, being now a full "trusty"; that his pardon
has been recommended by nine hundred citizens of the
County in which the crime occurred; by the County Com-
missioners, and by all the jury who convicted him ex-
cept one, who had moved away, and it being made to
appear further that there was some question as to the
guilt of the applicant. Conditional pardon granted
upon above terms September 9, 191C.

JosEPI' BaowN.-Convicted of Murder at the Fall
Term of the Circuit Court for Volusia County, A. D. 1902,
and sentenced to life imprisonment. It having been
made to appear to the Board that this applicant has
served fourteen years in the State Prison, during which
time his prison record has been excellent, he having
been a full "trusty" at the State Prison for thirteen
years, that he is now fifty years of age but is offered a
position which will enable him to be self supporting.
Conditional pardon granted upon above terms Septem-
ber 9, 1916.

DUNCAN JORDAN.-Convicted of Murder in the Sec-
ond Degree at the Spring Term of the Circuit Court for
Alachua County, A. D. 1904, and sentenced therefore to
life imprisonment. It having been made known to the
Board that this applicant is now sixty years of age and
in seriously impaired health; that there were facts at-
tendant upon the homicide which were in a large mes-
ure mitigating circumstances, that a pardon for this
applicant has been recommended by the Judge who pre-
sided at the trial by the Prosecuting Attorney, by the
!Sheriff and Clerk of the Circuit Court of the County in
which the crime occurred and by a large number of the
most prominent and representative citizens of .the










'72



county in which the homicide occurred; that seven of the
jury who tried the applicant.have recommended his par-
don; and it further appearing to the Board that this ap-
plicant has been in jail and in the State Prison since 1909,
during which time his prison life has been exemplary,
and that reliable parties have offered a home to this ap-
plicant in a neighboring State. Conditional pardon
granted upon above terms September 9, 1916.

WILL CAME:ON.-Convicted of murder at the May
Term of the Circuit Court for Dural County, A. 1). 1903,
and sentenced to life imprisonment. It having been made
known to the Board that a pardon for this applicant had
been recommended by the Judge who presided at the trial.
by the State Attorney who prosecuted, and that he had
actually served in the State Prison for more than thir-
teen years, during which time his prison record was good.
Conditional pardon granted upon above terms September
9, 1916.

ARTHun MILEs.-Convicted of entering without break-
ing and grand larceny at the November Term of the
Court of Record of Escambia County, A. D. 1915, and
sentenced therefore to eighteen months imprisonment. It
having been made known to the Board that this applicant
was a mere youth at4the time of the commission of this
offense, thai he is now only twenty years of age, that he
is desirous of returning to his mother, who resides in
another State; and it being made to appear further that
the Prosecuting Attorney has recommended a pardon
for this applicant. Conditional pardon granted upon the
above terms September 9, 1916.

FRANK SuirTER.-Convicted of murder in the second
degree at the Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County in 1911 and sentenced to life imprison-
ment. It having been made known to the Board that there
was considerable doubt as to the guilt of this applicant
among the court officials, that a pardon has been recom-
mended by all of the jury who convicted him, by the State
Attorney who prosecuted him and by a number of citizens
of the county in which the offense occurred, all basing
their recommendation on the probable innocence of the
applicant; and it being made to appear further to the










73



Board that subsequent to the trial and conviction of this
applicant affidavits were filed by three parties chrimiing
to be eyewitnesses to the crime which completely exoner-
ated this applicant. Conditional pardon granted upon
above terms September 9, 1916.

WILL EVNS.--Convicted of murder at the Spring Term
of the Circuit Court for Franklin County, A. D. 1900, and
sentenced to life imprisonment. It having been made to
appear to the Board that this applicant has served in the
State Prison at hard labor for sixteen and one-half years,
during which time his prison record has been good, and
that on account of the long prison service his health is
impaired. Conditional pardon granted upon Above terms
September 9, 1916.

JEFF POWELL.-Convicted of receiving stolen goods at
the August term of the Criminal Court for Volusia Coun-
ty, A. 1). 1915, and sentenced therefore to two years im-
prisonment. It having been made known to the Board that
this applicant has served more than one-half of his sen-
tence, that a pardon is requested for the applicant by the
prosecuting witness at the trial, by the. Judge who pre-
sided at the trial, by the Judge of the Circuit Court, by
the Prosecuting Attorney, by the Clerk of the Circuit
Court and the Clerk of the Criminal Court, and by a
strong petition of the representative citizens familiar
with the facts in the case. Conditional pardon granted
upon above terms September 9, 1916.

W. M. WYNNE.-Convicted of manslaughter at the Fall
Term of the Circuit Court for Orange County, A. D. 1910,
and sentenced therefore to seven years in the State Prison.
It having been shown to the Board that this applicant's
sentence would expire by operation of law within one
month's time, and it having been made to appear further,
that this applicant had to his credit special meritorious
conduct during his incarceration at the State Prison.
Conditional pardon granted upon above terms September
9, 1916.

M. W. MAPLES.-Convicted of manslaughter at the
Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Alachua County;
A. D. 1914, and sentenced to three years in the State










74



Prison. It being shown to the Board that a pardon for
this applicant has been recommended by the Judge of the
Circuit Court who presided at the trial; by the Clerk of
the Circuit Court who was present and heard all the testi-
mony; by eight .of the jury who tried this case, and by
a large number of representative citizens of the County
in which the crime occurred, and it being shown, further,
that this applicant's previous good conduct is certified to
by citizens of Florida, and by a number of prominent cit-
izens of Georgia-his former home-and his prison record
being certified as "of the best," the applicant having now
served a goodly portion of his sentence. Conditional
pardon granted upon above terms September 9, 1916.
0
JOHN HENRY WILLIAMS.-Convicted of selling liquor
in the County Judge's Court of Leon County in 1915,
and sentenced to three years imprisonment in the State
Prison. It being shown to the Board that this applicant
had now served a goodly portion of his sentence, and a
number of citizens having presented a petition for his
release; the applicant being a white man advanced in
years and whose family is in exceedingly needy circum-
stances, and because of sickness are in need of attention
and care that could be given them by this applicant; and
it further appearing to the Board that the punishment
already suffered by him has apparently worked a reform-
ation. Conditional 'pardon granted upon above terms
September 9, 1916.

JOHN WESLEY HURST.-Convicted of manslaughter at
the Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Marion County,
A. D. 1914, and sentenced to five years in the State Prison
was again taken up. It having been made known to the
Board that this applicant was an aged white man who
has served the major portion of the sentence imposed, the
circumstances of the homicide for which he was sentenced
showing that it was wholly without premeditation, and
the circumstances exceedingly aggravated, and his pardon
having been recommended by the State Attorney who
prosecuted the case, and the Judge who tried him, and by
a number of representative citizens of the County. Con-
ditional pardon granted upon above terms September 9,
1916.










75



JOHN LEGRANGE.-Convicted of larceny at the Septem-
ber Term of the Circuit Court for Pinellas County for
1915, and sentenced to two years imprisonment. It be-
ing shown to the Board that this applicant, at the time
of his conviction, was addicted to the use of drugs to the
extent of being a "dope fiend," and it now appearing that
this applicant, since his incarceration in the State Prison,
has been cured of this habit, and a goodly portion of his
sentence having been served. Conditional pardon granted
upon above terms November 24, 1916.

C. W. RANDALL.-Plead guilty to forgery at the April
Term of the Criminal Court of Hillsborough County, A.
D. 1915, and was sentenced therefore to two years im-
prisonment. It being shown to the Board that this ap-
plicant, at the time of the commission of the crime to
'which he plead guilty, was addicted to the use of drugs
to the extent that he was known as a "dope fiend," and
it being further shown to the Board that, since his incar-
ceration in the State prison, he has been cured of this
habit, his prison record having been good, and the Court
officials of the County in which his case was heard hav-
ing recommended his release from prison. Conditional
pardon granted upon above terms November 24, 1916.

DAVE MITCHELL.-Convicted of murder at the Fall
Term of the Circuit Court for Bradford County, A. D.
1905, and sentenced to life imprisonment. It being shown
to the Board that this applicant has been incarcerated in
the State Prison for more than eleven years during all
of which time his record has been good; has rendered
faithful service while in prison. Conditional pardon
granted upon above'terms November 24, 1916.

W. H. HARRELL.-Convicted of attempted arson at the
Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Leon County, A. D.
1915, and sentenced to three years in the State.Prison.
It having come to the knowledge of the Board that, since
the trial and conviction of this applicant, evidence has
been discovered which tended to show the probable in-
nocence of this applicant, and affidavits having been filed
with the Board, which practically established an alibi, and
the Board having come to the conclusion that the appli-
rant is probably innocent of the crime for which he was












ionvii 1til.'1 And it frith, r appearing that this applicant
J1as served a goodly portion of his sentence during which
time his prison record has been excellent. ConditionAl
.pardon granted upon above terms November 24, 1916.

SN. W. PADGETT.-Convicted of murder in the first dd-
gree and recommended to the mercy of the Court at the
Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Taylor County, A. D.
1911, and sentenced to life imprisonment. It being shown
to the Board that a pardon for this applicant was recom-
mended by the State Attorney who prosecuted, and the
Assistant Prosecuting Attorney; by eleven of the jury;
by two of the main witnesses for the prosecution; by a
large number of representative citizens of the County in
which the homicide occurred; and it further appearing to
the Board that the prison record of this applicant was
good; that he is fifty-three years old, and that there were
certain mitigating phases of the case. Conditional pardon
granted upon above terms November 24, 1916.
HExNRY MIARSIIALL.-Convicted of manslaughter at the
Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Washington County,
A. D. 1909, and sentenced to ten years imprisonment. It
having been shown to the Board that this applicant has
served a goodly portion of his sentence, that under the
operation of the gain time law his sentence has almost ex-
pired; that he is a trusty and has rendered faithful and
meritorious service at the State prison. Conditional
pardon granted upon-above terms November 24, 1916.
MOSES KovNTz.-Convicted of murder in the second de-
gree at the Spring term of the Circuit Court for Polk
County, A. D. 1901, and sentenced to life imprisonment.
It appearing to the Board that this applicant has been in-
carcerated in the State Prison for sixteen years; that his
prison record has been good; that his health is broken,
and that his long imprisonment with good record entitled
him to special consideration. Conditional pardon granted
upon above terms November 24, 1916.
ED SMITH.-Convicted of murder in the second degree
at the Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Washington
County, A. D. 1904, and sentenced to life imprisonment.
It having been shown to the Board that this applicant
was a youth only nineteen years of age at the time the



76












homicide, was committed,- that he has served for more
than twelve years in the State Prison, that his record
shows' continuous good conduct, that he, has rendered
faithful, meritorious service to tie prison system, that
there were mitigating circumstances in connection with
the homicide: Conditional pardon granted upon above,
terms November 29, 191G.

Doc IRELAND.-Convicted of murder at the June Term
of the Circuit Court for Hamilton County, A. 1). 1913,
and sentenced therefore to five years in the State Prison.
It coming to the knowledge of the Board that this appli-
cant has served a goodly portion of his sentence, that
under the operation of the gain-timte law his sentence has
almost expired, that he is a trusty and has rendered
faithful and meritorious service at the State Prison, his
application having been endorsed by the Judge who tried
him, the State Attorney who prosecuted him, by all the
county officials, including all of the County Commission-
ers: Conditional pardon granted upon above terms No-
vember 29, 1916.

SAM PRICE.-Convicted of manslaughter at the Spring
Term of the Circuit Court for Leon County, A. D. 1913,
and sentenced to twenty years imprisonment. It having
comet to the knowledge of the Board that this applicant,
has a good prison record; that the committing magistrate
has personally appealed for his release on the ground that
the punishment has been sufficient, and it appearing that
the circumstances of the case showed there was no inten-
tion to effect the death of anyone, and the applicant being
in poor health. Conditional pardon granted upon the
above terms November 29, 1916.

CniTs GREEN.-Convicted of manslaughter in the Crim-
inal Court of Record for Orange County in 1906, and:
sentenced to seventeen years in the .State Prison. It:
having come to the knowledge of the Board that this
applicant is an old man and has served more than ten
ygars in the State Prison, and that under the operation
oT the gain-time law his sentence soon will expire: Con-
ditional pardon granted upon above terms November 29,,
1 16.









78;



JOHN L. DEDGE.-Convic.ted of murder in the second
degree at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for D)ual
County, A. D. 1913, and sentenced therefore to life im-
prisonment. It appearing to the Board that this appli-
cant was recommended by the State Attorney who prose-
cuted, making a statement to the Board that he always
had doubts of the justice of the conviction, and it further
appearing that the first trial of this applicant resulted
in a mistrial and there were certain mitigating circum-
stances in connection with the crime which have since
come to the knowledge of the Board. Conditional pardon
granted upon above terms November 29, 1916.

RILEY FLEMING. Convicted of murder at the Spring
Term of the Circuit Court for Lake County, A. D. 1903,
and sentenced to life imprisonment. It coming to the
knowledge of the Board that this applicant has served
more than eleven years in the State Prison, that he was
convicted on circumstantial evidence, that during all the
time he has been in the State Prison his record has been
good, that he has rendered meritorious service to the
prison system by saving the stockade from burning: Con-
ditional pardon granted upon above terms November 29,
1916.

RGORGE KING.-Convicted of murder at the November
Term of the Circuit Court for Volusiia County, A. D.
1904, and sentenced to life imprisonment. It coming to
the knowledge of the Board that this prisoner during
the twelve years he has served in the State Prison has
had a record of especially good conduct, having pre-
vented escapes of prisoners and aided in capturing pris-
oners who had escaped; and it further appearing that
the circumstances surrounding the homicide. were such
that it could have possibly been an accident; and the
pardon being recommended by the Judge who tried the
case. Conditional pardon granted upon above terms
November 29, 1916.

L. S. DAvENPORT.-Convicted of Forgery in the Court
of Record of Escambia County in February, A. D. 1916,
and sentenced to eighteen months imprisonment. It ap-
pearing to the Board that this applicant had served
more than one-half of the sentence imposed; that his









79'



pardon was recommended by the Prosecuting Attorney
and by more than one-half of, the jury who convicted
him and also by a strong petition of representative citi-
zens of the county; and it further appearing that this
is a White man whose family is in distressed circum-
stances. Conditional pardon granted upon above terms
November 29, 191G.

WILLIAM FOUNTAIN.-Convicted of Murder in the first
degree at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Santa
Rosa County, A. D. 1004, and sentenced to life imprison-
ment. It having come to the knowledge of the Board
that this applicant has served for twelve years in the
State Prison, during which time he has hada good record
and rendered meritorious service. Conditional pardon
granted upon above terms November 29, 191G.

ANNIE WALKER.-Convicted of uttering a forgery at
the August Term of the Criminal Court of Duval
County in 1914, and sentenced therefore to five years in
the State Prison. It having come to the knowledge of
the Board that this applicant was a young woman of
good parentage and her mother being present before
the Board and asked the privilege of taking the appli-
cant home to give her opportunity and encouragement
for living a reformed life. And it further appearing to
the Board that the applicant had given assurance of
reformation, and, having served more than two years
in the State Prison, it was determined by the Board
that she be granted a conditional pardon. Conditional
pardon granted upon above terms November 29, 1916.

PLEAS LINDSEY.-Convicted of assault and attempt to
murder at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court of Santa
Rosa County, A. D 1906, and sentenced to five years in
the State Prison. It appearing to the Board that this
applicant had been conditionally pardoned in 1908, and
that his pardon was revoked in 1914, since which time
he has served in the State Prison, and it being shown
that with the time allowed by the law for good behavior
in prison, this applicant has now served within a few
months of the end of his sentence; that his application
was endorsed by the Clerk of the Circuit Court, in of-
fice at the time of his trial, and by many other citizens










80:



of the county, and it appearing to tre Board thftt th&
ends of justice would be best subserved by griltiug a
conditional pardon before the expiration of his sentence.
Cii.lit.iiii;i pardon granted upon the above terms Nov-
ember 29, 1910.

JAMEs W. HAMMOND.-Plead guilty to breaking and en-
.l-in,4 at the July Term of the Criminal Court of Orange
County in 1916, and sentenced to two years in the State
Prison. This application being endorsed by the Judge
who tried the pli.kiL!. the Prosecuting Attorney, the
'ill i Ii' and il'ipi ', Sheriff, and other county officials, and
by a large petition of the most prominent citizens of the
4' iily, iii. l.ulli'Lj the officers of the place of business en-
tered. And it : mtii.r t iplii n li'c.n to the Board that this
r.:,Il: .' I had a previous good record; that at the time of
the coin'mission of this 0ull'-,-, he was in a dazed condition
from drink and drugs furnished him by others, and he
1'. : a v. ii' and three small euildll-' now in serious
"need of his at' uhliol, and that the applicant is a ,rin-g
white man who is asking for another chance to make
p-. and having ,,X'cVl six uL.i'l.s in prison. Condi-
tional pardon granted upon above terms December 6,.
'i;&..

SSAMtEr [ g',';. .--. '...n-vi>:d of e'v.-ii]g s-ioen prop-'
,'! at the :.hi,: Ti' of the C'iniuin'l '..o : I of Dural
Count in I ';,. and sentenced to ten years in '_.e State
I'., s. It iI..o shown to the r.:-iX'l1 Th.: this -."i. -e.Lit
was, :" .-m l.1 b the .l]' .,: who ; 'eshlt.:. at the flial,
,.' the i.'.: five %.,f the jury who tried the narpLr-aat;
lby prominent : 'i! ;. workers. ..m other !:'-L'-L;t:,eu- cit-
inens of the i..unjj in which ile conviction was L- L : and
it 0.<; WY, a:;:L< i ,2', the IT'..:t t ..T this ar.: .;. i- has
a largeu1i cf! i t'n 0 in .1;in''.-- i Jl'i'niC.. .r. and
he T-.' served a portion of his sentence in the State
Prison ...*:i:-whieh l -lh.. .'his 1i'. record has been good.
i':.q. *'.n.' *pardon a;ic J. upon above terms 1i cber


UaHtB x- .s-,-s.-- '."-..'i :r of murder in the first de-
ree at the Fall '. r-.r. of the Cirrcuit Co(.n Ir t Leon 'rVity
iin 19I, and sentenced to life i1pripsonment, It hai7r,2
been tafiO to the iBamt sW.'at this applicant is an old












man, seventy-three years of age; that he has served in
prison and in jail for more than thirteen years; that his
application is endorsed by a l;irg number of prominent
white citizens of the community in which he had lived;
that his record, previous to the occurrence for which he
served sentence had been exemplary. And it further ap-
pearing that on account of his age and physical condition
he had but a short time to live, and prominent white cit-
izens having appeared before the Board and offered to
see that the applicant had proper care and attention.
Conditional pardon granted upon above terms December
6, 1916.

ED McWCiGHT.-Convicted of murder in the second de-
gree at the Spring term of the Circuit Court for Brad-
ford County, in 1912, and sentenced to life imprisonment.
It being shown to the Board that the Judge who presided
at the trial of this applicant, and the State Attorney who
prosecuted him, having both requested that this applicant
be pardoned, it appearing that there were mitigating cir-
cumstances in connection with the details of the offense
which called for leniency, and it appearing that this ap-
plicant had served for nearly five years in the State
Prison, during which time his prison record had been
good, it was determined by the Board that this applicant
be granted a conditional pardon effective December 20th,
A. D. 1916.

DAN CARLTON.-Convicted of Murder in the second de-
gree at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for St. Johns
County in 1911, and sentenced to life imprisonment. It
being shown to the Board that in affirming the convic-
tion of this applicant at a previous hearing by the Su-
preme Court, that two of the Justices of the Supreme
Court in dissenting opinion stated that they believed the
evidence against this applicant was insufficient upon
which to base a conviction, and it being represented to.
the Board that this applicant was not a principal in the
crime, and his application for pardon being requested by
nearly one thousand citizens of the County in which the
offense was committed, and a large number of citizens of
other sections of the State; that eight of the jury who
tried the case has asked for a pardon and the State At-
torney who prosecuted having endorsed the application
6--H J



81









82



and stated that the applicant was "sincerely reformed."
And it further appearing to the Board that this applicant
has served in the State Prison for five years during which
time he has had a good prison record. Conditional pardon
granted upon above terms December 6, 1916.
R. S. SLAEY.-Convicted of being an accessory to a jail
delivery at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Frank-
lin County, A. D. 1913, and sentenced to two years im-
prisonment. It being shown to the Board that this ap-
plication was endorsed by a number of citizens from that
portion of the State in which the applicant had formerly
lived ,and that there was some question as to the guilt
of this applicant, as he made noeffort to escape from the
jail at the time, he having served a large portion of the
sentence imposed. Conditional pardon granted upon the
above terms December 6, 1916.
GEORGE BUsH.-Convicted of murder at the Fall Term
of the Circuit Court for Escambia County in 1902, and
sentenced to life imprisonment. It being shown to the
Board that this applicant has served at hard labor in the
State Prison for fourteen years, that prior to the offense
he bore a good reputation, that the negro killed by him
did not bear a favorable reputation, and during the four-
teen years this applicant has served in the State Prison
he has had an excellent prison record and is now a full
trusty. Conditional pardon granted upon above terms
December 6, 1916.
WILLIE GOODWIN.-Plead guilty to murder in the sec-
ond degree at the Spring Term of the Circuit Court for
St. Johns County in 1907, and was sentenced to life im-
prisonment. It coming to the knowledge of the Board
that this applicant's pardon was requested by a large
number of citizens of St. Johns County, including the
county officials and Mayor of St. Augustine, that his
pardon was recommended by the Judge who presided at
the trial and by the State Attorney who prosecuted; and
it further appearing that there were mitigating circum-
stances in connection with the homicide. Conditional
pardon granted upon above terms December 6, 1916.
ELZY FLOYD.-Convicted of manslaughter at the Spring
Term of the Circuit Court for Hillsborough County in
1910, and sentenced to fifteen years? in the State Prison.









83



It appearing to the Board that the homicide was com-
mitted on account of domestic relations trouble, that this
applicant has served in the State Prison for nearly
seven years, during which time her prison record is cer-
tified to as being excellent, that her pardon has been re-
quested by the Judge who presided at the trial and a
number of citizens of the county in which the offense was
committed. Conditional pardon granted upon the above
terms December 6, 1916.

AMos AusTIN.-Convicted of rape at the Fall Term of
the Circuit Court for Leon County with a recommenda-
tion to mercy, said term of the court being in 1912, and
sentenced to life imprisonment. It being shown to the
Board that the Prosecuting Attorney who prosecuted this
applicant has now asked for a pardon on the grounds
that his guilt, in his opinion, was always uncertain, that
all of the white citizens in the community where the of-
fense occurred have petitioned for the pardon, that- the
petition is signed by the prosecuting witness and her
mother, and the only other State witness, which facts
have brought the Board to the conclusion that the appli-
cant is probably innocent of the crime with which he was
charged, and his prison record having been good. Condi-
tional pardon granted upon above terms December 6, 1916.

JOHNSON O. WILLIAMS.-Convicted of assault to com-
mit murder at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for
Osceola County in 1912, and sentenced to ten years im-
prisonment. It being shown to the Board that this ap-
plicant's pardon has been requested by the Judge who
presided at the trial, the State Attorney who prosecuted,
and it being further shown that this applicants prison
conduct has been especially meritorious and deserving of
special consideration. Conditional pardon granted upon
above terms December 6, 1916.

CLARENCE JORDAN.-Convicted of manslaughter in the
Court of Record of Escambia County in February, 1910,
and sentenced to nine years imprisonment. It being
shown to the Board that this applicant's pardon was
recommended by the Judge who presided at the trial-and
by the present State Attorney, and that he has served for










84



nearly seven years of the nine-year sentence imposed,
that he was quite young at the time of this offense, and
has a good prison record: Conditional pardon granted
upon above terms December 6, 1916.

HARNEY MoRGAN.--Plead guilty to breaking and enter-
ing at,the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Lee County,
A. D. 1915, and sentenced to two years in the State
Prison. It being shown to the Board that this pardon
was recommended by the Judge who presided at the trial,
by the State Attorney who prosecuted,,and by a large
petition from citizens, and the Judge having written the
Board that, because of subsequent developments not fully
brought out at the time, he believes this applicant should
now be pardoned. Conditionla pardon granted upon the
above terms December 6, 1916.

FLORA PERRY and. MARTHA PERRY.-Convicted of the
illegal sale of liquor at the'August Term of the County
Judge's Court for Leon County in 1916, and sentenced to
four months imprisonment in the County Jail. It being
shown to the Board that one of these applicants had a
family of small children who were sadly in need of atten-
tion, that they had served all but 1hree weeks of the sen-
tence imposed, that the pardon was asked by the foreman
of the Jury who convicted them and by a petition of
prominent business men of the county. Conditional par-
don was granted upon above terms December 6, 1916.

GEORGE SALLET.-Convicted of breaking and entering at
the June Term of the Criminal Court of Duval County in
1899, and sentenced to eighteen years imprisonment. It
being shown to the Board that this applicant has served
for nearly fourteen years in the State Prison on the sen-
tence imposed and his prison record having been certified
to as good. Conditional pardon was granted upon the
above terms December 6, 1916.

JAMES R. FRANKS. Convicted of murder in the first
degree at the Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Mon-
roe County, A. D. -1902, and sentenced to life imprison-
ment. It appearing to the Board that this prisoner had
actually served more than fifteen years of such sentence
in jail and in the State Prison, and had borne a good









85



prison record, and the long confinement at hard labor
having seriously impaired his health. Conditional pardon
was granted upon above terms January 1, 1917.

KING WILLIAMs.-Convicted of murder at the Fall
Term of Court for Holmes County, A. D. 1902, and sen-
ienced to life imprisonment. It appearing to the Board
that this prisoner has served in jail and in prison more
than fifteen years of his sentence, and having, during
this time, sustained an excellent prison record, and his
long prison service at hard labor having seriously im-
paired his health. Conditional pardon was granted upon
above terms January 1, 1917.

Jon NEwsoME.-Convicted of breaking and entering
with intent to commit misdemeanor at the Fall Term
of the Circuit Court for Washington County, A. D. 1915,
and sentenced to two years imprisonment. It appearing
to the satisfaction of the Board that the applicant had
sustained a. good prison record, and his application for
a pardon being strongly endorsed by a large number of
citizens of Washington County and endorsed also by the
State Attorney who prosecuted him, and the applicant
having served the major portion of his sentence. Condi-
tional pardon was granted upon above terms January
1, 1917.

JOHN SEXTON.-Convicted of unlawfully selling liquor,
second offense, at the Spring Term of the Circuit Court
for Leon County, A. D. 1915, and sentenced to two
years' imprisonment. It appearing to the satisfaction of
the Board that this prisoner has sustained an exmplary
prison record, and his application for clemency being
strongly endorsed by a citizens' petition from the County
in which the offense was committed and the applicant hav-
ing served more than nineteen months of the-entire sen-
tence imposed and having a family in need of his support.
Conditional pardon was granted upon above terms Janu-
ary 1, 1917.

ROBERT MC FADDEN.-Convicted of murder in the third
degree at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Leon
County, A. D. 1912, and sentenced to twenty years im-
prisonment. It appearing to the Board that this pris-










86



oner has sustained an exemplary prison record, and his
petition for clemency being strongly endorsed by a peti-
tion of citizens of the County where the crime was com-
mitted, and by the Sheriff of Said County, who believes
the applicant should never have been convicted, having
killed another negro in a turpentine camp in the defense
of applicant's employer; and it further appearing that
the applicant is now sixty-three years of age and in bad
health. Conditional pardon was granted upon above
terms January 1, 1917.

C. S. HENDrICKSON.-Convicted of issuing a check
without funds in the bank to cover same, at the Fall
Term of the Circuit Court for Palm Beach County, A.
D. 1915, and sentenced therefore to eighteen months' im-
prisonment. It appearing to the satisfaction of the
Board that this applicant is a young white man, whose
present trouble was brought about through bad compan-
ionship, and that he has a wife and baby in need of his
presence and support, both being ill and the wife phys-
ically unable longer to support herself and her child,
and it appearing further that the applicant had served
between thirteen and fourteen months of his total sen-
tence. Conditional pardon was granted upon above terms
January 1, 1917.

WRIGHT GRAY.-Convicted of Murder at the Fall
term of the Circuit Court for Suwannee County, A. D.
1901, and sentenced therefore to life imprisonment. This
applicant having served more than fifteen years of such
sentence and having sustained a good record in prison
during that time, and his long confinement at hard la-
bor having seriously impaired his health. Conditional
pardon was granted upon above terms January 1, 1917.

HORACE BuRToN.-Convicted of an assault to commit
murder in the second degree, at the November Term of
the Criminal Court of Record for Duval County, A. D.
1914, and sentenced to five years imprisonment. It ap-
pearing that the prisoner was a mere youth when the
alleged crime was committed, and had a good record
previous to this trouble, and that the man he assaulted
was of bad character, and that little injury was done










87



by reason of said assault; and it further appearing to
the satisfaction of the Board, from affidavits of F. C.
Weaver, a Deputy Sheriff, Agnes Robinson, a witness
for the State in the prosecution- of this case, and Julia
Anderson, that the prisoner acted purely in the defense
of his own person in committing the alleged assault,
and a petition signed by a large number of citizens be-
ing filed with this Board, asking Executive clemency.
Conditional pardon was granted upon above terms Jan-
uary 1, 1917.
GRANT WEST.-Convicted on a charge of petty larceny,
at the Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Washington
County, A. D. 1916, and sentenced therefore to serve
six months at hard labor in the County Jail. It appear-
ing to the Board that this applicant is an old man un-
able to do any kind of work except light farm work;
that he has served practically all of his sentence, his
prison record having been good, his application being
endorsed by practically all of the County officials of
Washington County. Conditional pardon was granted
upon above terms February 9, 1917.
0. C. SCARBOROUGH.-Convicted of breaking and enter-
ing, at the April Term of the Circuit Court for Duval
County, 1916, and sentenced to five year's imprisonment.
It appearing that L. L. Scarborough and 0. C. Scar-
borough were both prosecuted for this crime, and 0. C.
Scarborough being the younger of the boys was sentenced
to five years and the older one for one year; that his
prison record has been good; that his application was en-
dorsed by the Judge who sentenced him, by the Probation
Officer of Duval County, and also by a strong petition of
reputable citizens of the County. Conditional pardon was
granted upon above terms March 12, 1917.
OscAR JoHNs.-Convicted of an assault to commit mur-
der, at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Marion
County, 1915, It being shown to the Board that this ap-
plication was endorsed by approximately eight hundred
citizens of the County in which the crime was committed;
by the Judge who presided at the trial, by the Prosecut-
ing attorney who prosecuted him; his prison record hav-
ing been excellent. Conditional pardon was granted upon
above terms March 12, 1917.









88



NATHAN EDWARDS.-Convicted of manslaughter, at the
Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Palm Beach County,
i915, and sentenced therefore to ten years' imprisonment.
It being shown to the Board that this application was
endorsed by all of the County officers of the County in
which the crime was committed, with the exception of
one, by a very large petition of the citizens of West Palm
Beach and of Palm Beach County; it appearing further
to the Board that this applicant's family are in destitute
circumstances and bady in need of his aid and assistance,
and that his prison record has been good. Conditional
pardon was granted upon above terms March 12, 1917.

THEODORE HAWKINS.-Convicted of forgery and utter-
ing a forgery, at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for
Nassau County, 1915, and sentenced therefore to one year's
imprisonment. It being shown to the Board that this ap-
plication was endorsed by responsible citizens of this and
other States; that his prison record has been good; it be-
ing shown further that if a forgery had been committed
that the applicant did not profit thereby, and no one los-
ing anything by the alleged charge of forgery, the notes
or checks never having been cashed. The applicant hav-
ing served more than one-half of his sentence. Condi-
tional pardon was granted upon above terms March 12,
1917.

BEN HAYWOOD.-Convicted of manslaughter, at the
Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Clay County, 1914,
and sentenced therefore to six years' imprisonment. It
appearing to the Board that this applicant has served a
goodly portion of his sentence; his prison record during
said service being good, his application being endorsed by
the Judge who sentenced him, and also by the Prosecut-
ing Attorney who prosecuted him, and also by a strong
petition of citizens of Clay County, among the number
being the endorsement of the Sheriff of the County, the
applicant being now fifty-five years of age. Conditional
pardon was granted upon above terms March 12, 1917.

.WATT MoRGAN.-Convicted of murder in the second de-
gree, at the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Bradford
County, 1904, and sentenced therefore to life imipri.on-
hient. It appearing to the Board that this applicant has









89



served thirteen years of his sentence, during which time
his prison record has been good; his petition for release
having been signed by a large number of the prison of-
ficials, including the Prison Physician, said Physician
having certified that the applicant is at this time in bad
physical condition. Conditional pardon was granted upon
above terms March 12, 1917.
FRED WILLIAMS.-C.onvicted of larceny of an auto, at
the Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Brevard County,
1916, and sentenced therefore to five years' imprisonment.
It appearing to the Board that this application was en-
dorsed by all of the County officers of Brevard County,
and all the members of the Bar of Titusville; the man
from whom the auto was stolen having signed the peti-
tion for his release along with several hundred of the
most influential citizens of Volusia and Brevard Coun-
ties; his prison record during his incarceration having
been good. Conditional pardon was granted upon above
terms March 12, 1917.
MANAN LAND.-Convicted of wife desertion and with-
holding from her the means of support, at the Spring
Term of the Circuit Court for Madison County, 1915, and
sentenced therefore to one year's imprisonment. It appear-
ing to the Board that this application was endorsed by a
strong petition .of the most influential citizens of Madi-
son County; by one of the members of the Tax Commis-
sion, and that his prison record since his incarceration
having been good. Conditional pardon was granted upon
above terms March 12, 1917.
OLLIE BENNETT.-Convicted of manslaughter, at the
Spring Term of the Circuit Court for Jackson County,
1913, and sentenced therefore to five years' imprisonment.
It being shown to the Board that this applicant has served
nearly all of his sentence; that his prison record during
his entire'service having been good; the Prosecuting At-
torney of the County in which the crime was committed
having appeared before the Board in person and asked
for the release of this applicant; his application being
endorsed also by a very strong petition of citizens of the
County in the vicinity where the crime was committed.
Conditional pardon was granted upon above terms March
12, 1917.










90



JOE TURNER.-Convicted of assault with intent to rape,
at the February Term of the Criminal Court of Walton
County, 1912, and sentenced therefore to four years'
imprisonment. It appearing to the that this applicant
has served a godly portion of his sentence, his prison rec-
ord during that time having been good; it appearing fur-
ther that the main prosecuting witness having since the
conviction made affidavit that the testimony given at the
trial was false; his application having been endorsed by
several hundred citizens of Walton County. Conditional
pardon was granted upon above terms March 12, 1917.

A. L. BARRINEAU.-Convicted of selling whiskey, at the
Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Leon County, 1916,
and sentenced therefore to one year imprisonment. It be-
ing shown to the Board that this application was endorsed
by all of the County officers of the County in which the
crime was committed, by a large number of the most in-
fluential citizens of Tallahassee and Leon County; by the
Judge who presided at the trial, and his prison record be-
ing excellent. Conditional pardon was granted upon
above terms March 12, 1917.

JACK LAND.-Convicted of entering without breaking
to commit a felony, at the June Term of the Criminal
Court of Dade County, 1912, and sentenced therefore to
ten years' imprisonment. It appearing to the Board that
this applicant has served something like one-half of his
sentence; that his prison record during his incarceration
having been good; it appearing further that this applica-
tion was endorsed by very large petitions from both
Dade and Bradford Counties, asking for hiss release.
Conditional pardon was granted upon above terms
March 12, 1917.

A. D. LINDSEY.-Convicted of violating the local option
law, at the Fall Term of the Circuit.Court for Santa Rosa
County, 1914, and sentenced therefore to two years im-
prisonment. It being shown to the Board that this appli-
cant is now forty-six years of age, and has served practi-
cally all of his sentence; his application having been en-
dorsed by four of the jurors who convicted him; by a pe-
tition of five hundred citizens of the County in which the










91



crime was committed; his prison record having been good.
Conditional pardon was granted upon above terms March
12, 1917.
ARCH LINDSEY.-Convicted of manslaughter, at the Jan-
uary Term of the Circuit Court for Santa Rosa County,
1913, and sentenced therefore to five years' imprisonment.
It being shown to the Board that this applicant is in
feeble health, he now being eighty-two years of age and
unable to do but very little except light work; he having
served all of his sentence except about eleven months; his
prison record being good, he having been a trusty since
his incarceration. Condition pardon granted upon above
terms March 12, 1917.
WILLIAM CRUTCHFIELD.-Convicted of petit larceny, at
the Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Leon County, 1916,
and sentenced therefore to nine months in the County Jail.
It being shown to the Board that the applicant's family is
now in serious need of his aid and assistance, they being
at this time in destitute circumstances; his application
being endorsed by a strong petition of citizens of the
County. Conditional pardon granted upon above terms
March 12, 1917.
HARVEY JoHNSON.-Convicted of petit larceny at the
Fall Term of the Circuit Court for Leon County, 1916,
and sentenced therefore to nine months in the County
jail. It being shown to the Board that the applicant's
family is now in serious need of his support, they being
at this time in very needy circumstances; his application
being endorsed by a strong petition of citizens of the
County. Conditional pardon was granted upon above
terms March 12, 1917.
Gus MASHBY.-Convicted of murder in the first degree
with recommendation to mercy, at the Spring Term of
the Circuit Court for Alachua County, 1905, and sen-
tenced therefore to life imprisonment. It being shown to
the Board that this application was endorsed by a large
number of citizens of the County in which the crime was
committed; that this applicant has served twelve years
of his sentence during which time his'prison record has
Ibeer good; it being shown further that the applicant is
in bad; health at this time and that, the ends of Justice