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 Title Page
 Members of the House of the Representatives,...
 Officers and Attaches of the House...
 Errata
 April 1919
 May 1919
 June 1919
 Legislative Pay Roll
 Index


FHR UFLAW









1521



And Senate Bill No. 338 was read a second time by its
title only.
Mr. Hamblin moved that the rules be further waived
and that Senate Bill No. 338 be read a third time in full
and put upon its passage.
\Which was agreed to by a two-thirds vote.
And Senate Bill No. 338 was read a third time in ful.
Upon the call of the roll on the passage of the bill, the
vote was:
Yeas-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Barber, Brooks, Busto,
Camipbell, Caro, Carroll, Chavous, Corbett, Crews,
De(Grove, Dillard, Edge, Earnest, Folks, Fort, Fow-
ler, Futch (Alachua), Futch (Lake), Gates, Gillis,
Glazier, Green, Hamblin, Hagan, Hardin, Harris, Hart,
Jones, Keen, Kite, Lewis, Marshall, Mathis, Mays, Mer-
chant, Miller, McKenzie, McLeran, McRae, Perry, Par-
rish, Phillips, Ray, Scruggs, Small, Stokes, Strom, Sur-
rency, Tilghman, Tillis, Wade, Watson, Waybright,
Weaver, Williams (Leon). Williams (Polk), Wilson
(Iasco), Woodruff (Orange)-61.
"Nays-N one.
So the Bill passed, title as stated.
And the same was ordered to be certified to the Senate.
Mr. Hamblin moved that House Bill No. 686 be with-
drawn from the House.
Which was agreed to.

Senate Bill'No. 339:
A bill to be entitled An Act to abolish the present
municipal government of the Town of Tavares, Lake
County, Florida, and to organize a town government for
the same, and to provide its jurisdiction and powers; to
erect the same into an independent Road District of Lake
County.
Was taken up.
Mr. Futch moved that the rules be waived and Sen-
ate Bill No. 339 be read a second time by its title only.
Which was agreed to by a two-thirds vote.
And Senate Bill No. 339 was read a second time by
its title only.
Mr. Futch moved that the rules be further waived and
that Senate Bill No. 339 be read a third time in full and
prt upon its passage.
Which was agreed to by a two-thirds vote.



96-11 .T










1522



And Senate Bill No. 339 was read a third time in
full.
Upon the passage of the bill the roll was called and the
vu.te was:
Yeas-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Campbell, Caro, Cochran,
Corbett, Crews, DeGrove, Dillard, Edge, Earnest, Folks,
Fort, Fowler, Futch (Alachua), Futch (Lake), Gates,
Gillis, Glazier, Green, Hamblin, Hagan, Hardin, Harris,
Hart, Keen, Kite, Marshall, Mathis, Mays, McKenzie,
MeLeran, McRae, Perry, Parrish, Ray, Sams, Scruggs,
Small, Stokes, Strom, Surrency, Tilghman, Wade, Wat-
son, Waybright, Weaver, Wicker, Williams (Leon), Wil-
liams (Polk), Wilson (Pasco), Woodruff (Orange)-51.
Nays--None.
So the bill passed, title as stated.
And the same was ordered to be certified to the Senate.

Senate Bill No. 316:
A bill to be entitled An Act to authorize Leon County
to borrow money to pay the expense of its work for tick
eradication, and to issue interest bearing warrants for
such loans.
Was taken up.
Mr. Williams moved that the rules be waived and Sen-
ate Bill No. 316 be read a second time by its title only.
Which was agreed to by a two-thirds vote.
And Senate Bill No. 316 was read a second time by its
title only.
Mr. Williams moved that the rules be further waived
and that Senate Bill No. 316 be read a third time in full
and put upon its passage.
Which was agreed to by a two-thirds vote.
And Senate Bill No. 316 was read a third time in full.
Upon call of the roll on the passage of the bill, the vote
was:
Yeas-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Barber, Brooks, Bryan,
Eusto, Campbell, Caro, Carroll, Chavous, Cochran, Crews,
Dillard, Edge, Earnest, Folks, Fort, Futch (Alachua),
Futch (Lake), Gates, Gillis, Glazier, Green, Hamblin,
Hagan, Hardin, Harris, Hart, Hinely, Keen, Kite, Mar-
shall, Mathis, Mays, McKenzie, McLeran, McRae, Perry,
Parrish, Sams, Scruggs, Small, Stokes, Strom, Surrency,
Tilghman, Tills, Wade, Watson, Waybright, Weaver, Wil-










1681



Which was agreed to by a two-thirds vote.
And Senate Bill No. 375 was read a second time by its
title only.
Mr. Tillis moved that the rules be further waived and
that Senate Bill No. 375 be read a third time in full and .
put upon its passage.
Which was agreed to by a two-thirds vote.
And Senate Bill No. 375 was read a third time in full.
Upon call of the roll on the passage of the bill the
vote was:
Yeas-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Brooks, Bunker, Campbell,
Carroll, Chavous, Coats, Crews, Dillard, Earnest, Folks,
Futch (Alachua), Futch (Lake), Gates, Gillis, Glazier,
Green, Hagan, Harris, Hart, Hinely, Jarmon, Jones, Keen,
Kite, Marshall, Mathis, Miller, Moore, McCrary, McKen-
zie, McLeran, McRae, Parrish, Ray, Small, Stokes, Strom,
Surrency, Tilghman, Tillis, Wade, Waybright, Williams
(Leon), Williams (Polk), Wilson (Gadsden), Wilson
(Pasco), Woodruff (Seminole)-48.
Nays-None.
So the bill passed, title as stated.
And the same was ordered to be certified to the Senate.

House Bill No. 712:
A bill to be entitled An Act to amend the paragraph
in Section 1 of Chapter 7570, Acts of 1917, referring to
location of road described in Section 1 of said Act enti-
tled: "An Act to legalize and validate the proceedings
of the Commissioners of Pinellas County in relation to
the formation of a special road and bridge district in
said County, and for the issuing and sale of bonds of the
said road and bridge district to the amount of $100,000.
for the purpose of constructing a hard-surfaced highway
in said county, in connection with a causeway and bridge
from the mainland to Long Key, running to Passa-a
Grille, Florida, and providing for the payment thereof
and to authorize the said improvement."
Was taken up.
Mr. Harris moved that the rules be waived and House
Bill No. 712 be read a second time by its title only.
Which was agreed to by a two-thirds vote.
And House Bill No. 712 was'read a second time by its
title only.
Mr. Harris moved that the rules be further waived and



106--H J











1682



that House Bill No. 712 be read a third time in full and
put upon its passage.
Which was agreed to by a two-thirds vote.
And House Bill No. 712 was read a third time in full.
Upon call of the roll on the passage of the bill, the
vote was:
Yeas-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Brooks, Bunker, Busto,
Campbell, Carroll, Chavous, Coats, Corbett, Crews,
Dillard, Earnest, Folks, Futch (Alachua), Gillis, Glazier,
Green, Hagan, Hardin, Harris, Hart, Hinely, Jarmon,
Keen, Kite, Marshall, Mathis, Miller, Moore, McCrary,
McKenzie, McLeran, McRae, Perry, Parrish, Ray, Smalj,
Stokes, Strom, Surrency, Tilghman, Wade, Waybright,
Williams (Leon), Wilson (Gadsden), Wilson (Pasco),
Woodruff (Seminole)-49.
Nays-None.
So the Bill passed, title as stated.
And the same was ordered to be certified to the Senate.

House Bill No. 730:
A bill to be entitled An Act allowing the Tax Collec-
tors of the Counties of Broward and Dade of the State
of Florida an additional compensation of one-half of one
per cent for their services in collecting certain drainage
taxes under the provisions of Chapter 7430 as amended
by Chapter 7758 of the Laws of Florida.
Was taken up.
Mr. Marshall moved that the rules be waived and
House Bill No. 730 be read a second time by its title only.
Which was agreed to by a two-thirds vote.
And House Bill No. 730 was read a second time by its
title only.
Mr. Marshall moved that the rules be further waived,
and that House Bill No. 730 be read a third time in full
and put upon its passage.
Which was agreed to by a two-thirds vote.
And House Bill No. 730 was read a third time in
full.
Upon the call of the roll on the passage of the bill, the
vote was:
Yeas-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Bunker, Campbell, Car-
roll, Chavous, Coats, Crews, Earnest, Folks, Futch
(Alachua), Gates, Gillis, Glazier, Hagan, Harris, Hart,
Hinely, Jarmon, Keen, Kite, Marshall, Mathis, Miller,
Moore, McKenzie, McLeran, McRae, Parrish, Ray, Small,





Journal of the House of Representatives of the session of ..
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027772/00098
 Material Information
Title: Journal of the House of Representatives of the session of ..
Alternate Title: Journal of the House of Representatives, State of Florida
Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Florida of the session of ..
Physical Description: v. : ; 23-32 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Legislature. -- House of Representatives
Publisher: State Printer
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: April 1919
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Legislative journals -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
General Note: Title varies slightly.
General Note: Description based on: 1907.
Funding: Digitized for the Florida House of Representatives, the Office of the Clerk.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida House of Representatives. African American History Collections at the Office of the Clerk.
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 003417935
oclc - 12901236
lccn - sn 85065608
System ID: UF00027772:00098
 Related Items
Preceded by: Journal of proceedings of the House of Representatives of the Legislature of the State of Florida
Succeeded by: Journal of the Florida House of Representatives

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
    Members of the House of the Representatives, Regular Session of 1919
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Officers and Attaches of the House of Representatives, Regular Session of 1919
        Page iv
    Errata
        Page v
    April 1919
        Tuesday, April 8
            Page 1
            Page 2
            Page 3
            Page 4
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
        Wednesday, April 9
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
        Thursday, April 10
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
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            Page 108
            Page 109
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            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
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            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
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            Page 133
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            Page 135
            Page 136
            Page 137
            Page 138
            Page 139
            Page 140
            Page 141
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            Page 143
            Page 144
            Page 145
            Page 146
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            Page 148
            Page 149
            Page 150
            Page 151
            Page 152
            Page 153
            Page 154
            Page 155
            Page 156
            Page 157
            Page 158
            Page 159
            Page 160
            Page 161
            Page 162
        Friday, April 11
            Page 163
            Page 164
            Page 165
            Page 166
            Page 167
            Page 168
            Page 169
            Page 170
            Page 171
            Page 172
            Page 173
            Page 174
            Page 175
            Page 176
            Page 177
            Page 178
            Page 179
            Page 180
            Page 181
            Page 182
            Page 183
            Page 184
            Page 185
            Page 186
            Page 187
            Page 188
            Page 189
            Page 190
            Page 191
            Page 192
            Page 193
            Page 194
            Page 195
            Page 196
            Page 197
            Page 198
            Page 199
            Page 200
            Page 201
        Monday, April 14
            Page 202
            Page 203
            Page 204
            Page 205
            Page 206
            Page 207
            Page 208
            Page 209
            Page 210
            Page 211
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            Page 216
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            Page 219
            Page 220
            Page 221
            Page 222
            Page 223
            Page 224
            Page 225
            Page 226
            Page 227
            Page 228
            Page 229
            Page 230
            Page 231
            Page 232
            Page 233
            Page 234
            Page 235
            Page 236
            Page 237
            Page 238
            Page 239
            Page 240
            Page 241
            Page 242
            Page 243
            Page 244
            Page 245
            Page 246
            Page 247
            Page 248
            Page 249
            Page 250
            Page 251
            Page 252
            Page 253
            Page 254
            Page 255
        Tuesday, April 15
            Page 256
            Page 257
            Page 258
            Page 259
            Page 260
            Page 261
            Page 262
            Page 263
            Page 264
            Page 265
            Page 266
            Page 267
            Page 268
            Page 269
            Page 270
            Page 271
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            Page 273
            Page 274
            Page 275
            Page 276
            Page 277
            Page 278
            Page 279
            Page 280
        Wednesday, April 16
            Page 281
            Page 282
            Page 283
            Page 284
            Page 285
            Page 286
            Page 287
            Page 288
            Page 289
            Page 290
            Page 291
            Page 292
            Page 293
            Page 294
            Page 295
            Page 296
            Page 297
            Page 298
            Page 299
            Page 300
            Page 301
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            Page 311
            Page 312
            Page 313
            Page 314
            Page 315
            Page 316
            Page 317
            Page 318
            Page 319
            Page 320
            Page 321
            Page 322
            Page 323
        Thursday, April 17
            Page 324
            Page 325
            Page 326
            Page 327
            Page 328
            Page 329
            Page 330
            Page 331
            Page 332
            Page 333
            Page 334
            Page 335
            Page 336
            Page 337
            Page 338
            Page 339
            Page 340
            Page 341
            Page 342
            Page 343
            Page 344
            Page 345
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            Page 356
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            Page 368
            Page 369
            Page 370
            Page 371
            Page 372
            Page 373
        Friday, April 18
            Page 374
            Page 375
            Page 376
            Page 377
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        Monday, April 21
            Page 416
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            Page 418
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        Tuesday, April 22
            Page 459
            Page 460
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        Wednesday, April 23
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        Thursday, April 24
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        Friday, April 25
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        Saturday, April 26
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        Monday, April 28
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        Tuesday, April 29
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        Wednesday, April 30
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    May 1919
        Thursday, May 1
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        Friday, May 2
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        Monday, May 5
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        Tuesday, May 6
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        Wednesday, May 7
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        Thursday, May 8
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        Friday, May 9
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        Saturday, May 10
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        Monday, May 12
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        Tuesday, May 13
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        Thursday, May 15
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        Friday, May 16
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        Saturday, May 17
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        Monday, May 19
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        Friday, May 23
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            Unnumbered ( 1741 )
        Saturday, May 24
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        Tuesday, May 27
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        Thursday, May 29
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        Friday, May 30
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            Unnumbered ( 2087 )
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        Saturday, May 31
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    June 1919
        Monday, June 2
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        Tuesday, June 3
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        Wednesday, June 4
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        Thursday, June 5
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            Unnumbered ( 2486 )
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        Friday, June 6
            Page 2537
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            Page 2564
    Legislative Pay Roll
        Page 2565
        Page 2566
        Page 2567
        Page 2568
        Page 2569
        Page 2570
        Page 2571
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        Page 2573
        Page 2574
    Index
        Page 2575
        Page 2576
        Index to Members
            Page 2577
            Page 2578
            Page 2579
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            Page 2590
        Index to House Bills and Joint Resolutions in the House
            Page 2591
            Page 2592
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            Page 2671
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        Index to Senate Bills and Joint Resolutions in the House
            Page 2673
            Page 2674
            Page 2675
            Page 2676
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            Page 2688
        Index to House Concurrent Resolutions in the House
            Page 2689
            Page 2690
            Page 2691
        Index to House Resolutions in the House
            Page 2692
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            Page 2695
            Page 2696
        Index to House Memorials in the House
            Page 2697
        Index to Senate Concurrent Resolutions in the House
            Page 2698
        Index to Unclassified Subjects in the House
            Page 2699
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JOURNAL


OF THE



House of Representatives


FOR THE



SESSION OF 1919



T. J. Appleyard,
"Printer, Tallahassee, Fla.
'Printer, Tallahasgee, Fla.











MEMBERS OF THE
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Regular Session of 1919



Alachua-E. R. B. Kite, Orange Heights.
Alachua-Eli Futch, Gainesville.
Baker-C. F. Barber, Macclenny.
Bay-J. E. Stokes, Panama City.
Bradford-R. A. Green, Starke.
Bradford-A. S. Crews, Starke.
Brevard-J. J. Parrish, Titusville.
Broward-W. H. Marshall, Fort Lauderdale.
Calhoun-T. C. Ray, Blountstown.
Citrus-L. H. Marlow, Holder.
Clay-L. E. Wade, Orange Park.
Columbia-W. J. Roebuck, Lake City.
Columbia-W. W. Phillips, Lake City.
Dade-John W. Watson, Miami.
DeSoto-John B. Cochran, Nocatee.
Duval-F. 0. Miller, Jacksonville.
Duval-E. W. Waybright, Jacksonville.
Escambia-J. R. M. Gates, Pensacola.
Escambia-Herbert P. Caro, Pensacola.
Flagler-A. S. Fowler, Bunnell.
Franklin-E. R. L. Moore, Carrabelle.
Gadsden-S. H. Strom, Juniper.
Gadsden-A. L. Wilson, Quincy.
Hamilton-Braxton Small, Jasper.
Hamilton-W. J. Deas, Jasper.
Hernando-M. L. Dawson, Brooksville.
Hillsborough-Geo. H. Wilder, Plant City.
Hillsborough-A. C. Hamblin, Tampa.
Holmes-C. R. Mathis, Boriifay.
Jackson-Amos E. Lewis, Marianna.
Jackson-R. L. McCrary, Graceville.
Jefferson-D. H. Mays, Monticello.
Jefferson-Roland J. Carroll, Lamont.
Lafayette-W. P. Chavous, Mayo.
Lake-L. D. Edge, Groveland.
Lake-T. G. Futch, Leesburg.
Lee-Francis W. Perry, Fort Myers.
Leon-John A. Scruggs, Lloyd.
Leon-A. H. Williams, Tallahassee.










Levy-W. J. Epperson, Bronson.
Liberty-C. M. Ernest, Hosford.
Madison-T. C. Merchant, Madison.
Madison-N. W. Campbell, Ebb.
Manatee-H. S. Glazier, Bradentown.
Marion-W. J. Folks, Romeo.
Marion-Norman A. Fort, Lynn.
Monroe-George G. Brooks, Key West.
Monroe-J. F. Busto, Key West.
Nassau-J. Hampton Jones, Callahan.
Nassau-H. H. Surrency, Callahan.
Okaloosa-J. A. Hart, Baker.
Okeechobee-W. L. Coats, Okeechobee.
Orange-J. L. Dillard, Winter Garden.
Orange-Seth Woodruff, Orlando.
Osceola-N. C. Bryan, Kissimmee.
Palm Beach-E. W. Bunker, Lake Worth.
Pasco-E. P. Wilson, Dade City.
Polk-John M. Keen, Lakeland.
Polk-W- Williams, Fort Meade.
Putnam-W. G. Tilghman, Palatka.
Putnam-H. S. McKenzie, Palatka.
Pinellas-S. D. Harris, St. Petersburg.
Santa Rosa-J. J. Hardin, Jay.
Santa Rosa-E. H. Jarmon, Munson.
Seminole-F. L. Woodruff, Sanford.
St. Johns-Frank M. Corbett, Moultrie.
St. Johns-W. M. DeGrove, Palm Valley.
St. Lucie-Richard Whyte, Fort Pierce.
Sumter-N. J. Wicker, Coleman.
Suwannee-S. A. Hinely, Live Oak.
Suwannee-A. W. McLeran, Wellborn.
Taylor-W. L. Weaver, Perry.
Volusia-Murray Sams, DeLand.
Volusia-J. J. Tillis, DeLand.
Wakulla-J. A. Hagan, Arran.
Walton-D. Stuart Gillis, DeFuniak Springs.
Washington-L. D. McRae, Chipley.




















OFFICERS AND ATTACHES
OF THE
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Regular Session of 1919


Speaker-Hon. Geo. H. Wilder of Hillsborough.
Speaker Pro Tem.-Hon. E. P. Wilson of Pasco.
Chief Clerk-J. G. Kellum of Leon.
Assistant Chief Clerk-E. M. Johns of Bradford.
Bill Clerk-Mrs. W. R. Dorman of Suwannee.
Reading Clerk-Miss Myrtice McCaskill of Taylor.
Assistant Reading Clerk-Wallace Tervin of Santa
Rosa.
Engrossing Clerk-Miss Miriam Futch of Alachua.
Enrolling Clerk-J. W. Kelly of Lafayette.
Sergeant-at-Arms-W. R. Griffin of Hillsborough.
Messenger-J. N. Rogers of Madison.
Doorkeeper-H. Wheeler of Jefferson.
Chaplain-Rev. J. D. Adcock of LeQn.
Janitor-Eugene Hawkins of Florida.
Pages-Walter S. McLin, Jr.; Raymond Wood, Earl
Hentz and Augustus Maxwell.











ERRATA


On page 162 ,line 4, the word "legislate" should be
"legalize."
One page 166, last line, the word "not" should be
omitted.
On page 188, after last line, the following should be
inserted: "Senate Bill No. 20, contained in the above mes-
sage, was ordered placed on Calendar."
On page 236, line 24, the word "legislate" should be
"legalize."
On page 244, line 22, the figures "70" should read "7."
On page 618, lines 39 and 41, the number "446" should
be "446A."
On page 820, line 25, the number "362" should read
"62."
On page 951, line 9, after the word "and" should be
inserted the following: "Committee Substitute for."
On page 951, line 20, the number "456" should be
"453."
On page 1304, line 25, the word "majority" should be
"minority.''
On page 1372, line 41, the number "23" should be "22."
On page 1658, after line 40, the following should be
inserted: "Which was agreed to."
On page 1874, line 34, after the word "Fort" should
be inserted the word "Folks."
On page 2005, in lines 16, 19, 22 and 25, before the word
"Senate," should be inserted the following: "Committee
Substitute for."
On page 2119, in lines 38 and 41, the numbers "73"
should be "763."
On page 2123, line 31, the figure "1" should be "2"
and the figure "8" should be "6."
On page 2123, line 37, the figure "1" should be "2"'
and the figure "8" should be "6" and "$8,500.00" should
be "$8,400.00."
On page 2127, line 2, the word "Brooks" should be
"Busto."
On page 2158, line 38, the name "Bunker" should be
omitted.
On page 2325, Mr. Epperson's name should not appear
in the names of those voting on House Bill No. 811.
On page 2371, line 22, the figures "483" should be
".33."














JOURNAL OF THE
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



Of the seventeenth regular session of the Legislature,
under the Constitution of A. D. 1885, began and held at
the Capitol, in the city of Tallahassee, the State of Flor-
ida, on Tuesday, the 8th day of April, A. D. 1919, being
the day fixed by the Constitution of the State of Florida
for lthe meeting of the Legislature.

Tuesday. April 8, 1919

The House was called to order by Mr. J. G. Kellum, of
Leon County, Florida, Chief Clerk of the House of Rep-
resentatives, at 12 o'clock m.
The certified list of the Secretary of State of members
elected to ihe Legislature for the session of 1919 was
called as follows:
MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
1919
Eli Futch of Alachua County.
E. R. B. Kite of Alachua County.
C. F. Barber of Baker County.
J. E. Stokes of Bay County.
A. S. Crews of Bradford County.
R. A. Green of Bradford County.
J. J. Parrish of Brevard County.
W. H. Marshall of Broward County.
T. C. Ray of Calhoun County.
L. H. Marlow of Citrus County.
L. E. Wade of Clay County.
W. W. Philips of Columbia County.
W. J. Roebuck of Columbia County.
John W. Watson of Dade County.
J. B. Cochran of DeSoto County.
F. 0. Miller of Duval County.
E. W. Waybright of Duval County.
Herbert P. Caro of Escambia County.
J. R. M. Gates of Escambia County.










2



A. S. Fowler of Flagler County.
E. R. L. Moore of Franklin County.
S. H. Strom of Gadsden County.
A. L. Wilson of Gadsden County.
W. J. Deas of Hamilton County.
Braxton Small of Hamilton County.
M. L. Dawson of Hernando County.
A. C. Hamblin of Hillsborough County.
George H. Wilder of Hillsborough County.
C. R. Mathis of Holmes County.
Amos E. Lewis of Jackson County.
R. L. McCrary of Jackson County.
Roland J. Carroll of ..: it. .,,11 County.
D. H. Mays of .-1 .ll *I County.
W. P. Chavous of ., f.iN tI.. County.
L. D. Edge of Lake County.
T. G. Futch, of Lake m< iir;.
Francis WV. Perry of Lee County.
John A. Scruggs of Leon C,,ri i .
A. H. Williams of Leon County.
W. J. Epperson of Levy County.
C. M. Earnest of Liberty County.
N. W. Campbell of Madison County.
T. C. Merchant of Madison County.
H. S. Glazier of Manatee County.
W. J. Folks of Marion ,,. ,.
N.'A. Fort of Marion County.
George G. Brooks of Monroe County.
J. F. Busto of .Mlwiv.. County.
J. Hampton Jones of Nassau County.
H. H. Surrency of Nassau County.
J. A. Hart of Okaloosa County.
W. L. Coats of Okeechobee County.
J. L. Dillard of Orange County.
Seth Woodruff of Orange County.
"N. C. Bryan of Osceola County.
E. WV. Bunker of Palm Beach Cmi\.
E. P. Wiil-n of Pasco County.
S. D. Harris of Pinellas County.
John M. Keen of Polk County.
W. O. Williams of Polk County.
H. S. McKenzie of Putnam County.
W. G. Tilghman of Putnam County.
J. J. Hardin of Santa Rosa County.
E. H. Jarman of Santa Rosa County.











Frank L. Woodruff of Seminole County.
F. M. Corbett of St. Johns County.
W. M. DeGrove of St. Johns County.
R. Whyte of St. Lucie County.
N. J. Wicker of Sumter County.
S. A. Hinely of Suwannee County.
A. W. McLeran of Suwannee County.
W. L. Weaver of Taylor County.
Murray Sams of Volusia County.
J. J. Tillis of Volusia County.
Jas. A. Hagan of Wakulla County.
D. Stuart Gillis of Walton.
L. 1). McRae of Washington County.

State of Florida,
Office Secretary of State, ss.
I, H. Clay Crawford, Secretary of State of the State of
Florida, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a correct
list of the members of the House of Representatives of the
State of Florida, elected at the general election on the
fifth day of November, A. D. 1918, and at the special
elections held since in the counties of Flagler, Lafayette
and Wakulla, as shown by the election returns on file
in this office.
Given under my hand and the Great Seal of the State
of Florida, at Tallahassee, the Capital, this the eighth
day of April, A. D. 1919.
H. CLAY CRAWFORD,
(Seal) Secretary of State.
Tlhe following members, A. S. Fowler, W. P. Chavous,
H. S. McKenzie and James A. Hagan, came forward and
took the oath of office prescribed by the Constitution
of the State of Florida before Mr. Justice James B. Whit-
field of the Supreme Court of the State of Florida.
All the other members had taken the oath of office at
the Extraordinary Session of the Legislature convened
November 25th, 1918.
Mr. J. G. Kellum, Chief Clerk, announced a quorum
present.
Prayer by Rev. J. D. Adcock.
Mr. Phillips moved that the House proceed with a
permanent organization by the election of a Speaker,
a Speaker pro tem., Chief Clerk and other officers and
attaches.
Which was agreed to.










4



Mr. Phillips nominated Hon. George H. Wilder, of
Hillsborough County, for Speaker.
Mr. Lewis, of Jackson, seconded the nomination of
Hon. George H. Wilder.
Upon call of the roll the vote was:
For Hon. George H. Wilder for Speaker-
Messrs. Barber, Brooks, Bryan, Bunker, Busto, Camp-
bell, Caro, Carroll, Chavous, Coats, Cochran, Corbett,
Crews, Dawson, Deas, DeGroves, Dillard, Epperson, Ear-
nest Folks Fort, Fowler, Futch (Alachua), Futch (Lake),
Gates, Gillis, Glazier, Green, Hamblin, Hagan, Hardin,
Harris, Hart, Hinely, Jarmon, Jones, Keen, Kite, Lewis,
Marlow, Marshall, Mathis, Mays, Merchant, Miller, Moore,
McCrary, McKenzie, McLeran, McRae, Perry, Parrish,
Phillips, Ray, Roebuck, Sams, Scruggs, Small, Stokes,
Strom, Surrency, Tilghman, Tillis, Wade, Watson, Way-
bright, Weaver, Whyte, Wicker, Williams (Leon), Wil-
liams (Polk), Wilson (Gadsden), Wilson (Pasco), Wood-
ruff (Orange), Woodruff (Seminole).
Mr. J. G. Kellum, Chief Clerk, announced that Hon.
George H. Wilder was unanimously elected Speaker.
Thereupon Mr. Kellum, Chief Clerk, appointed Messrs.
Lewis of Jackson, Phillips of Columbia and Crews of
Bradford to escort the Speaker to the chair.
The Speaker being conducted to the chair, extended
his thanks to the House for the honor conferred upon
him.
Mr. Phillips of Columbia nominated E. P. Wilson of
Pasco for ;Speaker pro tern.
Mr. Stokes of Bay seconded the nomination of Mr.
Wilson.
Mr. Lewis of Jackson moved that Mr. Wilson of Pasco
be elected by acclamation.
Which was agreed to.
The Speaker declared E. P. Wilson elected Speaker
pro tem. by acclamation.
Mr. Phillips of Columbia nominated Mr. J. G. Kellum
for Chief Clerk.
Mr. Lewis of Jackson, Mr. Watson and Mr. Corbett
of St. Johns seconded the nomination of Mr. Kellum.
Upon call of the roll, the vote was for Mr. J. G. Kellum
for Chief Clerk.
Mr. Speaker. Mesrs. Barber, Brooks, Bryan, Bunker,
Busto, Campbell, Caro, Carroll, Chavous, Coats. Cochran,
Corbett, Crews Dawson, Deas, DeGroves, Dillard, Ep-













person, Ernest, Folks, Fort, Fowler, Futch (Alachua),
Futch (Lake), Gates, Gillis, Glazier, Green, Hamblin,
Hagan, Hardin, Harris, Hart, Hinely, Jarmon, Jones,
Keen, Kite, Lewis, Marlow, Marshall, Mathis, Mays, Mer-
chant, Miller, Moore, McCrary, McKenzie, McLeran, Mc-
Rae, Perry, Parrish, Phillips, Ray, Roebuck, Sams,
Scruggs, Small, Stokes, Strom, Surrency, Tilghman, Til-
lis, Wade, Watson, Waybright, Weaver, Whyte, Wicker,
Williams (Leon), Williams (Polk), Wilson (Gadsden),
Woodruff (Orange), Woodruff (Seminole).
The Speaker declared J. G. Kellum unanimously elected
Chief Clerk.
Mr. J. G. Kellum came forward and took the oath
of office as prescribed by the Constitution of the State
of Florida before Mr. Justice James B. Whitfield of the
Supreme Court of the State of Florida.
Mr. Phillips of Columbia made the following nomina-
tions:
Assistant Chief Clerk-E. M. Johns.
Bill Clerk-Mrs. W. R. Dorman.
Reading Clerk-Miss Myrtice McCaskill.
Assistant Reading Clerk-Wallace Tervin.
Engrossing Clerk-Miss Miriam Futch.
Enrolling Clerk-J. W. Kelly.
Sergeant-at-Arms-W. R. Griffin.
Messenger-J. N. Rogers.
Doorkeeper-Mr. H. Wheeler.
Chaplain-Rev. J. D. Adcock.
Assistant Reading Clerk-Wallace Tervin.
Janitor-Eugene Hawkins.
Page-Walter S. McLin, Jr.
Page-Raymond Wood.
Page-Earl Hentz.
Page-Augustus Maxwell.
Mr. Stokes of Bay moved that all officers, and attaches
as nominated.above be elected by acclamation.
Which was agreed to.
The following attaches came forward and took the
oath of office prescribed by the Constitution of the State
of Florida before Justice James B. Whitfield:
Assistant Chief Clerk-E. M. Johns.
Bill Clerk-Mrs. W. R. Dorman.
Enrolling Clerk-J. W. Kelley.















Sergeant-at-Arms-W\. R. Griffin.
Engrossing Clerk-Miss Miriam Futch.
Messenger-J. N. Rogers.
Mr. Stokes of Bay moved that a committee of three
be appointed to wait upon the Senate and inform that
body that the House was organized and ready for busi-
ness.
Which was agreed to.
Thereupon the Speaker al_ inted as such committee
Messrs. Stokes of Bay, Futch of Alachua and Epperson of
Levy.
After a brief absence, the committee returned and
reported that they had performed the duty assigned them
and were discharged.
A committee of three from the Senate, composed of
Messrs. W. A. MacWilliams, John B. Johnson and W. M.
Igou, appeared at the bar of the House of Representa-
tires and announced that they were instructed by the
Senate to inform the House that the s enate wa organ-
ized and ready to proceed to business.
On motion of Mr. Watson of Dade, a committee of
three, consisting of Messrs. John W. Watson, H. S. Mc-
Keuzie and N. W. (Cnmlpbell. was npnointed to wait upon
His Excellency, the Governor and! inform him that the
House was organized and'ready to receive any message
or communication that be may 1e leased to make.
Afi-er a brief absence, the committee, returned and re-
porlted that they had -rlri I n' 1 the duty assigned to
theom and were discharged.
Mr. Harris, of Pinellas, moved that the rules as adopted
and used by the House during the session of 1917, be
adoted for the use of the House nntil the Committee on
Rules could report.
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Green. of Bradford, moved that the House adopt
the Federal time.
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Bryan, of Osceoln. moved that the Chief C' .1ii be
instructed to have 500 copies of the daily journal of the
House printed each day.
"Which was agreed to.












7



INTRODUCTION OF RESOLUTIONS.

By Mr. Roebuck of Columbia-
House Resolution No. 1:
Whereas, The House of Representatives in extra-ordi-
nary session assembled, did, on the 6th day of December,
1918, pass House Resolution No. 21, wherein it was pro-
vided that no committee clerks would be employed at the
regular session of this body, and that a sufficient num-
ber of competent stenographers should be selected by a
committee, by process of competitive examination, to take
care of the work usually performed by committee clerks
and house stenographers; therefore
Be it Resolved, That the Speaker of the House appoint
a committee of three for the purpose of selecting said
stenographers, who shall certify those so passing to the
Committee on Legislative Expense.
Which was read.
Mr. Roebuck moved the adoption of the Resolution.
Which was agreed to.

By Mr. D)awson of Hernando-
Houe- R'esolution No. 2:
Be 11 resolved by the House of Represenlatives of the
State of Florida, That the individual appreciation of the
several members of this body to the ladies of Tallahassee
and of Leon County fo; tVe beautiful floral decorations
of their desks and of the liouse be expressed by this reso-
lotion ; le ii further
Resolved, That this House extend to the thoughtful
ladies of Tallahlnasee and o! Leon County the assurance
of this body of its profound appreciation, and that this
resolution be accepted as conveying the same. and that
the same be spread upon the House Journal.
Which was read.
IMr. Dawson moved the adoption of the Resolution.
Which was agreed to.

By Mr. )Dawson of Hernando-
House Resolution No. 3:
Whervas, It has bgen the custom in past sessions
to have detailed for assistance in the work directly con-
nected with that of the Chief Clerk of the House, in the
matter of correcting the.Jolurnal for filing as the official
record of the House, and other detail work connected











8



with the Chief Clerk's department, and that such work
was performed by a committee clerk in the past; and
Whereas, Inasmuch as the House has gone on record
as deeming committee clerks not to be necessary to the
carrying on of the work of legislation in this body; and
Whereas, The work of the Chief Clerk is so great and
pressing at certain hours as to make an extra assistant
be deemed necessary, and in the interest of efficiency and
economy, this assistant be provided by this House; there-
fore, be it
Resolved by the House, that the Chief Clerk be au-
thorized to appoint an assistant who shall be known as
the Journal Clerk, to do the work outlined in the pre-
amble to this resolution, also to assist in indexing the
Journal, and that he shall receive the same remunera-
tion as other clerks.
Which was read.
Mr. Dawson moved the adoption of the resolution.
A roll call being ordered, the vote was:
Yeas-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Brooks, Bryan, Bunker,
Busto, Chavous, Coats, Cochran, Corbett, Crews, Daw-
son, De Groves, Dillard, Epperson, Folks, Fort, Fowler,
Futch (Alachua), Futch (Lake), Gates, Gillis, Green,
Hamblin, Hagan, Hardin, Harris, Hart, Hinely, Jarmon,
Kite, Lewis, Marlow, Marshall, Mathis, Mays, Miller,
McCrary, McKenzie, Perry, Ray, Roebuck, Sams, Scruggs,
Stokes, Strom, Tilghman, Tillis, Wade, Watson, Weaver,
Whyte, Wicker, Williams (Leon),'Williams (Polk), Wil-
son (Gadsden), Wilson (Pasco), Woodruff (Orange),
Woodruff (Seminole)-58.
Nays-Messrs. Barber, Campbell, Carroll, Ernest, Mer-
chant, Moore, McLeran, McRae, Parrish, Phillips, Small,
Surrency-13.
So the resolution was adopted.

By N. C. Bryan of Osceola-
House Resolution No. 4:
Resolved, That none of the expert stenographers be re-
quired to write personal or business letters for the
members of the House, but that their services be only
required for legislative business and business pertaining
to the work of the Legislature.
Which was read.
Mr. Bryan moved the adoption of the Resolution.
Which was agreed to.










(9



The following message from the Governor was received:
Mr. Green, of Bradford, moved that the message of the
Governor be spread upon the Journal.
Which was agreed to.
MESSAGE OF THE GOVERNOR


STATE OF FLORIDA.
OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR.
Tallahassee, April 4th, 1919.
The the Senate and House of Representatives:
This session in the history of Florida and the United
States brings to us a most interesting and important
epoch, because it is at the successful termination of the
greatest war for Democracy which has ever been fought.
This war, and the victory which the Allied forces have
achieved, has resulted in cementing our own people, as a
nation, in the bonds of friendship, unity and strength,
not known before in the history of America. It has also
demonstrated to the world the fact that the Nation which
attends to its own business, without thought or prepara-
tion of war, is more than able to cope with those nations
whose supreme idea is military despotism, oppression and
imperialism. While this is true and we congratulate
America, England, France, Belgium, Italy, Servia, and
all other National friends who fought on our side, on the
fact that the world is safe for Democracy, yet this War
presents some new problems in our own history which
we must solve for ourselves or this destructive military
power of the Old World will be engrafted into the New.
ESPIONAGE.
The first problem which presents itself to the New
World is the very strict laws concerning espionage and
the right of free speech, which has always been a heritage
of the American people. This extremely strict law re-
sulted in much dissatisfaction among the American people,
because we represent Democracy and yet our mouths
were shut to hundreds of cases of injustice wrought
through military, judicial and legislative channels, which
was not right to be borne by a free people and which they
now deeply resent. These conditions should cause me-











10



morals to be sent from each and every Legislature to
Congress when it assembles in extraordinary session,
urging that, as a free people, these conditions should not
be borne by us, for as a Nation our fore-parents fought on
the bloody fields of revolution to establish free speech and
free thought.

PROFITEERING.

Another great problem for us to solve, brought about
by the war, is the system of profiteering which has come
into vogue, and while millions of people in the United
States were controlled and governed by higher principles
of patriotism, thousands of firms boldly profiteered and
made their fortunes upon the exigencies and necessities
of the very people who were I, it_".linr. to gain the victory
in this war. This condition is one of the saddest which
confronts us and shows that there is an innate selfishness
in the marts of trade, which even a world-wide war for
Democracy could not keep down. It also shows that the
Departments at Washington. while very eaoer to prose-
cute certain lines of deficiencies and lack of morality on
the rart of citizens of this Nation, took no hand in see-
ing that profiteering should be stopped.

HIGH PRICES.
Still another problem brought on by the War is the
high price of commodities and the high price of labor.
This nown confronts us and is knocking at the door of
Congress for solution. Let us hope that some equitable
conclusion will be attained, which will solve this great
problem.
SELECTIVE SERVICE DRAFT.
While these conditions, which militated against us,
were baneful and need to be corrected in the future, there
is one great triumph achieved by the several States of
the Union, whose citizenship entered into this world
war, and that is t'e Selective Service Draft. This Draft
was a supreme trial and also a test of efficiency of citizen-
ship in each and every county in the United States of
Amer:ica. The Governor is not posted as to the draft in
all States, except to know generally that it was a success,
but in Florid- we are indeed proud of the fact that it
was more than a success and that the private citizens in













11



the several counties of this State who were placed in
these responsible positions, on the Local and District
Boards and as Physicians, acquitted themselves with more
than usual fidelity, patriotism and devotion to the cause
of human liberty. This proves to us conclusively that
conscription, even with as many defects as surrounds the
system, was successful in the late war as evidenced by
private citizens who constituted said boards and who
arose to the supreme emergency of the occasion. We, in
Florida, were certainly fortunate in having at the head of
our Draft Board a man and his wife, both magnificently
endowed for this new and hard task. The Governor
refers to Captain Edward L. Anderson and his wife, and
no need of praise on his part can be too high for these two
people who worked so hard, faithfully and conscientiously
in the discharge of their duties as head of the Draft
Board of Florida, under the direction of the Governor,
and lie -'i.-'-* to the Legislature that a resolution of
thanks be 1< i-1 I to them some time during the session
and spread upon the records so that it will go down to
future ages, showing that Florida appreciates the su-
preme effort these people made.

RETURXINGC SOLDIERS AND SAILORS.

Another question before us, as a heritage of the great
World War, is hle returning soldiers and sailors. These
men, who when they left were in the heyday of iheAtlh,
many of them return broken in health and in life and the
places they once occupied are now filled by others who
do not care to give them up. The Governor would urge
upon the attention of the Legislature, that something be
done to insure these returned men positions which will
at least give themn a support until they can find some-
thing better to do.

STATE BUDGET.

Looking into the future of the State, there seems to be
a condition confronting us, which to the Governor's
mind should be attended to by the Legislature fi this
session, because of its importance. A Budget System,
to do away with the wild appropriations system at the
conclusion of each session, which oftentimes gives to one
cause too- much and not enough to another should be











12

adopted. By adopting the Budget System and having
a Committee appointed at the beginning of the session,
whose duty it will be to ferret out and go fully
into the needs and merits of each institution and depart-
ment of State Government, they could have a wise, sys-
tematic, business-like appropriation of funds, which
would guarantee no haste and great thought in the prepa-
ration of such funds as the State Institutions need. We
note in the business world that every great corporation
and business concern now has an entire Budget System
and these business concerns and corporations could not
ai all proceed with their vast endeavors, or small con-
cerns with theirs, if they did not have this system, which
shows conclusively their financial status at all times and
under all circumstances.

SECOND BOARD OF CONTROL.

The second great State need which seems to the Gov-
ernor, at the present time, to be of great importance, is
that there should be created a second Board of Control,
to be known possibly by the name of an Efficiency Com-
mission to investigate the manner and method of trans-
acting business at the various State Institutions, under
the supervision of the Governor and Cabinet and to make
suggestions, looking to the possibility of greater efficiency
and better business methods at these Institutions. You
may ask why this is necessary and why the Governor and
Cabinet do not perform these functions themselves? The
Governor replies that the manifold duties of the Gov-
ernor's Office and the heavy duties of each and every
Cabinet Officer, makes it extremely hard for them to take
the care and burden of these institutions upon them.
They become engrossed in the work of their offices, which
takes all their time, and before they realize it something
wrong has happened at one of these institutions, for
which they are severely blamed and criticised. If the
Governor's Office and the Cabinet Officers were mere
cynosures without work, they could leave their business
offices any day and go on a tour of inspection to these
Institutions and could well do the work without any help
from such Efficiency Board, but when they leave their
offices they find that there is a mass of business equally
as important, dealing with the business of different coun-
ties in the State, which has been slighted to do this in-










13



section work. If the Legislature could appoint five per-
sons, one of whom would be the President of the Federa-
tion of Woman's Clubs, together with four men on this
Board, either having 'a salary attached or making it
purely an honorary- distinction, such as the Board of Con-
trol now enjoys, they would have time to solve a great
and vexed proposition which confronts the Governor and
his Cabinet, and in fact the whole State of Florida. Of
course this Board of Efficiency would be under the direct
control of the Governor and his Cabinet and, whenever
they could find the time, would still have the right to visit
any State Institution and plan together with the Board
of State Institutions and Board of Efficiency, suggesting
any changes for the betterment of said Institutions.

FINANCIAL CONDITION.

In regard to the State's financial condition, the Gov-
ernor desires to say that it affords him great pleasure to
submit for your attention and consideration a report
made by State Auditor, Hon. J. Will Yon, as of February
11th, 1919, which reports is herewith incorporated:

"FINANCIAL REPORT OF STATE AUDITOR."

Tallahassee, Fla., February 11, 1919.

Hon. Sidney J. Catts, Governor,
The Capitol.

Dear Sir:
1 have the honor to report that I have made an exami-
nation of the office of State Treasurer as of date of close
of business December 31, 1918. All moneys and cash
items were counted and examined, and bank balances
were verified. Bonds and Securities held by the State
Treasurer for various purposes were examined and
checked. I beg to submit the following as found by my
examination:
BALANCE SHEET.
DEBITS.
general Revenue Fund.............. $ 199,679.76
One Mill School Tax Fund.......... 58,240.98
Pension Tax Fund.................. 218,528.38
State Board of Health Fund......... 64,466.57
Principal of School Fund............ 41,554.64










14



Interest of School Fund............. 47,803.56
Principal of Seminary Fund......... 386.01
Drainage Tax Fund................. 34,256.71
Drainage Bond Fund................ 668,540.82
State Prison Fund.................. 33,026.97
R. R. Commission Fines Fund....... 5,100.07
Shell Fish Fund .................... 5,090.17
Teachers' Examination Fund........ 1,227.89
State Road Tax Fund............... 130,551.49
Motor V. L. Maintenance Fund...... 5,173.29
Motor V. L. County Road Fund...... 159,289.37
Motor V. L. Expense Fund.......... 105.48
Florida National Forest Fund.................
Asylum Patients' Trust Fund........ 2,453.21
Everglades Drainage Sinking Fund.. 96,475.23
Agricultural College Fund........... 2,493.33
Interest of Seminary Fund.......... 1,873.10
Hatch Experiment Station Fund..... 2,584.30
Adams Experiment Station Fund.... 2,592.60
Lever Agricultural Extension Fund.. 6,124.04
White College Morrill Fund......... 14,480.34
A. & M. College Morrill Fund....... 18,063.20
A. & M. College Incidental Fund..... 24.45
A. & M. College Slater Fund........ 80.30
A. & M. College Fire Loss Fund..... 1.25
University of Florida Fire Loss Fund 133.82
University of Florida Incidental Fund 6,045.20
Experiment Station Incidental Fund. 260.16
Florida State Cillege Incidental Fund 12,983.11
Deaf & Blind School Incidental Fund. 417.54
Boys' Indus. School Fire Loss Fund.. 1,090.83
Smith-Hughes Agricultural Fund.... 2,437.18
Smith-Hughes Trades and Ind. Fund. 4,707.98
Smith-ilughes Teachers' Fund....... 3,313.42
Federal Aid Road Fund............. 9,972.55

CREDITS.
Cash and Cash Items:
Currency ......................... $ 16,362.00
Silver, Nickles and Pennies.......... 145.38
Checks cashed ..................... 456.50
Warrants paid Dec. 31, 1918 ......... 162.98
Requisitions:
Jurors and Witnesses ............... 64,411.95
State Board of Health.............. 1,000.00
Unpaid Coupons of S. S. D. No. 10,
DeSoto County ................... 105.00
Cash in Banks...................... 1,778,034.99



$1,861,628.80



$1,861,628.SO



You will find from this report that we have a balance
on hand of .1,861,628.80, which the State of Florida
should well be proud of; however, to offset this splendid
report, which is quite different to that of many Southern
States, which are deeply in debt, we have the bonding










t5



of Road Districts, School Districts, Drainage Districts
and other bonded indebtedness in the different counties
in the State, approximating over $2,500,000.00. If these
bonds were paid at once it would wipe out by consider-
able loss our cash balance as given above, and this calls
to your attention the fact that the Legislature should in-
sist that all bonds for the future be curtailed, because if
this is not carefully looked after by the Legislature we
will soon have our loved State so deeply in debt that it
will entail upon the coming generation a condition of in-
debtedness which will be very hurtful. The Governor
would, therefore, urge that you analyze the proposition
and allow no bonds in the future which will endanger the
good credit of the State of Florida, or the counties and
districts thereof. This is one of the supremest matters
that could come before you for consideration as a law-
making body.

STATE INSTITUTIONS.

The next matter which comes before us for attention
is the State Institutions, known as the Hospital for
Insane at Chattahoochee, Florida; the Boys Industrial
School at Marianna, the Girls' Industrial School at Ocala,
and the State Prison Farm at Raiford. The Governor
desires to say that the State Hospital for Insane has been
severely stricken, since your last session, by the Spanish
Influenza. This institution was well managed and con-
trolled for the past year by Dr. W. M. Bevis at the head
of it, while Dr. H. Mason Smith was in the Army, but a
few weeks ago Dr. Smith returned and has resumed con-
trol of said institution. Many improvements are being
made in the personnel of the Hospital this year and we
feel that it is upon higher and better ground than it has
been for several years.

BOYS' INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL.

The Boys' School at Marianna, as we all know, has
been for some time a storm center, superinduced by keep-
ing a man at its head who was not alive to his duties.
This has been remedied and a new Superintendent, Dr.
Frank E. McClane of Ocala, Florida, has been elected and
we hope he will prove able to contend with the conditions
at this school in a way which will show that he is a master











16



of men. We have also put a new Farmer at the Institu-
tion, a member of this Legislature, and who is well quali-
fied for this work. We feel that this Institution has been
exceedingly unfortunate in the past, because only a few
years ago it suffered a tremendous loss by fire, in which
several lives were lost and much property destroyed, but
we believe that with the late storm passed and a better
and newer set of officials at the Institution it faces a
condition which will, we hope, be full of successes and
good management in the future.

GIRLS' INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL.

The Girls' School at Ocala is well managed by Miss
Lumie B. Davis and the girls at the institution are very
happy and contented in their daily duties. All who come
in contact with the School praise it as being one of the
best managed within the range of their acquaintance.
We are proud of the record that the girls in this school
are making,

STATE EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS.

The next measure which claims our attention is the
State Educational Institutions, which are: The Univer-
sity of Florida at Gainesville, Florida; the State College
for Women at Tallahassee, Florida; the Blind and Deaf
school at St. Augustine, Florida; and the Agricultural
ind Mechanical College, for colored people, at Tallahas-
see. Florida.
The University of Florida is possibly our greatest edu-
cational institution and one over whose destinies Dr.
A. A. Murphree, its honored President, has control. The
University, for the past year, has had rather a small
attendance on.account of the world war, but it is coming
back into its own at once and is destined to be a great
factor in the lives of our youth in Law, Science, Litera-
ture, TI-*.-,1,\, Agriculture, and all other kindred in-
dustries and sciences. There is quite a question of
moment upon the tapis now, in regard to the University,
which has been suggested, promulgated and endorsed by
the Board of Control, which the Governor desires to call
to your attention so that you may pass an appropriate
lil concerning same whenever you so desire.










17



UNIVERSITY EXTENSION.

This matter is known as University Extension and
deals with carrying on the work through correspondence
courses, dominated and controlled by the different pro-
fessors of the University, to each and every person within
the State of Florida. The University Extension teaching
has been tried and is now successful in many lines, in-
cluding agriculture, and is made a part of the regular
work in the Universities of Wisconsin, Kansas, Colorado,
Harvard University, and Indiana University. The Gov-
ernor hopes, by calling your attention to this work, that
it will cause the Legislature to pass a law, making it a
part of the University training. No conscientious objector
can rise up against the assertion that any plan by which
the beenfits of an institution maintained at the public
expense, can be carried to all the people who are tax
burdened, is a good plan. Any plan that will scatter the
benefits better is also good in proportion to the length and
breadth of its scatteration. Let us also be thankful that
we have learned to be moderate in our expectations. Be-
lieving all these things our modesty has taken no shame
in venturing to suggest to the Board of Control that
University Extension work be no longer confined to the
farmers, but passed along to the fishermen, laborers, law-
yers, clerks, doctors, merchants and stenographers, and
all others included. President Wilson has received a
letter from Hon. Franklin K. Lane, who is Secretary of
the Interior, calling the President's attention to a bill
now pending in Congress appropriating much money to
"conduct a vigorous and systematic campaign for the
eradication of adult illiteracy." Now, it is quite plain
that the Honorable Secretary did not intend to endorse
University Extension in this official writing referred to.
He had in mind something else quite different, but he did
in fact endorse University Extension when he recom-
mended "a vigorous and systematic campaign for the
eradication of adult illiteracy." For adult illiteracy can
be eradicated in no other way. There is no use talking
about making a grown man go to school. It is one of the
few things that simply cannot be done. It is hard enough
to get children in school-grown-ups, none whatever. In
",University Extension a way is found to take the school to
2-I. J.










18



the pupil and in this way alone can adult illiteracy be
eradicated. Hence we get the slogan-"MULTIPLY THE
EXTENSION AND DIVIDE KNOWLEDGE AMONG
THE PEOPLE OF ALL AGES AND CONDITIONS."

VOCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL SCHOOLS AND
HOME ECONOMIC DEPARTMENTS.
Also in connection with the University of Florida and
the State College for Women, I desire to state that under
the Smith-Hughes Bill, the State Board of Education has
located ten Vocational Educational Schools and five
Home Economic Departments; the former for the train-
ing of our boys along the lines of agriculture and kin-
dred subjects, and the latter for the girls of Florida,
along lines of domestic science and home economics.
These schools are located as follows: Educational Voca-
tional Schools located at, Gonzalez, Bonifay, Starke,
Largo, Wauchula, Montverde, Lemon City, Pahokee,
Greensboro and Madison. Home Economics Departments
located at, Marianna, Tallahassee, Bushnell, Williston,
and DeLand. There is also another school under this
Bill, known as the Evening School, teaching trades and
industries, located at Jacksonville, Florida. These schools
are destined to become the feeders of our University
of Florida and State College for Women and need all
the encouragement that the Legislature of the State of
Florida can give, because each year they will be helped
more and more, not only by the laws passed by this
Legislature, but by accumulated sums of money given by
the Smith-Hughes Act and other acts and amendments
from our Federal Congress.

STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN.

Our State College for Women, located at Tallahassee,
is possibly the most beautiful jewel upon the bosom of
Florida and is becoming the cynosure of all eyes, in fact
it is the Vassar of the South. This Institution, under
the Board of Control and the President, Dr. Conradi, is
developing the young womanhood of Florida, and the
whole State is and has a right to be proud of this institu-
tion. This great school, together with the Home Eco-
nomic Departments established as above stated, will for-
ever guarantee to the girls of Florida and adjacent states











19



an education which will fit them for the duties devolving
upon the women of today and the future.
THE BLIND AND DEAF SCHOOL.
The Blind and Deaf School at St. Augustine is also
well presided over by Dr. Walker, its President, and his
able corps of teachers.

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL
SCHOOL.

The Agricultural and Mechanical School at Tallahassee
for negroes is doing a good work under the President,
Professor Young, and in conversation with him a week or
two ago, he stated that his institution is badly crowded
and presented the Governor with a synopsis of its needs,
which he in turn forwarded to the President of the Hoard
of Control. The Governor desires to suggest to the Legis-
lature that you appoint a Committee to confer with
Professor Young and his faculty in regard to the re-
quirements of this Institution.

TAXATION.

This is the most important question which will come
before the Legislature. The people of Florida are and
have been too heavily taxed. In some places the taxes
approximate such a high per cent that a person loading
out money at the legal rate of interest would hardly
realize any profit; this is abnormal and must be relieved.
The Governor, therefore, suggests that the Legislature
look carefully into the matter of having a great many
citizens, who have been escaping taxation, put upon the
list of tax-payers, for. the material progress and develop-
ment of the State depends largely upon the reasonable-
ness of the tax burdens upon property. Under the opera-
tion of the present system, property taxation is unequal
and unjust. Relief should be promptly afforded by dis-
covering new sources of revenue for State 1pr.-.. so
that the levy of property taxes for State expenses may
be wholly dispensed with. This will enable the counties
to levy assessments upon valuation without reference to
the State taxation, thereby rendering immaterial the
differences in values in the several counties, making a
Tax Commission unnecessary.










20



PRIVILEGE OR FRANCHISE TAX.

To meet the expenses of the State a reasonable privi-
lege or franchise tax may be imposed upon corporations
chartered in this State, and those chartered elsewhere but
doing inter-state business in this State, constitutional
limitations in the premises being duly observed in fram-
ing and administering the law. This would be a most
just tax that would, in a measure, compensate the State
for the benefits derived by the corporations through the
privilege or the authority conferred or permission given
to do business in the State as corporate entities with
such great advantages.

INHERITANCE AND INCOME TAX.

An inheritance tax should also be provided for. Should
these inheritance and franchise or privilege taxes, to-
gether with license taxes and other revenues accruing to
the State from sources other than from taxes upon prop-
erty, be insufficient to meet all proper state expenses, a
moderate income tax may be collected. But State ex-
penses should be reduced to the lowest possible point con-
sistent with true economy, efficiency and faithful service
to the State. Every department of the State Govern-
ment should be required to exercise most rigid economy
in expenditures and to dispense with unnecessary em-
ployment and disbursements of all kinds. In this way
the burden of taxation would not rest so heavily upon
the poor people who have been paying taxes to date. The
Governor would further suggest that, as the United
States of America has seen fit to place an income tax
upon the citizenship, possibly Florida might impose a
small tax on certain incomes, which would bring in great
sums of money and at the same time put the burden upon
those who should bear it.

PROHIBITION.

In regard to prohibition we have achieved much and
our State is to be congratulated upon what we have
already attained, but in the last bill, as passed by the
Legislature in extra session, there is a clause which
should be dealt with by you gentlemen before you con-
clude your session this year, and that is in regard to the











21



proposed law allowing the Drug Stores to sell whiskey
upon prescription of doctors. The reputable doctors and
druggists in this State resent this and have expressed
themselves in no measured terms, but while this is .true
the disreputable doctors and druggists are taking advan-
tage of the right given to them in this clause of the law.
If this remains as incorporated now in our prohibition
laws it will result in prohibition in Florida becoming a
mockery and a bane in the eyes of all men. The Gov-
ernor, would, therefore, urge upon your attention the
changing of this clause in said law.

FEDERAL ROAD AID ACT.

According to this Act the United States Government
gives dollar for dollar to the State to put its convicts and
their hire against the money which they give for the con-
struction of Federal roads within the domain of a given
State. The last legislature passed a law accepting this
proposition of the Federal Government and put against
said aid the work of 300 convicts within the State. This
has been tested for two years and the State Road Depart-
ment has done well in the management of these convicts,
with a few exceptions. The proposition made by the State
Road Department now is that they take over all the able-
bodied men in classes One and Three, except seventy-five
to be retained upon the State Farm, thus doing away
with the lease system to turpentine operators in the State,
and place these men upon the State Highways under the
supervision of the Road Department. This of course will
deprive the state of many thousands of dollars which they
receive from the lease system and will also possibly take
the county convicts from the county roads and place them
upon the state highways. This will give us a magnificent
system of Federal roads on the various highways of the
State, but will give us poor lateral county roads, which
the State Highway Commission will not touch and will
not work. It will, at the same time, in order to meet the
expenses of taking care of the convicts on the State
Federal Highways and the State Prison system, cause
to be assessed a tax of about three-eighths of a mill. The
Governor understands that the State Road Department
will also ask the Legislature to provide for a levy of two
mills upon all the taxable property of the State to secure
funds to meet an appropriation from the Federal Govern-











22



ment. The Governor, therefore, calls the attention of the
Legislature of Florida to these conditions and asks them
to look thoroughly into this matter. It has been the
pride of the administration that instead of having an in-
creased taxation, with all the high prices brought about
by the war, it has reduced the tax rate instead of increas-
ing it. If the lease system continues there will be no
necessity to levy a tax for the State Farm and Prison
System, but if the two-mill tax is not levied the appro-
priation from the Federal Government will not be avail-
able. This whole matter is one that must be thrashed out
by the Legislature and the Governor calls your attention
to it, so that you may act with wisdom and discretion in
whatever your conclusions may be.

AUDITOR'S OFFICE.

The Auditor's Office is well managed and well regu-
lated in the work, but it is simply impossible for three
auditors to do the work of fifty-four counties. These men
are honest, hardworking, and conscientious, but the
records show that there are several counties which they
have not been able to investigate since 1915 and several
more that have not been audited since 1916. This con.
edition has developed a number of large shortages during
the past four years and has caused State and Counties
to sustain losses that have run into hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars, because it was impossible for the
Auditor to reach his office in a year or more. Therefore,
the Legislature should give to the Auditor's Office, either
two more assistant State Auditors or allow three clerks
to go with the Auditors to do the perfunctory checking,
which will give one clerk to each auditor. Either of the
above conditions being observed will relieve the conges-
tion in this office.

SUPREME COURT.

There is also a congested condition in the Supreme
Court of Florida, which is evidenced by the Court being
behind in its docket about a year and a half or two years.
This congestion can be relieved in either of the follow-
ing ways. First, by the creation of a Sixth Judge, and
second, in case the Legislature thinks best, they might
pass a law whereby the Supreme Court would have the



t











23



right to invite Circuit Court Judges to leave their benches
in the Circuit Courts and come to the Supreme Court
bench to help these Judges with their cases, when their
own courts were not in session. There are a number of
Circuit Court Judges in the State, who have light dockets
and small circuits, and by an appropriation for expense
accounts these Judges could well come in and relieve the
congested condition now existing in the Supreme Court.

FOREIGN CORPORATIONS.

There should be a special tax on Foreign Corporations
doing business in the State of Florida and each and every
corporation so represented should have a place of busi-
ness where said tax could be due and collected.

PENSIONS FOR SOLDIERS.

The Governor of the State has received numbers of
letters from various old soldiers throughout the State,
begging for their allowance to be increased each year.
Year by year these great-hearted heroes of the past have
become more and more feeble by the flight of time and
fewer in number by the numerous deaths which have
occurred in their ranks. Therefore, if it is commensurate
with the thought of this Legislature and with the allow-
ance at your command, the Governor would respectfully
suggest that you put in force a graduated law, increas-
ing the pension of Old Soldiers and their widows, more
and more each year, until these magnificent spirits shall
"pass over the River" and rest under the shade of the
trees, for we cannot honor these men too highly.

PRIVILEGED TAX ON RIGHT TO HOLD LANDS.

It seems to be the policy of this State to impose a tax
in the nature of a privilege or license tax on the right to
engage in any business or occupation carried on in this
State. There is, however, no tax on the privilege of hold-
ing lands in this State in large bodies for the purpose of
speculation or for other purposes. A remedy that would
contribute to the relief of this condition is greater pro-
duction of all products, but in this the people are ham-
pered because of high prices for land, held frequently by
speculators in large tracts and in certain instances for











24



game preserves, and the like, which prevent its use for
this purpose and deprives the people of the opportunity
and privilege of earning a livelihood by the cultivation
of such land. If a tax was imposed by law upon the
privilege of holding land in this state for this purpose in
the same way that such a tax is imposed upon the privilege
of following any business or occupation in this State,
such tax being imposed on the privilege of holding lands
for other than agricultural or manufacturing purposes
and to apply only when the acreage so held is 640 acres,
or more, and increased as the acreage held increases it
would probably tend to remedy this condition, and the
Governor respectfully recommends that the Legislature
give serious thought and careful consideration to this
subject.

BANK GUARANTEE FUNDS.

There'are several States which have adopted the Bank
Guarantee and Reserve Fund, whereby depositors in
banks in the States having this law are guaranteed not
to lose any money in case of the Banks' failure. The law
in Oklahoma seems to be the best, and the Governor
would carefully urge upon the attention of the Legisla-
ture this law, or some similar law, whereby the depositors
shall be safely guaranteed from loss in the future in bank
failures.
FEDERATION OF LABOR.

The Federation of Labor and laws respecting labor
will be discussed- in this session of the Legislature,
possibly more than ever before in any previous session.
The coming to the front of the labor question and the
solution of many vexed problems, in which capitalists
and labor are involved, have now reached the South, as
well as the North, and we have within this State many
societies of federated labor demanding that we give them
proper recognition. The Governor would earnestly urge
that the Legislature look carefully into these laws and
see that the State of Florida will offer a home to these
federated labor societies by treating labor as a part of
the great body politic of our State. To show their power,
and that they will continue to be such a power in our
Nation, the federated labor societies of the railroad have
forced the eight-hour-a-day law upon the attention of the











25



world. Therefore, we cannot treat in silence these great
forces in our National Organization.

BETTER MARKETING( AND SHIPPING LAWS.

Florida, as a State, will forever be divided into about
seven sections: Farming, Truck, Citrus Fruit, Fishing,
Phosphate Mining, Lumber and Stock Raising. This
roughly shows how the people of the State make their
living and in each and every one of these seven divisions
the law-making powers of the State can readily see that
there must be a market attained or there will be suffering
upon the part of the person who is backing the business
in whatever department he or she has worked. Therefore,
there is no State in the Union more dependent upon a
Bureau of Marketing and good shipping laws than is the
State of Florida, for in all of these departments the
product produced must be shipped to other zones and
more northern climes and countries. The Governor, there.
fore, urges upon the attention of the Legislature the fact
that there should be laws safe-guarding the output of the
farmers, truckers, citrus fruit growers ,fishing and oyster
industries, mining, sawmills and stock raisers, for if our
people can be protected in any way by good laws on
these subjects they will see a degree of prosperity blossom
in this State which will do the heart of every citizen
good.

LEGAL RATE OF INTEREST.

The Governor earnestly suggests for your consideration
lhat the legal rate of interest in the State of Florida be
reduced to 6%, for the large money-lending interests of
the world are very much afraid of monetary conditions in
any state or community where a high rate of interest pre-
vails and is protected by law, because they feel that the
investment made by the common every-day man will not
bring returns commensurate with this high rate of inter-
est; therefore, capitalists become afraid and seek avenues
for investment where the rate of interest can be earned by
the average, ordinary man in his investment of money.
The lowering of the rate of interest from 8% to 6% will,
therefore, bring millions of dollars into this State. seek-
ing the development of the State and the progress of the
citizens and individuals, whereas, if the high rate of inter-











26



est remains capitalists are going to other states where the
citizens thereof can make their investments safe and
secure by a low rate of interest.
STATE BUILDINGS.
At the present time there is a degree of congestion
within the State building which must be relieved. The
Legislators would do well to examine the crowded con-
ditions as they prevail today. Archives which are price-
less in their nature and history are crowded into outer
corridors; State papers, whose import and power are
great, are placed in halls, and offices are so congested
with records and other memorials of State history, that
should be handed down to posterity, that unless some-
thing is done to relieve the congestion of the situation
before the next Legislature meets will be something in-
tense and frightful. The Governor, therefore, brings to
your consideration the following conclusions, either of
which will relieve this condition: First, If you gentle-
men, in your law-making capacity, think best to add to
the Capitol such additional room as shall give to each
department that space which is so much needed. Second,
If you think wise and best to erect a separate building,
such as the Supreme Court Building, on a different site
where the congestion of the present offices may be re-
lieved and where other offices, which now are forced to
rent quarters in already crowded centers of the City of
Tallahassee, may find room for expansion. This, Gentle-
men, is a matter of dire necessity and so great is the
consideration due to this proposition that the City Coun-
cil of Tallahassee has taken the matter up and asked
that it be brought to the attentionof the law-making
powers of the State.
RECONSTRUCTION OF THE PARDON BOARD.
Having noticed the difference in the actions of the
Board of Pensions and the Board of Pardons, the -Gov-
ernor is moved to make the following suggestions: That
as the Pension Board has a regular Secretary, whose
duty it is and whose time is entirely given to the prepara-
tion of cases to be presented to the Pension Board, and
all cases are treated exactly alike, whereas, in the Pardon
Board proceedings, only those cases that are presented
by lawyers are given that thorough and careful atten-
tion that should be bestowed upon each and every ense.











27



the Governor is suggesting to the Legislature that the
lawyers present their cases in writing and in said writ-
ing briefly state their position; and that the Legislature
create a Secretary whose duty it shall be to prepare an
entire list of all the cases of prisoners to be acted upon
by the Board of Pardons, and that each case be briefed
and presented by said Secretary and only at stated inter-
vals; and in future the Board of Pardons have these
stated meetings and no case will be brought up before the
Board except at such sittings, unless it involves the life
or death of a prisoner. This suggestion is brought about
because the Board of Pensions does its work more thor-
oughly, rapidly and with more justice than does the
Pardon Board under the present circumstances. There
are numbers of prisoners in the penitentiary today who
haye been there for long terms and are poor, ignorant
and without loved ones or relatives to help them, that
they have never had their cases presented by lawyers, or
otherwise. The proposition which the Governor submits
to the Legislature will assure each and every prisoner
having his or her case presented in regular order as the
Pension cases are presented before the Pension Board.
The Governor would also suggest, for the careful atten-
tion of the Legislature, in addition to the above, a needed
relief for the Pardon Board, by passing a law which will
make it obligatory upon a prisoner receiving a sentence
of the Court, to serve out a certain specified amount of
time on his- sentence before he could apply to the Board
of Pardons at all. For instance, if a man was sentenced
for ten years he would have to serve, say five years of
the time, and if he were sentenced for life, he would serve
ten years before applying for a pardon, and let some pro-
portion run through all sentences, which would relieve
the Pardon Board of many cases Just convicted, being
brought before the Board time after time, until the Board
is either tired out or grants said pardon. Of course this
law could be safeguarded by having it understood that,
if there was any new evidence which tended to show that
the prisoner was not guilty of the offense, these cases
could be brought before the Board for consideration.
There is no provision of the law which will come before
you at this time that is more important, and the Governor
urges that you give it your most careful attention.











28



TO ADVERTISE FLORIDA IN THE NORTH AND
WEST.

There is a disposition upon the part of the State Board
of Health, and a great many people of the State, to put
the train, which was formerly known as the Health Train,
upon the railroads of the United States, having one car
equipped with product of West Florida, one with products
of Central Florida, and one with products of South Flor-
ida, all in the hands of competent and skilled men and
women, traveling through the North and West, advertis-
ing Florida products and Florida lands. The Governor,
brings this to your careful attention, because in the his-
tory of Alabama, in the year 1886, Dr. B. F. Riley was
put at the head of such a train for Alabama, and in addi-
tion wrote a history of Alabama, and these two, under his
jurisdiction, were taken throughout the West and thou-
sands of immigrants came to the State of Alabama as a
result of this movement. It may be wise for you to con-
sider such a proposition, as we have millions of acres of
land held in large bodies untenanted today in this State,
which if settled by good men and women would help to
feed the world as well as bring riches to our loved State.

TO CREATE A BOARD OR COMMISSION FOR THE
PURPOSE OF PERPETUATING FLORIDA'S
PART IN THE GREAT WORLD WAR.

It is but natural that each and every State should be
proud of the record they have made in the great World
War and no State should be prouder of its part in this
great historic event than Florida, because it is an estab-
lished fact that there was a large amount of patriotism
developed throughout our own State, and each and every
one is not only proud of the record we made, but desires
this record to be perpetuated and handed down to pos-
terity, so that the names of the men and women who took
part in this great tragic event may live in the annals of
our State's History. The Governor would, therefore, sug-
gest for your consideration the creation of a Board or
Commission of five, for the purpose of getting a suitable
history written, which history should be adopted by your
Legislature and incorporated in the text book history of
the State.










29



LAWS REGULATING THE SALE OF ESSENCE OF
GINGER AND LIKE COMPOUNDS CONTAIN-
ING A LIKE PER CENT OF ALCOHOL.

While the United States Government has the law well
in hand, regulating the sale of narcotics, which law is be-
coming more strictly enforced each year, and which is not
only saving the lives of many persons, but reducing the
untold agony they suffered from the evil effects of such
narcotics, and such like drugs, yet the United States has
not so far taken up the sale of Essence of Jamaica Ginger
and other like compounds containing a high per cent of
alcohol. Thousands of people who were accustomed to
heavy drinking of whisky, brandy, wine, and other alco-
holic beverages, and who are unable to obtain said bever-
ages since strict enforcement of the law prevails in this
State, have now turned to buying from the drug stores
these baneful and hurtful extracts, oftentimes contain-
ing as high as 80 to 90 per cent alcohol. Any one can see
at a glance that a person who drinks these deadly com-
pounds is putting into his system drinks much more
dangerous than whiskey, brandies, wine, etc., because the
per cent of alcohol is so abnormally large and strong that,
instead of men and women dying as drunkards, their
brain becomes inebriated by this intensely strong decoe-
tion of alcohol to such an extent that they often die as
maniacs. This is a very pertinent question for you to
deal with at the present time, but these substitutes are
being sold largely by druggists throughout our State, and
the Governor presents to you this question, hoping that
some suitable law will be passed safe-guarding this great
danger and evil.

ADOPTION OF COMMON SCHOOL BOOKS.

The Governor calls to the attention of the Legislature
the adoption this summer of common school books and
would advise that you pass a law, which will force the
text book commission and the Governor and his Cabinet,
in the adoption this summer of the common school books,
to make only a two-year contract, because of the high
prices on paper supplies, book supplies, and every item or
expense which goes into the formation of a school book
at the present time. It is hardly probable that the high
prices now ruling such materials will continue two years











30



after peace has been declared, and two years from now
those in charge can get a lower price on all common
school books, whereas, if we contract for four years the
same high price will continue throughout the length of
these four years.

TO HAVE A HOG CHOLERA SERUM PLANT AND
TO DISTRIBUTE SAME FREE AT THE STATE
FARM AT RAIFORD, FLORIDA.

There is no subject affecting the welfare and best inter-
ests of the farmers of the State more than that of hog
cholera, which oftentimes desolates and destroys a man's
herd of swine just when they are at their best. At Rai-
ford, Florida, we have all the raw material to make a
great Hog Cholera Serum Plant and therefrom to dis-
tribute free to the farmers of the State of Florida,
through the County Demonstration Agent, this serum for
vaccinating the hogs of the State. The Governor, would,
therefore, urge upon your attention the thought of in-
stalling such a plant, by law, at Raiford, Florida.

STATE ABSENTEE VOTING LAW FOR SOLDIERS,
SAILORS, TRAVELING MEN AND OTHERS
QUALIFIED BUT AWAY FROM HOME
AT VOTING TIME.

A great many of the states of the Union have the
Absentee Voting Law and find that it works exceedingly
well. An effort was made at the last regular session of
the Legislature to have such a law passed, but it has not
been passed in its entirety and completion. The Governor
would, therefore, urge upon the Legislature that due con-
sideration be given this matter, because it is one of vital
import to the welfare of our State at present. If, after
your deliberations, you think best the Governor would
recommend that you pass a law of this kind, broad enough
to cover the entire range of voters absent from their
State, county, or precinct at the time of voting, who are
otherwise qualified.

EXPERIMENTAL FARM STATION FOR THE
EVERGLADES.
There can be no doubt that the Everglades, when
opened and developed will present to the world the most










31



magnificent array of rich muck lands that the world now
has upon its surface; at the same time the peculiar for-
mation of the Everglades is of such nature that much
experimentation must be done in the soils before ulti-
mate success will crown the efforts of the men who cast
their destinies in these muck soil lands. It is also true
that these lands are being taken up rapidly by a great
many settlers, men of larger means and large corpora-
tions, so that, if the Legislature does not do something
to locate Experimental Farms in the Everglades, it may
be possible that the large divisions and sub-divisions of
said lands will be swept beyond the control of the In-
ternal Improvement Board by the next session of tht
Legislature, and it will then be too late, for one or two
crop successes in the Everglades will produce an influx
of population so large that we cannot estimate them. As
it is now the Internal Improvement Board has about
1,200,000 acres of these rich, redeemed from overflow
lands in their possession and nothing would please them
more than to have this Legislature set aside 18,000 acres
of these lands, within a body, to be known as a State
Experimental Farm, especially adapted to the cultiva-
tion of sugar cane and all products therefrom, such as
syrup, molasses, preserving fluids, sugars and all kindred
products. At the same time this amount of land would
not only allow the State to experiment with the sugar
cane problem, but would give space to bring forth the
most perfect and money-making truck crops and crops of
forage, corn, cereal productions, citrus fruits, and other
orchard productions, which the land would be found
capable of producing. In this way the farm would and
could be a great criterion for each settler, who, coming
into the Everglades to live, would be asked to go to said
farm and note the experiments which had been made
and proven successful and those which had proven fail-
ures. It might be well also for the Legislature to take
up the matter, of the Experimental Farrh Station in the
Everglades, with large land owners in that section who
might be induced by encouragement from the Legislature
to establish farm stations within their holdings.

WOMAN'S SUFFRAGE.

This is a question which is the center of the world's
thought today and one which knocks at the door of the










32



Nation's Congress and the Legislatures of all the States.
It is a question which will not down and is one which
the Legislature must deal with, either at this session or
at some subsequent session. The Governor, therefore,
earnestly calls your attention to this matter so that you
may decide whether it is best to give the women of the
State of Florida the vote in the primaries, or to leave the
matter to a Constitutional Amendment. You gentlemen
will doubtless be approached by many of the fair Suffra-
gettes during this session, who will insistently urge upon
you the passage of a bill, and as Governor of the women
of the State, who are the mothers of our children, he
urges a respectful and careful hearing of their cause.
Personally, the Governor, is helping them to achieve this
distinction of citizenship which the crown of maternity,
the loving devotion of centuries of faithful service and a
desire for world usefulness, among the ranks of women,
forced to our attention. Therefore, any courtesy or kind-
ness shown to these ladies by you will be more than
highly appreciated by the Governor of the State.

PROTECTION OF ESTATES OF INSANE PEOPLE
WHILE IN THE ASYLUM.

Numerous complaints have come from different parts of
the State, making the assertion that where persons who
have idiosyncrasies of mind or inclinations towards
paranoism and kindred nervous diseases and have been
cited before the proper officials and had their liberty
taken away and sent to an asylum, their estates have been
squandered by those who should have protected them
while they were virtually in a position where they could
not speak with any authority. Thus, these people, who
are unable to help themselves have had filched from them,
by their kindred, who should have protected them, the
money and lands left them 'by inheritance. This. is a
proposition which should be carefully looked into by this
Legislature and a law passed in some way, looking to
the protection of these estates and the safe-guarding of
same, so that should the person ever recover from their
insanity, their estate should be given back to them in the
same condition in which it was when they entered the
Hospital.











33



FIRE PROTECTION FOR THE EVERGLADES.

The composition of the muck lands of the Everglades is
of such nature and character that it largely partakes of
the formation of "peat," which when thoroughly dry
easily ignites and burns. The conditions surrounding
the Everglades are such that the prairie lands, grazed
over by thousands of head of cattle and hogs, lie next to
these lands and the cattle men and hog men in the spring
burn the grazing lands over, and the fires thus started
go into the muck or peat lands of the Everglades and
sometimes burn as deep as from five to ten feet, destroy-
ing every bit of muck formation and burning down to the
white sand, thus destroying in a year millions of dollars
of this rich muck composite. The time has come
in the history of the State when the muck lands are of
more value than the cattle and prairies, and unless the
Legislature takes precautions to have fire guards placed
in the Everglades land, or gives the Internal Improve-
ment Board the right so to do, it will be but a few years
until much of the rich composite of muck is entirely
destroyed and the white sand and lime formation, under-
lying this rich section, will be all-that is left of it. The
Governor, therefore, recommends very strongly that the
Legislature pass a law safeguarding this condition, by
having fire guards, whose business will cause them to be
provided'with all kinds of fire-fighting apparatus for the
protection of these valuable sections. The lands of the
Everglades are so level that a fire started in any section,
from ten to fifteen and twenty miles distant, can be seen
by a fire guard and put out without a loss of time. This
is a matter which the Governor strongly urges upon your
attention.

TO STRENGTHEN CHILD LABOR LAWS.

To safeguard .the interests of its children, is one of the
first duties of the State's Lawmakers. The War has
created a situation regarding the labor of children that
should demand your serious consideration. From the
bi-ennial report of our State Labor Inspector the Gov-
ernor finds an increase of children employed since the
War began. We should not only oppose all attempts to
relax the standards of the present child labor law, but
the Legislature should strengthen it by allowing the in.
3-H. J.











34



spector sufficient appropriation and such extra assist-
ance as is required. The Governor desires to call your
attention to recommendations contained in the bi-ennial
report of the State Labor Inspector.

WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION LAW.
The labor interests of the State should receive the
proper consideration at your hands. A Workmen's Com-
pensation Law should be passed that would protect an
employee and allow him at least two-thirds, on account
of personal injury, which would obviate the necessity
now of having to enter long drawn out suits for dam-
ages, under the employer's act. It would save much
costly litigation to the State, besides the workmen would
receive what benefits he would be entitled to when he
needs it the most. Only eight states now remain that
have not passed a workmen's compensation law, and I
trust that Florida will not longer be counted among the
remaining.

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.

The Governor believes that the State has now developed
to such an extent in manufacturing enterprises that a
bureau of labor and industrial statistics should be
created. Thousands of requests are received annually
from other states, asking for information regarding our
industrial enterprises, which cannot be answered intelli-
gently. Such a bureau maintained on a high plane would
prove of great value to the State, both to capital and
labor, and would be the means of bringing in more manu-
facturing enterprises when the outside world is made
familiar with the great opportunities that Florida can
offer. To be in line with forty-three other States that
have had these bureaus for years, the Governor believes
the Legislature should establish a bureau of labor and
industrial statistics.

LAWS FOR THE ENCOURAGEMENT OF SMALL
CANNING AND DE-HYDRATING PLANTS.

Going into other states since the last regular session
of the Legislature, the Governor has given some time and
thought to the operation of Canning and De-Hydrating
Plants, which prevail largely in such states as Michigan,











35



Ohio, and other Western States, the one mighty in-
centive to these plants being that the farmers or truck
raisers of the section wherein they are located sell all of
their best and most perfectly developed specimen of fruit
or vegetables, and then sells to the canning factory or
de-hydrating plant those specimens which are not so per-
fect and would not bring the same price upon the market,
yet as wholesome and nutritious as the better looking
specimen, thus giving to the farmers and truckers an en-
tire market for the whole output of his farm or trucking
business. The States in which the Governor made in-
vestigation, all, in order to have these canning factories
and de-hydrating plants capitalized and established in
their borders, allowed an existence to said companies for
several years without taxation, and when taxation comes
upon these plants it is of such a low rate as not to work
any hardship or burden upon them. The Governor would,
therefore, urge upon your consideration that you study
conditions existing in the Western States and pass such
laws for the safe-guarding of small canning factories and
de-hydrating plants in this state as will make it attrac-
tive for local and foreign capital to invest in these plants
in Florida, which produces so much vegetables, truck pro-
duce, citrus fruits, and other commodities, which other
states cannot grow.

ESTABLISHING FRESH AND SALT WATER FISH
HATCHERIES.

Under the experienced management of the Shell Fish
Commissioner, Hon. J. A. Williams, much thought has
been given to the establishment of fresh and salt water
fish hatcheries within the State of Florida. We have
been fortunate in this State in having an experienced
fish authority, one who has been sent for several times by
the different departments of fish culture at Washington,
to give testimony in regard to doubted and disputed
points, and we are indeed to be congratulated in having
such a man at the head of our Fish Commission. The
Governor would earnestly urge that the Legislature get
in serious touch with Mr. Williams and that your Com-
mittee, with his help, draft suitable bills for the establish-
ment of these fresh and salt water fish hatcheries within
our State borders, which will insure forever a safe har-
bor for all kinds of fish along the shores of our great













fish-producing State. The Governor would further call
to your attention the fact that of the many blessings
which Diety bestowed upon our State, one is the fishing
industry, which if carefully protected and well supplied
with the means of keeping a full supply of well grown
fish on hand, should produce throughout future ages
larger and larger harvests of fish, until we could not only
supply the demands of our State in fishing season, but
reap great financial gain by sending these fish to foreign
and isolated states, which have no such water frontage
as Florida. The Governor would, therefore, call your at-
tention to this fact and urge that you establish these
hatcheries.

RIPARIAN AND WATER RIGHTS.

One of the most important issues now confronting the
State of Florida is the question of Riparian Rights, over-
flowed lands rights, and other kindred legal claims, based
upon .these low-lying shore lands of Florida. In order
that this question may be settled definitely and fully,
once and for all, and the interests and titles of the land
holders may be protected forever, it is absolutely neces-
sary, in the opinion of the Governor, that suitable laws be
passed dealing with this harrowing and vexed proposition
for all times.

COMPULSORY EDUCATION TO BE MADE STATE
WIDE AND UNIVERSAL.

The consensus of opinion of the people of the State and
the United States is to make the Public School System,
which has become so deeply rooted in our organic State
formation, the custodian of each and every child from the
age of seven years through the eighth grade, thus form-
ing a basis of universal, co-ordinate and'uniform Amer-
ican citizenship in each and every child. By placing the
child within the public school during the period men-
tioned above, teaching only the English language in said
schools throughout this State and Union, bringing to
their attention the universal power of American history,
teaching them the love and adoration of the American
Flag and National Patriotic Songs, and thus eliminating
from them the idea that they must give their first alle-
giance to creed, and second to Nation. Thus we have a










37



basis of forming this sun-crowned citizenship and through
this compulsory educational system we make them first
an American and afterwards allow them to attend any
religious, denominational school which their parents
desire. This is becoming a common American idea and
will sooner or later pervade the entire sisterhood of
States. The Governor, therefore, urges upon the atten-
tion of the Legislature, at this time, that a Compulsory
Education Bill be passed at this session, forcing each
and every child in the State of Florida to attend public
school from the age of seven through the eighth grade,
for at least eight months of the year.

ABOLITION OF BOND TRUSTEES.

By private letters written the Governor by best in-
formed and well guided citizens of this State, we find that
there are, in some of the Road Districts of the State of
Florida, Bond Trustees who are getting a per cent upon
the amount of money to be expended under them and
drawing a salary from five to ten thousand a year, and
doing very little to earn it. There is a demand among
the people of the State that the Legislature, at this sit-
ting, draw a bill which will forever preclude these heavy
salaries paid to the Bond Trustees of Road Districts and
cities or counties and Bond Districts. The Governor,
therefore, calls your attention to this matter, wherein
many of the funds raised by bonds in this State have been
unduly squandered by these heavy taxes in the way of
salaries to these almost useless trustees.

SMALL TOWNS IGNORING SECTION 1053 OF THE
GENERAL LAWS OF FLORIDA.

Permit the Governor to call to your attention the
manner in which the small incorporated towns of Florida
ignore Section 1053, Laws of Florida; in making assess-
ments for taxation. This section ]I'rvi.i that towns
shall not exceed the valuation of the State assessment,
while in.fact many of them multiply such valuation by
ten to twenty and the legal courts sustain them in con-
tempt of law, as well as common sense. The United
States Agricultural reports inform us that farms only
pay on the average of three to four per cent on the in-
vestment and in many counties they are being made to










38



pay 6% on an assessed valuation, which is four times
as much as paid for wild lands, that are still wild to
the State and County. These small towns reach out and
include these wild lands in their boundaries for raising
revenue, multiplying the State valuation by ten or more
and collecting in many cases as much as State and
County. Such as this is a death blow to farming inter-
ests in the vicinity of small towns and is certainly not
for the good of the public. The Governor, therefore, sug-
gests that you pass some legislation on this important
point, which will prevent confiscation of small farms in
this State.

LAW AGAINST LOAN SHARKS.

These men, who engage in the loan business, whether it
be furniture, commodities, or other commercial goods of
value, have pushed their charges to such an extent that
in this State they are seldom less than 33 1/3 per cent a
month, and the practice is to charge three monthly pay-
ments of $5.00 each for a loan of $10.00. They generally
have a considerably higher rate, especially upon risky
loans, and the lowest rate ever charged is 10% per month,
which in a year would be 120%. These rates show how a
law will work, which allows only the big rate of inter-
est with no other interest legalized for risky loans of this
class. You gentlemen realize that no law can make any-
body conduct a business at a loss and the proprietors of
other legitimate businesses are entitled to proceeds
which ought to be legalized. There is no doubt that the
small loan business is a legitimate one and will persist,
whatever the laws may be, but we should protect our
people against the fierce encroachment of the loan sharks,
who are now doing business in this State. The Governor,
therefore, calls the attention of you gentlemen to the
necessity of framing some law and putting it upon the
Statute Books at this session, which will safeguard, as
far as possible, the interests of the people of this State
against these loan sharks.

ENGINEERING STATIONS.

The Governor calls to your attention a letter received
from Professor J. R. Benton, Dean of the College of
I'ngineering of the University of Florida, which expresses











39



this law desired by the Engineers of the State better than
any exposition he has seen, and which reads as follows:

"Hon. Sidney J. Catts, Governor,
State of Florida,
Tallahassee, Florida.

Dear Sir:

Mr. Phinehas V. Stephens, formerly of Florida but
now of New York City, informs me that he has written
to you about the benefits which Florida would derive
from the passage of the Smith-Howard Bill, now before
Congress. which proposes to establish an Engineering
Experiment Station in each State.
I am taking the liberty of writing to you on the same
matter, to endorse Mr. Stephens' statement and to say
that the Engineering Instructors of your State Univer-
sity are unanimous in the belief that the proposed En-
gineering Experiment Station would be of the greatest
possible benefit to the development of industries in Flor-
ida. It would do as much for manufacturing and trans-
portation as the Agricultural Experiment Stations have
done for Agriculture.
We would all be very much gratified if you should feel
sufficiently interested in the Bill to establish Engineering
Experiment Stations, to give it your endorsement, and
to write to our Senators and Congressmen in its favor.
Mr. Sears is the Clairman of the Committee on Educa-
tion, to which the Bill has been referred in Congress.
Very truly yours,
J. R. BENTON,
Dean of the College of Engineering."

In conclusion the Governor calls to your attention this
matter and asks that you, if commensurate with your
duties, memorialize Congress to pass the above law.










40



AN ACT TO ALLOW THE STATE OF FLORIDA TO
SELL LANDS INSIDE THE MEANDER LINE
OF LAKE OKEECHOBEE AND OTHER
LAKES, ESTUARIES AND BAYOUS
WITHIN THE STATE.

This law will be one closely allied and akin to the one
concerning Riparian Rights, except that in the matter
of the drainage of the Everglades two large areas of land
along the lake fronts have been uncovered as the water
level has been lowered. These lands are exceedingly rich
and settlers are desirous of going upon them to live, and
the Governor suggests that you pass a suitable law in
regard to the selling and disposition of said lands by the
Internal Improvement Board.

TUBERCULAR AND SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS'
HOMES.

There is an evident need at the present time for a home
for tuberculosis people in the State of Florida, and a few
months back there was a disposition upon the part of the
War Department to donate a cantonment in each State
for such work as a home for the tubercular people, and
a separate home for the wounded and disabled Soldiers
and Sailors. The Tubercular Home, if built, should be
entirely isolated and separated from the other two, and
the matter of help from the Federal Government, in
regard to all three of these institutions, is the only point
of similarity linking them together. Whether the first is
of sufficient importance, with the salubrious clime that
we have and where those who have this dread malady
can find recluse and health in living under tents, is a
question you should solve. However, the Soldiers' and
Sailors' Home is one which should claim your careful
attention.

SURETY BOND FOR TAX COLLECTORS AND ALL
OTHER COUNTY OFFICIALS.

The need of bond for officials who handle large sums
of money is one which should be given careful considera-
tion at this session of the Legislature. If personal bonds
are to be given for these officers, the same law which has
.been adopted in a good many Western States should be










41



adopted in this State, which is, that when a private per-
son signs an officer's bond in any county, or for a State
official, he should at the same time give an entire list of
all of his property in the State of Florida, with a list of
liens upon said property, and this list should be filed by
him with the proper official in the proper Court of Record,
and this bond, given by said private person, and the
signing of said statement, would constitute a lien or
mortgage upon said property until said bond was paid
or estreated. However, the Governor calls your attention
to the fact that it would be much better, as far as the
opinions of the best thinkers of this State are concerned,
to have County and State officials give bond in Surety
Companies and have a law passed forbidding private per-
sons going upon the bond of any public officer. Another
matter needing attention is the bond of Tax Collectors in
our largest counties. Under the present law, Section 823 of
the General Statutes, thirty thousand dollars is the maxi-
mum amount of bond that can be required of Tax Col-
lectors in this State. This amount is no doubt sufficient
in some counties, but in the Governor's opinion a greater
bond should be required in others. It appears to the
Governor that it would be well to have a law regulating
the same, based upon some fixed per cent of the amount
of money handled by the office.

COUNTY DEPOSITORS.

Under the County Depository System, it appears to the
Governor that it would be well to limit the number of
depositories to one for each county, or certainly not more
than one depository for County Funds and one for School
Funds for any one year. If there should be more than
one bank in a county desiring to be designated as depos-
itory, they could very well be given their turns by years
instead of, at present, allowing various banks to handle
fractional parts of accounts. In the case of any irregu-
larity or shortage, it would be much easier to trace and
prove the same with one depository than it is with a
number of depositories. It appears to the Governor, also,
that it would be well to require depositories to keep in a
permanently bound book, serially numbered and item-
ized, stubs of all receipts issued for moneys received. The
present loose-leaf system of receipts is very unsatisfac-
tory, for the reason that the receipts are frequently mis-











42



placed, and there is no regular serial number on receipts
issued to serve as a guide in making a check of County
affairs.

REQUESTS OF SECRETARIES DANIELS AND
BAKER FOR STATE CO-OPERATION IN
REGARD TO VENEREAL
DISEASES.

In reference to this matter the Governor calls the at-
tention of the Legislature of Florida to the following
letter from the Secretary of the Navy, in regard to this
most deplorable condition among the sailors and soldiers
of our country, and he desires to say that not only has
Secretary Daniels, of the Navy, taken this up with him,
but also Secretary of War Newton D. Baker has lent his
aid in helping to solve all of the problems connected with
these hurtful diseases in the State of Florida. Following
is letter from Secretary Daniels:

"My Dear Governor:
"At the annual association of the Governors at An-
napolis, this week, at which I had the honor to speak, I
made an appeal to the Governors to recommend to their
general assemblies legislation that would secure united
action in co-operation with the Federal Government in
the war that has been organized against the menace of
venereal diseases.
"War has taught us that these diseases are worse than
cancer, worse than tuberculosis, and worse than typhoid
fever. This wastage of human life can soon be reduced
and finally ended if the States and the Federal Govern-
ment act together, making the letter and spirit of the
Chamberlin-Kahn Law effective. To do this each State
will need to take such other action as would protect its
civilian population as the Army and Navy have sought
to protect the men under arms.
"I am taking the liberty of sending you herewith an
extract from my address at Annapolis in the hope that
it will meet with your approval, and you will feel it wise










43



for you to urge this action along the line suggested upon
the Legislature of your State at its coming session.
"Sincerely yours,
"JOSEPHUS DANIELS.
"Hon. Sidney J. Catts,
"Governor of Florida,
"Tallahassee, Florida."
The Governor would, therefore, urge the request of
these gentlemen upon the attention of the Legislature of
Florida and ask that you give serious .consideration to
the establishment and maintenance of such a hospital as
they and the State Board of Health of Florida may see
fit and best to erect and form into a State law, concerning
the eradication of these woeful diseases.

STATE ORPHANAGE ASYLUM.
In regard to this matter the Governor calls to the at-
tention of the Legislature the fact that the war has left
and will leave many orphan children in this State, and
it is well that you consider carefully whether these
orphans should be taken care of by the State or whether
they should be allowed to go into private institutions,
over which the State has no control, either by finance or
inspection, thus causing many citizens to grow up with-
out the usual care and protection which the State exer-
cises over other children by the public school system.
The Governor, therefore, urges that you carefully con-
sider whether or not the State should establish an
Orphans' Home, where these children could have State
supervision.

AMENDMENT TO LAWS CONCERNING MARKS,
BRANDS AND CHATTEL MORTGAGES IN
REFERENCE TO LIVE STOCK.
It will be admitted without argument, the Governor
thinks, that more capital is needed in our State and at a
lower rate of interest and for longer time than is, or can
be, supplied by the local banks. Outside capital, as rep-
resented by the cattle loan companies of the big live
stock markets, is continually looking for investments of
this character, and are favorably impressed with the
opportunities of our State, but for the reason that our
present chattel laws are cumbersome in administration,










44



require so much time for foreclosures when such action is
necessary, and the penalties for selling or sequestration
of mortgaged property are so inadequate they do not feel
safe in making loans in this State. It will be noted that
the suggested changes do not apply to ordinary chattel
mortgages on such articles, for instance, as sewing ma-
chines, wagons, etc., but only on cattle and other live
stock. The cattle business of such States as Texas, Okla-
homa, etc., has been developed to its present extent by
the ability of the cattle men to secure funds by the
operation of adequate laws of this kind, and in practical
operation it has been shown that they work no hardship
on the honest borrower, and the other kind certainly
needs no protection. In taking up the subject of chattel
mortgage laws and their relationship to the development
of the animal industry, it should be said, in fairness to
Florida, that the State has been criticised during the past
two years rather more severely than the facts warranted.
It must be confessed that the chattel mortgage laws of
Florida are not ideal, but they are probably little, if any,
less desirable as stimulants for the cattle business than
the laws of many other States Florida has come into
prominence and her chattel mortgage laws have been
criticised by cattle loan experts in direct proportion to
the amount of interest created during the past two years
in the possibilities of the State as a cattle country. If
no one had been interested in the development of the
live stock industry in Florida, no cattle men would have
been interested in our chattel mortgage laws. At the
outset it must be said that the chattel mortgage laws of
a good many States seem to have been drawn more in
the interest of the borrower than fairly to make it pos-
sible for both the borrower and the lender to strike a
fair bargain. Shylock is not a happy figure in literature
and the professional loan shark is a contemptible creature,
but the man who makes sources of credit available on
just terms is a public benefactor, whether he uses his
own funds or, by his skill as a banker, makes accessible
the resources of others. Credit, rightly used, is an in-
dispensable adjunct of business and without it the de-
velopment of American industry would have been impos-
sible, The Legislature, in the various States which have
to do with the proper use of credit, banking, real estate
laws, etc., has had a profound effect on their industrial











,'1



and agricultural developments. In framing this legisla-
tion the rights of both the lender and the borroiver must
be respected. It is true that borrowers have often been
the victims of exploitations, which cannot be too strongly
condemned, but justice does not require that legislation
be carried to the point where business channels are com-
pletely closed. Legislation should stimulate commerce,
not throttle it.

CHANGE OF VENUE IN TRIAL OF CASES.

In regard to the change of venue, the Governor desires
to say that the law now gives the defendant the right to
make the change of venue upon his own oath and at his
own instigation. This may be a good law, but in the
hands of an unscrupulous man it gives him a great ad-
vantage over the State of Florida. It seems that a better
law would be to put the matter entirely in the hands of
the Circuit Judge, especially in extreme cases of rape
and other like offenses, where the life of a defendant is
in danger by mob violence. A concrete instance is shown
in the case of a negro who committed an offense in Man-
atee County and the State authorities succeeded in getting
him to Jacksonville, and could he have been tried in
Jacksonville at the suggestion of Judge Reaves, the Cir-
cuit Judge of the District where the offense was com-
mitted, it would have saved the county of Manatee at
least fifteen hundred or two thousand dollars, as the con-
ditions were such that the Governor had to call out troops
to act as an escort for him from Jacksonville to Braden-
town and remain there during the heated trial. If the
Circuit Judge, under the laws of Florida, in cases like
this and similar ones, had the right to change the venue,
the man could have been tried in another county without
any cost except the necessary court cost in cases. The
Governor earnestly urges upon the attention of the Legis-
lature this matter, which should claim serious thought at
your hands.











I1i



INSPECTION OF CONVENTS, PRIVATE AND DE-
NOMINATIONAL INSTITUTIONS, HOUSES OF
GOOD SHEPHERD, AND PRIVATE DE-
NOMINATIONALLY OWNED
ORPHAN HOMES.

The Supreme Court of the State of Georgia, in a recent
decision, gave its opinion that the inspection of convents
in Georgia by a committee of the Grand Jury in a certain
county, was legal and that the Sister Superior who op-
posed the investigation was in contempt of Court, and
she was fined for resisting the inspection. It is an estab-
lished fact that each State Institution is subject to in-
spection, and rightly so, by the State authorities. If the
State Institutions are liable to go wrong and need inspee-.
tion, is it not true that Church institutions and denomina-
tional institutions also need the same inspection by State
authorities? Not that the State authorities would insist
in any way upon a certain line of religious thought or
teaching being promulgated by these institutions, because
the State has no right whatever to interfere in spiritual
matters, but in order that the State might know that
everything about these institutions is as sanitary as are
the State Institutions, as well ordered and regulated,
and that nothing contrary to law, or the best interest of
morals or good State government; is allowed to go on in
said institutions. The Legislature of 1917, in this State,
did pass a law for the purpose of inspecting convents,
but it put the same in the hands of the County Commis-
sioners and did not allow them to act unless a petition of
citizens in that section of the State, where the institution
is located, demanded it. This was a very lame effort to
correct evils which now would creep in through this
channel. The Governor, therefore, recommends that the
Legislature carefully consider a law, forcing the inspec-
tion of these institutions by the County Grand Jury of
each and every county where such institutions are located,
for the purpose of investigating convents, parochial
schools, denominational schools, orphan homes, houses of
Good Shepherd, privately owned orphanages, and each
and every institution claiming public patronage, yet not
under the control of the State.










47



SUB-DRAINAGE DISTRICTS AND THEIR LIABILITY
TO FLOAT TOO HEAVY AN ISSUE
OF BONDS.
This is a matter which, at the present time, is fraught
with much danger, especially in the Everglades Drainage
District developments. The Internal Improvement Board,
which has charge of the larger efforts of draining the
Everglades, is controlled and dominated by a desire to
float as few bonds as will be commensurate with the need
of the vast system of lands drained by the canals which
they will build, but there are sub-drainage districts, es-
tablished by the Legislature of 1917, which are not liable
at the present time to any higher authority than them-
selves, and these subsidiary Drainage Districts are liable
to float bonds in such large quantities and of values which
might depreciate, that they will impair not only the sale
of their own bonds but the bonds of the Internal Improve-
ment Board and all sub-drainage district bonds in the
Everglades. This condition is of such vast moment that
the Governor suggests that you give the matter serious
consideration and enact such legislation as will protect
and safeguard the interest of the property owners in such
sub-districts.

HIGH PRICES AND SALARIES.

The Governor desires to say to the Legislature that the
high prices prevailing for the last two or three years,
engendered and caused by the World War, has caused
the salaries paid the Secretary of State, Attorney Gen-
eral, Comptroller, Treasurer, State Superintendent of
Public Instruction, Commissioner of Agriculture, and the
clerks and stenographers in the various offices of the
Capitol building to decrease in value to such an extent
that many of these persons are not only unable to live
upon what they are getting, but are going into debt, be-
cause of the fact that a dollar now purchases about one-
half of what it would a few years ago. The Governor,
therefore, recommends for your consideration, and hopes
that you will look carefully into the matter of a raise in
the salaries of each of the Cabinet Officers, so that they
can live comfortably in the sphere which holding their
offices forces upon them, and also that the clerks and
stenographers in the -Governor's office and various Cabi-











48



net offices of the Capitol building be increased in order
that we may give these people the same salaries that the
same class of officials and employees receive in positions
in private life occupying positions of equal responsibility
and labor.

NATIONAL GUARD.

The Governor desires to call your attention to the
magnificent response of the military department of Flor-
ida in both regiments. The failure of the Home Guards'
program and the entire absence of a dependable military
body with the wishes of the National Government at this
time, especially calls our attention to the reconstruction
of the National Guard, or some like arm of military serv-
ice, to be put into being at this session of the Legislature.
The present administration has met and overcome all
difficulties which have arisen or been interposed from
those sources which were against the better government
of the State of Florida, while lacking military strength
and power to do so. How much wiser, safer and better
Florida would be, as the country is now not at war, to
have a strong military organization such as the National
Guard, and the noble men who compose its body, always
ready and equipped for service. This was shown by
occular demonstration when so many of the National
Guard of the First and Second Regiments were called to
duty on the fields of France; they did not wait to be
drafted, but volunteered and went as noble sons of Flor-
ida to the defense of their native State. The Governor,
therefore, urges that you give careful consideration to
this part of his message and that in your deliberatoins
you plan for some adequate successor to the old National
Guard as it was before the World War.

CONCLUSION.
There are many other conditions confronting the State
of Florida which need your careful investigation, but as
this message has already attained quite a great length,
the Governor desires to state that he will bring the same
to a conclusion, and assures you of his good will in the
arduous tasks before you. The Governor will call your
attention to other matters, which will make demands
upon your time, as you progress in the work of the Legis-












49



lature. Desiring to express my confidence in the good
purpose of each and every Senator and Representative in
the discharge of every known duty and obligation incum-
bent upon him, and believing that you realize that the
Governor's office, his time, and all of said office force be-
long to yon during the sixty days of your stay in our
city, he hereby extends to you the privilege of their use
at any time you may need them, and assures you that he
believes that your efforts will help to make our great
Commonwealth one of the mightiest States in the Union,
and with best wishes to each and every Senator and Rep-
resentative, he has the honor to be,
Yours respectfully,
SIDNEY J. CATTS,
Governor of the State of Florida.
Mr. Harris of Pinellas-
House Resolution No. 5:
Be it Resolved, That the time of convening be fixed as
follows: Morning session. 10:30 a. im.; adjournment,
1 :30 p m. Time for afternoon and night session to be
fixed later.
Which was read.
Mr. Lewis, of Jackson, offered the following amendment
It House Resolution No. 5: Strike out the words 10:30
a. m. and insert in lieu thereof the following: 11 o'clock
a. In.
Mr. Lewis moved the adoption of the amendment.
Pending the further consideration of the amendment as
offered by Mr. Lewis to House Resolution Number 5.
Mr. Bryan moved that the House adjourn until eleven
o'clock a. m. tomorrow.
Which was agreed to.


Wednesday, April 9, 1919
Tlle House was called to order by the Speaker at eleven
o'clock a. m.
The roll being called, the following members answered
to their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Barber, Brooks. Bryan, Bunker,
Busto, Campbell ( ,, Carroll, Chavons. Coats, Cochrlan,
(orbett, Crews, Dawson; Deas, D)eGrove, Dillard, Edge,
Epperson Enlnest, Folks, Fort, Fowler, Futch (Alachun),
Ftch (Lake). Gates, Glaie, Gl Green, lOaliblin, Hagan,
Hlardin. Harris, llart, Hinely, Jarmon, Jones, Keen. Kite,
4-1i. .r.











50



Lewis Marlow, Marshall, Mathis, Mays, Merchant, Miller,
Moore McCrary, McKenzie, McLeran, McRae, Perry, Par-
rish, Phillips, Ray, Roebuck, Sams, Small, Stokes, Strom,
Surrency, Tilghman, Tillis, Wade, Watson, Waybright,
Weaver, Whyte, Wicker, Williams (Leon), Williams
(Polk), Wilson (Gadsden), Wilson (Pasco), Woodruff
(Orange), Woodruff (Seminole)-75.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the chaplain.
Miss Myrtice McCaskill, Reading Clerk, came forward
and took the oath of office as prescribed by the Constitu-
tion of the State of Florida before Notary Public A. P.
Crews of Bradford County, Florida.
Mr. Green of Bradford, moved that the reading of the
Journal be dispensed with for this morning and the re-
mainder of the session.
Which was agreed to.
The following communication was read:

STATE OF FLORIDA
AUDT)ITING DEPARTMENT
Tallahassee, Fla., April 9, 1919.
Hoq. Geo. H. Willcr,
SpcLakcr of the House of cpresentalire.i,
The Capitol.
Dear Sir:
As required under Section (17 of the General Statutes
of Florida, I have made an examination of Cabinet and
State offices for the two-year period ending December 31,
1918, and have the honor to submit herewith my i:eport on
same for consideration and information of the House of
Representatives.
Yours respectfully,
.1. WILL YON.
State Auditor.

REPORT OF TTIE STATE AUDITOR TO THE LEG IS-
LATURE OF 1919 ON AUDIT OF STATE
OFFICES FOR 3917 AND 1918.
Tallahassee, Fla., April 7, 1919.
Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives:
As required under Section 1C7 of the General Statutes
of Florida, I have the honor to report hereunder my
examination of Cabinet and State offices for the two-year
period ending )ecember 31, 1918.











51



Secretary of State.

All receipts and collections by the Secretary of State
were properly accounted for and turned over to the State
Treasurer.



Receipts and Collections-
Charter Tax, Corporations....'...$
Tax on Commissions ...........
Automobile Registration Tax....
Chauffeur Registration Tax.....
Sale of Bound General Statutes.
Sale Unbound General Statutes..
Sale of Acts of Legislature.....
Sale of Revised Statutes........
Sale of Justice of Peace Manuals.
Sale of Old Carpets, etc........
F ees .........................
Candidates' Filing Fees, Primary
Pages in Campaign Book.......



1917
51,641.20
2,222.00
3,678.00
30.00
75.00
38.50
611.50
4.00
7.00
25.35
2,900.25
.o o. o. .



$ 61,232.80


Total Receipts, 1917 and 1918.



1918
$ 44,144.00
2,128.00


"35.00
21.00
224.00
4.00
. . .. .
...... ...
2,299.00
4,017.00
1,792.50

$ 54,664.50
61,232.80

$115,897.30



COMPTROLLER.

ABSTRACT OF ACCOUNTS.

General Revenue Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ 304,200.58
Receipts in 1917............ 1,686,890.19
Receipts in 1918............ 1,989,249.39
Warrants cancelled in 1917.. 77.20
Warrants cancelled in 1918.. 501.83
Warrants issued in 1917....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



$1,852,370.21
1,943,169.59
185,379.39



$3,980,919.19 $3,980,919.19










52



Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 185,379.39
"Warrants outstanding Jan. 1,
1919 .................... 14,300.37

Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 199,679.76

General School One Mill Tax Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$
Receipts in 1917............
Receipts in 1918............
Warrants issued in 1917.....
"Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



61,058.17
315,701.47
305,180.94



$ 258,653.10
365,046.50
58,240.98



$ 681,940.58 $ 681,940.58



Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919......$ 58,240.98

State Board of Health Tax Fund



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$
Receipts in 1917............
Receipts in 1918............
"Warrants cancelled ........
"Warrants issued in 1917.....
"Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



16,563.38
158,335.77
153,759.39
8.80



$ 137,723.38
127,358.90
63,585.06



$ 328,667.34 $ 328,667.34



Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 63,585.06
"Warrants outstanding Jan. 1,
1919 .................... 881.51

Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ................... $ 64,466.57











53



State Prison Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917
Receipts in 1917...........
Receipts in 1918...........
Warrants cancelled ........
Warrants issued in 1917....
Warrants issued in 1918....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919


Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1
1919 ...................
Warrants outstanding Jan. 1
1199 ............. .....



.$ 7,622.91
S189,686.71
S228,421.82
10.00
$ 177,537.35
215,635.29
32,568.80

$ 425,741.44 $ 425,741.44
1,
.$ 32,568.80
L,5
S 458.17



Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 .................... $ 33,026.97

Drainage Tax Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$
Receipts in 1917.............
Receipts in 1918............
Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



40,910.14
807,609.60
314,560.60



$ 693,193.81
435,695.40
34,191.13



$1,163,080.34 $1,163,080.34



Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 34,191.13
Warrants outstanding Jan. 1,
1919 .................... 65.58

Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 .................... 34,256.71

Drainage Bond Fund.

Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ ..........
Receipts in 1917............ 419,799.77
Receipts in 1918............ 1,495,834.29
Warrants issued in 1917....



$ 368,016.88











54



Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



893,467.54
654,149.64



$1,915,634.06 $1,915,634.06



Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 654,149.64
"Warrants outstanding Jan. 1,
1919 .................... 14,390.68

Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 668,540.32

Shell Fish Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$
Receipts in 1917.............
Receipts in 1918............
"Warrants issued in 1917.....
"Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



6,962.31
14,698.41
29,080.98



$ 20,985.87
24,689.24
5,066.59



$ 50,741.70 $ 50,741.70
Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 5,066.59
Warrants outstanding Jan. 1,
1919 .................... 23.58



Treastirer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 .................... $ 5,090.17

State Road Auto Fund.

Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ 20,189.73
Receipts in 1917............ 21,631.46
Receipts in 1918............ 1,565.23
Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.

$ 43,386.42
Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919.......$ ........



$ 24,737.50
18,648.92


$ 43,386.42













State Road Tax Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917. $..........
Receipts in 1917............ 28,953.65
Receipts in 1918............ 146,888.46
Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918. ...
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



$...........
45,488.31
130,353.80



$ 175,842.11 $ 175,842.11
Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 .................... $ 130,353.80
Warrants outstanding Jan. 1,
1919 ...... ............. 197.69



Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 130,551.49

Agricultural College Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$
Receipts in 1917............
Receipts in 1918............
Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



2,021.44
1,790.00
7,790.00



$ 6,670.61
8,437.50
2,493.33



$ 17,601.44 $ 17,601.44
Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919.......$ ,2,493.33



Principal of School Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$
Receipts in 1917............
Receipts in 1918.............
Vouchers issued in 1917.....
Vouchers issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919



179,694.66
22,587.94
26,571.39



$ 124,317.66
62,981.69
41,554.64



$ 228,853.99 $ 228,853.99
Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919..-.....$ 41,554.64











56



Interest of School Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ 45,087.34
Receipts in 1917............ 68,321.56
Receipts in 1918............ 70,630.21
Warrants issued in 1917.....
"Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.

$ 184,039.11
Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919......$ 47,803.56



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ 386.01
Receipts in 1917 and 1918.............
Warrants issued in 1917 and
1918 ...................
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.

$ 386.01



Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919......$



$ 64,988.55
71,247.00
47,803.56

$ 184,039.11



$ ..........
386.01

$ 386.01



386.01



Interest Seminary Fund



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917
Receipts in 1917...........
Receipts in 1918..........
Warrants issued in 1917....
Warrants issued in 1918....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919



Comptroller's Balance Jan. "
1919 ..................
Warrants outstanding Jan. 1
1919 ...................



1,024.40
4,128.00
4,128.00



$ 2,689.80
4,740.00
1,850.60



$ 9,280.40 $ 9,280.40

L,
.$ 1,850.60
22.50
22.50



Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 1,873.10



Principal ',1. ,,, ir Ii Fund.











57



White College Morrill Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$
Receipts in 1917............
Receipts in 1918............
"Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



15,829.17
25,000.00
25,000.00



$ 25,739.17
26,407.66
13,682.34



$ 65,829.17 $ 65,829.17



Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 13,682.34
"Warrants outstanding Jan. 1,
1919 .................... 798.00

Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 .................... $ 14,480.34

A. & M. College Morrill Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ 16,164.18
Receipts in 1917............ 25,000.00
Receipts in 1918............ 25,000.00
Warrants issued in 1917.....

Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.

$ 66,164.18



$ 24,208.31

24,053.50
17,902.37

$ 66,164.18



Comptroller's Balance Jan..1,
1919 ................... $ 17,902.37
Warrants outstanding Jan. 1,
1919 .................. 160.83
Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 18,063.20

A. & M. College I).:idental Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$
Receipts in 1917............



75.26
666.68











58



Receipts in 1918............
Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



1,548.71



$ 704.79
1,584.41
1.45



$ 2,290.65 $ 2,290.65



Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 .................... .$
Warrants outstanding Jan. 1,
1919 ....................

Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ................... .$



1.45

23.00


24.45



A. & M. College Slater Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$
Receipts in 1917.............
Receipts in 1918............
Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



50.30
300.00
350.00



$ 320.00
300.00
80.30



$ 700.30 $ 700.30



Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919......$



80.30



Hatch Experiment Station Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917. $
Receipts in 1917............
Receipts in 1918.............
Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



849.82
15,000.00
15,000.00



$ 14,412.33
13,973.29
2,464.20



$ 30,849.82 $ 30,849.82











59



Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 2,464.20
Warrants outstanding Jan. 1,
1919 .................... 120.10

Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 .................... $ 2,584.30

Adams Experiment Station Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$
Receipts in 1917............
Receipts in 1918............
Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



1,663.34
15,000.00
15,000.00



$ 14,618.16
14,481.21
2,563.97



$ 31,663.34 $ 31,663.34



Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 .................... $ 2,563.97
Warrants outstanding Jan. 1,
1919 .................... 28.63

Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 .................... $ 2,592.60

Experiment .l','i l:r. Incidental Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$
Receipts in 1917............
Receipts in 1918............

Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.

$

Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 .................... $



56.72.
6,114.23
6,684.16



12,855.11



$ 3,819.27
8,777.33
258.51

$ 12,855.11



258.51











60



Warrants outstanding Jan. 1,
1919 ..................... 1.65

Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 260.16

Florida State College Incidental Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917 $
Receipts in 1917............
Receipts in 1918............
Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



7,509.07
12,897.49
17,318.36



$ 14,447.76
10,306.55
12,970.61



$ 37,724.92 $ 37,724.92



Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 .................... $ 12,970.61
Warrants outstanding Jan. 1,
1919 .................... 12.50

Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 .................... $ 12,983.11

University of Florida Incidental Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$
Receipts in 1917.............
Receipts in 1918.............
Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



3,160.26
4,660.05
3,616.97



$ 5,392.08

6,045.20



$ 11,437.28 $ 11,437.28



Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919......$ 6,045.20



University of Florida Fire Loss Fund.

Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ 407.87
Receipts in 1917 and 1918..............
Warrants issued in 1917..... $ 130.35



y










61



Warrants issued in 1918....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919



Comptroller's and Treasurer:
Balance Jan. 1, 1919.....



143.70
133.82

$ 407.87 $ 407.87



133.82



Lever Agricultural Extension Fund U. S.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$
Receipts in 1917.............
Receipts in 1918.............
Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



4,244.97
24,643.14
30,001.41



$ 25,508.39
27,430.58
5,950.55



$ 58,889.52 $ 58,889.52



Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 5,950.55
Warrants outstanding Jan. 1,
1919 .................... 173.49

Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 6,124.04

Fla. Ind. School for Boys' Fire Loss Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ 1,090.83
Receipts in 1917 and 1918..............
Warrants issued in 1917 and
1918 .................... $
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.

$ 1,090.83 $
Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919......$ 1,090.83

D. and B. School Incidental Fund.

Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ 1,481.54
Receipts in 1917............ 283.25
Receipts in 1918............ 252.75



"1,090.83......
1,090.83
1,090.83











62



Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



$ 1,600.00
". 417.5...
417.54



$ 2,017.54 $ 2,017.54



Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance 5an. 1, 1919......$ 417.54

Florida National Forest Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.$
Receipts in 1917.............
Receipts in 1918............
Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



17,888.43
2,501.51
2,310.94



$ 17,888.43
4,812.45



$ 22,700.88 $ 22,700.88

Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919......$ ..........



Railroad Commission Fines Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$
Receipts in 1917.............
Receipts in 1918.............
Warrants issued in 1917 and
1918 ..................
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



2,410.30
2,083.51
606.26



$........
5,100.07



$ 5,100.07 $ 5,100.07

Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919. .....$ 5,100.07

A. & M. College Fire Loss Fund.
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ ..........
Receipts in 1917............ 2,330.40
Receipts in 1918.....................










63



Warrants issued in 1917....
"Warrants issued in 1918....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919


Comptroller's and Treasurer.
Balance Jan. 1, 1919.....



$ 105.15
2,224.00
1.25

$ 2,330.40 $ 2,330.40
's
.$ 1.25



Teachers Examination Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ ..........
Receipts in 1917............. 449.00
Receipts in 1918............ 5,108.50
Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



$ .......,
4,329.61
1,227.89



$ 5,557.50 $ 5,557.50



Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919......$ 1,227.89

M. V. L. County Road Fund.

Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ ..........
Receipts in 1917............ ..........
Receipts in 1918............ 240,078.41
Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



$ ..........
87,072.98
153,711.43



$ 240,784.41 $ 240,784.41
Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 .................... $ 153,711.43
Warrants outstanding Jan. 1,
1919 .................... 5,577.94

Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 159,289.37
M. V. L. Maintenance Fund.

Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ ..........
Receipts in 1917............ ..........
Receipts in 1918............. 48,297.12










64



Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



$ ..........
43,216.87
5,080.25



$ 48,297.12 $ 48,297.12

Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 5,080.25
Warrants outstanding Jan. 1,
1919 .................... 93.04

Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ................... $ 5,173.29

M. V. L. Expense Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ .........
Receipts in 1917............ ..........
Receipts in 1918............ 57,000.00
Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



Comptroller's and Treasurer'
Balance Jan. 1, 1919.....



$ ..........
56,894.52
105.48



$ 57,000.00 $ 57,000.00
s
.$ 105.48



Smith-Hughes Agricultural Fund, U. S.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ ..........
Receipts in 1917........... .........
Receipts in 1918............ 5,441.46
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



$ 3,004.28
2,437.18



$ 5,441.46 $ 5,441.46



Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919......$ 2,437.18

Smith-Hughes Trades and- Inidental Fund.

Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ .........
Receipts in 1917........... .........











65



Receipts in 1918............
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



5,031.35



$ 323.37
4,707.98



$ 5,031.35 $ 5,031.35

Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919......$ 4,707.98



Smith-Hughes Teachers Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ .........
Receipts in 1917............ ..........
Receipts in 1918............ 5,032.71
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



$ 1,719.29
3,313.42



$ 5,032.71 $ 5,032.71

Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919......$ 3,313.42



Asylum Patients Trust Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ 2,753.21
Receipts in 1917 and 1918.............
Disbursements in 1917 and
1918 ..................
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



$ 300.00
2,453.21



$ 2,753.21 $ 2,753.21
Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919......$ 2,453.21

Everglades Drainage Bond Interest Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ 18,492.44
Receipts in 1917............. 76,807.56
Receipts in 1918............ ..........
Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918.....
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.

$ 95,300.00
5-H. J.



$ 84,575.10
10,724.90


$ 95,300.00











66



Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919......$ ..........

Everglades Drainage Bond Sinking Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917. $
Receipts in 1917.............
Receipts in 1918.............
Warrants issued in 1917 and
1918 ....................
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



2,276.16
26,239.72
67,959.35



$ ..........
$ 96,475.23



$ 96,475.23 $ 96,475.23

Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919......$ 96,475.23

Pension Tax Fund.



Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$
Receipts in 1917.............
Receipts in 1918.............
"Warrants cancelled in 1917..
Warrants cancelled in 1918..
Warrants issued in 1917.....
Warrants issued in 1918..'..
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919.



257,705.38
935,916.94
888,179.86
2,545.41
7,516.00



$ 972,167.48
932,216.00
187,480.11



$2,091,863.58 $2,091,863.59



Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 187,480.11
Warrants outstanding Jan. 1,
1919 .................... 31,048.27



Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1,
1919 ....................$ 218,528.38

Federal Aid Road Fund.

Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1917.$ ..........
Receipts in 1917............ ..........
Receipts in 1918............ 9,972.55,













67



"Warrants issued in 1917 and
1918 .................... $ ..........
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1919. 9,972.55

$ 9,972.55 $ 9,972.55

Comptroller's and Treasurer's
Balance Jan. 1, 1919......$ 9,972.55

Recapitulation of Balances.


Comptroller's Outstanding Treasurer's
Name of Fund- Balance Warrants Balance
General Revenue Fund....$ 185,379.39 $14,300.37 $ 199,679.76
General School One Mill
Tax .................... 58,240.98 ......... 58,240.98
State Board of Health.... 63,585.06 881.51 64,466.57
State Prison Fund........ 32,568.80 458.17 33,026.97
Drainage Tax Fund....... 34,191.13 65.58 34,256.71
Drainage Bond Fund...... 654,149.64 14,390.68 668,540.32
Shell Fish Fund.......... 5,066.59 23.58 5,090.17
State Road Auto Fund.... .......... .........
State Road Tax Fund..... 130,353.80 197.69 130,551.49
Agricultural College Fund. 2,493.33 .......... 2,493.33
Principal School Fund.... 41,55.4.64 ......... 41,554.64
Interest School Fund..... 47,803.56 ......... 47,803.56
Principal Seminary Fund.. 386.01 ......... 386.01
Interest Seminary Fund... 1,850.60 22.50 1,873.10
White College Morrill Fund 13,682.34 798.00 14,480.34
A. & M. College Morrill
Fund .................. 17,902.37 160.83 18,063.20
A. & M. College Incidental
Fund .................. 1.45 23.00 24.45
A. & M. College Slater
Fund .................. 80.30 ......... 80.30
Hatch Experiment Station. 2,464.20 120.10 2,584.30
Adams Experiment Station. 2,563.97 28.63 2,592.60
Experiment Station Inci-
dental Fund ............ 258.51 1.65 260.16
Florida State College Inci-
dental Fund ............ 12,970.61 12.50 12,983.11
University of Florida Inci-
dental Fund ............ 6,045.20 .......... 6,045.20
University of-Florida Fire
Loss Fund.............. 133.82 ......... 133.82
Lever Agricultural Exten-
sion Fund ............. 5,950.55 173.49 6,124.04
Fla. Industrial School for
Boys Fire Loss Fund... 1,090.83 ......... 1,090.83
D. & B. School Incidetnal
Fund .................. 417.54 ......... 417.54
Fla. National Forest Fund. .................... ..........













68



Name of Fund-
Railroad Commission Fines
Fund ..................
A. & M. College Fire Loss
Fund ..................
Teachers' Examination....
M. V. L. County Road.....
M. V. L. Maintenance.....
M. V. L. Expense.........
Smith-Hughes Agricultural
Fund ..................
Smith-Hughes T. & I. Fund
Smith Hughes Teachers
Fund ..................
Asylum Patients' Trust
Fund ..................
Drainage Interest Fund...
Drainage Sinking Fund...
Pension Fund ............
Federal Aid Road Fund...



Comptroller's



Balance

5,100.07

1.25
1,227.89
153,711.43
5,080.25
105.48

2,437.18
4,707.98

3,313.42

2,453.21

96,475.23
187,480.11
9,972.55



Totals, Jan. 1, 1919......$1,793,251.27



Outstanding Treasurer's
Warrants Balance



"5,577.94
93.04
S. .. ,



31,048.27


$68,377.53



5,100.07

1.25
1,227.89
159,289.37
5,173.29
105.48



2,437.18
4,707.98

3,313.42

2,453.21

96,475.23
218,528.38
9,972.55

$1,861,628.80



* A














69



TAX REDEMPTION ACCOUNT.



County Balance Receipts
1-1-17 1917
Alachua ..... ........ $ 12,663.21
Baker ........ 43.10 478.61
nay .......... ........ 22,004.21
Bradford ...... 152.85 1,242.07
Brevaid ...... 493.57 3,247.95
Broward ...... 835.99 8,335.49
Calhoun .. ........ 3,132.27
Citrus ........ ........ 5,713.64
Clay ......... 1 86.74 5,420.60
Columbia ...... 306.90 4.209.95
Dade .. ... ... 1,547.15 12,719.45
DeSolo ....... S.75 44,621.52
Duval ......... 14,911.04 105.,0 4.59
Escambia ...... 5,419.43 48.372.34
Franklin ...... ........ 915.08
Flagler ........ ........ 5.29
Gadsden ....... ........ 516.01
Hamilton ...... 74.88 2,511.20
Hernando ..... 2,070.17 5,;;0, .5 ,
Iillsborough ... 11,4-61.7! 72,158.37
Ilolmos ....... 245.09 1,231.76
Jackson ....... 579.11 6.005.52
Jefl' rson ...... ...... 3S .15
Lafayette ... .... .. 1,2: 1.::S
Lake ......... 767.57 6.S59.17
Lee .. .. ..... 587.15 4,19:.02
Leon ........ ........ 43.16
Levy ........ ........ 028.89
Liberty ...... 1,646.37 76.14
Madison .............. S .54
Manatee ...... 10,242.81 31.817.00
Marion ....... 2,093.42 10, 10.390
Monroe ....... 212.30 5,227.04
Nassau .. ... .. .14 4.14.21
* .. ...... 1,485.72 9.20:1.1S
"20..5 -1,787.11
Osccola ...... 511..50 2,.0002
Palm Beach ... 1,3,88.82 8,808.75
P.'.co ....... 157.98 4.110.8s
Pi'ellas ...... 2,61.40 .:l351.8i
Iolk ........ 1.871.16 10,977.13
Pu'tnam ................ ... ,410.50
St. .Tohns ...... t60.21 6,7:'6.1
St. Lucie ...... 372.42 ;.01 4.:;9
Santa Iosa .... 277.23 1,7!0.55
Seminole ... SS.3 14.479.12
Summer .. ...... 748.72 :,735.21
Suwannee ..... 2,203.73 6,221.60
Taylor ........ 34.02 33. 55
Voliis ....... 491.38 5,747.22
Wakulla ............ 310 28
Walton ..... ... 583.01 2,703.79
Washington ... 34.00 1.752.75
"*Interest ... .. ..... 1.819.32
liscellan's .... 1 0.77 ..........
fist Nat'l Bank,
Pensacola ... 35.65 ..........
Totals....... 77,980.52 $569,526.709
"*Interest on Deposits.
1fst Nat'l Bank, Pensacola, Defunct.



Receipts
1918
$ 8,987.98
2,086.53
6,800.61
165.14
7,349.20
9,318.18
10,627.17
3.409.13
1,104.69
3,011.77
8.256.01
50,785.77
98.459.30
8:.668.84
1,256.36
1,674.64
800.37
3,760.02
4,977.13
57,801.38
2,121.63
4,555.900
958.73
510.39
5,030.76
10,449.35

1,181.34
429.23
83.44
42,38 1.99
10.133.51
7,024.61
5.129.96
8.85:.84
1,879.59
6,259.26
53,0-12.71
3,429.07
6,379.76
7. 857.Z4
3.010.31
4.402.302
13.997.63
4.709.-12
13,6009.82
6.555.98
7,16 ;.12
579.36
. 9,880.47
323,80
5.503.37
3,168.30
1,191.06



Disbursed Disbursed Balance
1917 1018 1-1-19
$ 12,663.21 $ 8,987.08 ......
521.80 2,086.53 ......
22,994.21 6,800.1 ......
3,395.82 165.14 ...
3,741.52 7,349.20 ..
9,171.48 0 9,318.18 ....
3,132.27 19,27.17 ......
5,713.64 3,409.13 ......
5,607.34 1,104.0 ......
4,695.85 3,011.77 ... ..
14,206.60 8,25 .01 ......
44,630.27 50,785.7 .
120,876.53 98,459.30 ......
53,701.77 83,668.84 ......
915.08 r,250.38 ......
5.29 9.674.4 ......
516.01 860.37 ...
2,5810.14 3,700.02 ....
7,436.74 4,77.1 ......
83,620.16 57,01.: ......
1,476.S5 2,121,.(: ......
7,574.03 4,555.0 .....
r3 5.15 958.73 ......
1,2:1.38 510.39 ...
7,626.74 5,030.7 ......
4,780.17 10,449.5 ......
43.A 6 .......... ......
628.80 1,181.34 ..
1,722.51 429.33 ..
86.54 83.44 .....
54.059.81 42,381.99 .....
12.501.81 16,333.41 ...
5,439.94 7,624.1 .....
4,952.35 5,129.9 .....
10,088.90 8,5 .84 .....
4,80S.06 1,8709.5 .....
3.150.52 ,259.26 ....
10,197.57 53,042.71 ....
4,274.87 3,429.07 ..
15.953.26 6,.379.76 ....
12.848.29 27,857.4 .....
8,490.56 3,616.31 ..
7,397.12 4.402.36 ..
3,986.81 13,997.63 ......
2,067.78 4,700.42 ...
15,30 .25 13,09.82 ......
4,483.03 6,555.9S ......
8,561.39 7,163.12 ......
498.57 57 .3 ......
6,241.00 9,880.47 ......
310.28 32380 ......
3,287.40 5,503.37 ......
1,78 .75 3,686.30 ......
1,819.32 1,191.06 ...
160.77 .......... ......



.........8.90 ......... 26.75
$701,192.62 $647,480.56 $701,192.62 $26.75











70



COMPTROLLER-AUTO LICENSE ACCOUNT.

Licenses for Year 1918.

Dr. Cr.
Total collections, Register No. 1......... $149,570.16
Total collections, Register No. 2......... 188,710.20
Total collections, Chauffeur License Reg. 7,512.00
Total Duplicate Chauffeur Badges........ 12.00
Total Duplicate Tags as per invoice of
Scioto Sign Co........................ 441.00

Dec. 31-Paid State Treasurer .......... $335,000.00
Feb. 27, 1919-Paid State Treasurer..... 3,440.50
March 1I, 1919-Paid State Treasurer.... 12.00
Feb. 27, 1919-Total Cr. Refunds on Reg-
isters ................................ 7,792.86
$346,245.36 $346,245.36

Cash Account.

Feb. 25, 1919-Total Cash Deposits License
Year 1918 ............................ $384,413.40
Feb. 25, 1919-Total Paid State Treasurer. $338,440.50
Feb. 25, 1919-Total Refunds ............ 8,909.47
Feb. 25, 1919-Comptroller's Bal. in Banks 1,063.43
$348,413.40 $348,413.40
Lewis State Bank.............. $873.83
Capital City Bank ............. 189.60 $ 1,063.43

Feb. 25, 1919-Outstanding Checks:
Lewis State Bank............ $433.57
Capital City Bank ........... 35.17 $ 468.74

Feo. 25,1919-Bank Balance ... $ 1,532.17


STATE TREASURER.

I made an examination of the office of State Treasurer
as of date of close of business December 31, 1918. All
moneys and cash items were counted and examined, and
bank balances were verified. Bonds and securities held
by the State Treasurer for various purposes were ex-
amined and checked. I beg to submit the following as
found by my examination:












71



BALANCE SHEET.



DEBITS.
C(eneral Revenue Fund.............. $
One Mill School Tax Fund..........
Pension Tax Fund.................
State Board of Health Fund.........
Principal of School Fund............
Interest of School Fund.............
Principal of Seminary Fund.........
Drainage Tax Fund..................
Drainage Bond Fund................
State Prison Fund.................
R. R. Commission Fines Fund.......
Shell Fish Fund..................
Teachers' Examination Fund........
State Road Tax Fund...............
Motor V. L. Maintenance Fund......
Motor V. L. County Road Fund......
Motor V. L. Expense Fund...........
Florida National Forest Fund......
Asylum Patients' Trust Fund........
Everglades Drainage Sinking Fund..
Agricultural College Fund...........
Interest of Seminary Fund..........
Hatch Experiment Station Fund.....
Adams Experiment Station Fund....
Lever Agricultural Extension Fund..
White College Morrill Fund.........
A. & M. College Morrill Fund.......
A. & M. College Incidental Fund.....
A. & M. College Slater Fund........
A. & M. College Fire Loss Fund.....
University of Florida Fire Loss Fund
University of Florida Incidental Fund
Experiment Station Incidental Fund.
Florida State Cillege Incidental Fund
Deaf & Blind School Incidental Fund.
Boys' Indus. School Fire Loss Fund..
Smith-Hughes Agricultural Fund....
Smith-Hughes Trades and Ind. Fund.
Smith-lughes Teachers' Fund.......
Federal Aid Road Fund............



199,679.76
58,240.98
218,528.38
64,466.57
41,554.64
47,803.56
386.01
34.256.71
668,540.32
33,026.97
5,100.07
5,090.17
1,227.89
130,551.49
5,173.29
159,289.37
105.48

2,453.21
96,475.23
2,493.33
1,873.10
2,584.30
2,592.60
6,124.04
14,480.34
18,063.20
24.45
80.30
1.25
133.82
6,045.20
260.16
12,983.11
417.54
1,090.83
2,437.18
4,707.98
3,313.42
9,972.55 $1,861,628.80



CREDITS.
Cash and Cash Items:
Currency .......................... $ 16,362.00
Silver, Nickles and Pennies.......... 145.38
Checks cashed ..................... 456.50
Warrants paid Dec. 31, 1918......... 162.98
Requisitions:
Jurors and Witnesses............... 64,411.95
State Board of Health.............. 1,000.00
Unpaid Coupons of S. S. D. No. 10,
DeSoto County ................... 105.00
Cash in Banks...................... 1,778,984.99



$1,861,628.80











72



Balance in Treasury Jan. 1,
1917 .................. $
Aggregate Receipts, 1917..
Aggregate Receipts, 1918..
Disbursements, 1917.......
Disbursements, 1918 .......
Balance in Treasury Jan. 1,
1919 ..................



1,077,710.20
4,922,028.01
6,249,157.57



$ 4,935,929.56
5,451,337.42



"1,861,628.80



Grand Totals ..........S.12.2 1-.' ~..78 .I12.24 _. 595.78

TRUST FUNDS.



..A,1 ii, Patients Trust Fund.
Dr.
Shown in above Balance Sheet..$ 2,453.21



Recciver Accounts.
To Comptroller's Balance ..... $126,848.93
To Checks outstanding ......... 7,998.71

To Treasurer's Balance ....... $134,847.64
Covered by Following Deposits:
Fla. Nat. Bank, Jacksonville.....
Exchange Nat. Bank, Tampa.....
Atlantic Nat. Bank, Jacksonville.
Farmers and Merchants, Monti-
cello .................... .
First National, Live Oak........
Peoples Bank, Jacksonville.....
Guar. Trust and Savings, Jack-
sonville ....................
Commercial Bank, Live Oak....
American National, Pensacola...

$134,847.64

Reccicer Florida Life Insurance Co.
To Cash Assets of Company ....$ 21,148.82
Deposit, Atlantic National Bank.



Cr.
$ 2,453.21



S21,394.55
5,439.61
28,942.16

7,237.54
27,889.34
3,690.68

6,895.58
4,436.14
28,922.01

134,847.64



21,148.82











73

Bond and Securities.

To secure State deposits.................. $1,838,350.00
To secure I. I. Fund deposits.............. 93,000.00
Trust Companies' collateral............... 520,050.00
Insurance Companies' collateral........... 2,157,000.00

$4,608,400.00

Bonds and Securitics.

In Principal of School Fund.............. $1,546,667.00
In Principal Seminary Fund.............. 129,100.00
In Agricultural College Fund............. 153,800.00

$1,829,567.00

Ercrglades Drainage Bondls.

On hand in vault ...................... $ 3,200.00
For Sinking Fund....................... 5,000.00

$ 8,200.00
Deposited National Park Bank, New York.. 1,100,000.00

$1,108,200.00
"* Does not include value of "Bond for Title to Bank Propertv"
of Miami Bank and Trust Company.

Ecerglades Drainage District Bonds.

Bonds delivered to J. C. Luning:
To issue of November, 1915..$1,500,000.00
To issue of May, 1916 ...... 1,500,000.00
To issue of May, 1917 ...... 500,000.00

$3,500,000.00
By-
Sold Geo. F. Miles (for work) $ 21,000.00
Sold Savannah Eng. & Const.
Co. (work) ........... 29,000.00
Sold First National Bank, St.
Augustine ............... 10,000.00












74



Sold Everg. Drg. Bond Sink-
ing Fund ................. 5,000.00
Dec. 31, 1918-Sold Spitzer,
Rorich & Co. (delivered)... 2,331,800.00
Dec. 31, 1918-Bonds Treasur-
er's vault ................ 3,200.00
Bonds National Park Bank,
New York ................ 1,100,000.00

$3,500,000.00

Proceeds of Sales of Everglades Drainage District londs.

April 15, 1916-$10,000 sold First Na-
tional Bank, St. Augustine ........$ 9,773.34
Sept. 9, 1916-$5,000 sold Evg. Drag.
Bond Sinking Fund.............. 4,856.67
April 20, 1917-$500,000 sold Spitzer,
Rorich & Co..................... 489,165.00

Deposited to Credit of Drainage Tax
Fund ........................... $ 503,795.01

Aug. 20, 1917-$150,000 sold Spitzer,
Rorich & Co.....................$ 149,725.00
Sept. 24, 1917-$110,000 sold Spitzer,
Rorich & C ...................... 110,421.63
Nov. 19, 1917-$150,000 sold Spitzer,
Rorich & Co..................... 151,950.00

Deposited to Credit of Drainage Bond
Fund ........................... $ 412,096.63
Jan. 5, 1918-$99,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co......................$ 101,046.00
Jan. 14, 1918-$1,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co....................... 1,022.17
Feb. 1, 1918-$100,000 sold Spitzer,
Rorich & Co................... 102,500.00
March 14, 1918-$100,000 sold Spitzer,
Rorich & Co..................... 103,216.67
April 5, 1918-$57,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co....................... 59,033.00
April 12, 1,18-$5,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co....................... 5,184.17
April 22, 1918-$10,000 sold Spitzer,
Rorich & Co..................... 10,385.00
April 24, 1918-$24,000 sold Spitzer,
Rorich & Co..................... 24,932.00
May 3, 1918-$100,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co....................... 104,033.33
May 22, 1918-$100,000 sold Spitzer,
Rorich & Co..................... 104,3o0.00












75

June 7, 1918-$26,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co.......................
June 11, 1918-$30,000 sold Spitzer,
Rorich & Co.....................
June 14, 1918-$71,000 sold Spitzer,
Rorich & Co.....................
June 18, 1918-$33,000 sold Spitzer,
Rorich & Co.....................
July 3, 1918-$10,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co.......................
July 24, 1918-$65,u00 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co.......................
July 31, 1918-$25,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co.......................
Aug. 14, 1918-$10,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co.......................
Aug. 30, 1918-$15,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co......................
Sept. 4, 1918-$40,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co.......................
Sept. 6, 1918-$10,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co.......................
Sept. 5, 1918-$5,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co.......................
Sept. 16, 1918-$5,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co.......................
Sept. 19, 1918-$25,000 sold Spitzer,
Rorich & Co.......... .....
Sept. 27, 1918-$5,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co.......................
Oct. 16, 1918-$10,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co.......................
Nov. 4, 1918-$35,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co.......................
Nov. 6, 1918-$200,000 sold Spitzer,
Rorich & Co...................
Nov. 15, 1918-$15,000 sold Spitzer,
Rorich & Co.....................
Nov. 19, 1918-$10,000 sold Spitzer,
Rorich & Co.....................
Nov. 20, 1918-$20,000 sold Spitzer,
Rorich & Co.....................
Nov. 21, 1918-$5,000 sold Spitzer,. Ro-
rich & Co.......................
Nov. 26, 1918-$1,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co.......................
Dec. 5, 1918--i5,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co.......................
Dec. 6, 1918-$30,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich oc Co.......................
Dec. 9, 1918-$71,800 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co.............. .....
Dec. 13, 1918-$17,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co.......................



27,196.00

31,400.00

74,348.83

34,578.50

10,503.33

68,499.17

26,375.00

10,571.67

15,897.50

42,420.00

10,608.33

5,303.33

. 5,312.50

26,575.00

5,321.67

10,675.00

37,467.50

214,166.67

16,085.00

10,730.00

21,463.33

5,366.67

1,074.17

16,137.50

32,275.00

77,280.73

18,309.00












76

Dec. 23, 1918-$20,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co....................... 21,573.33
Dec. 2, 1918-$1,000 sold Spitzer, Ro-
rich & Co....................... 1,075.16

Deposited to Credit of Drainage Bond
Fund ........................... $1,493,217.07
Dec. 2, 1918-Sale not reported by Na-
tional Park Bank, N. Y., until after
Dec. 31, Credit for which will be
shown on Treasurer's Receipts
for 1919 ........................ 1,075.16

$2,410,183.87 $2,410,183.87

CO .113 11 IONER OF AGRICULTURE.

Land Division.

To Fees Received in 1917................... 308.50
To Fees Received in 1918................... 139.50 $ 448.00

By Deposits with State Treasurer in 1917, as
per his Receipts....................... $308.50
By Deposits with State Treasurer in 1918, as
per his Receipts........................ 139.50 $ 448.00


T;- Ii Note Division.

To Fees Received in 1917................... $782.05
To Fees Received in 1918................... 455.15 $1,237.20

By Deposits with State Treasurer in 1917, as
per his Receipts........................$782.05
By Deposits with State Treasurer in 1918, as
per his Receipts....................... 455.15 $1,237.20


Stamp Dcpartmcnt.
Fifty Pound Feed Stamps.

To balance on hand last report, Jan. 1, 1917. 167,060
To number purchased in 1917...................
To number purchased in 1918............ ........ ........

167,060

By number sold in i917................... 6,188
By number sold in 1918.................. 15,870 22,058

To balance on hand Jan. 1, 1919....... 145,002













77

One Hundred Pound Feed Stamps

To balance on hand last report, Jan. 1, 1917. 208,086
To number purchased in 1917.............. 2,500,000
To number purchased in 1918.............. 2,600,000 5,100,000

5,308,086

By number sold in 1917...................2,633,400
By number exchanged in 1917.............. 1,530
By number sold in 1918................... 2,588,029
By number exchanged in 1918............. 1,300 5,224,259

To balance on hand Jan. 1, 1919....... 83,827

One Hundred and Seventy-five Pound Feed Stamps.

To-balance on hand last report, Jan. 1, 1917. 157,967
To number purchased in 1917.............. .....
To number purchased in 1918............. .... ........

157,967

By number sold in 1917................... 11,019
By number sold in 1918................... 10,011 21,030

To balance on hand Jan. 1, 1919....... 136,937

Recapitulation of All Feed Stamps Sold in 1917 and 1918.

Number Equivalent Rate Cash
Sold in Tons Per Ton Value
50-lb. Feed Stamps.. 22,058 551.45 .25 $ 137.87
100-lb. Feed Stamps..5,221,429 261,071.45 .25 65,267.89
175-lb. Feed Stamps.. 21,030 1,840.13 .25 460.05

Totals.............5,264,517 263,463.03 .25 $65,865.81

Cash Received by State Treasurer, as per
his Report in 1917 ................. $33,197.28
Cash Received by State Treasurer, as per
his Report in 1918.................. 32,668.57 $65,865.85


Stamp Department.
One Hundred Pound Fertilizer Stamps.

To balance on hand last report, Jan. 1, 1917. 314,248
To number purchased in 1917...............1,115,900
To number exchanged in 1917............. 1,000
To number purchased in 1918..............1,000,000 2,116,900

2,431,148













78



By number sold in 1917................. 1,223,022
By number sold in 1918................... 778,988

To balance on hand Jan. 1, 1919.......

Two Hundred Pound Fertilizer Stamps.

To balance on hand last report, Jan. 1, 1917.
To number purchased in 1917..............1,294,300
To number purchased in 1918..............1,800,000


By number sold in 1917..................1,529,368
By number sold in 1918.....................1,657,626
By number exchanged in 1918............. 1,100
To balance on hand July 1, 1919.......



Recapitulation of All Fertilizer Stamps Sold in
1917 and 1918.



Number
Sold
100-lb. Fertilizer Stamps. 2,002,010
200-lb. Fertilizer Stamps. 3,186,994

Totais............. 5,189,004



Equivalent Rate
in Tons Per Ton
100,100.50 .25
318,699.40 .25

418,799.90 .25



Cash Received by State Treasurer, as per
his Report in 1917.................$53,521.98
Cash Received by State Treasurer, as per
his Report in 1918.................. 51,178.02



Grand Summary.
All Feed and Fertilizer Stamps Sold in Years
1917 and 1918.



Number
Sold
All Feed Stamps....... 5,264,517
All Fertilizer Stamps... 5,189,004

Totals..............10,453,521



Equivalent Rate Cash
in Tons Per Ton Value
263,463.03 .25 $ 65,865.81
418,799.90 .25 104,699.98

682,262.93 .25 $170,565.79



Total Cash Received by State Treasurer,
as per his Report in 1917............ $86,719.26
Total Cash Received by State Treasurer,
as per his Report in 1918............ 83,846.59



2,002,010

429,138



454,242

3,094,300

3,548,542


3,188,094
360,448



Cash
Value
$ 25,025.13
79,674.85

$104,699.98



$104,700.00



$170,565.85












79



Stamp Department.
Distribution of All Unsold, Mutilated and Old Stamps on
Hand January 1, 1919.
Unsold Feed Stamps on Hand January 1, 1919.

50-lb. Feed Stamps on hand Jan. 1, 1919...... 145,002
50-lb. Feed Stamps checked short Jan. 1, 1919. 28 144,974

100-lb. Feed Stamps on hand Jan. 1, 1919...... 83,827
175-lb. Feed Stamps on hand Jan. 1, 1919...... 136,937

Total.................................... 365,738
Unsold Fertilizer Stamps on Hand January 1, 1919.
100-lb. Fertilizer Stamps on hand Jan. 1, 1919.. 429,138
200-lb. Fertilizer Stamps on hand Jan. 1, 1919.. 360,448 789,586

Grand Total.......... ...... ........... 1,155,324

Mutilated Feed and Fertilizer Stamps on Hand
January 1, 1919.

100-lb. Feed Stamps exchanged for
Quaker Oats Co................ 130
100-lb. Feed Stamps exchanged for St.
Elmo W. Acosta................ 400
100-lb. Feed Stamps exchanged for
Steinhardt & Co................ 1,000
100-lb. Feed Stamps exchanged for
Stringfellow, Padgett & Co...... 900
100-lb. Feed Stamps exchanged for C.
E. Guller & Co.................. 400 2,830

200-lb. Fertilizer Stamps exchanged
for Va Ca Chemical Co.......... 1,100 3.930

Old Style Stamps on Hand January 1, 1919.
Black and Pink.
Black Pink
50-lb. ............. ....... .. 500,000
100-lb. '......... ........... 400,000
125-lb. ......................... 170,000 400,000
175-lb. ........................ 349,900
200-lb. ......... ....... .... 7,300 399,900
250-lb. ........................ 207,400

Totals ..................... 784,700 1,649,800
784,700 2,434,500

Grand Total Number of Stamps of all kinds........ 3,593,754













80


BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF STATE
INSTITUTIONS.

To convicts on hand last report, Jan. 1, 1917.... 1,621
To convicts received in 1917.................... 501
To convicts recaptured in 1917.................. 47 2,169

By convicts discharged in 1917.................. 416
By convicts died in 1917........................ 30
By convicts pardoned in 1917.................... 120
By convicts escaped in 1917..................... 78 644

By convicts on hand Jan .1, 1918 ................ 1,525
To convicts on hand Jan. 1, 1918 ............... 1,525
To.convicts received in 1918.................... 300
To convicts recaptured in 1918.................. 42 1,867

By convicts discharged in 1918................. 400
By convicts- died in 1918.................. ..... .48
By convicts pardoned in 1918.................... 91
By convicts escaped in 1918..................... 103
By convicts paroled in 1918.................... 6 648

By convicts on hand Jan. 1, 1919................ 1,219
To convicts on hand Jan. 1, 1919 ................. 1,219

Distribution of (,i ;' i on land Januiary 1, 1919.
By convicts located at State Prison Farms ............... 444
By convicts located at Private Lessee Camps............. 471
By convicts located at Camps of State Road Department.. 127
By convicts located at County State Road Camps......... 166
By convicts located at Insane Asylum (patients) ......... 2
By convicts located at Girls' Industrial School............ 9

Total convicts on hand Jan. 1, 1919 .................. 1,219

Time Earned for the Year 1917.
Days
Time of able-bodied convicts, 1st quarter..... 67,759
Time of able-bodied convicts, 2nd quarter..... 64,411
Time of able-bodied convicts, 3rd quarter...... 62,053
Time of able-bodied convicts, 4th quarter...... 59,120

County road prisoners, 1st quarter........... 24,269
County road prisoners, 2nd quarter........... 25,611
County road prisoners, 3rd quarter........... 28,871
County road prisoners, 4th quarter........... 26,037 104,788

358.131












81



Tine Earned for the Year 1918.

Days
Time of able-bodied convicts, 1st quarter..... 52,786
Time of able-bodied convicts, 2nd quarter..... 53,891
Time of able-bodied convicts, 3rd quarter..... 52,116
Time of able-bodied convicts, 4th quarter..... 47,007 205,800


County road prisoners, 1st quarter........... 18,840
County road prisoners, 2nd quarter........... 18,719
County road prisoners, 3rd quarter........... 17,811
County road prisoners, 4th quarter........... 15,949 71,319

277,119

Total time in days, all convicts, for 1917.. 358,131
Total time in days, all convicts, for 1918.. 277,119 635,250


RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS.

The accounts of the Railroad Commissioners have never
been audited, so far as I know. By direction'of Governor
Catts, I made an examination of their receipts and expen-
ditures for the five-year period ending January 1, 1919,
and submit thereon condensed statements below:

Salaries aid E.rpcnse FIniil.

Jan. 1, 1914-To bal., Comptroller's audit. .$11,961.84
Jan. 1, 1914-To appropriation for 1914... 30,000.00

$41,961.81
Dec. 31, 1914-By total expenditures ....... $30,882.66
Dec. 31, 1914---By balance ................ 11,079.18

$41,961.84 $41,961.84

Jan. 1, 1915-To balance ................. $11,079.18
Jan. 1, 1915-To appropriation to July 1... 15,000.00
July 1, 1915-To appropriation to Dec. 31.. 15,000.00

$41,079.18

Dec. 31, 1915-By total expenditures....... $30.278.72
Dec. 31, 1915-By amount to balance...... 10,800.46

$41,079.18 $41,079.18
Jan. 1, 1916-To balance .................$10,800.46
Jan. 1, 1916-To appropriation for 1916... 30,000.00

$40,800.46
6-IL. J.












82



Dec. 31, 1916-By total expenditures ....... $32,956.73
Dec. 31, 1916-By arhount to balance....... 7,843.73

$40,800.46 $40,800.46
Jan. 1, 1917-To balance .................$ 7,843.73
Jan. 1, 1917-To appropriation to July 1... 15,000.00
July 1, 1917-To appropriation to Dec. 31.. 15,000.00

$37,843.73

Dec. 31, 1917-By total expenditures....... $34,521.17
Dec. 31, 1917-By amount to balance....... 3,322.56

$37,843.73 $37,843.73
Jan. 1, 1918-To balance ................. $ 3,322.56
Jan. 1, 1918-To appropriation for 1918... 30,000.00

$33,322.56

Dec. 31, 1918-By total expenditures ....... $30,724.76
Dec. 31, 1918-By amount to balance....... 2,597.80

$33,322.56 $33,322.56
Dec. 31, 1918-To balance unexpended.....$ 2,597.80

Auditing Fund.

Jan. 1, 1914-To bal., Comptroller's audit..$ 6,145.75
Dec. 31, 1914-By total expenditures....... $ 4,427.88
Dec. 31, 1914-To amount to balance....... 1,717.87

$ 6,145.75 $ 6,145.75
Jan. 1, 1915-To balance .................$ 1,717.87
Dec. 31, 1915-By expenditures ....................


Jan. 1, 1916-To balance .................$ 1,717.87
Dec. 31, 1916-By total expenditures....... $ 1,717.87

Jan. 1, 1917-Balance in Fund............ None

Fines Fund.

Jan. 1, 1919-Balance ....................$ 5,100.07

This fund is derived from collections of fines imposed by the
Railroad Commissioners upon common carriers under their
jurisdiction, for violations by such common carriers of rules and
orders of the Commissioners. The fund has been accumulating
for several years without any expenditures out of it, and I would
recommend its being transferred to "General Revenue."












83



Trustees Internal Improvement Fund.

Jan. 1- Debits- 1917 1918
To Balances .........................$ 6,894.15 $ 56,432.10
To Receipts, Land Sales ............... 97,740.16 212,246.00
To Receipts, Interest ................... 1,379.15 1,816.74
To Receipts, Bd. Comrs. E. Dr.-Notes... 186,000.00 79,556.93
To Receipts, Bd. Comrs. E. Dr.-Tolls, etc. 4,776.33 2,035.53
To Receipts, J. R. Anthony, Loan........ 12,800.00 ..........
To Receipts, A. & G. Ry.-Right-of-way.. 1,000.00 ..........
To Receipts, Pelican Lake Sub-Dr: Dist.. 750.11 7,235.85
To Receipts, R. J. Bolles Estate, Mtge... 4,000.00 7,352.71
To Receipts, Tax Sale Redemption ..... ......... 4,717.23
To Receipts, Land Sales, Okeechobee
Road ............................ ......... 9,110.50
To Receipts, Miscellaneous ............ 164.43 1,533.21

To Totals.........................$315,504.33 $382,036.80

Dec. 31- Credits-
By Total Disbursements ................$259,072.23 $281,843.28

By Balances on hand ..................$ 56,432.10 $100,193.52

Jan. 1, 1919-
To Balance in Fund.....................$100,193.52
By Cash and Cash Items................ $ 1,000.00
By Bank Balances ..................... 99,193.52

$100,193.52 $100,193.52


State Board of Examiners, Teachers.

To Collections by Board, 1917 ...............$ 601.00
To Collections by Board, 1918............... 3,756.50

$4,357.50
To Collections, W. N. Sheats, Sec. 17........ 1,515.47

$5,872.97

By Treasurer's Receipts to Board........... $4,357.50
By Treasurer's Receipts to W. N. Sheats..... 1,200.00
By 3 Checks returned, W. N. Sheats......... 15.00
Dec. 31, 1918-By Bank Balance, W. N. Sheats 255.47
Jan. 4, 1919-By Deposit Bank, W. N. Sheats. 15.00
Jan. 15, 1918-By Deposit Bank, W. N. Sheats. 30.00

$5,872.97












84



Shell Fish Commissioner.

1917 1918
To Total Licenses, Fees, etc............... $15,486.65 $30,469.80
15,486.65

To Total Receipts, 1917 and 1918...... $45,956.45-

By Treasurer's Receipts in 1917...........$12,682.97
By Treasurer's Receipts in 1918........... 29,246.58
By Treasurer's Receipts in 1919........... 4,026.90 $45,956.45



Hotel Commissioner.

To Collections, A. L. Messer, 1917.................. $ 4,899.50
By Treasurer's Receipts ............................. 4,899.50


To Collections, J. W Carter, 1917.....................$ 4,931.50
To Collections, J. W. Carter, 1918 ..................... 11,126.00

To Total Collections, J. W. Carter ...................$16,057.50
By Treasurer's Receipts ............................. 16,057.50

To Collections, A. L. Messer, December, 1918..........$ 1,761.00
By Treasurer's Receipts ............................. 1,761.00


Rccapilullation.

To Collections, A. L. Messer, 1917 ...................$ 4,899.50
To Collections, J. W. Carter, 1917 ................... 4,931.50
To Collections, J. W. Carter, 1918.................... 11,126.00
To Coll-ctions, A. L. Messer, 1918 .................... 1,761.00

To Total Collections, 1917 and 1918.................. .$22,718.00
By Total Treasurer's Receipts........................ 22,718.00



STATE LIVE STOCK SANITARY BOARD.


Receipts, Deposits and Balance on Hand January 1, 1919.
Special Account Under Activities of the Board.

Balance on hand last report, Jan. 1, 1917.... $.......

Receipts in 1917........................... 2.67
Receipts in 1918........................... 2,034.44 $2,037.11












85



Deposits with State Treasurer, as per his
Receipts in 1917....................... $ 2.67
Deposits with State Treasurer, as per his
Receipts in 1918....................... 2,034.44 $2,037.11

Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1919 .......................

Rcccipts, Disbursements and Balance on Hand
January 1. 1919.

General Account Under Chapter No. 7345 June 9, 1917.

Balance on hand last report, Jan. 1, 1917..$.........
Receipts in 1917, appropriation......... $150,000.00
Receipts in 1918 ........................ ......... $150,000.00

Warrants issued in 1917 .................$ 11,855.35
Warrants issued in 1918................. 57,818.22 $ 69,673.57
Comptroller's Balance Jan. 1, 1919....... $ 80,326.43
Warrants outstanding Jan. 1, 1919....... 185.55
Treasurer's Balance Jan. 1, 1919......... $ 80,140.88

APPROPRIATIONS, DISBURSEMENTS AND BALANCE FROM

From January 1, 1915 to January 1, 1918.
of the
Educational Funds.

At the request of Hon. Sidney J. Catts, Governor of
Florida, and the Board of Control, to make an audit of
the Educational Funds of the State of Florida, which
comprise the four separate State Institutions for Higher
Education, created by Chapter 5384, Laws of Florida,
and the Fund or Expense Account of the Board of Con-
trol, the whole of which being 'ander the administration
of said Board of Control, for the period from the date of
the State Auditor's last report, Jan. 1, 1915, to Jan. 1,
1918, I beg to submit the following as the result of said
audit, which shows Totals of Receipts, Warrants Issued
and the Balance, with the Distribution thereof, viz.:
Balance in Funds Jan. 1, 1915 ........$ 106,599.58
Receipts in 1915..................... 428,000.00
Receipts in 1916..................... .........
Receipts in 1917..................... 645,400.00












86



Warrants issued in 1915.............. $ 199,192.36
Warrants issued in 1916.............. 211,093.03
Warrants issued in 1917.............. 216,427.41
Balance in Funds Jan. 1, 1918......... 553,286.78

$1,179,999.58 $1,179,999.58

Distribution of Balance.



Total Balance in Funds Jan. 1, 1918...
Board of Control .................... $ 4,547.14
University of Florida ................ 197,333.55
Florida State College for Women..... 244,347.22
Florida School for the Deaf and the
Blind ........................... 84,973.38
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical
College for Negroes.............. 22,085.49
$ 553,286.78



$ 553,286.78






$ 553,286.78



THE STATE PLANT BOARD.

"The Florida Plant Act of 1915," creating the State
Plant Board, and Chapter No. 7281, Acts'of 1917, provid-
ing for the Eradication and Control of Citrus Canker and
other dangerous Plant Diseases and Insects.

Since the creation of the State Plant Board, under
Chapter No. 6885, approved April 30, 1915, and the en-
actment of Chapter No. 7281, approved May 9, 1917, "for
the purpose of eradicating, preventing and controlling
Citrus Canker, and thereafter, so much as may be neces-
sary may be applied by the Board in carrying out the
general purpose of "The Plant Act of 1915," there has
been no audit of its accounts. At the request of the Gov-
ernor of Florida and the State Plant Board that an audit
be made of said accounts, I beg to submit the following
statement as the result of such determination, which
shows Totals of Receipts; Warrants Issued, and the Bal-
ances, with the Distribution thereof, covering the period
from April 30, 1915, to January 1, 1919:

State Plant Board General Fund.

Balance in Fund April 30, 1915.......... $.........
Receipts in 1915........................ 35,000.00
Receipts in 1916........................ 35,000.00
Receipts in 1917........................ 35,000.00
Receipts in 1918........................ 35,000.00













87



Warrants issued in 1915................. $ 12,995.72
Warrants issued in 1916................. 41,820.99
Warrants issued in 1917................. 36,384.53
Warrants issued in 1918................. 26,037.00
Unexpended balance in 1916 ........... .28
Unexrended balance in 1917............. 56.87
Unexpended balance in 1918............ .63
Balance in General Fund Jan. 1, 1919.... 22,703.98
$140,000.00 $140,000.00

State Plant Board Special Fund.

Balance in Fund April 30, 1915...........$.........
Receipts in 1915........................ 125,000.00
Receipts in 1916........................ ........
Receipts in 1917........................ 150,000.00
Receipts in 1918........................ 150,000.00
Receipts Comptroller's Warrant No.
18863, cancelled .................... .13.00
Warrants issued in 1915................. $ 79,689.54
Warrants issued in 1916................. 32,957.81
Warrants issued in 1917................. 40,435.38
W warrants issued in 1918................. 173,006.07
Balance in Special Fund Jan. 1, 1919..... 98,924.20

$425,013.00 $425,013.00

Distribution of Balances.

Total Balance of "The Florida Plant Act
of 1915" .......................... $121,628.18
State Plant Board, General Fund, Bal-
ance ...............................$ 22,703.98
State Plant Board, Special Fund, Bal-
ance ............................... 98,924.20

$121,628.18 $121,628.18

Plant Board Donation and Incidental Fund.

I beg to report that I have made an audit of the ac-
counts of what is known as the Plant Board Donation
and Incidental Fund. The source of receipts of this fund
is principally from those counties who niake application
to the Board to have special or rush work done for them,
as to the inspection of orange groves to determine the
prevalence and the eradication of Citrus Canker, said
counties donating or paying for the expenses incident to
such special work, comprising the salary of the inspector
detailed, and other collateral expense. This special work












88



is in charge of the Board's Plant Commissioner, Mr.
Wilmon Newell, who computes the cost of such service,
collects the amount so taxed, and deposits all said items
in the bank to the credit of the above-named fund subject
to the jurisdiction of the Board. Out of this fund is paid
the several items of expense by warrants drawn after the
Board has duly examined and approved them. The minor
source is the "incidental" portion, which embraces the
special services of a detailed inspector at packing houses.
The cash account of this fund is not handled by the State
Comptroller and State Treasurer, but is administered
direct by the Board in a separate cash or voucher book,
and its careful audit by me discloses the following status
for the period from November 8, 1915, to January 1, 1918:
Balance on hand Nov. 8, 1915.............. $........
Receipts in 1915.......................... 367.11
Receipts in 1916. .......................... 5,739.48
Receipts in 1917.......................... 5,710.41
W warrants issued in 1915................... $ 4.67
Warrants issued in 1916................... 4,490.92
Warrants issued in 1917 ................... 5,304.41
Balance in Fund Jan. 1, 1918............... 2,017.00

$11,817.00 $11,817.00

STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES OF CONTINGENT
APPROPRIATIONS, STATE AUDITOR'S
OFFICE.



1917.
April 23-Balance Auditor's Rerort..........
April 23 to Dec. 31-Expended in 1917
for:
Postage and Box Rent............. $ 40.70
Stationery and Supplies............ 41.56
Telegrams and Express............ 29.48
Typewriter and Adding Machine.... 91.78

July ]-Appropriation to Dec. 31...........
1918.
Jan. 1-Appropriation for 1918...............
Expended in 1918 for:
Postage and Box Rent............. $140.76
Stationery and Supplies............ 53.86
Telegrams and Express............ 16.98
Typewriter and Adding Machine.... 60.53

Dec. 31-Balance in Fund...................



$ 85.71



$203.52



$150.00



$300.00



$272.13

60.06

$535.71 $535.71












89



1919.
Jan. 1-Balance in Fund .................... $ 60.06
Jan. 1-Appropriation to June 30............ 150.00

Jan. 1-Total Balance in Fund.............. $210.06


TOTAL EXPENSES OF STATE AUDITING
DEPARTMENT.

1917.
Salaries:
State Auditor ........................ $ 3,000.00
First Assistant State Auditor............ 3,000.00
Second Assistant State Auditor.......... 1,738.01
Clerks ................................. 2,340.25 $10,078.26

Traveling Expenses:
State Auditor .......................... $ 812.71
First Assistant State Auditor............. 908.56
Second Assistant State Auditor.......... 568.33 $ 2,289.60

Office Supplies, etc ....................... 273.62

Total Expenses, 1917 .................. ... $12,641.48

1918.
Salaries:
State Auditor ......................... $ 3,000.00
First Assistant State Auditor............ 3,000.00
Second Assistant State Auditor........... 3,000.00
Clerks ................................. 2,393.76 $11,393.76

Traveling Expenses:
State Auditor ..........................$ 940.26
First Assistant State Auditor............ 793.73
Second Assistant State Auditor.......... 1,025.79 $ 2,759.78

Office Supplies, etc ....................... 272.13

Total Expenses, 1918.................. ... $14,425.67

Total Expenses, 1917 .................. .$12,641.48
Total Expenses, 1918 ...................... 14,425.67

Grand Total, 1917 and 1918................. $27,067.15

REMARKS AND RECOMMENDATIONS.

I wish to express my appreciation for the co-operation
of the Assistant State Auditors, Mr. Marvin C. McIntosh
and Mr. E. I. Matthews, and their loyalty to the best
interests and aims of the department. I believe this de-











90



apartment has done good work during the last two years,
credit for which is largely due to the steady and efficient
labors of Mr. McIntosh and Mr. Matthews.
The law says that all State and county offices shall be
audited by this department at least once each year. This
is done with reference to State offices, but has been a
physical impossibility to audit the counties once each
year. I assure you the members of this department work
as hard as any set of people could, and are on the job
every day; but we, as well as every one else, have our
physical limitations and can do only so much work and
no more. If all the counties are to be audited every year,
provision .will certainly have to be made for sufficient
force to do it, which is not the case with present force.
In 1921, Chapter 7334, Acts of 1917, becomes effective,
in which county officers will have to make an accounting
cf all fees collected. The operation of this semi-salary
law, I estimate, will fully double the auditing work we
have to do now, for then we will have to audit the collec-
tion and disbursement of all fees collected by these offi-
cials, which we have not done in the past, when all fees
collected belong to the official, except to a certain extent
in criminal case fees, to determine whether or not the
official had overcharged the State or county in cost bills.
You will find in this report total salaries and other ex-
penses to the State of this department. This is exceed-
ingly small when compared to the total shortages dis-
covered and recovered during the same period by this
department. The total shortage discovered by us during
the last two years runs near a quarter-million dollars.
It is all very good in the work of this department to
discover a shortage whenever a shortage exists; but I
consider the best work yet to be done by the department
is to eliminate, or to considerably minimize shortages in
the accounts of county officials. I believe much can be
accomplished toward this aim and end by more frequent
thorough audits.
A large part of the time of the auditors is taken up in
special examinations of complaints and accounts outside
of our regular audit work. This has been the case during
the existence of the department.
If the Legislature would authorize two more clerks in
addition to what we now have, to supplement the work
of the State Auditor and two Assistant State Auditors,











91



I believe we could keep up with the work of the depart-
ment fairly well. Such clerks, though, should be thor-
oughly competent men and expert accountants of well-
tried ability and sufficient salaries would have to be pro-
vided to enable us to secure such men. I would, there-
fore, recommend the following as the minimum necessary
need of the department, salaries not to exceed as stated,
respectively:
1 Chief Accountant .................. $2,500.00
1 Expert Accountant ................ 2,100.00
1 Accountant and Clerk ............. 1,800.00
1 Accountant and Clerk.............. 1,500.00
Office contingent expenses ............ 500.00
The Legislature to further authorize the payment of
traveling expenses of any of the clerks or accountants of
the department when such clerk or accountant is engaged
upon work of the department assigned to him by the
State Auditor, such necessary traveling expenses to be
authorized and paid as now provided for the State
Auditor or Assistant State Auditors provided any such
bill for traveling expenses shall first be approved by the
State Auditor.
There is a great deal of the work of auditing accounts
that is more or less detail, which can be performed accur-
ately by a clerk, under the direction of an aduitor, that
would save the time.of an auditor for the bigger and
more complex jobs. Practically half the time of the State
Auditor has to be spent at the Capitol in examination of
State offices and accounts. With the addition of the
clerks asked for, much of this work can be performed by
them, and thus release more of his time for the perform-
ance of county work, which is now so far behind. With
the authorization of traveling expenses of any of the
clerks, further work in the counties could be performed
by them that now takes the time of the Auditors.
Respectfully submitted,
J. WILL YON,
State Auditor.

Mr. Green of Bradford moved that the report of the
State Auditor be referred to the appropriate commit-
tee.













Which was agreed to.
The Speaker referred the report to the Committee on
Appropriations.

HOUSE RESOLUTIONS.

By T. C. Merchant of Madison-
House Resolution No. 6:
Resolved by the House of Representatives of the State
of Florida, That the courtesies of the floor be extended
to whomever the House wishes, and the same shall be an-
nounced by the Speaker of the House of Representatives,
but this fact shall not be ordered printed in the Journal.
Mr. Merchant moved the adoption of the resolution.
Which was agreed to.

By Mr. Harris of Pinellas-
House Resolution No. 7:
Resolved, That none of the stenographers or cleiks
employed by the Legislature for legislative purposes shall
be required to write personal or business letters for any
person during the sessions of the House or committees.
or v;when tleir services are required by the same.
Mr. Harris iLc ved the adoption of the resolution.
Which was agreed to.

By Mr. Green of Bradford-
House Resolution No. 8:
Be it Resolved by the House of Representatives, Thlat
the Sergeant-at-arms is authorized and directed to furnish
sanitary drinking cups for the House for the remainder
of the session.
Which was read.
Mr. Roebuck offered the following substitute for House
Resolution Number 8:
Resolved, That the Sergean-att-arms be, and he is here-
by, required to furnish for the use of the members and
attaches of this House distilled drinking water, ice and
sanitary drinking cups.
Mr. Roebuck moved the adoption of the substitute
I solution.
Which was agreed to.













INTRODUCTION OF MEMORIALS.

By Mr. Epperson of Levy-
House Memorial No. 1:
A memorial to the Congress of the United States to
return the railroads now being operated by the Federal
Railroad Administration to their former owners as soon
as practicable.
Which was read the first time.
Mr. Epperson moved that the rules be waived for the
purpose of reading the memorial the second time.
Mr. Futch moved to lay the motion on the table.
Which was agreed to.

Mr. Watson moved that the resolution be referred to the
Committee on Miscellaneous Legislation.
Which was agreed to.
The Speaker announced the appointment of the follow-
ing committee under House Resolution No. 1: Messrs.
Wilson of Pasco, Kite of Alachua and Caro of Escambia.
Mr. Stokes moved that the House adjourn until 11
o'clock a. m. tomorrow.
Which was agreed to.



Thursday, April 10, 1919



The House was called to order by the Speaker at
eleven o'clock a. m.
The roll being called the following members answered
to their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Barber, Brooks, Bryan, Bunker,
Busto, Campbell, Caro, Carroll, Chavous, Coats, Cochran.
Corbett, Crews, Dawson, Deas, DeGrove, Dillard, Eedge,
Epperson, Earnest, Folks, Fort, Fowler, Futch (Lake),
Futch (Alachua), Gates, Gillis, Glazier, Green, Hamblin,
Hagan, Hardin, Harris, Hart, Hinely, Jarmon, Jones,
Keen, Kite, Lewis, Marlow, Marshall, Mathis, Mays, Mer-
chant Miller, Moore, McCrary, McKenzie, McLeran, Mc-
Rae, Perry, Parrish, Phillips, Ray, Roebuck, Sams,
Scruggs, Small, Stokes, Strom, Surrency, Tilghman,










94



Tillis, Wade, Watson, Waybright, Weaver, Whyte,
Wicker, Williams (Leon), Williams (Polk), Wilson
(Gadsden), Wilson (Pasco), Woodruff (Orange), Wood-
ruff (Seminole)-77.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the chaplain.

The following communication was read:

Florida State College for Women,
Tallahassee, Fla., April 8th, 1919.
Hon. Geo. H. Vilder,
Speaker of the House of Representatives,
Tallahassee, Fla.
Dear Sir:
We extend to you and all members of the House of Rep-
resentatives an invitation to be present on our college
ct-mpus for our Annual Field Day, to be held April llth
and 12th, from 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. each day.
Hoping that you will find it possible to be with us, we
are
Very respectfully yours,
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA STATE
COLLEGE.
ALBERTA LEE DAVIS,
Secretary.

The following message was read:

Office of the Secretary of State,
State of Florida,
Tallahassee, April 10, 1919.
Hon. Geo. H. Wilder,
Speaker of the House of Representatives.
My Dear cir:
In conformity with the requirement of the Constitution
of the State of Florida, I herewith transmit to you, for
the consideration of the House of Representatives, the
following vetoed Act, with the Governor's objections at-
tached thereto, viz.:
"An Act to validate, approve and confirm all of the
proceedings taken for the creation, establishment and or-
ganization of the Bunnell Drainage District in Flagler
and Volusia Counties, Florida, and to validate, approve










95



and confirm all of the acts and proceedings taken by, for
and on behalf of said district since the creation thereof
and all of the acts and proceedings of the Circuit Court,
the Board of Supervisors, the Commissioners and all other
officers and all agents of said Bunnell Drainage District
acting for and on behalf of said district in carrying out
the affairs of said district, and to validate, approve and
confirm the issue of bonds of the par value of $255,000
ol said Bunnell Drainage District bearing date January
1;t, 1918, and bearing interest at the rate of six per cent
(61%) per annum, payable semi-annually and to validate,
approve and confirm any and all the tax levies and assess-
ments which have been made by the Board of Supervisors
of said Bunnell Drainage District for and on behalf of
said district upon the'taxable property located within said
district."
Also-
"An Act to validate, approve and confirm all of the
proceedings taken for the creation, establishments and
organization of the Bimini Drainage District in Flagler
County, Florida, and to validate, approve and confirm all
of the acts and proceedings taken by, for and on behalf
of said district since the creation thereof, and all of the
acts and proceedings of the Circuit Court, the Board of
Supervisors, the Commissioners and all other officers and
all agents of said Bimini Drainage District acting for and
on behalf of said district in carrying out the affairs of
said district and to validate, approve and confirm the is-
sue of bonds of the par value of $145,000.00 of said Bimini
Drainage District bearing date January 1st, 1918, and
bearing interest at the rate of six per cent (6%) per an-
num, payable semi-annually and to validate, approve and
confirm any and all tax levies and assessments which have
been made by the Board of Supervisors of said Bimini
Drainage District for and on behalf of said district upon
thc taxable property located within said district."
Yours very truly,
H. CLAY CRAWFORD,
Secretary of State.
The House took up the consideration of the veto mes-
..,'. on the Acts referred to in the above message.