Group Title: Journal of the Florida House of Representatives.
Title: Journal of the House of Representatives of the session of ..
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 Material Information
Title: Journal of the House of Representatives of the session of ..
Alternate Title: Journal of the House of Representatives, State of Florida
Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Florida of the session of ..
Physical Description: 44p. ; 23-32 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Legislature. -- House of Representatives
Publisher: Florida. Legislature. House of Representatives.
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Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla
Publication Date: July 12-13, 1983
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Subject: Legislative journals -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
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Additional Physical Form: Electronic reproduction of copy from George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida also available.
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General Note: Description based on: 1907.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00027772
Volume ID: VID00095
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 12895215
alephbibnum - 003417935
oclc - 12901236
lccn - sn 85065608
 Related Items
Preceded by: Journal of proceedings of the House of Representatives of the Legislature of the State of Florida
Succeeded by: Journal of the Florida House of Representatives

Full Text




Journal
of the

House of Representatives



Special



Session



of the



Seventy-first House
since Statehood in 1845



July 12 through July 13, 1983








MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
[Democrats in Roman (84); Republicans in Italic (36)]

District District
Part of Escambia Parts of Citrus, Marion
1 Thomas J. "Tom" Tobiassen, Gonzalez 26 Dick Locke, Inverness
Part of Escambia Parts ofLake, Marion, Putnam, Seminole, Volusia
2 Virginia "Ginger" Bass, Pensacola 27 Bobby Brantley, Longwood
Parts of Escambia, Santa Rosa Part of Volusia
3 Grover C. Robinson, III, Pensacola 28 Samuel P. Bell, III, Ormond Beach
Parts ofEscambia, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa Partherell, Port OrangeVousia
4 Bolley L. "Bo" Johnson, Milton
s of O, W Part of Volusia
Parts of Okaloosa, Walton 30 Tom C. Brown, Port Orange
5 James G. Ward, Fort Walton Beach
Part of Bay Part of Brevard
arto o o o ay 31 Winston W. "Bud" Gardner, Jr., Titusville
6 Ronald Clyde "Ron" Johnson, Panama City
"Holmes, Washington and parts ofBay, Jackson, Walton P2 TmothD. "Tim"Deratany, Indialantic
7 Sam Mitchell, Vernon
Calhoun, Gadsden, Gulf and parts of Bay, Franklin, aray Evans-Jones, Melbourne
Jackson
8 James Harold Thompson, Quincy Parts of Brevard, Orange, Seminole
Liberty and parts of Franklin, Leon, Wakulla 34 arl elph, Casselberry
9 Alfred J. "Al" Lawson, Jr., Tallahassee Part of Seminole
Part of Leon 35 Arthur E. "Art" Grindle, Altamonte Springs
10 Herbert F. "Herb" Morgan, Tallahassee Parts of Orange, Seminole
Dixie, Gilchrist, Jefferson, Lafayette, Levy, Taylor 36 Thomas B "Tom" Drage Jr., Orlando
and parts of Citrus, Marion, Wakulla Part of Orange
11 Gene Hodges, Cedar Key 37 Richard "Rich" Crotty, Orlando
Columbia, Hamilton, Madison, Suwannee Part of Orange
12 Wayne Hollingsworth, Lake City 38 Bruce McEwan, Orlando
Baker, Nassau, Union and parts of Bradford, Duval Part of Orange
13 George A. Crady, Yulee 39 Fran Carlton, Orlando
Part of Duval Part of Orange
14 Carl Ogden, Jacksonville 40 Alzo J. Reddick, Orlando
Part of Duval Part of Orange
15 Steve Pajcic, Jacksonville 41 Daniel Webster, Orlando
Part of Duval Parts of Osceola, Polk
16 John Thomas, Jacksonville 42 C. Fred Jones, Auburndale
Part of Duval Part of Polk
17 Corrine Brown, Jacksonville 43 Richard E. "Rick" Dantzler, Winter Haven
Part of Duval Part of Polk
18 John W. Lewis, III, Jacksonville 44 Gene Ready, Lakeland
Parts of Duval, St. Johns Part of Polk
19 William G. "Bill" Bankhead, Jacksonville 45 Beverly B. Burnsed, Lakeland
Part of Duval Parts ofLake, Sumter
20 Thomas L. "Tommy" Hazouri, Jacksonville 46 Everett A. Kelly, Astatula
Clay and parts of Bradford, St. Johns Hernando and parts ofPasco, Sumter
21 Frank Williams, Crystal Lake 47 Charles R. "Chuck" Smith, Brooksville
Flagler and parts of Putnam, St. Johns Part of Pasco
22 Hamilton D. Upchurch, St. Augustine 48 Raymond B. "Ray" Stewart, Zephyrhills
Parts of Alacjua, Putnam Part of Pasco
23 Sidney'"Sid" Martin, Hawthorne 49 Ronald R. "Ron" Richmond, Holiday
Part of Alachua Parts ofPasco, Pinellas
24 Jon L. Mills, Gainesville 50 Peter M. "Pete" Dunbar, Crystal Beach
Part of Marion Part of Pinellas
25 Christian "Chris" Meffert, Ocala 51 Byron Combee, Clearwater











District
Part of Pinellas
52 Betty Easley, Largo
Part of Pinellas
53 Dennis L. Jones, Treasure Island
Part of Pinellas
54 Dorothy Eaton Sample, St. Petersburg
Part of Pinellas
55 Douglas L. "Doug" Jamerson, St. Petersburg
Part of Pinellas
56 Peter Rudy Wallace, St. Petersburg
Part of Pinellas
57 Patricia L. Bailey, Pinellas Park
Part of Pinellas
58 T. M. "Tom" Woodruff St. Petersburg
Part of Hillsborough
59 John A. Grant, Jr., Tampa
Part of Hillsborough
60 Mary Figg, Lutz
Parts of Hillsborough, Pasco
61 Carl Carpenter, Jr., Plant City
Part of Hillsborough
62 S. L. "Spud" Clements, Jr., Brandon
Part of Hillsborough
63 James T. "Jim" Hargrett, Jr., Tampa
Part of Hillsborough
64 Helen Gordon Davis, Tampa
Part of Hillsborough
65 Elvin L. Martinez, Tampa
Part of Hillsborough
66 H. Lee Moffitt, Tampa
Hardee and part of Manatee
67 Lawrence F. "Larry" Shackelford, Palmetto
Part of Manatee
68 Peggy Simone, Bradenton
Parts of Manatee, Sarasota
69 Thomas E. "Tom" Danson, Jr., Sarasota
Part of Sarasota
70 Robert M. "Bob" Johnson, Sarasota
Parts of Charlotte, Sarasota
71 Frederic H. "Fred" Burrall, Port Charlotte
Parts of Charlotte, DeSoto, Lee
72 Vernon Peeples, Punta Gorda
Part of Lee
73 J. Keith Arnold, Fort Myers
Part of Lee
74 Fred R. Dudley, Fort Myers
Parts of Collier, Lee
75 Mary Ellen Hawkins, Naples
Glades, Hendry, Highlands and parts of Collier, De-
Soto, Okeechobee
76 Bert J. Harris, Jr., Lake Placid
Parts of Brevard, Indian River, Okeechobee, Osceola,
St. Lucie
77 Irlo "Bud" Bronson, Jr., Kissimmee



District
Parts of Brevard, Indian River, St. Lucie
78 R. Dale Patchett, Vero Beach
Parts of Martin, St. Lucie
79 Charles L. "Chuck" Nergard, Port St. Lucie
Parts of Martin, Palm Beach
80 James C. "Jim" Hill, Jr., Jupiter
Part of Palm Beach
81 James L. "Jim" Watt, Lake Park
Part of Palm Beach
82 Ray Liberti, West Palm Beach
Part of Palm Beach
83 Eleanor Weinstock, Palm Beach
Part of Palm Beach
84 Edward J. "Ed" Healey, West Palm Beach
Part of Palm Beach
85 Frank S. Messersmith, Lake Worth
Part of Palm Beach
86 Steve Press, Delray Beach
Parts of Broward, Palm Beach
87 Carol G. Hanson, Boca Raton
Part of Broward
88 Jack N. Tobin, Margate
Part of Broward
89 Joe Titone, Coral Springs
Part of Broward
90 Peter R. Deutsch, Sunrise
Part of Broward
91 Bill Clark, Lauderdale Lakes
Part of Broward
92 Robert J. "Bob" Shelley, Pompano Beach
Part of Broward
93 Deborah P. "Debby" Sanderson, Fort Lauderdale
Part of Broward
94 Tom Gustafson, Fort Lauderdale
Part of Broward
95 Anne Mackenzie, Fort Lauderdale
Part of Broward
96 Thomas H. Armstrong, Plantation
Part of Broward
97 Frederick "Fred" Lippman, Hollywood
Part of Broward
98 David J. Lehman, Hollywood
Part of Broward
99 Walter C. "Walt" Young, Pembroke Pines
Parts of Broward, Dade
100 Ronald A. "Ron" Silver, North Miami Beach
Part of Dade
101 Michael I. "Mike" Abrams, Miami
Part of Dade
102 Elaine Gordon, Miami
Part of Dade
103 Michael Friedman, Miami Beach
Part of Dade
104 Barry Kutun, Miami Beach











District
Part of Dade
105 Harold W. "Hal" Spaet, Miami Beach
Part of Dade
106 Jefferson "Jeff" Reaves, Sr., Miami
Part of Dade
107 James C. "Jim" Burke, Miami
Part of Dade
108 Willie Logan, Jr., Opa Locka
Part of Dade
109 Robert R. "Bob" Reynolds, Hialeah
Part of Dade
110 Ileana Ros, Miami
Part of Dade
111 Roberto Casas, Hialeah
Part of Dade
112 John F. Cosgrove, Coral Gables



District
Part of Dade
113 Humberto J. Cortina, Miami
Part of Dade
114 Elizabeth "Betty" Metcalf, Coral Gables
Part of Dade
115 Tim Murphy, Miami
Part of Dade
116 Art Simon, Miami
Part of Dade
117 C. Thomas "Tom" Gallagher, III, Coconut Grove
Part of Dade
118 Dexter W. Lehtinen, Miami
Part of Dade
119 Lawrence R. "Larry" Hawkins, Miami
Monroe and part of Dade
120 Joseph B. "Joe" Allen, Jr., Key West



OFFICERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



Speaker-H. Lee Moffitt
Speaker pro tempore-Steve Pajcic



Clerk-Allen Morris
Sergeant at Arms-Wayne Westmark


















Lae Journal OF THE

'House of representatives


THIRD SPECIAL SESSION-"C" of 1982-1984



Tuesday, July 12, 1983



Journal of the House of Representatives for a Special Session of the Seventy-first House since Statehood in 1845,
convened by Proclamation of the Governor and held at the Capitol in the City of Tallahassee in the State of Florida,
on Tuesday, July 12, 1983.



The House was called to order by the Speaker at 10:00 a.m.

Prayer
Prayer was offered by Representative Elaine Gordon.
The following Proclamation was read:


PROCLAMATION

State of Florida
Executive Department
Tallahassee
TO THE HONORABLE MEMBERS OF THE FLORIDA SENATE
AND THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES:
WHEREAS, the Legislature of the State of Florida adjourned its
Regular Session for the year 1983 on June 13, 1983 and has con-
vened in subsequent Special Session through June 24, 1983, and
WHEREAS, on the 30th day of June, 1983, a veto was issued,
pursuant to Article I, Section 8 of the Florida Constitution, of
portions of the 1983 appropriations bill dealing with funding of
public education.
WHEREAS, adequate funding of Florida's public education sys-
tem is vital to the future of all of Florida's citizens;
NOW, THEREFORE, I, BOB GRAHAM, Governor of the State of
Florida, by virtue of the power and authority vested in me by
Article III, Section 3 (c) (1), Florida Constitution, do hereby pro-
claim as follows:

Section 1.
That the Legislature of the State of Florida is convened in Special
Session commencing at 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, July 12, 1983, and
extending through 5:00 p.m., Wednesday, July 13, 1983.

Section 2.
That the Legislature of the State of Florida is convened for the
sole and exclusive purpose of considering the following legislation:
(a) Enactment of an appropriations bill to adequately fund pub-
lic education.
(b) Legislation relating to the reform of public education.
(c) Amendment of Chapters 214 and 220 eliminating tax ex-
emption on corporate income from foreign transactions and
related implementing legislation.
(d) Amendment of Chapters 563, 564 and 565 increasing the
taxes on beer, wine and liquors.

1



r IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have
hereunto set my hand and caused
the Great Seal of the State of Flor-
ida to be affixed to this Proclama-
tion convening the Legislature in
Special Session at the Capitol, this
o ,* 7th day of July, 1983.
BOB GRAHAM
Governor
ATTEST:
GEORGE FIRESTONE
Secretary of State

The following Members were recorded present:



The Chair
Abrams
Allen
Armstrong
Arnold
Bailey
Bankhead
Bass
Bell
Brantley
Bronson
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burrall
Carlton
Carpenter
Casas
Clark
Combee
Cortina
Cosgrove
Crady
Crotty
Danson
Dantzler
Davis
Deratany
Deutsch



Drage
Dudley
Dunbar
Easley
Evans-Jones
Figg
Friedman
Gallagher
Gardner
Gordon
Grant
Grindle
Gustafson
Hanson
Hargrett
Harris
Hawkins, L. R.
Hawkins, M. E.
Hazouri
Healey
Hill
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Johnson, R. C.
Johnson, R. M.
Jones, C. F.
Jones, D. L.



Kelly
Kutun
Lawson
Lehtinen
Lewis
Liberti
Lippman
Locke
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mills
Mitchell
Morgan
Murphy
Nergard
Ogden
Pajcic
Patchett
Peeples
Press
Ready
Reaves
Reddick
Richmond
Robinson



Ros
Sample
Sanderson
Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Silver
Simon
Simone
Smith
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone
Tobiassen
Tobin
Upchurch
Wallace
Ward
Watt
Webster
Weinstock
Wetherell
Williams
Woodruff
Young



Excused: Representative Clements, who recently had heart sur-
gery; Representative Reynolds, due to illness; Representative Met-
calf, who is touring the mental health facilities in Russia; Repre-
sentative Lehman, who is convalescing from recent surgery;
Representatives Burnsed and Logan for the morning session; Rep-
resentative Dunbar after the morning session.
A quorum was present.



A digest of today's Chamber action appears on last page



Number 1











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



Pledge
The Members pledged allegiance to the Flag.

The Journal
The Journal of June 24, Special Session was approved as corrected.

Presentation of Guest
Representative Lawson presented Clemon Johnson of Monticello,
a player with the Philadelphia 76ers, national basketball champi-
onship team.

Recessed
On motion by Rep. Thompson, the House recessed at 10:16 a.m.
for the purpose of holding committee meetings to reconvene at 3:30
p.m. today, or upon call of the Speaker.


Reconvened
The House was called to order by the Speaker at 6:49 p.m. The
following Members were recorded present:



The Chair
Abrams
Allen
Armstrong
Arnold
Bailey
Bankhead
Bass
Bell
Brantley
Bronson
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Burrall
Carlton
Carpenter
Casas
Clark
Combee
Cortina
Cosgrove
Crady
Crotty
Danson
Dantzler
Davis
Deratany



Deutsch
Drage
Dudley
Easley
Evans-Jones
Figg
Friedman
Gallagher
Gardner
Gordon
Grant
Grindle
Gustafson
Hanson
Hargrett
Harris
Hawkins, L. R.
Hawkins, M. E.
Hazouri
Healey
Hill
Hedges
Hollingsworth
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Johnson, R. C.
Johnson, R. M.
Jones, C. F.
Jones, D. L.



Kelly
Kutun
Lawson
Lehtinen
Lewis
Liberti
Lippman
Locke
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mills
Mitchell
Morgan
Murphy
Nergard
Ogden
Pajcic
Patchett
Peeples
Press
Ready
Reaves
Reddick
Richmond



Robinson
Ros
Sample
Sanderson
Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Silver
Simon
Simone
Smith
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone
Tobiassen
Tobin
Upchurch
Wallace
Ward
Watt
Webster
Weinstock
Wetherell
Williams
Woodruff
Young



A quorum was present.
The following Proclamations were read:


PROCLAMATION

State of Florida
Executive Department
Tallahassee
(Amendment to Proclamation dated July 7, 1983)
TO THE HONORABLE MEMBERS OF THE FLORIDA SENATE
AND THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES:
WHEREAS, on the 7th day of July, 1983, a Proclamation of the
Governor was issued convening a Special Session of the Florida



Legislature commencing at 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, July 12, 1983, and
extending through 5:00 p.m., Wednesday, July 13, 1983; and
WHEREAS, it is in the best interest of the citizens of the State of
Florida to amend the Proclamation of July 7, 1983, in order to
expand the call of the Special Session so that the Legislature may
consider the additional business set forth below;



NOW, THEREFORE, I, BOB GRAHAM, Governor of the State of
Florida, by virtue of the power and authority vested in me by
Article III, Section 3 (c) (1), Florida Constitution, do hereby pro-
claim as follows:
I. That Section two (2) of the Proclamation of the Governor
dated July 7, 1983, is hereby amended to read:
Section 2.
That the Legislature of the State of Florida is convened for the
sole and exclusive purpose of considering the following legislation:
(a) Enactment of an appropriations bill to adequately fund public
education.
(b) Legislation relating to the reform of public education.
(c) Amendment of Chapters 214 and 220 eliminating tax ex-
emption on corporate income from foreign transactions and
related implementing legislation.
(d) Amendment of Chapters 563, 564 and 565 increasing the
taxes on beer, wine and liquors.
(e) Legislation authorizing state employee salary increases.

II. Except as amended by this Proclamation, the Proclamation
of the Governor dated July 7, 1983, is ratified and confirmed.
F IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have
hereunto set my hand and caused the
Great Seal of the State of Florida to
be affixed to this proclamation at the
Capitol, this 12th day of July, 1983.
BOB GRAHAM
Governor
ATTEST:
GEORGE FIRESTONE
Secretary of State

PROCLAMATION

State of Florida
Executive Department
Tallahassee
(Second Amendment to Proclamation dated July 7, 1983)
TO THE HONORABLE MEMBERS OF THE FLORIDA SENATE
AND THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES:
WHEREAS, on the 7th day of July, 1983, a Proclamation of the
Governor was issued convening a Special Session of the Florida
Legislature commencing at 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, July 12, 1983, and
extending through 5:00 p.m., Wednesday, July 13, 1983; and
WHEREAS, on the 12th day of July, 1983, a Proclamation of the
Governor was issued amending the Proclamation in order to ex-
pand the call; and
WHEREAS, it is in the best interest of the citizens of the State of
Florida to further amend the Proclamation of July 7, 1983, in order
to expand the call of the Special Session so that the Legislature
may consider the additional business set forth below;
NOW, THEREFORE, I, BOB GRAHAM, Governor of the State of
Florida, by virtue of the power and authority vested in me by
Article I, Section 3(c)(1), Florida Constitution, do hereby pro-
claim as follows:



2-



July 12, 1983











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



I. That Section two (2) of the Proclamation of the Governor
dated July 7, 1983, as amended, is hereby amended to read:
Section 2.
That the Legislature of the State of Florida is convened for the
sole and exclusive purpose of considering the following legislation:
(a) Enactment of an appropriations bill to adequately fund public
education.



(b)
(c)



Legislation relating to the reform of public education.
Amendment of Chapters 214 and 220 eliminating tax ex-
emption on corporate income from foreign transactions and
related implementing legislation.



(d) Amendment of Chapters 563, 564 and 565 increasing the
taxes on beer, wine and liquors.
(e) Legislation authorizing state employee salary increases.
(f) A bill authorizing a convention development tax in counties
defined by s. 125.011 (1).
II. Except as amended by this Proclamation, the Proclamation
of the Governor dated July 7, 1983, as amended, is ratified and
confirmed.
I E s IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have
hereunto set my hand and caused the
Great Seal of the State of Florida to
be affixed to this proclamation at the
Capitol, this 12th day of July, 1983.

BOB GRAHAM
Governor
ATTEST:
GEORGE FIRESTONE
Secretary of State


Messages from the Senate

The Honorable H. Lee Moffitt, Speaker

I am directed to inform the House of Representatives that the
Senate has passed as amended SB 3-C and requests the concurrence
of the House.
Joe Brown, Secretary

By Senator Johnston-

SB 3-C-A bill to be entitled An act relating to taxation; amend-
ing s. 214.71 (3) (a), Florida Statutes, relating to determination of
the base upon which the corporate income tax is apportioned; pro-
viding conditions under which sales of tangible personal property
are in this state; amending s. 220.03 (1) (t), Florida Statutes, 1982
Supplement, and adding paragraphs (aa) and (bb); redefining "state"
to include foreign countries; defining "unitary business group" and
"nonbusiness income"; amending s. 220.13 (1) (b), Florida Statutes,
1982 Supplement; disallowing specified deductions and changing
provisions for subtracting certain amounts from taxable income in
determining adjusted federal income;'amending subsection (1) of s.
220.131, Florida Statutes, to conform provisions relating to affili-
ated groups; creating s. 220.135, Florida Statutes, providing that
all members of a unitary business group must use the unitary
reporting method, and providing requirements with respect there-
to; amending s. 220.14 (3), Florida Statutes; providing that only one
exemption shall be allowed to a unitary business group or taxpay-
ers filing a return; amending s. 220.15 (3) and (4), Florida Statutes;
redefining "everywhere" as used in computation of apportionment
factor denominators; deleting provisions relating to a refund under
specified circumstances; creating s. 220.16, Florida Statutes, relat-
ing to the allocation of nonbusiness income; amending s. 220.63(5),
Florida Statutes; deleting a cross reference; amending s. 220.64,



Florida Statutes, relating to unitary business groups and applica-
tion to the franchise tax on banks and savings associations; provid-
ing for recomputation of estimated tax due by taxpayers whose tax
year begins on or after September 1, 1982, to comply with this act;
amending s. 563.05, Florida Statutes; increasing the excise tax on
malt beverages; amending s. 563.07, Florida Statutes; reducing the
beer distributors' collection credit; amending s. 564.06 (1), (3) and
(7), Florida Statutes; increasing the excise tax on certain beverages
and wines and reducing the distributors' allowance; amending s.
565.12 (1), Florida Statutes; increasing the excise tax on certain
alcoholic beverages; amending s. 565.13, Florida Statutes; reducing
the distributors' allowance; requiring manufacturers, distributors
and vendors to inventory beverages subject to the increased taxes
and pay the amount of tax due; providing for application of penalty
and interest provisions; repealing s. 196.033, Florida Statutes, and
s. 236.25 (2) (b), Florida Statutes, 1982 Supplement; eliminating
the School District Homestead Trust Fund; providing an appropria-
tion to the Department of Revenue for establishment of a corporate
income tax historical computer data base and computerized audit
system; providing conditions; amending s. 193.1142 (1), Florida Stat-
utes, 1982 Supplement, relating to the date by which ad valorem
tax assessment rolls are to be submitted to the Department of
Revenue; declaring invalid an emergency rule of the Department of
Revenue; making certain changes to the notice of proposed property
taxes; amending subsection (1) of section 220.12, Florida Statutes;
providing for inclusion of certain nonbusiness income in the calcu-
lation of net income; providing an appropriation for the administra-
tion of this act; providing effective dates.
-was read the first time by title. On motion by Rep. Kutun, the
rules were waived and the bill was taken up instanter and read the
second time by title.
Rep. Thompson moved the previous question on the bill, which
was not agreed to. The vote was:

Yeas-55



The Chair
Abrams
Armstrong
Bailey
Bass
Bell
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Carlton
Carpenter
Clark
Crady

Nays-59
Allen
Arnold
Bankhead
Brantley
Bronson
Burrall
Casas
Combee
Cortina
Cosgrove
Crotty
Danson
Dantzler
Deratany
Drage



Davis
Deutsch
Figg
Friedman
Gordon
Gustafson
Hargrett
Hawkins, L. R.
Hazouri
Healey
Jamerson
Kutun
Lawson
Liberti



Dudley
Easley
Evans-Jones
Gallagher
Gardner
Grant
Grindle
Hanson
Harris
Hawkins, M. E.
Hill
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Johnson, B. L.
Johnson, R. C.



Lippman
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
Mills
Morgan
Ogden
Pajcic
Peeples
Press
Reaves
Reddick
Silver



Johnson, R. M.
Jones, D. L.
Kelly
Lehtinen
Lewis
Locke
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mitchell
Murphy
Nergard
Patchett
Ready
Richmond



Simon
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone
Tobin
Wallace
Ward
Weinstock
Wetherell
Williams
Young




Robinson
Ros
Sample
Sanderson
Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Simone
Smith
Tobiassen
Upchurch
Watt
Webster
Woodruff



Representative Richmond offered the following amendment:

Amendment 1-On page 18, line 13, strike "2.58" and insert: 3



3



July 12, 1983











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



Rep. Richmond moved the adoption of the amendment. On mo-
tion by Rep. Pajcic, the amendment was laid on the table. The vote
was:



Yeas-62
The Chair
Abrams
Armstrong
Bailey
Bass
Bell
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Carlton
Carpenter
Clark
Cosgrove
Crady
Dantzler

Nays-51
Allen
Arnold
Bankhead
Brantley
Bronson
Burrall
Casas
Combee
Cortina
Crotty
Danson
Deratany
Drage



Deutsch
Figg
Friedman
Gordon
Grant
Gustafson
Hargrett
Hawkins, L. R.
Hazouri
Healey
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Kutun
Lawson
Lehtinen
Lewis



Dudley
Easley
Evans-Jones
Gallagher
Gardner
Grindle
Hanson
Harris
Hawkins, M. E.
Hill
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Johnson, R. C.



Liberti
Lippman
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
Mills
Morgan
Murphy
Ogden
Pajcic
Peeples
Press
Reaves
Reddick
Robinson



Johnson, R. M.
Jones, C. F.
Jones, D. L.
Kelly
Locke
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mitchell
Nergard
Patchett
Ready
Richmond



Rep. Davis abstained from voting because of a conflict of interest.

Representative Patchett offered the following amendment:
Amendment 2-On page 17, line 8, insert new Section 12: Sec-
tion 12. In the event that the revenues collected from the methods
used in sections 1 through 11 should exceed $95 million dollars,
such revenue shall be utilized to increase Career Service Employ-
ees salaries by a per centage rate not less than 2.3 per cent. Such
increase shall total no less than the increase granted to those
covered by the education bill of Special Session "C" of 1983. (Re-
number subsequent sections)
Rep. Patchett moved the adoption of the amendment. On motion
by Rep. Morgan, the amendment was laid on the table. The vote
was:

Yeas-64



Deutsch
Figg
Friedman
Gordon
Grant
Gustafson
Hargrett
Hawkins, L. R.
Hazouri
Healey
Hodges
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Kutun
Lehtinen
Lewis



Liberti
Lippman
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
Mills
Morgan
Murphy
Ogden
Pajcic
Peeples
Press
Reaves
Reddick
Robinson



Shackelford
Silver
Simon
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone
Tobiassen
Tobin
Wallace
Ward
Weinstock
Wetherell
Williams
Young



Nays-50
Allen
Arnold
Bankhead
Brantley
Bronson
Burrall
Casas
Combee
Cortina
Crotty
Danson
Deratany
Drage



Dudley
Easley
Evans-Jones
Gallagher
Gardner
Grindle
Hanson
Harris
Hawkins, M. E.
Hill
Hollingsworth
Johnson, R. C.
Johnson, R. M.



Jones, C. F.
Jones, D. L.
Kelly
Lawson
Locke
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mitchell
Nergard
Patchett
Ready
Richmond



Ros
Sample
Sanderson
Selph
Shelley
Simone
Smith
Upchurch
Watt
Webster
Woodruff



Shackelford
Silver
Simon
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone
Tobiassen
Tobin
Wallace
Ward
Weinstock
Young





Ros
Sample
Sanderson
Selph
Shelley
Simone
Smith
Upchurch
Watt
Webster
Williams
Woodruff



The Chair
Abrams
Armstrong
Bailey
Bass
Bell
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Carlton
Carpenter
Clark
Cosgrove
Crady
Deutsch

Nays-51
Allen
Arnold
Bankhead
Brantley
Bronson
Burrall
Combee
Cortina
Crotty
Danson
Dantzler
Deratany
Drage



Figg
Friedman
Gordon
Grant
Gustafson
Hargrett
Hawkins, L. R.
Hazouri
Healey
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Kutun
Lawson
Lehtinen
Lewis
Liberti


Dudley
Easley
Evans-Jones
Gallagher
Gardner
Grindle
Hanson
Harris
Hawkins, M. E.
Hill
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Johnson, R. C.



Lippman
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
Mills
Morgan
Murphy
Ogden
Pajcic
Peeples
Press
Reaves
Reddick
Robinson
Silver


Johnson, R. M.
Jones, C. F.
Jones, D. L.
Kelly
Locke
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mitchell
Nergard
Patchett
Ready
Richmond



Simon
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone
Tobiassen
Tobin
Wallace
Ward
Weinstock
Wetherell
Williams
Young




Ros
Sample
Sanderson
Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Simone
Smith
Upchurch
Watt
Webster
Woodruff



Representative Davis abstained from voting because of a conflict
of interest.

Votes after roll call:
Yeas-Metcalf

Pair Vote

I am paired with Representative Dunbar on passage of SB 3-C. If
present, he would vote Nay and I would vote Yea.
Representative Roberto Casas
So the bill passed and was immediately certified to the Senate.



Rep. Davis abstained from voting because of a conflict of interest.

On motion by Rep. Thompson, the rules were waived and SB 3-C
was read the third time by title. Pending roll call-
On motion by Rep. Thompson, the rules were waived and debate
was limited to four minutes per side.
Rep. Thompson suggested the absence of a quorum. A quorum of
114 Members was present. The question recurred on the passage of
SB 3-C. The vote was:

Yeas-62



The Chair
Abrams
Armstrong
Bailey
Bass
Bell
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Carlton
Carpenter
Clark
Cosgrove
Crady
Dantzler



4



July 12, 1983











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE



Explanation of Vote on SB 3-C
I am voting for this tax bill to avert a crisis in our educational
system. But I do so only after vigorously supporting efforts to delete
inequitable taxes from the measure. My initiatives in the days and
hours preceding this vote were spent advocating alternative sources of
funding educational needs. The process was impeded from the begin-
ning due in large part to the short notice on which we were operat-
ing. Nonetheless, I felt compelled to make every attempt to turn
back the provision in this bill which lifts the tax exemption on
foreign source income. I sat through the Finance & Tax Committee
workshop and registered my opposition. I also prepared amend-
ments to substitute a 1% overall corporate tax increase, delete the
provision for unitary tax, and provide for a foreign income tax
credit.

My belief is that the foreign source income tax exemption has
been the cornerstone of international economic development in the
State of Florida. The Department of Commerce has spent many
millions of dollars attracting foreign investment. So have private
entities, such as the City of Coral Gables and the Coral Gables
Chamber of Commerce Committee of 21. A major selling point in
our success has been the foreign source income tax exemption.
Indeed, multinational companies in Florida (with over 110 in my
district) have pumped substantial sums into Florida's economy-an
economy which has remained among the strongest in the country.
In the downtown hubs of Tampa, Orlando, and Miami new con-
struction has been in full throttle providing jobs for many workers.
Compare this to our sister cities in the Northeast and Midwest
where the cranes, trucks, and machinery remain silent and unem-
ployment rages near and in some cases beyond 20 percent. Gover-
nor Graham has been heard to proclaim the State of Florida the
"gateway to the Americas" and the "leader of the Sunbelt". If that
is to be true, then we must be clearly number one in America in the
involvement of international trade and commerce. If multinational
corporations choose to settle in Atlanta rather than Miami, the
proclamations will ring hollow.

The foreign source tax proposal, furthermore, singles out the
multinational corporations, most of which are located in one area,
Dade County. If we are to fund education through corporate reve-
nues, the burden of increases should be spread statewide, not shoul-
dered by one narrow segment of the corporate community. Of this
228 million dollar tax package, over 40 percent will be funded by
taxing foreign source income. The revenue will generate mostly
from Dade County, but will be distributed across the state. If we are
to take the position that corporations are the ultimate benefactors
of quality education, then we must assume they will expect to see
some tangible evidence. Accordingly, the dismay in the multina-
tional community is understandable when it is clear at the very
outset, that a disproportionate amount of their 40 percent share
will not be returned to the schools and universities in their locality.

Regretfully I and several others could not ultimately generate a
majority of support for alternative revenue sources.

I also recognize that my home county, Dade County, was liter-
ally in an education crisis. Without the new package, the Dade
County School System would have faced a 36 million dollar short-
fall. Cutbacks would have included eliminating 119 art, music, and
physical education second grade teachers; eliminating 132 of the
same positions in grades 4-6; eliminating 180 elective teachers in
grades 7-8; eliminating 271 general education teachers by increas-
ing student-teacher ratios in grades 7-12; eliminating 12 elemen-
tary assistant principals; eliminating 4 area reading clinics; elimi-
nating 22 elementary counselors; eliminating 71 junior and senior
high school reading laboratory teachers.

These reductions amounted to 24.3 million dollars. The remain-
ing 12.2 million in cutbacks would have eliminated such areas as
advanced academic programming, driver education, juvenile justice
support, career planning counselors, curriculum development, sub-



July 12, 1983



1 Lump Sum
Salary Increases
From General Revenue
Fund ............... 29,750,000
From Trust Funds .......



12,750,000



OF REPRESENTATIVES 5

stitute teacher hiring, hearing impaired programs, and foreign lan-
guage instruction.
All this in Dade County alone.

When forced with the choice, I could not in the end vote for a
year of crisis for the children of Dade County, even though I fought
the foreign source tax with vigor. With no possibility of gaining
approval of alternative revenue sources, the statesmanlike position
was to vote for education.

In the year ahead, I will encourage thorough review of the plan,
in an effort to seek reinstatement of the foreign source income tax
exemption. We must find a more equitable method of distributing
responsibility for a sound statewide education system, through a
funding formula which does not halt international economic devel-
opment in Florida.

I have also requested the Commerce Committee staff to survey
other states and prepare legislation for 1984 to provide tax credits
for multinational corporations who will hopefully locate in Florida.
I plan to coordinate a workshop with Department of Revenue offi-
cials responsible for drafting rules on how the tax will be applied, so
my constituents will have the opportunity to ensure technical, legal,
and computational input into the rulemaking process. This applica-
tion is as important as the substantive aspects of the legislated tax
bill.
Representative John F. Cosgrove



The Honorable H. Lee Moffitt, Speaker

I am directed to inform the House of Representatives that the
Senate has passed as amended SB 1-C and requests the concurrence
of the House.

Joe Brown, Secretary



By Senator Johnston-
SB 1-C-A bill to be entitled An act making supplemental appro-
priations; providing moneys for the annual period beginning July 1,
1983 and ending June 30, 1984, to pay salaries, other expenses, and
for other specified purposes of the various agencies of state gov-
ernment; supplementing specific appropriations appropriated by
Chapter 83-300, Laws of Florida; providing an effective date.

-was read the first time by title. On motion by Rep. Morgan, the
rules were waived and the bill was read the second time by title.


Representative Morgan offered the following amendment:

Amendment 1-On page 1, strike everything after the enacting
clause and insert:

Section 1. The moneys in the following specific appropriations
are appropriated from the named funds for the Fiscal Year 1983-84
to the state agency indicated, to be used to supplement the appro-
priations made in Section 1 of Chapter 83-300, Laws of Florida, as
supplemental amounts to be used to pay the salaries and other
expenditures of the named agencies.

Administered Funds











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
Commerce, Department of
Economic Development, Division of
1A Special Categories
Miami Grand Prix
From General Revenue
Fund ...............
Funds in Specific Appropriation
1A are appropriated to Metro-
politan Dade County, Florida for
promotion and/or facilitation of
motor sporting events in Dade
County as the County Commis-
sion deems appropriate.
2 Special Categories
Paid Advertising and Promo-
tion
From General Revenue
Fund ...............
Education, Department of, and Com-
missioner of Education
Office of Deputy Commissioner for Ed-
ucational Management
From the funds provided in Spe-
cific Appropriation 308 of Chap-
ter 83-300, Laws of Florida,
$347,000 shall be used to estab-
lish a demonstration project at
the University of South Florida
Medical Center and $170,000
shall be used by the Southeast-
ern College of Osteopathic Med-
icine to increase the availabil-
ity of physicians to underserved
urban and rural areas. The dem-
onstration project shall empha-
size the onsite training of med-
ical students in underserved
urban and rural areas. Such on-
site training shall be conducted
in existing community medical
facilities that serve medically
indigent individuals, and shall
include the use of physician
extenders.
3 Lump Sum
Florida Quality Instruction In-
centives Council

POSITIONS
From General Revenue
Fund ...............
4 Special Categories
Postsecondary Programs of
Excellence
From General Revenue
Fund ...............
From the funds appropriated in
Specific Appropriation 4, $2,-
000,000 shall be allocated by
the department to establish
postsecondary education pro-
grams of excellence in math-
ematics, science and computer
education as provided for in
SB 38-B, 1983 Special Session
B.



500,000



375,000



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
The remaining $500,000 shall
be used to improve the intern-
ship component of approved
teacher preparation programs
in public institutions, accord-
ing to guidelines to be estab-
lished by the Department of
Education, Office of Teacher
Education; provided, however,
that these funds shall not be
used to supplant funds from
any other source currently used
to support internship programs.
5 Special Categories
Regional Centers of Excellence
From General Revenue
Fund ...............
The funds appropriated in Spe-
cific Appropriation 5 shall be
used to establish regional cen-
ters of excellence in mathemat-
ics, science, computers and tech-
nology, as provided for in SB
38-B, 1983 Special Session B,
at Florida Atlantic University
and the University of South
Florida.
6 Special Categories
School Principals Inservice
Training
From General Revenue
Fund ...............
Funds appropriated in Specific
Appropriation 6 shall only be
expended for those principal
training programs approved by
the Florida Quality Instruction
Incentives Council provided for
in SB 38-B, 1983 Special Ses-
sion B. Attendance is required
of all school principals; howev-
er, school boards may receive
attendance exemption requests
from principals but shall grant
exemptions only if the board finds
the request to be fully warrant-
ed. All exemptions must be re-
ported to the Commissioner of
Education one month prior to
the seminar which the exempted
principal is scheduled to attend.

Office of Deputy Commissioner for Spe-
cial Programs
7 Special Categories
Summer Inservice Institutes
From General Revenue
Fund ...............
Funds provided in Specific Ap-
propriation 7 shall be used to
pay the cost of salaries and em-
ployee benefits to teacher-par-
ticipants and to pay the cost of
instruction for an intensive sub-
ject matter content summer in-
service training program for
classroom teachers and for sum-
mer camps as provided for in



3

750,000



2,500,000



200,000



1,000,000



4,600,000



6



July 12, 1983











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
Senate Bill 6-B, 1983 Special
Session B. Each school district
shall include in its master plan
for in-service staff development
submitted to the Department of
Education pursuant to s. 236.-
0811, F.S., provisions for an in-
tensive subject matter content
summer in-service training pro-
gram, the emphasis of which for
the summer of 1984 shall be
math and science content instruc-
tion for elementary and second-
ary teachers, especially for those
who are out-of-field math and
science teachers. School districts
which use university faculty for
the summer in-service institutes
shall give first consideration to
faculty in colleges of arts and
sciences to provide instruction
in intensive subject matter con-
tent. The department shall es-
tablish an equitable method to
determine the distribution of
these funds based on the num-
ber of full-time equivalent class-
room teachers participating in
the districts' approved subject
matter content summer in-
service training programs. For
1983-84, districts may use a max-
imum of five percent of the total
amount of their allocation for
summer in-service planning ac-
tivities.

8 Financial Assistance Payments
Critical Teacher Shortage
From General Revenue
Fund ...............
From Critical Teacher
Shortage Trust Fund ...
Funds provided in Specific Ap-
propriation 8 shall be expended
through the Critical Teacher
Shortage Trust Fund. These
funds shall be expended accord-
ing to Sections 10, 11, and 12 of
Senate Bill 38-B passed in the
1983 Special Legislative Session
B. These funds shall not revert
to the General Revenue Fund
at the end of the fiscal year.

Public Schools, Division of
9 Aid to Local Governments
District Sparsity Supplement
From General Revenue
Fund ...............
If the number of dollars gener-
ated by using the formula as
provided in s. 236.081 (f) (1) and
(2), F.S., exceeds the funds pro-
vided in Specific Appropriation
9, the department shall prorate
each district's share of the ap-
propriation. Only districts with
14,000 or fewer full time equiva-
lent students shall be eligible



500,000



500,000



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
to receive funds provided in Spe-
cific Appropriation 9.

10 Aid to Local Governments
Florida Educational Finance
Program
From General Revenue
Fund ............... 2094,894,985
From Principal State School
Trust Fund ..........
From the amount generated
through the FEFP for vocational
students in Specific Appropria-
tion 10, districts shall spend no
less than 2.78% of the total for
the replacement, updating, and
repair of vocational equipment.
The allocation of funds provided
in Specific Appropriation 10 shall
be consistent with the common
definitions, uniform program
structure, equitable procedures
for charging fees, and compara-
ble placement and follow-up in-
formation contained in "A Plan
for A Uniform Coordinated Sys-
tem of Vocational Education."
The department's monthly dis-
tributions of FEFP funds pro-
vided in Specific Appropriation
10 shall be made in equal pay-
ments on the 10th and 23rd of
each month.
The Department of Education
shall have the authority to use
funds provided in Specific Ap-
propriation 10 for the operation
of the Florida School for Boys
at Okeechobee in Okeechobee
County either directly or through
grants or contractual agreements
with other duly accredited edu-
cation agencies.



Pursuant to s. 236.0811, F.S.,
districts shall develop inservice
training plans which they shall
submit to the department. The
department shall review districts'
master plans and annual updates
of those plans to ensure they
are consistent with the goals and
objectives of the beginning
teacher program, the Teacher
Education Center Act, and the
Management Training Act. To
maintain ongoing inservice edu-
cation activities, the department
4,500,000 shall, from the funds provided
in Specific Appropriation 10, in-
cluding the funds provided in s.
236.081 (3), F.S., allocate to each
district that has submitted a sat-
isfactory plan an amount equal
to $4.30 times the district's es-
timated 1983-84 FTE student
count. To implement the begin-
ning teacher program an addi-
tional $1.70 per FTE will be al-
located to each district.



8,000,000



7



July 12, 1983










8 JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

SPECIFIC SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION APPROPRIATION
Funds provided in Specific Ap- Districts in 1983-84 shall be
propriation 10 are based upon guaranteed a 9.5% per FTE in-
a base student allocation of crease in funding from the funds
$1,510.34, a required local effort provided in Specific Appropria-
of 4.4 mills in ad valorem tax tion 10. The determination of
and an amount of $145 in 1983- the percent increase shall be that
84 for each postsecondary voca- one used in the above 12% cap.
tional FTE to be added to and From the amount provided in
made a part of the local required Specific Appropriation 10, funds
effort for each district. No school shall be provided as partial
district shall be required to levy equalization of districts' discre-
a village for required local ef- tionary levy. Equalization funds
fort that will produce more than shall be calculated in the follow-
100% of the calculated FEFP ing manner. An amount shall
for that district. be calculated that is the state
average amount per FTE gen-
The funds provided in Specific erated with a one mill levy. This
Appropriation 10 are to be al- average shall be the sum of the
located by comparing the FTE's value of a one mill levy per FTE
in 1983-84 to the FTE's of the student for each district divided
prior year. In those districts by the state total FTE. Each
where there is a decline in the district's equalization entitle-
FTE's, 50% of the decline is to meant shall be calculated by mul-
be multiplied by the prior year tiplying (A) the amount of the
calculated FEFP Program per actual discretionary millage lev-
WFTE and added to the alloca- ied by the district that is in the
tion of that district. For this last .5 mill allowable discretion-
purpose the calculated FEFP ary millage, (B) the difference
Program is computed by multi- between the state average value
plying the WFTE by the Base of one mill per FTE student and
Student Allocation and then by the district value of one mill
the district cost differential. per FTE student, and by (C) the
Eighty-five (85) percent of the district's FTE student count.
FTE decline that results from
the transfer of programs from The State Board of Education
school districts to other institu- shall use a maximum of
tions shall not be counted in the $20,000,000 from the Working
calculation of a district's declin- Capital Fund to maintain the
ing enrollment allocation, base student allocation in
1983-84 if funds provided in Spe-
For fiscal year 1983-84 in addi- cific Appropriation 10 are insuf-
tion to the limitation on non- ficient to maintain this level
voted millage for operating pur- when the insufficiency is caused
poses as set forth in Chapter by unexpected fluctuations in
80-274, Laws of Florida, an ad- either enrollments or taxrolls.
ditional limitation shall apply No more than $10,000,000 of this
and be calculated as follows: (A) sum shall be released before the
Divide the sum of the 1982-83 recalculation of the FEFP based
calculated program, actual dis- on the February 1984 F'E count
cretionary millage and home- is completed.
stead exemption payback for each
district by their 1982-83 FTE. Students in public schools served
(B) Divide the sum of the 1983-84 with funds provided in Specific
calculated program and 1.1 mills Appropriation 10 and for com-
discretionary millage for each munity colleges in Specific Ap-
district by their 1983-84 FTE. propriation 423 in Chapter 83-
(C) Determine the percent in- 300, Laws of Florida, for the
crease per FTE for each district Adult Basic and High School
based on (A) and (B) above. (D) Program shall be served in the
For those districts who are both following priority order:
over the statewide average dol-
lar amount per FTE and who 1. Students without a high
lar amount per FTE and who demonstrate
are over a 12% increase, the al- school diploma who demonstrate
lowable discretionary millage skills at or below the eighth
shall be decreased from 1.1 mills grade level and are studying to
to such a level that they will achieve literacy;
have a 12% increase per FTE. 2. Students earning credit re-
The discretionary village calcu- quired for a high school diploma
lation shall be made on or be- or preparing for the General Ed-
fore August 1, 1983. Changes ucation Development (GED) test;
made after August 1, 1983, are
not intended to influence the dis- 3. Students who have a high
cretionary millage. school diploma but require ad-



July 12, 1983











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
ditional specific literacy skills
to obtain employment;

4. Students who have a high
school diploma and are employed
but desire to maintain or enhance
their professional competencies;

5. Participants in non-credit
courses and activities principally
concerned with community prob-
lems in the areas of health, safe-
ty, human relations, government,
child rearing, consumer econom-
ics and the environment;

6. Participants in recreation
and leisure skill activities.
Priorities 14 shall be served with
funds provided for the Adult
Basic and High School Program;
provided, however, that no in-
dividual in a lower priority shall
be served by a district until all
students in a higher priority have
been served. No fees shall be
charged to students served under
priorities 1 or 2. An amount for
each priority 3 and 4 FTE, equal
to the minimum amount charged
for post secondary adult voca-
tional students, shall be added
to and made a part of the local
required effort for each district.
Priority 5 activities shall be sup-
ported with funds provided in
Specific Appropriation 411 in
Chapter 83-300, Laws of Flori-
da, for Community Instructional
Services, and with fees that may
be charged to participants; par-
ticipants in priority 6 activities
shall be charged fees sufficient
to make the activities self-sup-
porting.

The department shall collect from
districts both a total FTE count
for the Adult Basic and High
School Program and subtotal
counts that correspond to prior-
ities 1-4. Participants in priori-
ties 5 and 6 activities shall not
be included in FTE counts re-
ported for FEFP funding pur-
poses.

Funds provided in Specific Ap-
propriation 10 are based upon
program cost factors for 1983-84
as follows:
1. Basic Programs
A. K-3 1.234
B. 4-8 1.000
C. 9-12 1.116
D. Educational
Alternatives 1.763
E. K-3
Mainstream 2.352
F. 4-8
Mainstream 2.000



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
G. 9-12
Mainstream 2.232
H. Educational
Alternatives
Mainstream 3.526
2. Special Programs
for Exceptional
Students
A. Educable
Mentally
Retarded 2.154
B. Trainable
Mentally
Retarded 2.863
C. Physically
Handicapped 3.539
D. Physical and
Occupational
Therapy
Part-Time 7.045
E. Speech and
Hearing
Part-Time 6.795
F. Deaf 3.840
G. Visually Han-
dicapped
Part-Time 11.666
H. Visually
Handicapped 4.316
I. Emotionally
Disturbed
Part-Time 4.922
J. Emotionally
Disturbed 3.183
K. Specific Learn-
ing Disability
Part-Time 4.309
L. Specific Learn-
ing Disability 2.294
M. Gifted
Part-Time 2.371
N. Hospital and
Homebound
Part-Time 12.873
O. Profoundly
Handicapped 5.330
3. K-12 Vocational
Programs
A. Agriculture 1.989
B. Business and
Office 1.470
C. Distributive 1.409
D. Diversified 1.386
E. Health 1.952
F. Public Service 2.052
G. Home
Economics 1.582
H. Industrial 1.982
I. Exploratory 1.382
4. Adult Preparatory
Vocational
Programs
A. Agriculture 1.929
B. Business and
Office 1.479
C. Distributive 1.467
D. Diversified 1.336
E. Health 1.975
F. Public Service 1.912
G. Home
Economics 1.634



9



July 12, 1983











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
H. Industrial
5. Adult Supplemental
Vocational Program
A. Agriculture
B. Business and Office
C. Distributive
D. Health
E. Public Health
F. Home Economics
G. Industrial
6. Adult Basic and
High School
In the administration of FEFP
funds provided for agriculture
job preparatory vocational tech-
nical programs in Specific Ap-
propriation 10, the department
shall ensure that districts pro-
vide instruction and supervision
for programs that include an an-
nual production and marketing
cycle; this supervision and in-
struction shall be maintained
during all phases of the produc-
tion and marketing cycle and
shall, if necessary to complete
the cycle, extend beyond 180
days.
No district shall receive funds
provided in Specific Appropria-
tion 10 for any postsecondary
FTE's without the approval of
the Regional Coordinating Coun-
cil.
A student in grades kindergar-
ten through grade 12 and pre-
kindergarten exceptional stu-
dents, excluding provisions of
s. 236.013 (2) (c) 2a, F.S., may
earn up to a maximum value of
one full-time equivalent student
membership for a school year
or equivalent as defined in s.
228.041 (16), F.S.
During 1983-84, the department
shall implement program cost
review procedures described in
the department's program cost
factor study report, which shall
include school site cost reviews
for selected programs. As part
of its implementation of the pro-
gram cost review procedure, the
department shall conduct pro-
gram cost factor computation con-
ferences with the Divisions of
Public Schools and Vocational
Education, the Executive Office
of the Governor, House and Sen-
ate Appropriations and Educa-
tion Committees. The conferences
shall be presented appropriate
data for the determination of
program cost factors including,
but not limited to: 1) data from
the program cost report devel-
oped pursuant to s. 237.34, F.S.,
2) school site cost data, 3) policy
and priority analyses, and 4) staff



1.785


1.945
1.315
1.183
1.393
1.472
1.162
1.514

1.012



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
and salary analyses. Conference
participants shall review and
evaluate available cost data and
shall make a determination
based on this review of the most
appropriate set of cost factors
to be used to calculate the sub-
sequent year's FEFP. These rec-
ommendations shall be made
available to the Executive Of-
fice of the Governor, and House
and Senate Appropriations and
Education Committees.
The department shall review the
current FEFP program cost fac-
tors to determine the feasibil-
ity and desirability of reducing
the number of cost factors.
The department shall submit a
report of its findings and rec-
ommendations to the Legislature
on or before March 1, 1984.
11 Aid to Local Governments
Mathematics and Computer
Laboratories
From General Revenue
Fund ..................
Funds appropriated in Specific
Appropriation 11 shall be used
to provide additional computer
hardware and software for the
purposes of computer-assisted in-
struction in mathematics and
computer literacy. These funds
shall be allocated to school dis-
tricts on the basis of unweighted
full-time equivalent students in
Grades K-12.
12 Aid to Local Governments
Science Laboratories
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Specific Appropriation 12 shall
be allocated to school boards of
the 67 school districts for im-
provements to public school sci-
ence facilities. Funds in Specific
Appropriation 12 shall be dis-
tributed according to the num-
ber of unweighted full-time equi-
valent students in Grades 7-12
for the purposes authorized by
s. 235.435, F.S. However, prior
to the issuance of encumbrance
authorizations for projects quali-
fying pursuant to the provisions
of s. 235.435 (3) (b), F.S., each
school board shall submit to the
commissioner a school-by-school
plan which identifies facility de-
ficiencies, corrections required,
cost estimates, and methods of
financing.
13 Aid to Local Governments
Safe Schools
From General Revenue
Fund ................



10,000,000



10,000,000



2,000,000



10



July 12, 1983











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
The funds provided in Specific
Appropriation 13 shall be added
to and become part of Specific
Appropriation 385A in Chapter
83-300, Laws of Florida.
14 Special Categories
Assessment Program Upgrade
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Funds provided in Specific Ap-
propriation 14 shall be used by
the Commissioner of Education
to conduct an analysis of the
state's minimum competency
program, including the state
minimum student performance
standards required by s. 229.565,
F.S., and the state student as-
sessment testing program, re-
quired by s. 229.57, F.S. This
analysis shall include at least
the following:
1. A description of activities
undertaken since the enabling
legislation was enacted.
2. Changes in the program pro-
posed by the department to in-
crease future levels of student
performance and to enhance the
quality of education within the
public schools. This analysis shall
be submitted to the State Board
of Education for review. Based
upon this review, the State Board
shall make any recommendations
deemed necessary to improve the
state's minimum competency
program. These recommenda-
tions shall be made to the Leg-
islature by March 1, 1984.
3. On or before January 1,
1984, the State Board of Edu-
cation shall make recommenda-
tions to the Legislature con-
cerning the feasibility and de-
sirability of administering the
state student assessment tests
in the spring of each year and
on the use of such tests as a
condition of promotion.
15 Special Categories
Curriculum Framework De-
velopment
From General Revenue
Fund ................
From the funds provided in Spe-
cific Appropriation 15, the de-
partment of Education shall de-
velop, maintain, and revise cur-
riculum frameworks for the pur-
pose of insuring a degree of in-
structional consistency within
academic disciplines among Flor-
ida's high schools. A curriculum
framework is a set of broad guide-
lines which aids educational per-



15,000



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
sonnel to produce specific instruc-
tional plans for a given subject
or area of study. First priority
shall be given to mathematics,
science, foreign languages, and
social studies. Each curriculum
framework developed by the de-
partment shall be approved by
the State Board.
16 Special Categories
Visiting School Scholars
From General Revenue
Fund ................
17 Special Categories
Summer Camps
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Funds appropriated in Specific
Appropriation 17 shall be ex-
pended according to the provi-
sions of Senate Bill 38-B, 1983
Special Session B. Up to 2.5%
of these funds may be expended
by the Department of Education
for administration of this pro-
gram.
18 Special Categories
Mathematics and Science Sev-
enth Period
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Funds appropriated in Specific
Appropriation 18, shall be used
to provide a seventh period of
instruction in mathematics and
science. These funds are provided
to assist school districts in meet-
ing the 1984-85 high school grad-
uation requirements provided for
in Senate Bill 6-B, 1983 Special
Session B. These funds shall be
allocated according to unweight-
ed full-time equivalent students
in Grades 11-12. School districts
may offer this seventh period
before or after the regular school
day or at any alternative time.
19 Special Categories
Student Performance Stand-
ards and Standards of Excel-
lence
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Funds appropriated in Specific
Appropriation 19 shall be ex-
pended according to the provi-
sions of Senate Bill 38-B, 1983
Special Session B.
Community Colleges, Division of
20 Aid to Local Governments
Community Colleges Program
Fund
From General Revenue
Fund ................



20,000



500,000



1,000,000



27,000,000



200,000



5,500,000



11



July 12, 1983











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
Funds in Specific Appropriation
20 are allocated to community
colleges as follows:
Brevard ........$ 266,200
Broward ....... 386,650
Central Florida 101,200
Chipola ........ 48,950
Daytona ....... 237,050
Edison ......... 95,150
Florida JC-Jack
sonville ........ 510,400
Florida Keys .... 44,000
Gulf Coast ...... 85,800
Hillsborough .... 245,850
Indian River .... 157,850
Lake City ...... 79,200
Lake Sumter .... 47,300
Manatee ....... 116,050
Miami ......... 1,080,200
North Florida ... 33,000
Okaloosa ....... 88,000
Palm Beach ..... 224,950
Pasco ......... 68,200
Pensacola ...... 301,400
Polk ........... 104,500
St. Johns ...... 41,250
St. Petersburg ... 345,400
Santa Fe ....... 226,600
Seminole ....... 176,550
South Florida ... 44,000
Tallahassee ..... 96,250
Valencia ....... 248,050
Florida School for the Deaf and the
Blind
21 Salaries and Benefits
From General Revenue
Fund ................
From Grants and Dona-
tions Trust Fund ......
Funds in Specific Appropriation
21 are for salary increases for
employees in the Board of Trust-
ees Pay Plan.

Universities, Division of
Educational and General Activities
22 Salaries and Benefits
From General Revenue
Fund ................
From Engineering Industri-
al Experiment Station
Trust Fund .........
From General Trust Fund .
Funds in Specific Appropriation
22 shall be used to provide sal-
ary increases for faculty subject
to collective bargaining. All sal-
ary increases pursuant to this
item shall not increase the av-
erage annual rate by more than
$13,530,836 and shall not become
effective prior to September 1,
1983. These salary increases
shall not apply to any faculty
member who began employment
subsequent to January 31, 1983.



154,826



23,134



12,300,000



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
23 Lump Sum
Law School Quality Improve-
ment Program
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Funds in Specific Appropriation
23 are for the enhancement of
law education at FSU and UF
Colleges of Law. Up to 20 posi-
tions may be established with
these funds.
23A Special Categories
New Program Development-
Hospitality-UCF
POSITIONS
From General Revenue
Fund ................
23B Special Categories
Department of Communica-
tions Equipment-UWF
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sci-
ences
24 Lump Sum
Quality Improvement Program
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Up to 15 positions may be es-
tablished from funds provided
in Specific Appropriation 24. Two
of these positions and $200,000
shall be used to initiate a joint
FIU-FAU-IFAS Educational Pro-
gram in ornamental horticulture
and turf.
University of South Florida Medical
Center
25 Lump Sum
Quality Improvement Program
From General Revenue
Fund ................
From funds provided in Specific
Appropriation 25, up to 2 posi-
tions may be established.



University of Florida Health Center -
Educational and General
26 Lump Sum
156,000 Quality Improvement Program
860,000 From General Revenue
Fund .................
From funds provided in Specific
Appropriation 26, up to 6 posi-
tions may be established.
The reduction in administrative
costs included in Specific Appro-
priations 515 thru 517 in Chap-
ter 83-300, Laws of Florida, may
be implemented on a proportional
basis among all program com-
ponents in the Health Center
budget.



1,000,000



2

87,000




110,000



600,000



125,000



275,000



12



July 12, 1983











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION

State, Department of, and Secretary
of State
Library Services, Division of
26A Aid to Local Governments
Construction Grants Man-
darin Library Jackson-
ville
From General Revenue
Fund .................
TOTAL OF SECTION 01



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION



Judges-District Courts of Appeal ............ 59,385 60,994
Judges-Circuit Courts .................... 56,710 58,247
Commissioner-Public Service Commission .... 56,710 58,247



Public Employee Relations Commission-Chair-
man .................................. 49,755
Public Employee Relations Commission-Com-
missioners ........................... 47,080



175,000
5



FROM GENERAL FUNDS .. .2210,631,811
FROM TRUST FUNDS ......
TOTALALLFUNDS ........



2232,920,945



Section 2. The moneys in the following specific appropriations
are appropriated from the named funds for the 1983-84 Fiscal Year
to the state agencies indicated, as amounts for fixed capital outlay.
Health and Rehabilitative Services, De-
partment of
Office of the Assistant Secretary for
Administrative Services
27 Fixed Capital Outlay
Centrally Managed Facilities
Maintenance and Repair
From General Revenue
Fund ................. 200,000
TOTAL OF SECTION 02



FROM GENERAL FUNDS ...



200,000



TOTALALLFUNDS ........ 200,000
Section 3. Salaries and Benefits
(1) Statement of Purpose
This section provides instructions for implementing salary and
benefit increases appropriated within Specific Appropriation 1. All
allocations and distributions of these adjustments are to be made in
strict accordance with the provisions of this act. Except as specific-
ally provided in this section or in other sections of this act, all state
employees shall receive effective October 1, 1983, a 2.71% across-
the-board salary increase plus associated benefit costs, based on
their September 30, 1983 base rate of pay.
(2) Elected Officers
The salaries of the following officers shall be paid during fiscal
year 1983-84 at the annual rates shown below; however, in the
event of a revenue shortfall as defined in s. 216.221, F.S., these
salaries may be reduced on a voluntary basis:
7-1-83 10-1-83
Governor .......................... ...... $69,550 $71,435
Lieutenant Governor ...................... 60,455 62,093



Secretary of State .



.............. .. ..... . 59,385



60,994



Comptroller ............................. 59,385 60,994



Treasurer ............................... 59,385
Attorney General ......................... 59,385



60,994
60,994



51,103

48,356



Judges-County Courts .................... 52,430 53,851
A county court judge assigned to active judicial service in any of the
courts created by Article V of the State Constitution shall be paid
as additional compensation for such service, the difference between
his normal salary and the salary then currently paid to a judge of
the court to which he is assigned. The amount of such differential
shall be computed on the basis of an eight-hour day, or major
fraction thereof, and certified by the chief judge to the Judicial
Administrative Commission on a monthly basis.
State Attorneys:
Circuits with 1,000,000 population or less .... 56,710 58,247
Circuits over 1,000,000 ................... 59,385 60,994
Public Defenders:
Circuits with 1,000,000 population or less .... 53,500 54,950
Circuits over 1,000,000 ................... 56,175 57,697
All population figures relating to state attorneys' and public de-
fenders' salaries shall be based on the most recent population esti-
mates prepared pursuant to the provisions of S. 23.019, F.S. These
population estimates shall become effective as of July 1, 1983, for
fiscal year 1983-84 and shall not be adjusted subsequently.
(3) Professional Health Care
Based on the Collective Bargaining Agreement between the Gov-
ernor and the Florida Nurses Association, these employees shall
receive a 10% salary increase based on the statewide minimum of
each pay grade, effective October 1, 1983.
(4) Law Enforcement
Based on the Collective Bargaining Agreement between the Gov-
ernor and the Florida Police Benevolent Association, these employ-
ees shall receive a 5% increase in their September 30, 1983 base
rate of pay, (excluding any payment being received for leadworker
pay, hazardous-duty pay, shift differential pay, on-call fees or law
enforcement incentive pay which are salary additives rather than a
part of the base rate of pay of an employee), effective October 1,
1983.
Section 4. This act shall take effect July 1, 1983, or upon be-
coming law, whichever occurs later; however, if this act becomes
law after July 1, 1983, then it shall operate retroactively to July 1,
1983.



TOTAL THIS GENERAL AP-
PROPRIATION ACT POSI-
TIONS



5



FROM GENERAL FUNDS .2210,831,811
FROM TRUST FUNDS ....
TOTAL ALL FUNDS ......



22,289,134
2233,120,945



SRep. Morgan moved the adoption of the amendment, which was
Education, Commissioner of ................ 59,385 60,994 adopted without objection.



Agriculture, Commissioner of ............... 59,385
Supreme Court Justice ..................... 65,805



60,994 Rep. Thompson moved the previous question on the bill, which
67,588 was agreed to. The vote was:



July 12, 1983



13











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Votes after roll call:



14

Yeas-60
The Chair
Abrams
Armstrong
Bailey
Bass
Bell
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Carlton
Carpenter
Clark
Crady
Davis

Nays-54
Allen
Arnold
Bankhead
Brantley
Bronson
Burrall
Casas
Combee
Cortina
Crotty
Danson
Dantzler
Deratany
Drage



Deutsch
Figg
Friedman
Gordon
Grant
Gustafson
Hargrett
Hawkins, L. R.
Hazouri
Healey
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Kutun
Lawson
Lewis



Dudley
Easley
Evans-Jones
Gallagher
Gardner
Grindle
Hanson
Harris
Hawkins, M. E.
Hill
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Johnson, R. C.
Johnson, R. M.



Liberti
Lippman
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
Mills
Morgan
Murphy
Ogden
Pajcic
Peeples
Press
Reaves
Reddick



Jones, C. F.
Jones, D. L.
Kelly
Lehtinen
Locke
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mitchell
Nergard
Patchett
Ready
Richmond
Robinson



On motion by Rep. Morgan, the rules were waived and SB 1-C, as
amended, was read the third time by title. On passage, the vote
was:



Davis
Deutsch
Figg
Friedman
Gardner
Gordon
Grant
Gustafson
Hargrett
Hawkins, L. R.
Hazouri
Healey
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Kutun
Lawson
Lehtinen



Easley
Evans-Jones
Gallagher
Grindle
Hanson
Harris
Hawkins, M. E.
Hill
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Johnson, R. C.
Johnson, R. M.
Jones, C. F.



Lewis
Liberti
Lippman
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
Mills
Morgan
Murphy
Ogden
Pajcic
Peeples
Press
Reaves
Reddick
Robinson



Jones, D. L.
Kelly
Locke
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mitchell
Nergard
Patchett
Ready
Richmond
Ros
Sample



Silver
Simon
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone
Tobiassen
Tobin
Wallace
Ward
Weinstock
Wetherell
Williams
Young



Sanderson
Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Simone
Smith
Upchurch
Watt
Webster
Woodruff



July 12, 1983



Silver
Simon
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone
Tobiassen
Tobin
Wallace
Ward
Weinstock
Wetherell
Williams
Young



Ros
Sample
Sanderson
Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Simone
Smith
Upchurch
Watt
Webster
Woodruff



Yeas-Metcalf

So the bill passed, as amended, and was immediately certified to
the Senate after engrossment.


The Honorable H. Lee Moffitt, Speaker
I am directed to inform the House of Representatives that the
Senate has passed as amended SB 2-C and requests the concurrence
of the House.
Joe Brown, Secretary


By Senator Peterson-
SB 2-C-A bill to be entitled An act relating to education; amend-
ing s. 232.246 (6) (d), Florida Statutes, as amended; delaying the
requirement of 1.5 cumulative grade point average for graduation;
amending s. 232.425, Florida Statutes; delaying the effective date
of student standards for participation in extracurricular student
activities; amending s. 236.081 (1) (h), Florida Statutes, relating to
dual enrollment programs; providing that such instruction may be
offered at community college or university sites under certain cir-
cumstances; amending s. 231.088, Florida Statutes; revising the
membership of the Florida Quality Instruction Incentives Council;
providing for appointment of an executive director and other per-
sonnel by the council and exempting such positions from the Career
Service System; providing duties of the council; repealing s. 21 of
Senate Bill 38-B, which created the Educational Reform Study
Commission; amending s. 23 of Senate Bill 38-B; revising the effec-
tive date of said act; creating s. 236.1227, Florida Statutes; creating
the Extended School Day and Quality Instruction Incentive Cate-
gorical Program; providing an appropriation; transferring an ap-
propriation to the Department of Education for the council; repeal-
ing the contingency appropriation from the Working Capital Fund;
repealing s. 3 of House Bill 38-B, which limits salary increases for
state employees and certain other employees except under specified
circumstances; providing for the application of House Bill 38-B;
providing an appropriation to the Critical Teacher Shortage Trust
Fund; providing an appropriation for planning a joint-use facility at
Polk Community College; providing for application of the 2-mill
levy for school purposes in certain counties; providing an effective
date.
-was read the first time by title. On motion by Rep. Weinstock,
the rules were waived and SB 2-C was taken up instanter and read
the second time by title.

Representative Pajcic offered the following amendment:
Amendment 1-On page 7, between lines 19 & 20, insert: Sec-
tion 13. The provisions of ss. 236.25 (1) and 236.081 (4), Florida
Statutes, shall not apply for fiscal year 1983-1984 and the required
local millage and discretionary millage for school districts shall be
established in the Supplemental Appropriations Act passed during
the 1983 Special Session C. (Renumber subsequent sections)

Rep. Pajcic moved the adoption of the amendment, which was
adopted without objection.


Representative Pajcic offered the following title amendment:

Amendment 2-On page 2, line 4, after the semicolon, insert:
providing for the required local and discretionary millage for 1983-1984;

Rep. Pajcic moved the adoption of the amendment, which was
adopted without objection.

Rep. Thompson moved the previous question on the bill, which
was not agreed to. The vote was:



Yeas-66
The Chair
Abrams
Allen
Armstrong
Bailey
Bass
Bell
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Carlton
Carpenter
Casas
Clark
Cosgrove
Crady

Nays-49
Arnold
Bankhead
Brantley
Bronson
Burrall
Combee
Cortina
Crotty
Danson
Dantzler
Deratany
Drage
Dudley












JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



Deutsch
Figg
Friedman
Gordon
Grant
Gustafson
Hargrett
Hawkins, L. R.
Hazouri
Healey
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Kutun
Lawson



Liberti
Lippman
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
Mills
Morgan
Murphy
Ogden
Pajcic
Peeples
Press
Reaves



Reddick
Silver
Simon
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone
Tobin
Wallace
Ward
Weinstock
Wetherell
Young



Nays-55
Allen
Arnold
Bankhead
Brantley
Bronson
Burrall
Casas
Combee
Cortina
Crotty
Danson
Dantzler
Deratany
Drage



Dudley
Easley
Evans-Jones
Gallagher
Grant
Grindle
Hanson
Harris
Hawkins, M. E.
Hill
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Johnson, R. C.
Johnson, R. M.



The question recurred on the adoption of the amendment, which
Nays-58 was adopted. The vote was:



Allen
Arnold
Bankhead
Brantley
Bronson
Burrall
Casas
Combee
Cortina
Cosgrove
Crotty
Danson
Dantzler
Deratany
Drage



Dudley
Easley
Evans-Jones
Gallagher
Gardner
Grindle
Hanson
Harris
Hawkins, M. E.
Hill
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Johnson, R. C.
Johnson, R. M.
Jones, C. F.



Jones, D. L.
Kelly
Lehtinen
Lewis
Locke
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mitchell
Nergard
Patchett
Ready
Richmond
Robinson
Ros



Sample
Sanderson
Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Simone
Smith
Tobiassen
Upchurch
Watt
Webster
Williams
Woodruff



Representatives Pajcic and Silver offered the following amendment:

Amendment 3-Strike "Section 14. For those school districts
with a full-time equivalent student enrollment in excess of 200,000
students, up to 0.3 mills of the 2.0 mills authorized by s. 236.25,
Florida Statutes, shall be exempt from the provisions of s.
236.25 (2) (a) 2., Florida Statutes, for fiscal year 1983-84." and in-
sert: Section 14. For those school districts with a full-time equiva-
lent student enrollment in excess of 200,000 students, up to 0.3
mills of the 2.0 mills authorized by s. 236.25 (2), Florida Statutes,
shall be exempt from the provisions of s. 236.25 (2) (a) 2. that pro-
hibit the supplanting of current expenditures from operating reve-
nues for maintenance, renovation, and repair for fiscal year 1983-1984.
(renumber subsequent sections.)

Rep. Pajcic moved the adoption of the amendment. Rep. Thomp-
son moved the previous question on the amendment and the bill,
which was agreed to. The vote was:

Yeas-60



The Chair
Abrams
Armstrong
Bailey
Bass
Bell
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Carlton
Carpenter
Clark
Cosgrove
Crady



Davis
Deutsch
Figg
Friedman
Gardner
Gordon
Gustafson
Hargrett
Hawkins, L. R.
Hazouri
Healey
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Kutun
Lawson



Lewis
Liberti
Lippman
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
Mills
Morgan
Murphy
Ogden
Pajcic
Peeples
Press
Reaves



Reddick
Silver
Simon
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone
Tobin
Upchurch
Wallace
Ward
Weinstock
Wetherell
Williams



Yeas-64
The Chair
Abrams
Armstrong
Bailey
Bass
Bell
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Carlton
Carpenter
Casas
Clark
Cortina
Cosgrove



Nays-48
Allen
Arnold
Brantley
Bronson
Burrall
Combee
Crotty
Danson
Dantzler
Deratany
Drage
Dudley



Crady
Davis
Deutsch
Figg
Friedman
Gallagher
Gordon
Gustafson
Hargrett
Hawkins, L. R.
Hazouri
Healey
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Kutun
Lawson



Easley
Gardner
Grant
Grindle
Hanson
Harris
Hawkins, M. E.
Hill
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Johnson, R. C.
Johnson, R. M.



Lehtinen
Liberti
Lippman
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
Mills
Morgan
Murphy
Ogden
Pajcic
Peeples
Press
Reaves
Robinson



Jones, C. F.
Jones, D. L.
Kelly
Locke
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mitchell
Nergard
Patchett
Ready
Reddick



Ros
Silver
Simon
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone
Tobiassen
Tobin
Upchurch
Wallace
Ward
Weinstock
Williams
Young



Richmond
Sample
Sanderson
Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Simone
Smith
Watt
Webster
Wetherell
Woodruff



Votes after roll call:
Yeas to Nays-Carlton
Rep. Weinstock moved that the rules be waived and SB 2-C, as
amended, be read the third time by title, which was not agreed to
by two-thirds vote. The vote was:

Yeas-63



The Chair
Abrams
Armstrong
Bailey
Bass
Bell
Brown, C.
Burke
Burnsed
Carlton
Carpenter



Clark
Cosgrove
Crady
Davis
Deutsch
Figg
Friedman
Gardner
Gordon
Gustafson
Hargrett



Hawkins, L. R.
Hazouri
Healey
Hodges
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Kutun
Lawson
Lehtinen
Lewis
Liberti



Lippman
Logan
Martin
Martinez
Mills
Morgan
Murphy
Ogden
Pajcic
Peeples
Press



Yeas-56
The Chair
Abrams
Armstrong
Bailey
Bass
Bell
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Carlton
Carpenter
Clark
Davis



Jones, C. F.
Jones, D. L.
Kelly
Lehtinen
Locke
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mitchell
Nergard
Patchett
Ready
Richmond
Robinson



Ros
Sample
Sanderson
Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Simone
Smith
Tobiassen
Watt
Webster
Woodruff
Young



July 12, 1983



15











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone



Reaves
Reddick
Robinson
Silver
Simon

Nays-49
Allen
Arnold
Bankhead
Brantley
Bronson
Burrall
Casas
Combee
Cortina
Crotty
Danson
Dantzler
Deratany



Tobiassen
Tobin
Upchurch
Wallace
Ward



Jones, C. F.
Jones, D. L.
Kelly
Locke
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mitchell
Nergard
Patchett
Ready
Richmond
Ros



Weinstock
Wetherell
Williams
Young



Sample
Sanderson
Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Simone
Smith
Watt
Webster
Woodruff



Under Rule 8.19, the bill was referred to the Engrossing Clerk.

The Honorable H. Lee Moffitt, Speaker
I am directed to inform the House of Representatives that the
Senate has passed SB 9-C and requests the concurrence of the
House.
Joe Brown, Secretary

By Senators Gordon and Margolis-
SB 9-C-A bill to be entitled An act relating to taxation; creat-
ing s. 212.057, Florida Statutes; authorizing certain counties to
levy a convention development tax on certain rentals or leases;
providing for uses of tax revenues; authorizing certain municipali-
ties to prohibit the tax under certain circumstances; requiring cer-
tain municipalities to appoint an authority to administer proceeds
from the tax; providing an effective date.
-was read the first time by title. Rep. Silver moved that the rules
be waived and SB 9-C be taken up instanter and read the second
time by title, which was not agreed to by two-thirds vote. The vote
was:

Yeas-60



Dantzler
Davis
Deutsch
Figg
Friedman
Gardner
Gordon
Gustafson
Hargrett
Harris
Hawkins, L. R.
Healey
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Jones, C. F.



Deratany
Drage
Dudley
Easley
Evans-Jones
Grant
Grindle
Hanson



Kutun
Lawson
Lehtinen
Liberti
Lippman
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
Mills
Morgan
Murphy
Ogden
Pajcic
Peeples



Hawkins, M. E.
Hazouri
Hill
Hollingsworth
Johnson, R. C.
Jones, D. L.
Kelly
Lewis



Press
Reaves
Reddick
Silver
Simon
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone
Tobiassen
Tobin
Wallace
Weinstock
Young



Locke
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mitchell
Nergard
Patchett
Ready



Richmond
Ros
Sample
Sanderson



Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Simone



Smith
Watt
Webster



Williams
Woodruff



Dudley
Easley
Evans-Jones
Gallagher
Grant
Grindle
Hanson
Harris
Hawkins, M. E.
Hill
Hollingsworth
Johnson, R. C.
Johnson, R. M.



The Chair
Abrams
Allen
Armstrong
Bailey
Bass
Bell
Bronson
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Burrall
Carlton



Carpenter
Casas
Clark
Cortina
Cosgrove
Crady
Crotty
Danson
Dantzler
Davis
Deutsch
Figg
Friedman
Gallagher



Gardner
Gordon
Grant
Grindle
Gustafson
Hargrett
Harris
Hawkins, L. R.
Hazouri
Healey
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Johnson, R. M.
Jones, C. F.



Kutun
Lawson
Lehtinen
Liberti
Lippman
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
Mills
Morgan
Murphy
Ogden
Pajcic



So the bill was placed on the Calendar of bills on second reading.

Award for Representative Easley
Rep. Richmond announced that Representative Betty Easley had
been elected by national Republican legislators as the National
Republican Legislator of the Year.

Recessed
On motion by Rep. Thompson, the House recessed at 8:54 p.m. to
reconvene at 10:00 p.m. tonight, or upon call of the Speaker.

Reconvened
The House was called to order by the Speaker at 10:34 p.m. A
quorum was present.

On motion by Rep. Thompson-
SB 2-C-A bill to be entitled An act relating to education; amend-
ing s. 232.246(6Xd), Florida Statutes, as amended; delaying the
requirement of 1.5 cumulative grade point average for graduation;
amending s. 232.425, Florida Statutes; delaying the effective date
of student standards for participation in extracurricular student
activities; amending s. 236.081(1Xh), Florida Statutes, relating to
dual enrollment programs; providing that such instruction may be
offered at community college or university sites under certain cir-
cumstances; amending s. 231.088, Florida Statutes; revising the
membership of the Florida Quality Instruction Incentives Council;
providing for appointment of an executive director and other per-
sonnel by the council and exempting such positions from the Career
Service System; providing duties of the council; repealing s. 21 of
Senate Bill 38-B, which created the Educational Reform Study
Commission; amending s. 23 of Senate Bill 38-B; revising the effec-
tive date of said act; creating s. 236.1227, Florida Statutes; creating
the Extended School Day and Quality Instruction Incentive Cate-
gorical Program; providing an appropriation; transferring an ap-
propriation to the Department of Education for the council; repeal-
ing the contingency appropriation from the Working Capital Fund;
repealing s. 3 of House Bill 38-B, which limits salary increases for
state employees and certain other employees except under specified
circumstances; providing for the application of House Bill 38-B;
providing for the required local and discretionary millage for 1983-
1984; providing an appropriation to the Critical Teacher Shortage
Trust Fund; providing an appropriation for planning a joint-use
facility at Polk Community College; providing for application of the
2-mill levy for school purposes in certain counties; providing an
effective date.
-was taken up. On motion by Rep. Thompson, the rules were
waived and the bill, as amended, was read the third time by title.
On passage, the vote was:

Yeas-79



The Chair
Abrams
Allen
Armstrong
Bailey
Bass
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Carpenter
Casas
Clark
Cortina
Cosgrove

Nays-45
Arnold
Bankhead
Brantley
Bronson
Burrall
Combee
Crady
Crotty



16



July 12, 1983












JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



Peeples
Press
Ready
Reaves
Reddick
Robinson
Nays-36
Arnold
Bankhead
Brantley
Combee
Deratany
Drage
Dudley
Easley
Evans-Jones



Shelley
Silver
Simon
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas



Thompson
Titone
Tobiassen
Tobin
Wallace
Ward



Hanson Locke
Hawkins, M. E. McEwan
Hill Meffert
Hodges Messersmith
Hollingsworth Mitchell
Johnson, R. C. Nergard
Jones, D. L. Patchett
Kelly Richmond
Lewis Ros



Watt
Weinstock
Wetherell
Williams
Young



Sample
Sanderson
Selph
Shackelford
Simone
Smith
Upchurch
Webster
Woodruff



Votes after roll call:
Yeas-Metcalf

So the bill passed, as amended, and was immediately certified to
the Senate after engrossment.
On motion by Rep. Silver-
SB 9-C-A bill to be entitled An act relating to taxation; creat-
ing s. 212.057, Florida Statutes; authorizing certain counties to
levy a convention development tax on certain rentals or leases;
providing for uses of tax revenues; authorizing certain municipali-
ties to prohibit the tax under certain circumstances; requiring cer-
tain municipalities to appoint an authority to administer proceeds
from the tax; providing an effective date.
-was taken up. On motions by Rep. Silver, the rules were waived
and SB 9-C was read the second time by title and the third time by
title. On passage, the vote was:

Yeas-90



The Chair
Abrams
Allen
Armstrong
Bailey
Bass
Bell
Bronson
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Burrall
Carpenter
Casas
Clark
Cortina
Cosgrove
Crady
Crotty
Danson
Dantzler
Davis

Nays-21
Arnold
Bankhead
Carlton
Combee
Deratany
Dudley



Deutsch
Drage
Evans-Jones
Figg
Friedman
Gardner
Gordon
Grant
Grindle
Gustafson
Hanson
Hargrett
Harris
Hawkins, L. R.
Hazouri
Healey
Hodges
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Johnson, R. C.
Johnson, R. M.
Jones, C. F.
Kutun



Easley
Gallagher
Hawkins, M. E.
Hill
Hollingsworth
Jones, D. L.



Lawson
Lehtinen
Liberti
Lippman
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
McEwan
Mills
Mitchell
Murphy
Ogden
Pajcic
Peeples
Press
Ready
Reaves
Reddick
Richmond
Robinson
Sample
Sanderson



Kelly
Lewis
Locke
Meffert
Morgan
Nergard



Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Silver
Simon
Simone
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone
Tobiassen
Tobin
Wallace
Ward
Watt
Webster
Weinstock
Wetherell
Williams
Young



Ros
Smith
Woodruff



17



Votes after roll call:
Yeas to Nays-Sanderson, L. R. Hawkins
Nays to Yeas-Lewis, Bankhead
So the bill passed and was immediately certified to the Senate.

The Honorable H. Lee Moffitt Speaker
I am directed to inform the House of Representatives that the
Senate has admitted for introduction and consideration by the re-
quired Constitutional two-thirds vote and passed as amended SB
11-C and requests the concurrence of the House.
Joe Brown, Secretary

By Senator Henderson-
SB 11-C-A bill to be entitled An act relating to the tax on
sales, use and other transactions; creating s. 212.058, Florida Stat-
utes; providing a short title; authorizing counties to levy a discre-
tionary additional 1 percent tax for 1 year; creating a trust fund for
deposit of proceeds; specifying that the proceeds be used for acquisi-
tion, construction, or improvement of local criminal justice facili-
ties; specifying applicability to purchases made in jurisdictions not
levying such a tax under certain circumstances; providing method
of taxing certain services billed on a monthly cycle; providing for
refund of additional tax paid by certain contractors; providing pen-
alties; requiring that counties certify to the Department of Revenue
that they have entered into contracts for such purposes; providing
for the use of the proceeds for property tax relief and certain other
specified tax relief if such certification is not made; providing appli-
cable tax brackets; providing that excess proceeds be used for such
tax relief; requiring referendum approval; providing for adminis-
tration, collection, and enforcement; providing an effective date.
Rep. C. F. Jones moved that SB 11-C be admitted for introduc-
tion, the Speaker having ruled the measure was outside the pur-
view of the Call. The vote was:

Yeas-95



Abrams
Allen
Armstrong
Arnold
Bailey
Bankhead
Bass
Bell
Brantley
Bronson
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Burrall
Carlton
Carpenter
Casas
Clark
Combee
Cortina
Cosgrove
Crady
Crotty

Nays-14
The Chair
Deratany
Dudley
Figg



Danson
Dantzler
Davis
Deutsch
Drage
Easley
Evans-Jones
Friedman
Gallagher
Gardner
Gordon
Grant
Grindle
Hanson
Harris
Hawkins, L. R.
Hawkins, M. E.
Healey
Hill
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Johnson, R. C.



Gustafson
Hazouri
Jones, D. L.
Martinez



Johnson, R. M.
Jones, C. F.
Kelly
Kutun
Lawson
Lehtinen
Lewis
Liberti
Locke
Logan
McEwan
Messersmith
Mitchell
Murphy
Nergard
Patchett
Peeples
Press
Ready
Reaves
Reddick
Richmond
Robinson
Ros



Meffert
Morgan
Ogden
Pajcic



Sample
Sanderson
Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Silver
Simon
Simone
Smith
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Titone
Tobiassen
Tobin
Wallace
Ward
Watt
Webster
Weinstock
Wetherell
Williams
Young



Thompson
Woodruff



July 12, 1983












JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



The motion was agreed to by the required Constitutional two-
thirds vote and SB 11-C was read the first time by title. On motions
by Rep. Jones, the rules were waived and SB 11-C was read the
second time by title and the third time by title. On passage, the
vote was:

Yeas-90



Abrams
Allen
Armstrong
Arnold
Bailey
Bell
Bronson
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Burrall
Carlton
Casas
Clark
Cortina
Cosgrove
Crady
Crotty
Danson
Dantzler
Davis
Deratany

Nays-21
The Chair
Bankhead
Bass
Brantley
Carpenter
Combee



Deutsch
Drage
Easley
Evans-Jones
Figg
Friedman
Gardner
Gordon
Grant
Grindle
Gustafson
Hanson
Harris
Hawkins, M. E.
Hill
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Jamerson
Johnson, R. C.
Johnson, R. M.
Jones, C. F.
Kelly
Kutun



Dudley
Gallagher
Hazouri
Healey
Johnson, B. L.
Jones, D. L.



Lawson
Lehtinen
Lewis
Liberti
Lippman
Locke
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mills
Mitchell
Murphy
Nergard
Peeples
Press
Ready
Reaves
Reddick
Richmond
Ros



Martinez
Morgan
Ogden
Pajcic
Robinson
Thompson



Sample
Sanderson
Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Silver
Simon
Simone
Smith
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Titone
Tobin
Upchurch
Wallace
Webster
Weinstock
Wetherell
Williams
Young



Tobiassen
Watt
Woodruff



Votes after roll call:
Nays-L.R. Hawkins

So the bill passed and was immediately certified to the Senate.



The Honorable H Lee Moffitt, Speaker

I am directed to inform the House of Representatives that the
Senate has passed SB 4-C and requests the concurrence of the
House.

Joe Brown, Secretary


By Senator Hair-

SB 4-C-A bill to be entitled An act relating to the Florida
School for the Deaf and the Blind; amending s. 242.331(3), Florida
Statutes; authorizing the board of trustees of the Florida School for
the Deaf and the Blind to adopt rules and submit same to the State
Board of Education for approval or amendment; amending s.
120.54(11) (a), Florida Statutes; requiring the Florida School for the
Deaf and the Blind to file rules with the Administrative Procedures
Committee; amending s. 120.55(1) (a), Florida Statutes; deleting
the Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind from those entities
not required to publish rules in the Florida Administrative Code;
providing an effective date.

-was read the first time by title. On motions by Rep. Upchurch,
the rules were waived and SB 4-C was read the second time by title
and the third time by title. On passage, the vote was:



Yeas-1ll
The Chair
Abrams
Allen
Armstrong
Arnold
Bailey
Bankhead
Bass
Brantley
Bronson
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Burrall
Carlton
Carpenter
Casas
Clark
Combee
Cortina
Cosgrove
Crady
Crotty
Danson
Dantzler
Davis
Deratany

Nays-None



Deutsch
Drage
Dudley
Easley
Evans-Jones
Figg
Friedman
Gallagher
Gardner
Gordon
Grant
Grindle
Gustafson
Hanson
Hargrett
Harris
Hawkins, L. R.
Hawkins, M. E.
Hazouri
Healey
Hill
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Johnson, R. C.
Johnson, R. M.
Jones, C. F.



Jones, D. L.
Kelly
Kutun
Lawson
Lehtinen
Lewis
Liberti
Lippman
Locke
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mills
Mitchell
Morgan
Murphy
Nergard
Ogden
Patchett
Peeples
Press
Ready
Reaves
Reddick



Richmond
Robinson
Ros
Sample
Sanderson
Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Silver
Simon
Simone
Smith
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone
Tobiassen
Tobin
Upchurch
Wallace
Ward
Watt
Webster
Williams
Woodruff
Young



So the bill passed and was immediately certified to the Senate.

The Honorable H. Lee Moffitt, Speaker
I am directed to inform the House of Representatives that the
Senate has admitted for introduction and consideration by the re-
quired Constitutional two-thirds vote and passed SB 6-C and re-
quests the concurrence of the House.
Joe Brown, Secretary

By Senator Neal and Others-
SB 6-C-A bill to be entitled An act relating to the protection of
natural resources; amending s. 376.11 (5), Florida Statutes, as amended
by ch. 83-310, Laws of Florida; authorizing money in the Florida
Coastal Protection Trust Fund to be used for certain expenses of the
department; creating s. 376.185, Florida Statutes; reenacting the
provisions of s. 376.18, Florida Statutes, which was repealed by ch.
83-310, Laws of Florida; repealing ss. 208.001-208.005, Florida Stat-
utes, relating to an excise tax on the generation of hazardous wastes;
providing a retroactive effective date.
Rep. Mills moved that SB 6-C be admitted for introduction, the
Speaker having ruled the measure was outside the purview of the
Call. The vote was:



Yeas-103
The Chair
Abrams
Allen
Armstrong
Arnold
Bailey
Bankhead
Bass
Bell
Brantley
Bronson
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke



Burnsed
Burrall
Carpenter
Casas
Clark
Combee
Cortina
Cosgrove
Crady
Danson
Dantzler
Davis
Deutsch
Drage



Easley
Evans-Jones
Figg
Friedman
Gardner
Gordon
Grant
Grindle
Gustafson
Hanson
Harris
Hawkins, L. R.
Hawkins, M. E.
Hazouri



Healey
Hill
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Johnson, R. C.
Johnson, R. M.
Jones, D. L.
Kelly
Kutun
Lawson
Lehtinen
Lewis



18



July 12, 1983












JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



Murphy
Nergard
Ogden
Pajcic
Peeples
Press
Ready
Reaves
Reddick
Richmond
Robinson
Ros



Gallagher
Martinez
Patchett



Sanderson
Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Silver
Simon
Simone
Smith
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson



Sample
Titone



Tobiassen
Tobin
Upchurch
Wallace
Ward
Webster
Weinstock
Wetherell
Williams
Woodruff
Young



Watt



The motion was agreed to by the required Constitutional two-
thirds vote and SB 6-C was read the first time by title. On motion
by Rep. Mills, the rules were waived and the bill was read the
second time by title.

Representative Mills offered the following amendment:
Amendment 1-On page 1, line 27, following "376.185", insert:
until July 1, 1984
Rep. Mills moved the adoption of the amendment, which was
adopted without objection.

Representative Mills offered the following amendment:
Amendment 2-On page 2, line 30, insert a new Section 3 as
follows: Section 3. Section 376.60 (3) (d), as created by Chapter 83-310,
Laws of Florida, is amended to read:
(d) A one-time transfer of $11 million from the Florida Coastal
Protection Trust Fund pursuant to s. 376.11 (5) (c). This transfer
shall not be subject to the General Revenue Fund deduction author-
ized in s. 215.20 and s. 215.22. (renumber subsequent sections)
Rep. Mills moved the adoption of the amendment, which was
adopted without objection.

Representative Mills offered the following title amendment:
Amendment 3-On page 1, line 11, insert, following the comma:
amending s. 376.60 (3) (a), as created by Chapter 83-310, Laws of
Florida;
Rep. Mills moved the adoption of the amendment, which was
adopted without objection.
On motion by Rep. Mills, the rules were waived and SB 6-C, as
amended, was read the third time by title. On passage, the vote
was:

Yeas-113



Burrall
Carlton
Carpenter
Casas
Clark
Combee
Cortina
Cosgrove
Crady
Crotty
Danson
Dantzler
Davis
Deratany
Deutsch



Drage
Dudley
Easley
Evans-Jones
Figg
Friedman
Gallagher
Gardner
Gordon
Grant
Grindle
Gustafson
Hanson
Hargrett
Harris



Hawkins, L. R.
Hawkins, M. E.
Hazouri
Healey
Hill
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Johnson, R. C.
Johnson, R. M.
Jones, D. L.
Kelly
Kutun
Lawson



Lehtinen
Lewis
Liberti
Lippman
Locke
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mills
Mitchell



Morgan
Murphy
Nergard
Ogden
Pajcic
Patchett
Peeples
Press
Ready
Reaves
Reddick
Richmond
Robinson
Ros



Sanderson
Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Silver
Simon
Simone
Smith
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone
Tobiassen



Tobin
Upchurch
Wallace
Ward
Watt
Webster
Weinstock
Wetherell
Williams
Woodruff
Young



Nays-None
Votes after roll call:
Yeas-Sample
So the bill passed, as amended, and was immediately certified to
the Senate after engrossment.

The Honorable H. Lee Moffitt, Speaker
I am directed to inform the House of Representatives that the
Senate has admitted for introduction and consideration by the re-
quired Constitutional two-thirds vote and passed SB 5-C and re-
quests the concurrence of the House.

Joe Brown, Secretary

By Senator Vogt-
SB 5-C-A bill to be entitled An act relating to building inspec-
tors; amending s. 553.79 (5) (b), Florida Statutes, as created by ch.
83-160, Laws of Florida; authorizing persons certified under certain
programs of Broward County or Dade County to be special inspec-
tors of threshold buildings; providing an effective date.
Rep. Ward moved that SB 5-C be admitted for introduction, the
Speaker having ruled the measure was outside the purview of the
Call. The vote was:
Yeas-99



Abrams
Allen
Arnold
Bailey
Bankhead
Bass
Bell
Bronson
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burrall
Carlton
Carpenter
Casas
Clark
Combee
Cortina
Cosgrove
Crady
Danson
Dantzler
Davis
Deutsch
Drage



Nays-5
Brantley
Crotty



Dudley
Easley
Evans-Jones
Figg
Friedman
Gallagher
Gardner
Gordon
Grant
Grindle
Gustafson
Hanson
Harris
Hawkins, M. E.
Hazouri
Hill
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Johnson, R. M.
Jones, D. L.
Kelly
Lawson
Lehtinen



Deratany



Lewis
Liberti
Lippman
Locke
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
McEwan
Messersmith
Mills
Mitchell
Morgan
Murphy
Nergard
Ogden
Pajcic
Patchett
Peeples
Press
Ready
Reaves
Reddick
Richmond
Robinson
Ros



Martinez



Sample
Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Silver
Simon.
Simone
Smith
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone
Tobiassen
Tobin
Wallace
Ward
Watt
Webster
Weinstock
Wetherell
Williams
Woodruff
Young



Sanderson



Liberti
Lippman
Locke
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mills
Mitchell
Morgan



Nays-9
Crotty
Deratany
Dudley



The Chair
Abrams
Allen
Armstrong
Arnold
Bailey
Bankhead
Bass
Bell
Brantley
Bronson
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed



July 12, 1983



19












JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



The motion was agreed to by the required Constitutional two-
thirds vote and SB 5-C was read the first time by title. On motions
by Rep. Ward, the rules were waived and SB 5-C was read tlh
second time by title and the third time by title. On passage, the
vote was:



CS for HB 17-B Relating to workers' compensation.
Sincerely,
GEORGE FIRESTONE
Secretary of State



Yeas-114
The Chair
Abrams
Allen
Armstrong
Arnold
Bailey
Bankhead
Bass
Bell
Brantley
Bronson
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Burrall
Carlton
Carpenter
Casas
Clark
Combee
Cortina
Cosgrove
Crady
Crotty
Danson
Dantzler
Davis
Deratany



Deutsch
Drage
Dudley
Easley
Evans-Jones
Figg
Friedman
Gallagher
Gardner
Gordon
Grant
Grindle
Hanson
Hargrett
Harris
Hawkins, L. R.
Hawkins, M. E.
Hazouri
Healey
Hill
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Johnson, R. C.
Johnson, R. M.
Jones, C. F.
Jones, D. L.
Kelly



Kutun
Lawson
Lehtinen
Lewis
Liberti
Lippman
Locke
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mills
Mitchell
Morgan
Murphy
Nergard
Ogden
Pajcic
Patchett
Peeples
Press
Ready
Reaves
Reddick
Richmond
Robinson



Ros
Sample
Sanderson
Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Silver
Simon
Simone
Smith
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone
Tobiassen
Tobin
Upchurch
Wallace
Ward
Watt
Webster
Weinstock
Wetherell
Williams
Woodruff
Young



Nays-None
So the bill passed and was immediately certified to the Senate.



Communications
Vetoed Bills
The following veto messages were received:
Honorable H. Lee Moffitt
Speaker, House of Representatives



July 8, 1983



Dear Mr. Speaker:
In compliance with the provisions of Article III, Section 8 (b), of
the State Constitution, I am transmitting to you for consideration
of the House the following vetoed bills, 1983 Regular Session, with
the Governor's objections attached thereto:
HB 708-Relating to fishing in Santa Rosa County
HB 820-Relating to fishing in Escambia County
HB 985-Relating to judicial circuits
HB 1071-Relating to the Choctawhatchee Bay Causeway/
Bridge Authority
Sincerely,
GEORGE FIRESTONE
Secretary of State

Honorable H. Lee Moffitt July 8, 1983
Speaker, House of Representatives
Dear Mr. Speaker:
In compliance with the provisions of Article III, Section 8 (b), of
the State Constitution, I am transmitting to you for consideration
of the House the following vetoed bill, 1983 Special Session "B",
with the Governor's objections attached thereto:



Honorable George Firestone
Secretary of State



June 30, 1983



Dear Mr. Secretary:
By the authority vested in me as Governor of Florida, under the
provisions of Article III, Section 8, of the Constitution of the State
of Florida, I hereby withhold my approval of and transmit to you
with my objections House Bill 708, enacted by the 1983 Regular
Session, and entitled:
An act relating to Santa Rosa County; providing certain restric-
tions on the use of fishing nets; providing a penalty; providing an
effective date.

This bill requires that each gill or similar net used for fishing in the
saltwaters of Santa Rosa County be removed from the water begin-
ning within one-half hour after being set or laid out, and be com-
pletely removed from the water before being set or laid out again.

The policy issue presented is whether the method of fishing which
would be severely curtailed by House Bill 708 represents a threat to
the marine resources. Issues of economic competition should be left
to the free enterprise market place.

The methods used in gill net fishing have been the subject of con-
siderable scientific review. In November of 1981, six marine biolo-
gists from the Florida Department of Natural Resources Marine
Research Laboratory conducted a survey of the fishing practices
and commercial fish landings in Escambia, Santa Rosa, and Okaloosa
Counties. These scientists concluded:
"Current fishing practices in the Escambia, Santa Rosa and Okaloosa
counties area present no biological threat to the resources."

The matter was further reviewed and investigated in depth by a
Grand Jury in the First Judicial Circuit in and for Escambia Coun-
ty. The Grand Jury issued a Preliminary and a Final Report on the
fishing dispute on December 8, 1981, and February 4, 1982, respec-
tively. It reaffirmed the conclusion of the Department of Natural
Resources Marine Research Laboratory biologists and stated further:
"No evidence that we have independently gathered gives us rea-
son to doubt the validity of this finding."

Current law places limitations on the time a net can remain in the
water in only three Florida Counties. Lee, Sarasota and Charlotte
Counties have five, three, and five-hour limitations, respectively. A
thirty minute net removal requirement on the fishermen of Santa
Rosa County is unreasonable in light of the standards imposed on
fishermen in other Florida Counties.

If relevant and rational fishery management or marine biological
information is developed that justifies this kind of netting restric-
tions, it should be presented to the new Marine Fisheries Commis-
sion created by the 1983 Legislature. All net regulations will be
continuously reviewed by the Commission in light of existing stand-
ards, balanced with good fishery management rules.

For the above reasons, I am withholding my approval of House Bill
708, Regular Session of the Legislature, commencing on April 5,
1983, and do hereby veto the same.
With kind regards,



Sincerely,
BOB GRAHAM
Governor



20



July 12, 1983











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



Honorable George Firestone
Secretary of State



June 30, 1983



Dear Mr. Secretary:
By the authority vested in me as Governor of Florida, under the
provisions of Article III, Section 8, of the Constitution of the State
of Florida, I hereby withhold my approval of and transmit to you
with my objections House Bill 820, enacted by the 1983 Regular
Session, and entitled:
An act relating to Escambia County; providing certain restric-
tions on the use of fishing nets; providing a penalty; providing an
effective date.
This bill requires that each gill or similar net used for fishing in the
saltwaters of Escambia County be removed from the water begin-
ning within one-half hour after being set or laid out, and be com-
pletely removed from the water before being set or laid out again.
The policy issue presented is whether the method of fishing which
would be severely curtailed by House Bill 820 represents a threat to
the marine resources. Issues of economic competition should be left
to the free enterprise market place.
The methods used in gill net fishing have been the subject of con-
siderable scientific review. In November of 1981, six marine biolo-
gists from the Florida Department of Natural Resources Marine
Research Laboratory conducted a survey of the fishing practices
and commercial fish landings in Escambia, Santa Rosa, and Okaloosa
Counties. These scientists concluded:
"Current fishing practices in the Escambia, Santa Rosa and Okaloosa
counties area present no biological threat to the resources."
The matter was further reviewed and investigated in depth by a
Grand Jury in the First Judicial Circuit in and for Escambia Coun-
ty. The Grand Jury issued a Preliminary and a Final Report on the
fishing dispute on December 8, 1981, and February 4, 1982, respec-
tively. It reaffirmed the conclusion of the Department of Natural
Resources Marine Research Laboratory biologists and stated further:
"No evidence that we have independently gathered gives us rea-
son to doubt the validity of this finding."
Current law places limitations on the time a net can remain in the
water in only three Florida Counties. Lee, Sarasota and Charlotte
Counties have five, three, and five-hour limitations, respectively. A
thirty minute net removal requirement on the fishermen of Escambia
County is unreasonable in light of the standards imposed on fish-
ermen in other Florida Counties.
If relevant and rational fishery management or marine biological
information is developed that justifies this kind of netting restric-
tions, it should be presented to the new Marine Fisheries Commis-
sion created by the 1983 Legislature. All net regulations will be
continuously reviewed by the Commission in light of existing stand-
ards, balanced with good fishery management rules.
For the above reasons, I am withholding my approval of House Bill
820, Regular Session of the Legislature, commencing on April 5,
1983, and do hereby veto the same.
With kind regards,
Sincerely,
BOB GRAHAM
Governor

Rep. Tobiassen moved that HB 820 (1983 Regular Session) with
veto message be taken up, which was not agreed to. The vote was:

Yeas-50



The Chair
Allen
Armstrong
Bankhead
Bass



Bell
Bronson
Burnsed
Carlton
Carpenter



Dantzler
Deutsch
Easley
Evans-Jones
Gardner



Gordon
Harris
Hawkins, L. R.
Hodges
Hollingsworth



Johnson, B. L.
Johnson, R. C.
Jones, C. F.
Jones, D. L.
Kelly
Kutun
Liberti
Locke

Nays-59
Abrams
Arnold
Bailey
Brantley
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burrall
Casas
Clark
Combee
Cortina
Cosgrove
Crotty
Danson



Mackenzie
McEwan
Meffert
Mitchell
Morgan
Patchett
Ready
Richmond


Davis
Deratany
Drage
Dudley
Figg
Friedman
Gallagher
Grant
Grindle
Gustafson
Hanson
Hargrett
Hazouri
Healey
Hill



Robinson
Sample
Sanderson
Shelley
Silver
Smith
Stewart
Thompson



Jamerson
Johnson, R. M.
Lawson
Lehtinen
Lewis
Lippman
Logan
Martin
Martinez
Messersmith
Murphy
Pajcic
Peeples
Press
Reaves



Honorable George Firestone
Secretary of State
Dear Secretary Firestone:



Tobiassen
Upchurch
Ward
Wetherell
Williams
Woodruff



Reddick
Ros
Selph
Shackelford
Simon
Simone
Spaet
Thomas
Titone
Tobin
Wallace
Watt
Webster
Young



June 28, 1983



By the authority vested in me as Governor of Florida, under the
provisions of Article II, Section 8 of the Constitution of the State of
Florida, I hereby withhold my approval of and transmit to you with
my objections House Bill 985, enacted by the 1983 Regular Session,
and entitled:
An act relating to judicial circuits; amending s. 26.021(9), Florida
Statutes, 1982 Supplement, providing that at least one judge in
the ninth judicial circuit shall reside in Osceola County; provid-
ing that upon the occurrence of a vacancy within the ninth judi-
cial circuit the judge appointed to fill the vacancy shall reside in
Osceola County; providing an effective date.
This bill requires that at least one judge in the Ninth Judicial
Circuit reside in Osceola County and that at least one judge in the
Tenth Judicial Circuit reside in Highlands County.
The residency requirements of House Bill 985 are not consistent
with the provisions of Article V of the Florida Constitution which
create and govern the courts of Florida. Under Article V, there are
no provisions requiring a judge to reside in a particular county
within the circuit in which the judge is elected or appointed. Fur-
ther, Article V provides that any judge within a circuit can sit and
serve in any county within that circuit without regard to the resi-
dency of the judge. Judges are assigned among the various court-
houses within a circuit to meet the needs for judicial manpower as
they may exist within each county. Such assignments are not based
upon residency, but are predicated upon need and the most efficient
use of judicial resources. House Bill 985 conceptually changes the
meaning and intent of Article V by requiring residency within a
county, not the circuit, as a criteria for judicial service.
Finally, Article V does not limit the Governor in his selection of a
judge to fill a judicial vacancy to considering a person who either
resides in a certain county within a circuit or to considering a
person who is willing to reside in a certain county within a circuit.
House Bill 985 would contravene the provisions of Article V and
restrict the authority of the Governor in filling judicial vacancies.
For the above reasons, I am withholding my approval of House Bill
985, Regular Session of the Legislature, commencing April 5, 1983,
and do hereby veto the same.
Sincerely,
BOB GRAHAM
Governor



21



July 12, 1983











22 JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE

Rep. Bronson moved that HB 985 (1983 Regular Session) with
veto message be taken up, which was agreed to. The vote was:

Yeas-59



Allen
Armstrong
Arnold
Bailey
Bankhead
Bass
Brantley
Bronson
Burke
Combee
Cosgrove
Crady
Danson
Deratany
Deutsch

Nays-47
Abrams
Bell
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Carlton
Carpenter
Casas
Cortina
Crotty
Dantzler
Davis
Drage



Gallagher
Gardner
Grant
Grindle
Harris
Hill
Hodges
Johnson, B. L.
Johnson, R. C.
Johnson, R. M.
Jones, C. F.
Jones, D. L.
Kelly
Lawson
Lewis



Easley
Evans-Jones
Figg
Friedman
Gordon
Hanson
Hargrett
Hawkins, L. R.
Hawkins, M. E.
Hazouri
Healey
Jamerson



E



Locke
Logan
Martin
Meffert
Messersmith
Mitchell
Murphy
Patchett
Peeples
Press
Ready
Richmond
Robinson
Sample
Sanderson



Kutun
Lehtinen
Liberti
Lippman
Mackenzie
Martinez
McEwan
Morgan
Nergard
Pajcic
Reaves
Reddick



Rep. Bronson moved that HB 985 (1983 Regular Session) pass,
the veto of the Governor to the contrary notwithstanding. The vote
was:

Yeas-58



Deutsch
Easley
Gallagher
Grant
Grindle
Hanson
Harris
Hill
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Johnson, B. L.
Johnson, R. C.
Johnson, R. M.
Jones, C. F.
Jones, D. L.



Drage
Evans-Jones
Figg
Friedman
Gardner
Gordon
Gustafson
Hargrett
Hawkins, L. R.
Hazouri
Healey
Jamerson
Kutun



Kelly
Lawson
Lewis
Locke
Meffert
Messersmith
Mitchell
Nergard
Patchett
Peeples
Richmond
Robinson
Ros
Sample
Sanderson



Lehtinen
Liberti
Lippman
Logan
Mackenzie
Martinez
McEwan
Morgan
Murphy
Pajcic
Press
Ready
Reaves



Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Simone
Smith
Stewart
Thompson
Tobiassen
Upchurch
Ward
Watt
Webster
Williams





Reddick
Silver
Simon
Spaet
Thomas
Titone
Tobin
Wallace
Weinstock
Wetherell
Woodruff
Young



Selph
Shackelford
Shelley
Simone
Smith
Stewart
Thompson
Tobiassen
Upchurch
Ward
Watt
Webster
Williams
Woodruff




Ros
Silver
Simon
Spaet
Thomas
Titone
Tobin
Wallace
Weinstock
Wetherell
Young



_ __ ____



Allen
Armstrong
Arnold
Bankhead
Bass
Brantley
Bronson
Brown, C.
Casas
Combee
Cortina
Cosgrove
Crady
Danson
Deratany

Nays-51
The Chair
Abrams
Bailey
Bell
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Carlton
Carpenter
Clark
Crotty
Dantzler
Davis



OF REPRESENTATIVES July 12, 1983

So HB 985 (1983 Regular Session) failed to pass by the required
Constitutional two-thirds vote of all Members present. The veto of
the Governor was sustained and the bill was certified to the Secre-
tary of State.

Honorable George Firestone June 28, 1983
Secretary of State
Dear Secretary Firestone:
By the authority vested in me as Governor of Florida, under the
provisions of Article III, Section 8, of the Constitution of the State
of Florida, I hereby withhold my approval of and transmit to you
with my objections House Bill 1071, enacted by the 1983 Regular
Session, and entitled:
An act relating to Okaloosa and Walton Counties; creating the
Choctawhatchee Bay Causeway/Bridge Authority; providing a
purpose; providing for membership; providing for appointments
of office; providing for terms of office; providing for definition
under Chapter 119, Florida Statutes; providing for the authority
to be subject to the requirements of Chapter 286, Florida Stat-
utes, the "government in the sunshine" law; providing for ap-
proval of the Authority budget by the county commissions of both
Okaloosa and 'Walton County; providing for the election of offi-
cers; providing the definition of a quorum; providing powers of
the authority; providing the power to construct a causeway/bridge
transversing the Choctawhatchee Bay; providing the power to
fix, charge, and collect fees, tolls, rents, and charges; providing
the power to enter into contracts; providing the power to act as
lessor and lessee; providing the power to issue bonds; providing
the power to borrow money and issue notes; providing for the
hiring, employment, and contracting of staff persons; providing
for definition of the authority under part II of Chapter 159, Flor-
ida Statutes; providing for an annual audit of financial records;
providing an effective date.
This bill creates the Choctawhatchee Bay Causeway/Bridge Au-
thority, a five member board to be appointed by the Governor. The
Authority would be empowered to: construct a causeway or bridge
crossing the bay; coordinate and encourage public and private de-
velopment on the causeway or bridge; collect fees, tolls, rents and
other charges for the use of any part of the project; purchase and
lease property; issue bonds and borrow money; and employ staff to
carry out these functions.
This bill would authorize and promote construction and develop-
ment of a transportation corridor across Choctawhatchee Bay, one
of Florida's great estuaries.
Although this coastal area of North Florida has witnessed an ex-
plosive growth rate in recent years, there is no urgent need for
another vehicular crossing of the bay.
The Florida Department of Transportation has conducted a prelim-
inary assessment of transportation needs in this area. Its study
indicates that a facility such as the proposed causeway/bridge is
unlikely to be needed for approximately 10 to 15 years. Improve-
ments that increase the capacity of U.S. 98 in the Destin area are
planned for FY 83-84. Steps are being taken now to alleviate traffic
congestion problems associated with this region.
Planning and construction for surface transportation cannot be
done independently of the needs for other governmental services
such as water supply, sewage treatment facilities, public utilities,
and other public services. My concern is that all of these issues need
to be addressed in a comprehensive assessment of the area before
authorization of a particular response to one element, future trans-
portation needs.
Because the challenges associated with this growth are many and
local government resources are limited, it is my intention to estab-
lish a Northwest Florida Coast Resource Planning and Manage-
ment Committee in the near future.
The Committee will be charged with the responsibility of develop-
ing a Management Plan, identifying growth factors and growth











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE



constraints, and offering recommendations on how growth can best
be balanced within the assimilative capability of natural and man-
made systems. In my view, it is premature to create an authority
whose purpose is the construction of a causeway or bridge across
the bay without adequate time and planning for overall growth
management for the area.
It is the policy of this State to protect and manage its extensive
coastal resources in order to enhance their recreational, scientific,
economic and natural resources values. The environmental sensi-
tivity and hazard-prone characteristics of the land at and adjacent
to Piney Point have been recognized by the Federal Government by
its inclusion in the "Coastal Barrier Resources Act." This Act pro-
hibits the expenditure of federal funds for road improvements, in-
frastructure, and insurance in this area. The construction of a
causeway or bridge with the possible placement of fill in the waters
of Choctawhatchee Bay, the run-off and other pollution associated
with buildings along the causeway, and the concomitant develop-
ment of the Piney Point and White Point areas, are actions which
should not be undertaken without an overall plan for prudent de-
velopment of such a fragile area.
It is with regret that I veto House Bill 1071 because I believe that
the sponsors have shown great foresight and good intentions in
their legislative effort to deal with future transportation needs in a
booming coastal area of Florida. I pledge myself to work closely
with them as we undertake a comprehensive effort to rationally
plan the growth of one of Florida's last remaining undisturbed
estuarine regions.
For the above reasons, I am withholding my approval of House Bill
1071, Regular Session of the Legislature, commencing on April 5,
1983, and do hereby veto the same.

Sincerely,
BOB GRAHAM
Governor



July 6, 1983



Honorable George Firestone
Secretary of State



Dear Secretary Firestone:
By the authority vested in me as Governor of Florida, under the
provisions of Article III, Section 8 of the Constitution of the State of
Florida, I hereby withhold my approval of and transmit to you with
my objections Committee Substitute for House Bill 17-B, enacted by
the 1983 Special Session "B", and entitled:
An act relating to workers' compensation amending s. 440.20 (13) (d),
Florida Statutes, as amended, relating to payment of compensa-
tion, to clarify; amending s. 440.51, Florida Statutes, modifying
the current method of deriving administrative costs; lowering the
maximum assessment rate; providing for payment of supplemen-
tal benefits; providing for use of a statistical organization; creat-
ing s. 440.515, Florida Statutes, providing for confidentiality of
certain records, reenacting s. 440.56 (6), Florida Statutes, in a
reference thereto; providing an effective date.
This bill deals with several issues relative to workers' compensa-
tion. It changes the maximum allowable assessment rate for ad-
ministrative costs from four percent to two percent of net premiums
charged for workers' compensation insurance; requires that after
July 1, 1984, self-insurers shall use a statistical organization, which is
a Florida Corporation, for insurance information and data required
by law and requires insurers to make supplemental benefit pay-
ments directly to recipients after July 1, 1983.
House Bill 17-B would exclude any statistical organization which is
not a Florida Corporation from developing and providing informa-
tion to insurers for use under the law after July 1, 1984. No infor-
mation has been provided in the legislative process which would
form the basis for a public policy which excludes out-of-state statis-
tical organizations from providing such information. In the absence
of a compelling rationale for such a change this provision is anti-
competitive and unnecessary.



July 12, 1983



OF REPRESENTATIVES 23

Lowering the maximum allowable assessment rate on administra-
tive costs from four percent to two percent is generally consistent
with my goal to reduce insurance costs wherever possible.
Reduced revenues during the current year have, however, caused a
severe cash flow problem within the Division of Workers' Compen-
sation which would be aggravated by cutting the maximum as-
sessment rate in half immediately. The Division would need to
borrow approximately two million dollars from other state reve-
nues to fund operations for the full 1983-84 Fiscal Year should this
provision take effect at this time.
For the above reasons, I am withholding my approval of Committee
Substitute for House Bill 17-B, Special Session "B" of the Legisla-
ture, commencing June 15, 1983, and do hereby veto the same.

Sincerely,
BOB GRAHAM
Governor
On motions by Rep. Burke, the rules were waived and-

By Representatives Burke, Cosgrove, Reaves, Abrams, Friedman,
and Logan-
HR 3-C-A resolution recognizing the participation of the Miami
Central Senior High School Band, the "Marching Rockets," in the
Berlin German-American Summer Festivities.
WHEREAS, the Berlin German-American Summer Festivities
commemorated the 300th anniversary of the first German emigra-
tion to the United States, and
WHEREAS, for the opportunity to represent the United States,
the State of Florida, and the City of Miami at the festivities, the
members of the Miami Central Senior High School Band and its
supporters among parents, students, and other members of the
community worked together to raise over $30,000 through fundraisers
and donations, and
WHEREAS, in addition, Air Florida donated a free round-trip
charter flight from Miami to London and back to enable the band to
participate in this event, and
WHEREAS, the European trip of the Marching Rockets has pro-
vided the band members and other students of Miami Central Se-
nior High School, as well as parents, supporters, and citizens of the
community, with an unforgettable memory and great civic pride,
NOW, THEREFORE,

Be It Resolved by the House of Representatives of the State ofFlorida:
That the Florida House of Representatives does hereby recognize
and commend the members of the Miami Central Senior High
School Marching Rockets and the Band Director, Mr. Kenneth Tolbert,
as well as the students, parents, and other supporters of the band,
all of whom helped make the trip possible and a success, for the
great honor they have bestowed on the state by their participation
in the Berlin German-American Summer Festivities.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that a copy of this resolution be
presented to the principal and to the band director of Miami Cen-
tral Senior High School as a tangible token of the sentiments ex-
pressed herein.
-was read the first time by title, second time by title, and adopted.

On motions by Rep. Bronson, the rules were waived and-

By Representative Bronson-
HR 2-C-A resolution commending Emerson Davidson, age 11,
and Dameon Thomas, age 13, of Kissimmee, Florida, for their hero-
ism in rescuing five children from an apartment fire.
WHEREAS, on June 10, 1983, a fire was ignited in an apartment
complex in Kissimmee, Florida, by a young child who stuck a pencil











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



into an exposed light socket, spraying sparks into the apartment
and starting the fire, and
WHEREAS, two young boys, Emerson Davidson and Dameon
Thomas, noticed smoke coming from the apartment, ran into the
smoke-filled room, and led five children, aged 6 months to 8 years,
to safety, and
WHEREAS, the members of the Fire Department of Kissimmee,
in responding to the alarm, were amazed and relieved to learn that
there were no fatalities in the fire due to the act of compassion and
bravery of Emerson Davidson and Dameon Thomas, and
WHEREAS, it is appropriate that the House of Representatives
commend these boys for their heroic actions, NOW, THEREFORE,
Be It Resolved by the House of Representatives of the State of Florida"
That the House of Representatives hereby commends Emerson
Davidson and Dameon Thomas for their heroic actions in rescuing
five children from an apartment fire.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that a copy of this resolution be
presented to Emerson Davidson and Dameon Thomas as a tangible
token of the sentiments expressed herein.



Press
Ready
Reaves
Reddick
Richmond
Robinson

Nays-28
Brantley
Bronson
Carlton
Combee
Crotty
Deratany
Dudley



Sample
Shackelford
Silver
Simon
Spaet
Stewart



Evans-Jones
Gallagher
Grindle
Harris
Hill
Johnson, R. M.
Jones, D. L.



Thomas
Thompson
Tobiassen
Tobin
Upchurch
Wallace



Locke
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Morgan
Nergard
Patchett



Ward
Weinstock
Williams
Young



Ros
Selph
Simone
Smith
Titone
Watt
Woodruff



The motion was agreed to by the required Constitutional two-
thirds vote and SB 12-C was read the first time by title. On motions
by Rep. Pajcic, the rules were waived and SB 12-C was read the
second time by title and the third time by title. On passage, the
vote was:



-was read the first time by title, second time by title, and adopted. Yeas-75



Recessed
The House stood in informal recess at 11:22 p.m. to reconvene
upon call of the Speaker.

Reconvened
The House was called to order by the Speaker at 12:50 a.m. A
quorum was present.

Messages from the Senate
The Honorable H Lee Moffitt, Speaker
I am directed to inform the House of Representatives that the
Senate has admitted for introduction and consideration by the re-
quired Constitutional two-thirds vote and passed SB 12-C and re-
quests the concurrence of the House.
Joe Brown, Secretary

By Senator Hair and others-
SB 12-C-A bill to be entitled An act relating to taxation; au-
thorizing certain counties to levy a convention development tax on
certain rentals or leases; providing for uses of tax revenues; author-
izing counties to appoint an authority to administer proceeds from
the tax; providing an effective date.
Rep. Pajcic moved that SB 12-C be admitted for introduction, the
Speaker having ruled the measure was outside the purview of the
Call. The vote was:

Yeas-82



The Chair
Abrams
Allen
Armstrong
Arnold
Bailey
Bankhead
Bass
Bell
Brown, C.
Burke
Burnsed
Burrall
Carpehter
Casas



Clark
Cortina
Cosgrove
Crady
Danson
Dantzler
Davis
Deutsch
Drage
Easley
Figg
Friedman
Gardner
Gordon
Grant



Gustafson
Hanson
Hargrett
Hawkins, L. R.
Hawkins, M. E.
Hazouri
Healey
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Johnson, R. C.
Jones, C. F.
Kelly
Kutun



Lawson
Lehtinen
Lewis
Liberti
Lippman
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
Mills
Mitchell
Murphy
Ogden
Pajcic
Peeples



The Chair
Abrams
Allen
Armstrong
Bailey
Bankhead
Bell
Bronson
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Burrall
Carpenter
Casas
Clark
Cortina
Cosgrove
Crady

Nays-33
Arnold
Brantley
Carlton
Combee
Crotty
Danson
Deratany
Dudley
Gallagher



Dantzler Jonres, C. F.
Davis Kelly
Deutsch Kutun
Drage Lawson
Easley Lehtinen
Evans-Jones Lewis
Figg Lippman
Friedman Logan
Gordon Mackenzie
Grant Martin
Gustafson Martinez
Hanson McEwan
Harris Mills
Hawkins, M. E. Mitchell
Hazouri Murphy
Healey Ogden
Hodges Pajcic
Hollingsworth Peeples
Jamerson Press



Gardner
Grindle
Hill
Johnson, B. L.
Johnson, R. M.
Jones, D. L.
Liberti
Locke
Meffert



Messersmith
Morgan
Nergard
Robinson
Sample
Selph
Shackelford
Simone
Smith



Ready
Reaves
Reddick
Richmond
Sanderson
Shelley
Silver
Simon
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Titone
Tobin
Upchurch
Wallace
Ward
Williams
Young



Thompson
Tobiassen
Watt
Webster
Weinstock
Woodruff



So the bill passed and was immediately certified to the Senate.

The Honorable H. Lee Moffitt, Speaker
I am directed to inform the House of Representatives that the
Senate has amended House amendment and concurred in same as
amended, further amended, and passed as amended SB 1-C and
requests the concurrence of the House.
(House Amendment attached to original bill)
Joe Brown, Secretary

By Senator Johnston-
SB 1-C-A bill to be entitled An act making supplemental ap-
propriations; providing moneys for the annual period beginning July
1, 1983 and ending June 30,1984, to pay salaries, other expenses, and



24



July 12, 1983











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



for other specified purposes of the various agencies of state gov-
ernment; supplementing specific appropriations appropriated by
Chapter 83-300, Laws of Florida; providing an effective date.
Senate Amendment 1 to House Amendment 1: On page 1,
strike everything after the enacting clause and insert:
Section 1. The moneys in the following specific appropriations
are appropriated from the named funds for the Fiscal Year 1983-84
to the state agency indicated, to be used to supplement the appro-
priations made in Section 1 of Chapter 83-300, Laws of Florida, as
supplemental amounts to be used to pay the salaries and other
expenditures of the named agencies.

SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
Administered Funds



1 Lump Sum
Salary Increases
From General Revenue
Fund ................
From Trust Funds .......
Commerce, Department of
Economic Development, Division of
1A Special Categories
Miami Grand Prix
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Funds in Specific Appropriation
IA are appropriated to Metro-
politan Dade County, Florida for
promotion and/or facilitation of
motor sporting events in Dade
County as the County Commis-
sion deems appropriate.
2 Special Categories
Paid Advertising and Promo-
tion
From General Revenue
Fund ................

Education, Department of, and Com-
missioner of Education
Office of Deputy Commissioner for Ed-
ucational Management
From the funds provided in Spe-
cific Appropriation 3A, $347,000
shall be used to establish a dem-
onstration project at the Univer-
sity of South Florida Medical
Center and $170,000 shall be
used by the Southeastern Col-
lege of Osteopathic Medicine to
increase the availability of phy-
sicians to underserved urban and
rural areas. The demonstration
project shall emphasize the on-
site training of medical students
in underserved urban and rural
areas. Such onsite training shall
be conducted in existing commu-
nity medical facilities that serve
medically indigent individuals,
and shall include the use of phy-
sician extenders.
3 Lump Sum
Florida Quality Instruction In-
centives Council



29,750,000



12,750,000



500,000



375,000



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
POSITIONS
From General Revenue
Fund .............. .
3A Special Categories
Community Hospital Educa-
tion Program
From General Revenue
Fund ................

4 Special Categories
Postsecondary Programs of
Excellence
From General Revenue
Fund ................

From the funds appropriated in
Specific Appropriation 4,
$2,000,000 shall be allocated by
the department to establish
postsecondary education pro-
grams of excellence in mathe-
matics, science and computer ed-
ucation as provided for in SB
38-B, 1983 Special Session B.
The remaining $500,000 shall
be used to improve the intern-
ship component of approved
teacher preparation programs in
public institutions, according to
guidelines to be established by
the Department of Education,
Office of Teacher Education; pro-
vided, however, that these funds
shall not be used to supplant
funds from any other source cur-
rently used to support internship
programs.

5 Special Categories
Regional Centers of Excellence
From General Revenue
Fund ...............
The funds appropriated in Spe-
cific Appropriation 5 shall be
used to establish regional cen-
ters of excellence in mathemat-
ics, science, computers and tech-
nology, as provided for in SB
38-B, 1983 Special Session B,
at Florida Atlantic University
and the University of South
Florida.

6 Special Categories
School Principals Inservice
Training
From General Revenue
Fund ...............
Funds appropriated in Specific
Appropriation 6 shall only be
expended for those principal
training programs approved by
the Florida Quality Instruction
Incentives Council provided for
in SB 38-B, 1983 Special Ses-
sion B. Attendance is required
of all school principals; howev-
er, school boards may receive
attendance exemption requests



3

750,000




517,000





2,500,000



200,000



1,000,000



25



July 12, 1983











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
from principals but shall grant
exemptions only if the board finds
the request to be fully warrant-
ed. All exemptions must be re-
ported to the Commissioner of
Education one month prior to
the seminar which the exempted
principal is scheduled to attend.
Office of Deputy Commissioner for Spe-
cial Programs
7 Special Categories
Summer Inservice Institutes
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Funds provided in Specific Ap-
propriation 7 shall be used to
pay the cost of salaries and em-
ployee benefits to teacher-par-
ticipants and to pay the cost of
instruction for an intensive sub-
ject matter content summer in-
service training program for
classroom teachers and for sum-
mer camps as provided for in
Senate Bill 6-B, 1983 Special
Session B. Each school district
shall include in its master plan
for in-service staff development
submitted to the Department of
Education pursuant to s. 236.
0811, F.S., provisions for an in-
tensive subject matter content
summer in-service training pro-
gram, the emphasis of which for
the summer of 1984 shall be
math and science content instruc-
tion for elementary and second-
ary teachers, especially for those
who are out-of-field math and
science teachers. School districts
which use university faculty for
the summer in-service institutes
shall give first consideration to
faculty in colleges of arts and
sciences to provide instruction
in intensive subject matter con-
tent. The department shall es-
tablish an equitable method to
determine the distribution of
these funds based on the num-
ber of full-time equivalent class-
room teachers participating in
the districts' approved subject
matter content summer in-
service training programs. For
1983-84,' districts may use a max-
imum of five percent of the total
amount of their allocation for
summer in-service planning ac-
tivities.
8 Financial Assistance Payments
Critical Teacher Shortage
From General Revenue
Fund ................
From Critical Teacher
Shortage Trust Fund ...
Funds provided in Specific Ap-
propriation 8 shall be expended



4,600,000



500,000



500,000



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
through the Critical Teacher
Shortage Trust Fund. These
funds shall be expended accord-
ing to Sections 10, 11, and 12 of
Senate Bill 38-B passed in the
1983 Special Legislative Session
B. These funds shall not revert
to the General Revenue Fund
at the end of the fiscal year.
Public Schools, Division of
9 Aid to Local Governments
District Sparsity Supplement
From General Revenue
Fund ................



4,500,000



If the number of dollars gener-
ated by using the formula as
provided in s. 236.081 (f)(1) and
(2), F.S., exceeds the funds pro-
vided in Specific Appropriation
9, the department shall prorate
each district's share of the ap-
propriation. Only districts with
14,000 or fewer full time equiv-
alent students shall be eligi-
ble to receive funds provided in
Specific Appropriation 9.
10 Aid to Local Governments
Florida Educational Finance
Program
From General Revenue
Fund ................ 2094,894,985
From Principal State School
Trust Fund ...........
From the amount generated
through the FEFP for vocational
students in Specific Appropria-
tion 10, districts shall spend no
less than 2.78% of the total for
the replacement, updating, and
repair of vocational equipment.
The allocation of funds provided
in Specific Appropriation 10 shall
be consistent with the common
definitions, uniform program
structure, equitable procedures
for charging fees, and compara-
ble placement and follow-up in-
formation contained in "A Plan
for A Uniform Coordinated Sys-
tem of Vocational Education."
The department's monthly dis-
tributions of FEFP funds prov-
ided in Specific Apropriation 10
shall be made in equal pay-
ments on the 10th and 23rd of
each month.
The Department of Education
shall have the authority to use
funds provided in Specific Ap-
propriation 10 for the operation
of the Florida School for Boys
at Okeechobee in Okeechobee
County either directly or through
grants or contractual agreements
with other duly accredited edu-
cation agencies.



8,000,000



July 12, 1983



26











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
Pursuant to s. 236.0811, F.S.,
districts shall develop inservice
training plans which they shall
submit to the department. The
department shall review districts'
master plans and annual updates
of those plans to ensure they
are consistent with the goals and
objectives of the beginning
teacher program, the Teacher
Education Center Act, and the
Management Training Act. To
maintain ongoing inservice edu-
cation activities, the department
shall, from the funds provided
in Specific Appropriation 10, in-
cluding the funds provided in s.
236.081 (3), F.S., allocate to each
district that has submitted a sat-
isfactory plan an amount equal
to $4.30 times the district's es-
timated 1983-84 FTE student
count. To implement the begin-
ning teacher program an addi-
tional $1.70 per FTE will be al-
located to each district.
Funds provided in Specific Ap-
propriation 10 are based upon
a base student allocation of
$1,510.34, a required local effort
of 4.4 mills in ad valorem tax
and an amount of $145 in 1983-
84 for each postsecondary voca-
tional FTE to be added to and
made a part of the local required
effort for each district. No school
district shall be required to levy
a millage for required local ef-
fort that will produce more than
100% of the calculated FEFP
for that district.
The funds provided in Specific
Appropriation 10 are to be al-
located by comparing the FTE's
in 1983-84 to the FTE's of the
prior year. In those districts
where there is a decline in the
FTE's, 50% of the decline is to
be multiplied by the prior year
calculated FEFP Program per
WFTE and added to the alloca-
tion of that district. For this pur-
pose the calculated FEFP Pro-
gram is computed by multiply-
ing the WFTE by the Base Stu-
dent Allocation and then by the
district cost differential. Eighty-
five (85) percent of the FTE de-
cline that results from the trans-
fer of programs from school dis-
tricts to other institutions shall
not be counted in the calcula-
tion of a district's declining en-
rollment allocation.
For fiscal year 1983-84 in addi-
tion to the limitation on non-
voted millage for operating pur-
poses as set forth in Chapter
80-274, Laws of Florida, an ad-



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
ditional limitation shall apply
and be calculated as follows: (A)
Divide the sum of the 1982-83
calculated FEFP program, actual
discretionary millage and home-
stead exemption payback for each
district by their 1982-83 FTE.
(B) Divide the sum of the 1983-84
calculated FEFP program and
1.1 mills discretionary millage
for each district by their 1983-84
FTE. (C) Determine the percent
increase per FTE for each dis-
trict based on (A) and (B) above.
(D) For those districts who are
both over the statewide average
dollar amount per FTE in 1983-
84 and who are over a 12% in-
crease, the allowable discretion-
ary millage shall be decreased
from 1.1 mills to such a level
that they will have a 12% in-
crease per FTE. The discretion-
ary millage calculation shall be
made on or before August 1,
1983. Changes made after Au-
gust 1, 1983, are not intended
to influence the discretionary
village.
Districts in 1983-84 shall be
guaranteed a 9.5% per FTE in-
crease in funding from the funds
provided in Specific Appropria-
tion 10. The determination of
the percent increase shall be that
one used in the above 12% cap.
From the amount provided in
Specific Appropriation 10, funds
shall be provided as partial equ-
alization of districts' discretion-
ary levy. Equalization funds shall
be calculated in the following
manner. An amount shall be cal-
culated that is the state aver-
age amount per FTE generated
with a one mill levy. This av-
erage shall be the sum of the
value of a one mill levy per FTE
student for each district divided
by the state total FTE. Each
district's equalization entitle-
ment shall be calculated by mul-
tiplying (A) the amount of the
actual discretionary millage lev-
ied by the district that is in the
last .5 mill allowable discretion-
ary millage, (B) the difference
between the state average value
of one mill per FTE student and
the district value of one mill
per FTE student, and by (C) the.
district's FTE student count.

The State Board of Education
shall use a maximum of $20,-
000,000 from the Working Cap-
ital Fund to maintain the base
student allocation in 1983-84 if
funds provided in Specific Ap-
propriation 10 are insufficient



July 12, 1983



27











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
to maintain this level when the
insufficiency is caused by unex-
pected fluctuations in either en-
rollments or taxrolls. No more
than $10,000,000 of this sum
shall be released before the re-
calculation of the FEFP based
on the February 1984 FTE count
is completed.
Students in public schools served
with funds provided in Specific
Appropriation 10 and for com-
munity colleges in Specific Ap-
propriation 423 in Chapter 83-
300, Laws of Florida, for the
Adult Basic and High School
Program shall be served in the
following priority order:
1. Students without a high
school diploma who demonstrate
skills at or below the eighth
grade level and are studying to
achieve literacy;
2. Students earning credit re-
quired for a high school diploma
or preparing for the General
Education Development (GED)
test;
3. Students who have a high
school diploma but require addi-
tional specific literacy skills to
obtain employment;
4. Students who have a high
school diploma and are employed
but desire to maintain or enhance
their professional competencies;
5. Participants in non-credit
courses and activities principally
concerned with community prob-
lems in the areas of health,
safety, human relations, govern-
ment, child rearing, consumer
economics and the environment;
6. Participants in recreation
and leisure skill activities.
Priorities 14 shall be served with
funds provided for the Adult
Basic and High School Program;
provided, however, that no in-
dividual in a lower priority shall
be served by a district until all
students in a higher priority have
been served. No fees shall be
charged to students served under.
priorities 1 or 2. An amount for
each priority 3 and 4 FTE, equal
to the minimum amount charged
for postsecondary adult voca-
tional students, shall be added
to and made a part of the local
required effort for each district.
Priority 5 activities shall be
supported with funds provided
in Specific Appropriation 411 in
Chapter 83-300, Laws of Florida,
for Community Instructional



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
Services, and with fees that may
be charged to participants; part-
icipants in priority 6 activities
shall be charged fees sufficient
to make the activities self-
supporting.
The department shall collect from
districts both a total FTE count
for the Adult Basic and High
School Program and subtotal
counts that correspond to priori-
ties 1-4. Participants in priorities
5 and 6 activities shall not be
included in FTE counts reported
for FEFP funding purposes.
Funds provided in Specific Ap-
propriation 10 are based upon
program cost factors for 1983-84
as follows:
1. Basic Programs
A. K-3 1.234
B. 4-8 1.000
C. 9-12 1.116
D. Educational
Alternatives 1.763
E. K-3 Mainstream 2.352
F. 4-8 Mainstream 2.000
G. 9-12 Main-
stream 2.232
H. Educational Al-
ternatives Main-
stream 3.526
2. Special Programs for
Exceptional Students
A. Educable Men-
tally Retarded 2.154
B. TrainablB Men-
tally Retarded 2.863
C. Physically
Handicapped 3.539
D. Physical and
Occupational
Therapy Part-
Time 7.045
E. Speech and
Hearing Part-
Time 6.795
F. Deaf 3.840
G. Visually Handi-
capped Part-
Time 11.666
H. Visually Handi-
capped 4.316
I. Emotionally
Disturbed Part-
Time 4.922
J. Emotionally
Disturbed 3.183
K. Specific Learn-
ing Disability
Part-Time 4.309
L. Specific Learn-
ing Disability 2.294
M. Gifted Part-
Time 2.371
N. Hospital and
Homebound
Part-Time 12.873
O. Profoundly
Handicapped 5.330



28



July 12, 1983











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
3. K-12 Vocational Pro-
grams
A. Agriculture 1.989
B. Business and
Office 1.470
C. Distributive 1.409
D. Diversified 1.386
E. Health 1.952
F. Public Service 2.052
G. Home
Economics 1.582
H. Industrial 1.982
I. Exploratory 1.382
4. Adult Preparatory
Vocational
Programs
A. Agriculture 1.929
B. Business and
Office 1.479
C. Distributive 1.467
D. Diversified 1.336
E. Health 1.975
F. Public Service 1.912
G. Home
Economics 1.634
H. Industrial 1.785
5. Adult Supplemental
Vocational Program
A. Agriculture 1.945
B. Business and
Office 1.315
C. Distributive 1.183
D. Health 1.393
E. Public Health 1.472
F. Home
Economics 1.162
G. Industrial 1.514
6. Adult Basic and High
School 1.012
In the administration of FEFP
funds provided for agriculture
job preparatory vocational tech-
nical programs in Specific Ap-
propriation 10, the department
shall ensure that districts provide
instruction and supervision for
programs that include an annual
production and marketing cycle;
this supervision and instruction
shall be maintained during all
phases of the production and
marketing cycle and shall, if
necessary to complete the cycle,
extend beyond 180 days.
No district shall receive funds
provided in Specific Appropria-
tion 10 for any postsecondary
FTE's without the approval of
the Regional Coordinating Coun-
cil.
A student in grades kindergar-
ten through grade 12 and pre-
kindergarten exceptional stu-
dents, excluding provisions of
s. 236.013 (2 (c) 2a, F.S., may
earn up to a maximum value of
one full-time equivalent student
membership for a school year
or equivalent as defined in s.
228.041 (16), F.S.



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
During 1983-84, the department
shall implement program cost
review procedures described in
the department's program cost
factor study report, which shall
include school site cost reviews
for selected programs. As part
of its implementation of the
program cost review procedure,
the department shall conduct
program cost factor computation
conferences with the Divisions
of Public Schools and Vocational
Education, the Executive Office
of the Governor, House and
Senate Appropriations and Ed-
ucation Committees. The con-
ferences shall be presented ap-
propriate data for the determi-
nation of program cost factors
including, but not limited to:
1) data from the program cost
report developed pursuant to
s. 237.34, F.S., 2) school site cost
data, 3) policy and priority
analyses, and 4) staff and salary
analyses. Conference participants
shall review and evaluate avail-
able cost data and shall make a
determination based on this
review of the most appropriate
set of cost factors to be used to
calculate the subsequent year's
FEFP. These recommendations
shall be made available to the
Executive Office of the Governor,
and House and Senate Appropria-
tions and Education Committees.
The department shall review the
current FEFP program cost fac-
tors to determine the feasibility
and desirability of reducing the
number of cost factors. The de-
partment shall submit a report
of its findings and recommenda-
tions to the Legislature on or
before March 1, 1984.
11 Aid to Local Governments
Mathematics and Computer
Laboratories
From General Revenue
Fund ................ 10,000,000
Funds appropriated in Specific
Appropriation 11 shall be used
to provide additional computer
hardware and software for the
purposes of computer-assisted
instruction in mathematics and
computer literacy. These funds
shall be allocated to school dis-
tricts on the basis of unweighted
full-time equivalent students in
Grades K-12.
12 Aid to Local Governments
Science Laboratories
From General Revenue
Fund ................ 10,000,000
Specific Appropriation 12 shall
be allocated to school boards of



29



July 12, 1983











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
the 67 school districts for im-
provements to public school
science facilities. Funds in Spe-
cific Appropriation 12 shall be
distributed according to the num-
ber of unweighted full-time equiv-
alent students in Grades 7-12
for the purposes authorized by
S. 235.435, F.S. However, prior
to the issuance of encumbrance
authorizations for projects quali-
fying pursuant to the provisions
of s. 235.435 (3) (b), F.S., each
school board shall submit to the
commissioner a school-by-school
plan which identifies facility
deficiencies, corrections required,
cost estimates, and methods of
financing.
13 Aid to Local Governments
Safe Schools
From General Revenue
Fund ................
The funds provided in Specific
Appropriation 13 shall be added
to and become part of Specific
Appropriation 385A in Chapter
83-300, Laws of Florida.
14 Special Categories
Assessment Program Upgrade
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Funds provided in Specific Ap-
propriation 14 shall be used by
the Commissioner of Education
to conduct an analysis of the
state's minimum competency
program, including the state min-
imum student performance
standards required by s. 229.565,
F.S., and the state student as-
sessment testing program, re-
quired by s. 229.57, F.S. This
analysis shall include at least
the following:
1. A description of activities
undertaken since the enabling
legislation was enacted.
2. Changes in the program pro-
posed by the department to in-
crease future levels of student
performance and to enhance the
quality of education within the
public schools. This analysis shall
be submitted to the State Board
of Education for review. Based
upon this review, the State Board
shall make any recommendations
deemed necessary to improve the
state's minimum competency
program. These recommenda-
tions shall be made to the Leg-
islature by March 1, 1984.
3. On or before January 1, 1984,
the State Board of Education
shall make recommendations to
the Legislature concerning the



2,000,000



15,000



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
feasibility and desirability of ad-
ministering the state student as-
sessment tests in the spring of
each year and on the use of such
tests as a condition of promotion.

15 Special Categories
Curriculum Framework
Development
From General Revenue
Fund ................

From the funds provided in Spe-
cific Appropriation 15, the de-
partment of Education shall de-
velop, maintain, and revise cur-
riculum frameworks for the pur-
pose of insuring a degree of in-
structional consistency within
academic disciplines among Flor-
ida's high schools. A curriculum
framework is a set of broad guide-
lines which aids educational per-
sonnel to produce specific instruc-
tional plans for a given subject
or area of study. First priority
shall be given to mathematics,
science, foreign languages, and
social studies. Each curriculum
framework developed by the de-
partment shall be approved by
the State Board.
16 Special Categories
Visiting School Scholars
From General Revenue
Fund ................
17 Special Categories
Summer Camps
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Funds appropriated in Specific
Appropriation 17 shall be ex-
pended according to the provi-
sions of Senate Bill 38-B, 1983
Special Session B. Up to 2.5%
of these funds may be expended
by the Department of Education
for administration of this pro-
gram.
18 Special Categories
Mathematics and Science
Seventh Period
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Funds appropriated in Specific
Appropriation 18, shall be used
to provide a seventh period of
instruction in mathematics and
science. These funds are provided
to assist school districts in meet-
ing the 1984-85 high school grad-
uation requirements provided for
in Senate Bill 6-B, 1983 Special
Session B. These funds shall be
allocated according to unweight-
ed full-time equivalent students
in Grades 11-12. School districts



20,000



500,000



1,000,000



27,000,000



July 12, 1983



30












JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
may offer this seventh period
before or after the regular school
day or at any alternative time.
19 Special Categories
Student Performance Stan-
dards and Standards of Ex-
cellence
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Funds appropriated in Specific
Appropriation 19 shall be ex-
pended according to the provi-
sions of Senate Bill 38-B, 1983
Special Session B.
Vocational Education, Division of
19A Aid to Local Governments
Center for Industrial Excel-
lence
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Community Colleges, Division of
20 Aid to Local Governments
Community Colleges Program
Fund
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Funds in Specific Appropriation
20 are allocated to community
colleges as follows:
Brevard .....$ 266,200
Broward ..... 386,650
Central
Florida .... 101,200
Chipola ..... 48,950
Daytona ..... 237,050
Edison ...... 95,150
Florida JC-
Jacksonville 510,400
Florida Keys 44,000
Gulf Coast ... 85,800
Hillsborough 245,850
Indian River 157,850
Lake City .... 79,200
Lake Sumter 47,300
Manatee ..... 116,050
Miami ...... 1,080,200
North Florida 33,000
Okaloosa .... 88,000
Palm Beach .. 224,950
Pasco ....... 68,200
Pensacola .... 301,400
Polk ........ 104,500
St. Johns .... 41,250
St. Petersburg 345,400
Santa Fe ..... 226,600
Seminole .... 176,550
South Florida 44,000
Tallahassee .. 96,250
Valencia .... 248,050
20A Special Categories
Cooperative Agreements Study
From General Revenue
Fund ................



200,000



178,500



5,500,000



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
Florida School for the Deaf and the
Blind

21 Salaries and Benefits
From General Revenue
Fund ................
From Grants and Donations
Trust Fund ...........
Funds in Specific Appropriation
21 are for salary increases for
employees in the Board of Trust-
ees Pay Plan.

Universities, Division of
Educational and General Activities
22 Salaries and Benefits
From General Revenue
Fund ................
From Engineering Industrial
Experiment Station Trust
Fund ................
From General Trust Fund .
Funds in Specific Appropriation
22 shall be used to provide sal-
ary increases for faculty. Salary
increases for bargaining unit fac-
ulty shall be subject to collec-
tive bargaining. All salary in-
creases pursuant to this item
shall not increase the average
annual rate by more than
$13,530,836 and shall not become
effective prior to September 1,
1983. These salary increases
shall not apply to any faculty
member who began employment
subsequent to January 31, 1983.
These funds shall also be used
to supplement the funds appro-
priated in Specific Appropriation
1 to insure that teachers in the
University Demonstration
Schools shall receive up to 5%
salary increases.

23 Lump Sum
Law School Quality Improve-
ment Program
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Funds in Specific Appropriation
23 are for the enhancement of
law education at FSU and UF
Colleges of Law. Up to 20 posi-
tions may be established with
these funds.

23A Special Categories
Florida Sea Grant-UF
From General Revenue
Fund ................
23B Special Categories
New Program Development-
Hospitality-UCF



35,000



154,826



23,134



12,300,000



156,000
860,000



1,000,000



100,000



31



July 12, 1983











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION



POSITIONS 2



From General Revenue
Fund ................
23C Special Categories
Department of Communica-
tions Equipment-UWF
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences
24 Lump Sum
Quality Improvement Program
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Up to 15 positions may be es-
tablished from funds provided
in Specific Appropriation 24. Two
of these positions and $200,000
shall be used to initiate a joint
FIU-FAU-IFAS Educational Pro-
gram in ornamental horticulture
and turf.

University of South Florida Medical
Center
25 Lump Sum
Quality Improvement Program
From General Revenue
Fund .................
From funds provided in Specific
Appropriation 25, up to 2 posi-
tions may be established. From
funds in Specific Appropriation
496 in the Conference Report
on SB 1-B, $135,000 shall be used
to purchase a cardiac patient
simulator.

University of Florida Health Center-
Education and General
26 Lump Sum
Quality Improvement Program
From General Revenue
Fund ..................
From funds provided in Specific
Appropriation 26, up to 6 posi-
tions may be established. From
funds in Specific Appropriation
520 in the Conference Report
on SB 1-B, $135,000 shall be used
to purchase a cardiac patient
simulator. The health center is
authorized to establish a program
of public health.
The reduction in administrative
costs included in Specific Appro-
priations 515 thru 517 in Chap-
ter 83-300, Laws of Florida, may
be implemented on a proportional
basis among all program com-
ponents in the Health Center
budget.



87,000



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
State, Department of, and Secretary
of State
Library Services, Division of
26A Aid to Local Governments
Construction Grants-
Mandarin Library-Jackson-
ville
From General Revenue
Fund ................
TOTAL OF SECTION 01



110,000



200,000
5



FROM GENERAL FUNDS .. .2211,487,311
FROM TRUST FUNDS ......
TOTAL ALL FUNDS ........



600,000



22,289,134
2233,776,445



Section 2. The moneys in the following specific appropriations are
appropriated from the named funds for the 1983-84 Fiscal Year to
the state agencies indicated, as amounts for fixed capital outlay.
Game and Fresh Water Fish Commis-
sion, Florida
Wildlife, Division of



125,000















275,000



26B Fixed Capital Outlay
Access Road Improvements-
Corbett
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Provided that any revenues
earned by the state from the
sale of any spoil material con-
veyed to the Florida Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission
from the Indian Trail Water Con-
trol District in association with
this road improvement project
shall be deposited in the Flor-
ida Panther Research and Man-
agement Trust Fund.
Health and Rehabilitative Services, De-
partment of
Office of the Assistant Secretary for
Administrative Services
27 Fixed Capital Outlay
Centrally Managed Facilities
Maintenance and Repair
From General Revenue
Fund ................
Transportation, Department of
Construction, Division of
27A Fixed Capital Outlay
Institutional Paving/Seminole
Community College
From Working Capital Trust
Fund ................
TOTAL OF SECTION 02
FROM GENERAL FUNDS ...
FROM TRUST FUNDS ......
TOTAL ALL FUNDS ........



150,000



200,000



250,000



350,000



250,000
600,000



32



July 12, 1983











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
Section 3. Salaries and Benefits
(1) Statement of Purpose
This section provides instructions for implementing salary and
benefit increases appropriated within Specific Appropriation 1. All
allocations and distributions of these adjustments are to be made in
strict accordance with the provisions of this act. Except as specific-
ally provided in this section or in other sections of this act, funds
are provided for an overall average 2.71% increase in base salaries
plus associated benefit costs, effective October 1, 1983.
(2) Elected Officers
The salaries of the following officers shall be paid during fiscal
year 1983-84 at the annual rates shown below; however, in the
event of a revenue shortfall as defined in s. 216.221, F.S., these
salaries may be reduced on a voluntary basis:
7-1-83 10-1-83
Governor ........................... $69,550 $71,435
Lieutenant Governor ................. 60,455 62,093
Secretary of State .................... 59,385 60,994
Comptroller ......................... 59,385 60,994
Treasurer .......................... 59,385 60,994
Attorney General .................... 59,385 60,994
Education, Commissioner of ............ 59,385 60,994
Agriculture, Commissioner of .......... 59,385 60,994
Supreme Court Justice ................ 65,805 67,588
Judges-District Courts of Appeal ....... 59,385 60,994
Judges-Circuit Courts ................ 56,710 58,247
Commissioner-Public Service Commis-
sion ............................... 56,710 58,247
Public Employee Relations Commission-
Chairman .......................... 49,755 51,103
Public Employee Relations Commission-
Commissioners ...................... 47,080 48,356
Judges-County Courts ............... 52,430 53,851



A county court judge assigned to active judicial service in any of the
courts created by Article V of the State Constitution shall be paid
as additional compensation for such service, the difference between
his normal salary and the salary then currently paid to a judge of
the court to which he is assigned. The amount of such differential
shall be computed on the basis of an eight-hour day, or major
fraction thereof, and certified by the chief judge to the Judicial
Administrative Commission on a monthly basis.



State Attorneys:
Circuits with 1,000,000 population or
less ..............................
Circuits over 1,000,000 ..............
Public Defenders:
Circuits with 1,000,000 population or
less ..............................
Circuits over 1,000,000 ..............



SPECIFIC
APPROPRIATION
population estimates shall become effective as of July 1, 1983, for
fiscal year 1983-84 and shall not be adjusted subsequently.

(3) Professional Health Care

Based on the Collective Bargaining Agreement between the Gov-
ernor and the Florida Nurses Association, those employees repre-
sented by the Florida Nurses Association shall receive a 10% salary
increase based on the statewide minimum of each pay grade, effec-
tive October 1, 1983.

(4) Law Enforcement

Based on the Collective Bargaining Agreement between the Gov-
ernor and the Florida Police Benevolent Association, those employ-
ees represented by the Police Benevolent Association shall receive
a 5% increase in their September 30, 1983 base rate of pay, (exclud-
ing any payment being received for leadworker pay, hazardous-
duty pay, shift differential pay, on-call fees or law enforcement
incentive pay which are salary additives rather than a part of the
base rate of pay of an employee), effective October 1, 1983.

(5) Administrative and Clerical, Operational Services, Human
Services, and Professional

These employees shall receive a 2,71% across-the-board salary
increase based on their September 30, 1983 base rate of pay.

Section 4. Notwithstanding the proviso language to Item 198A
of Chapter 81-206, Laws of Florida, and the agreement of October
12, 1981, entered into, pursuant to such proviso language, by the
Division of Economic Development of the Department of Commerce,
the County of Escambia, and the Pensacola-Escambia Promotion
and Development Commission, said Commission is hereby author-
ized to retain up to 25 percent of the proceeds of the resale of lands
identified as a part of Ellyson Field to be used for the purpose of
developing the Ellyson Industrial Park. The remaining proceeds,
i.e., no less than 75 percent, shall continue to be returned to the
State Treasury until the amount of $2,500,000 has been returned in
accordance with said proviso language and said agreement. How-
ever, the initial $200,000 of such proceeds which are realized sub-
sequent to the effective date of this section shall be retained in its
entirety by the commission and shall be used for the rebuilding and
four-laning of roads and entrances to Ellyson Industrial Park.

Section 5. This act shall take effect July 1, 1983, or upon be-
coming law, whichever occurs later; however, if this act becomes
law after July 1, 1983, then it shall operate retroactively to July 1,
1983.



TOTAL THIS GENERAL APPRO-
PRIATION ACT POSITIONS 5
FROM GENERAL FUNDS .....2211,837,311
FROM TRUST FUNDS ........
TOTAL ALL FUNDS .........



22,539,134
2234,376,445



Senate Amendment 26-In title, on page 1, strike everything
"56,710 58,247 before the enacting clause and insert: A bill to be entitled An act
59,385 60,994 making supplemental appropriations; providing moneys for the an-
nual period beginning July 1, 1983 and ending June 30, 1984, to
pay salaries, other expenses, capital outlay-buildings and improve-
ments, and for other specified purposes of the various agencies of
53,500 54,950 state government; supplementing specific appropriations appropri-
ated by Chapter 83-300, Laws of Florida; providing an effective
56,175 57,697 date.



All population figures relating to state attorneys' and public de-
fenders' salaries shall be based on the most recent population esti-
mates prepared pursuant to the provisions of S. 23.019, F.S. These



On motions by Rep. Morgan, the House concurred in the Senate
amendments. The question recurred on the passage of SB 1-C. The
vote was:



33



July 12, 1983











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



Yeas-71
The Chair
Abrams
Allen
Armstrong
Bailey
Bass
Bell
Brown, C.
Brown, T. C.
Burke
Burnsed
Burrall
Carlton
Carpenter
Casas
Clark
Cortina
Cosgrove

Nays-43
Arnold
Bankhead
Brantley
Bronson
Combee
Crotty
Danson
Dantzler
Deratany
Drage
Dudley



Crady
Davis
Deutsch
Figg
Friedman
Gardner
Gordon
Grant
Grindle
Gustafson
Hargrett
Hawkins, L. R.
Hazouri
Healey
Jamerson
Johnson, B. L.
Kutun
Lawson



Easley
Evans-Jones
Gallagher
Hanson
Harris
Hawkins, M. E.
Hill
Hodges
Hollingsworth
Johnson, R. C.
Johnson, R. M.



Lehtinen
Lewis
Liberti
Lippman
Logan
Mackenzie
Martin
Martinez
Mills
Morgan
Murphy
Ogden
Pajcic
Peeples
Press
Reaves
Reddick
Robinson



Jones, C. F.
Jones, D. L.
Kelly
Locke
McEwan
Meffert
Messersmith
Mitchell
Nergard
Ready
Richmond



Selph
Shelley
Silver
Simon
Spaet
Stewart
Thomas
Thompson
Titone
Tobiassen
Tobin
Wallace
Ward
Weinstock
Wetherell
Williams
Young




Ros
Sample
Sanderson
Shackelford
Simone
Smith
Upchurch
Watt
Webster
Woodruff



Votes after roll call:
Yeas-Metcalf

So the bill passed, as further amended. The action, together with
the bill and amendments thereto, was immediately certified to the
Senate.

The Honorable H. Lee Moffitt, Speaker
I am directed to inform the House of Representatives that the
Senate has concurred in House amendments and passed SB's 2-C,
6-C, as amended.
Joe Brown, Secretary

Introduction and Reference

First Reading by Publication
HB 1-C-Not read
HR 2-C-Adopted earlier today
HR 3-C-Adopted earlier today
HB 4-C-Not read

By Representatives Kutun, Moffitt, and Thompson-
HB 5-C-A bill to be entitled An act relating to taxation; amend-
ing s. 214.71(3Xa), Florida Statutes, relating to determination of the
base upon which the corporate income tax is apportioned; providing
conditions under which sales of tangible personal property are in
this state; amending s. 220.03(1Xt), Florida Statutes, 1982 Supple-
ment, and adding paragraphs (aa) and (bb); redefining "state" to
include foreign countries; defining "unitary business group" and
"nonbusiness income"; amending s. 220.12(1), Florida Statutes; pro-
viding for inclusion of certain nonbusiness income in net income;
amending s. 220.13(1Xb), Florida Statutes, 1982 Supplement; disal-
lowing specified deductions and revising provisions for subtracting
certain amounts from taxable income in determining adjusted fed-
eral income; amending s. 220.131(1), Florida Statutes, to conform



provisions relating to affiliated groups; creating s. 220.135, Florida
Statutes; providing that all members of a unitary business group
must use the unitary reporting method, and providing requirements
with respect thereto; amending s. 220.14(3), Florida Statutes; pro-
viding that only one exemption shall be allowed to a unitary busi-
ness group; amending s. 220.15(3) and (4), Florida Statutes; redefin-
ing "everywhere" as used in computation of apportionment factor
denominators; deleting provisions relating to a refund under speci-
fied circumstances; creating s. 220.16, Florida Statutes, relating to
the allocation of nonbusiness income; amending s. 220.63(5), Flor-
ida Statutes; deleting a cross reference relating to certain subtrac-
tions in provisions relating to income of international banking
facilities; amending s. 220.64, Florida Statutes; providing for appli-
cation of specified provisions to the franchise tax on banks and
savings associations; providing for recomputation of estimated tax
due by taxpayers whose tax year begins on or after September 1,
1982, to comply with this act; amending s. 563.05, Florida Statutes;
increasing the excise tax on malt beverages; amending s. 563.07,
Florida Statutes; reducing the beer distributors' collection credit;
amending s. 564.06(1), (3) and (7), Florida Statutes; increasing the
excise tax on certain beverages and wines and reducing the distrib-
utors' allowance; amending s. 565.12(1), Florida Statutes; increas-
ing the excise tax on certain alcoholic beverages; amending s. 565.13,
Florida Statutes; reducing the distributors' allowance; requiring
vendors to inventory beverages subject to the increased taxes and
pay the amount of tax due; providing for application of penalty and
interest provisions; repealing s. 196.033, Florida Statutes, and s.
236.25(2Xb), Florida Statutes; 1982 Supplement; eliminating the
School District Homestead Trust Fund; providing an appropriation
to the Department of Revenue for establishment of a corporate
income tax historical computer data base and computerized audit
system; providing conditions; providing requirements with respect
to entries on the notice of proposed property taxes relating to school
levies for notices issued with respect to 1983 assessment rolls;
amending s. 193.1142(1), Florida Statutes, 1982 Supplement, relat-
ing to the date by which ad valorem tax assessment rolls are to be
submitted to the Department of Revenue; declaring invalid an emer-
gency rule of the Department of Revenue; providing effective dates.
Referred to the Committee on Appropriations.


Report of Standing Committee
The Committee on Appropriations recommends the following
pass: HB 5-C (fiscal note attached)
The above bill was placed on the calendar.

Adjournment
On motion by Rep. Thompson, the House adjourned at 1:05 a.m.
sine die.



CHAMBER ACTION ON BILLS
JULY 12, 1983
HR 2-C-Adopted
HR 3-C-Adopted
SB 1-C-Passed as amended 6649; concurred; passed as
amended 71-43
SB 2-C-Passed as amended 79-36
SB 3-C-Passed 62-51
SB 4-C-Passed 111-0
SB 5-C-Introduction allowed; passed 114-0
SB 6-C-Introduction allowed; passed as amended 113-0
SB 9-C-Passed 90-21
SB 11-C-Introduction allowed; passed 90-21
SB 12-C-Introduction allowed; passed 75-33
[Source: Legislative Information Division]



July 12, 1983



34











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



CERTIFICATE
THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the foregoing pages numbered 1
through 34, inclusive, are and constitute a complete, true and correct
journal and record of the proceedings of the House of Representatives
of the State of Florida at a Special Session of the Seventy-first House
since Statehood in 1845, convened under the Constitution, held from
July 12 through July 13, 1983.

Clerk of the House
Tallahassee, Florida
July 13, 1983



July 13, 1983



35












INDEX

to the

JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES




Special Session "C"

July 12 through July 13, 1983












CONTENTS
Pages
Bill Sponsors in "C" Session ............................................................... 37
Miscellaneous Subjects ... ... ......................... . . ... ..... ... ... ..... .. 37
Vetoed Bills ............................................. ................................... 38
Subject Index of House and Senate Bills and Resolutions ............................................ 39
House Bills and Resolutions by Number, Subject, Sponsor, and Disposition .............................. 40
Senate Bills (received in House) by Number, Subject, Sponsor, and Disposition ........................... 40



36











INDEX JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 37

Bill Sponsors in "C" Session

[Source: Information Division, Joint Legislative Management Committee]

ABRAMS, MICHAEL I.-101st District LOGAN, WILLIE, JR.-108th District
Co-sponsored: 3-C Co-sponsored: 3-C
BRONSON, IRLO, JR.-77th District MOFFITT, H. LEE-66th District (Speaker)
Sponsored: 2-C Co-sponsored: 5-C
BROWN, CORINNE-17th District PAJCIC, STEVE-15th District
Co-sponsored: 1-C Sponsored: 1-C, 8-C
BURKE, JAMES C.-107th District REAVES, JEFFERSON, SR.-106th District
Sponsored: 3-C Co-sponsored: 3-C
COSGROVE, JOHN F.-112th District SILVER, RONALD A.-100th District
Co-sponsored: 3-C Sponsored: 4-C
FRIEDMAN, MICHAEL-103rd District THOMAS, JOHN-16th District
Co-sponsored: 3-C, 4-C Sponsored: 1-C
HAZOURI, THOMAS L.-20th District THOMPSON, JAMES HAROLD-8th District
Sponsored: 1-C, 8-C Co-sponsored: 5-C
KUTUN, BARRY-104th District
Sponsored: 5-C


APPROPRIATIONS
Committee Bills: 6-C, 7-C
















Miscellaneous Subjects

Subject Pages
Award
Easley, Representative Betty; National Republican Legis-
lator of the Year ................................. 16
Governor
Proclamations ................. .................. 1, 2-3
Presentation of Guest
Johnson, Clemon .................. ... ............ 2










JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



Vetoed Bills

Where no disposition shown, veto message was not taken up by House.



Date
No. Subject Sponsor Pages Vetoed Disposition


1983 Regular Session Vetoed House Bills
HB
708 Santa Rosa County; net fishing ................ B. L. Johnson 20 .............................. 6-30-83
820 Escambia County; net fishing ................ Tobiassen 20, 21 .............................. 6-30-83
985 Judicial circuits ............................ Bronson 20, 21-22 .............................6-28-83 Sustained
1071 Okaloosa and Walton Counties; Choctawhatchee
Bay Causeway/Bridge Authority ............. Ward 20, 22-23 ............................... 6-28-83

1983 Regular Session Vetoed Senate Bill
SB
168 Practice of optometry ........................ Thomas ..................................... 6-29-83

1983 Special Session "B" Vetoed House Bill
CS/HB
17-B Workers' compensation ...................... Gustafson 20, 23 ............................. 7-6-83

1983 Special Session "B" Vetoed Senate Bill
SB
1-B (Item veto) General Appropriations Bill ......... Johnston .................................... 6-30-83
Date shown hereafter is date when Governor vetoed bill and sent it
directly to Secretary of State for subsequent transmittal to House.


1983 Special Session "C" Vetoed Senate Bill
SB
1-C (Item veto) Supplemental Appropriations Bill .... Johnston .................................... 7-26-83



INDEX



38












JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



Subject Index of House and Senate
Bills and Resolutions
[Source: Information Division, Joint Legislative Management Committee]
This index embraces all measures introduced in both the House and Senate. The house of origin is
identified by the letter preceding each bill: H-House, S-Senate. Senate bills shown in this index include
those never received by the House, and their inclusion here is only for the convenience of the user
interested in all the legislation introduced in the Legislature on a particular subject.
(Boldfaced bill numbers passed both houses.)



-A-
ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES
Deaf and Blind School, rule adoption; filing requirement, S4-C
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES AND LIQUORS
Excise tax increased, S3-C
APPOINTMENTS
Governor and Legislature
Quality Instruction Incentives Council, S2-C, H7-C
APPROPRIATIONS
Critical Teacher Shortage Trust Fund; extended school day and
quality instruction incentive categorical program, S2-C, H7-C
Revenue Department; historical computer data base and audit
system and administration costs, S3-C
Supplemental Appropriations Bill, Sl-C, H6-C
-B-
BROWARD COUNTY
Special inspectors, threshold buildings, S5-C
BUILDINGS AND BUILDING CODES
Special inspectors, threshold buildings; Broward and Dade coun-
ties, S5-C
-C-
COASTAL PROTECTION TRUST FUND
Administrative and personnel expenses and equipment costs; use
for implementation of Ch. 83-310, S6-C
COMMENDATIONS
Davidson, Emerson and Dameon Thomas; commended for life-
saving heroism, H2-C
Miami Central Senior High School Band Marching Rockets; par-
ticipation in Berlin German-American Summer Festivities, H3-C
-D-
DADE COUNTY
Special inspectors, threshold buildings, S5-C
DEAF AND BLIND SCHOOL
Rules, board authority for adoption; filed State Department, S4-C
-E-
EDUCATION
Quality Instruction Incentives Council created; interscholastic
extracurricular student activities, grade point average effective
date, S2-C, H7-C
EMINENT DOMAIN
Big Talbot and Long Islands; DNR acquisition, H1-C
-G-
GOVERNMENTAL REORGANIZATION
Mental health boards abolished, S13-C
GOVERNOR
Reports; Quality Instruction Incentives Council; education reforms,
S2-C, H7-C



-H-
HEALTH & REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF
Big Talbot and Long Islands; study of sewage disposal facilities,
S10-C, H8-C
Community Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Services
Act, created; community mental health services, uniform au-
diting procedures; mental health boards abolished, S13-C
HOSPITALS
Certificate of need; health-related projects; local district plan,
S13-C
-I-

INSURANCE
Comprehensive health association policies; sale, S7-C
--_
LANDS See: NATURAL RESOURCES, DEPARTMENT OF
LEGISLATURE
Reports
HRS; study of sewage disposal facilities on Big Talbot and Long
Islands, S10-C, H8-C
Quality Instruction Incentives Council; education reforms, S2-C,
H7-C
1983 Regular Session amended bills
SB 40, specific parcel bill, H1-C
LOCAL GOVERNMENTS
Community mental health services; local matching fund require-
ment eliminated, S13-C
Convention development tax, certain rentals and leases, S9-C,
S12-C
Discretionary tax, additional; referendum approval; use criteria,
S11-C
-M-
MENTAL HEALTH
Community mental health services, audit liabilities applied con-
tractor's or subcontractor's agency budget; local matching fund
requirement eliminated; uniform auditing procedures; mental
health boards abolished, S13-C
-N-
NATURAL RESOURCES, DEPARTMENT OF
Big Talbot and Long Islands; acquisition by eminent domain,
H1-C
Big Talbot, Little Talbot and Long Islands Protection Act, S10-C,
H8-C
Coastal Protection Trust Fund; use, administrative and person-
nel expenses and equipment costs for implementation of Ch.
83-310, S6-C
-P-
POPULAR NAMES
Big Talbot, Little Talbot and Long Islands Protection Act, S10-C,
H8-C
Community Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Services
Act, S13-C
Supplemental Appropriations Bill, S1-C, H6-C



_




39



INDEX











JOURNAL OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES



RESOLUTIONS See: COMMENDATIONS

-S-

SCHOOLS See: EDUCATION

SUNDOWN BILLS
Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Planning Council, S13-C



TAXATION
Convention development tax, certain rentals or leases, S9-C,
S12-C, H4-C
Corporate income tax; unitary business group and nonbusiness
income; apportionment; reporting methods; exemption determi-
nation, S3-C, H5-C
Sales tax, additional discretionary; referendum approval; use cri-
teria, S11-C
-W-
WORKERS COMPENSATION
Compensation payments, clarification; statistical organization use,
S8-C



House Bills and Resolutions by
Number, Subject, Sponsor, and Disposition
To obtain the number of a bill, see the subject matter index preceding this index.
Page number in boldfaced print indicates location of roll call vote on disposition.



Abbreviations:
CSP-Companion or similar bill passed
DCH-Died on House Calendar



HB-House Bill
HR-House Resolution
ID-Introduction deferred



HB HB
1-C Land acquisition (Hazouri) 34 ID 4-C Taxation (Silver) 34 ID/CSP-SB 9-C, SB 12-C
HR 5-C Taxation (Kutun) 34 DCH/CSP-SB 3-C
2-C Emerson Davidson & Dameon Thomas (Bronson) 23-24, 34 6-C Supplemental appropriations (Appropriations) ID/CSP-SB
Adopted 1-C
3-C Miami Central Senior High School Band (Burke) 23, 34 7-C Education (Appropriations) ID/CSP-SB 2-C
Adopted 8-C Natural resources protection (Hazouri) ID



Senate Bills (Received in House) by
Number, Subject, Sponsor, and Disposition
To obtain the number of a bill, see the subject matter index preceding this index.
Page number in boldfaced print indicates location of roll call vote on disposition.

Abbreviations:
Ch.-Chapter number, as passed
SB-Senate Bill



SB
1-C Supplemental appropriations (Johnston) 5-14, 24-34 Ch.
83-350
2-C Education (Peterson) 14-15, 16-17, 34 Ch. 83-348
3-C Taxation (Johnston) 3-4, 5 Ch. 83-349
4-C Deaf & Blind School (Hair) 18 Ch. 83-351



SB
5-C Building inspectors (Vogt) 19-20 Ch. 83-352
6-C Natural resources protection (Neal) 18-19, 34 Ch. 83-353
9-C Taxation (Gordon) 16, 17 Ch. 83-354
11-C Sales tax (Henderson) 17-18 Ch. 83-355
12-C Taxation (Hair) 24 Ch. 83-356



40



INDEX





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