<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 April 1901
 May 1901
 Appendix


FHR UFLAW



Journal of the House of Representatives of the session of ..
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027772/00049
 Material Information
Title: Journal of the House of Representatives of the session of ..
Alternate Title: Journal of the House of Representatives, State of Florida
Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Florida of the session of ..
Physical Description: v. : ; 23-32 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Legislature. -- House of Representatives
Publisher: State Printer
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: April 1901
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Legislative journals -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
General Note: Title varies slightly.
General Note: Description based on: 1907.
Funding: Digitized for the Florida House of Representatives, the Office of the Clerk.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida House of Representatives. Office of the Clerk.
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 003417935
oclc - 12901236
lccn - sn 85065608
System ID: UF00027772:00049
 Related Items
Preceded by: Journal of proceedings of the House of Representatives of the Legislature of the State of Florida
Succeeded by: Journal of the Florida House of Representatives

Table of Contents
    April 1901
        Tuesday, April 2
            Page 1
            Page 2
            Page 3
            Page 4
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
        Wednesday, April 3
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
        Thursday, April 4
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
        Friday, April 5
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
        Saturday, April 6
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
        Monday, April 8
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
        Tuesday, April 9
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 133
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
            Page 137
            Page 138
            Page 139
            Page 140
            Page 141
            Page 142
            Page 143
            Page 144
            Page 145
        Wednesday, April 10
            Page 146
            Page 147
            Page 148
            Page 149
            Page 150
            Page 151
            Page 152
            Page 153
            Page 154
            Page 155
            Page 156
            Page 157
            Page 158
            Page 159
        Thursday, April 11
            Page 160
            Page 161
            Page 162
            Page 163
            Page 164
            Page 165
            Page 166
            Page 167
            Page 168
            Page 169
            Page 170
            Page 171
            Page 172
            Page 173
            Page 174
            Page 175
            Page 176
            Page 177
            Page 178
            Page 179
            Page 180
            Page 181
            Page 182
        Friday, April 12
            Page 183
            Page 184
            Page 185
            Page 186
            Page 187
            Page 188
            Page 189
            Page 190
            Page 191
            Page 192
            Page 193
            Page 194
            Page 195
            Page 196
            Page 197
            Page 198
            Page 199
        Saturday, April 13
            Page 200
            Page 201
            Page 202
            Page 203
            Page 204
            Page 205
            Page 206
            Page 207
            Page 208
            Page 209
            Page 210
            Page 211
            Page 212
        Monday, April 15
            Page 213
            Page 214
            Page 215
            Page 216
            Page 217
            Page 218
            Page 219
            Page 220
            Page 221
            Page 222
            Page 223
            Page 224
            Page 225
            Page 226
        Tuesday, April 16
            Page 227
            Page 228
            Page 229
            Page 230
            Page 231
            Page 232
            Page 233
            Page 234
            Page 235
            Page 236
            Page 237
            Page 238
            Page 239
            Page 240
            Page 241
            Page 242
            Page 243
            Page 244
            Page 245
            Page 246
            Page 247
            Page 248
            Page 249
            Page 250
            Page 251
            Page 252
            Page 253
        Wednesday, April 17
            Page 254
            Page 255
            Page 256
            Page 257
            Page 258
            Page 259
            Page 260
            Page 261
            Page 262
            Page 263
            Page 264
            Page 265
            Page 266
            Page 267
            Page 268
            Page 269
            Page 270
            Page 271
            Page 272
            Page 273
        Thursday, April 18
            Page 274
            Page 275
            Page 276
            Page 277
            Page 278
            Page 279
            Page 280
            Page 281
            Page 282
            Page 283
            Page 284
            Page 285
            Page 286
            Page 287
            Page 288
            Page 289
            Page 290
            Page 291
            Page 292
            Page 293
            Page 294
            Page 295
            Page 296
            Page 297
            Page 298
        Friday, April 19
            Page 299
            Page 300
            Page 301
            Page 302
            Page 303
            Page 304
            Page 305
            Page 306
            Page 307
            Page 308
            Page 309
            Page 310
            Page 311
            Page 312
            Page 313
            Page 314
        Saturday, April 20
            Page 315
            Page 316
            Page 317
            Page 318
            Page 319
            Page 320
            Page 321
            Page 322
            Page 323
            Page 324
            Page 325
            Page 326
            Page 327
            Page 328
            Page 329
        Monday, April 22
            Page 330
            Page 331
            Page 332
            Page 333
            Page 334
            Page 335
            Page 336
            Page 337
            Page 338
            Page 339
            Page 340
            Page 341
            Page 342
            Page 343
            Page 344
            Page 345
        Tuesday, April 23
            Page 346
            Page 347
            Page 348
            Page 349
            Page 350
            Page 351
            Page 352
            Page 353
            Page 354
            Page 355
            Page 356
            Page 357
            Page 358
            Page 359
            Page 360
            Page 361
            Page 362
            Page 363
            Page 364
            Page 365
            Page 366
            Page 367
            Page 368
            Page 369
            Page 370
            Page 371
            Page 372
            Page 373
            Page 374
        Wednesday, April 24
            Page 375
            Page 376
            Page 377
            Page 378
            Page 379
            Page 380
            Page 381
            Page 382
            Page 383
            Page 384
            Page 385
            Page 386
            Page 387
            Page 388
            Page 389
            Page 390
            Page 391
            Page 392
            Page 393
            Page 394
            Page 395
            Page 396
            Page 397
            Page 398
        Thursday, April 25
            Page 399
            Page 400
            Page 401
            Page 402
            Page 403
            Page 404
            Page 405
            Page 406
            Page 407
            Page 408
            Page 409
            Page 410
            Page 411
            Page 412
            Page 413
            Page 414
            Page 415
            Page 416
            Page 417
            Page 418
            Page 419
            Page 420
            Page 421
            Page 422
            Page 423
            Page 424
            Page 425
            Page 426
            Page 427
            Page 428
            Page 429
            Page 430
            Page 431
            Page 432
            Page 433
        Monday, April 29
            Page 434
            Page 435
            Page 436
            Page 437
            Page 438
            Page 439
            Page 440
            Page 441
            Page 442
            Page 443
            Page 444
            Page 445
            Page 446
            Page 447
            Page 448
            Page 449
            Page 450
            Page 451
            Page 452
            Page 453
            Page 454
            Page 455
            Page 456
            Page 457
            Page 458
            Page 459
            Page 460
            Page 461
            Page 462
            Page 463
        Tuesday, April 30
            Page 464
            Page 465
            Page 466
            Page 467
            Page 468
            Page 469
            Page 470
            Page 471
            Page 472
            Page 473
            Page 474
            Page 475
            Page 476
            Page 477
            Page 478
            Page 479
            Page 480
            Page 481
            Page 482
            Page 483
            Page 484
            Page 485
    May 1901
        Wednesday, May 1
            Page 486
            Page 487
            Page 488
            Page 489
            Page 490
            Page 491
            Page 492
            Page 493
            Page 494
            Page 495
            Page 496
            Page 497
            Page 498
            Page 499
            Page 500
            Page 501
            Page 502
            Page 503
            Page 504
            Page 505
            Page 506
            Page 507
            Page 508
            Page 509
            Page 510
            Page 511
            Page 512
            Page 513
            Page 514
            Page 515
            Page 516
            Page 517
        Thursday, May 2
            Page 518
            Page 519
            Page 520
            Page 521
            Page 522
            Page 523
            Page 524
            Page 525
            Page 526
            Page 527
            Page 528
            Page 529
            Page 530
            Page 531
            Page 532
            Page 533
            Page 534
            Page 535
            Page 536
            Page 537
            Page 538
            Page 539
            Page 540
            Page 541
            Page 542
            Page 543
            Page 544
            Page 545
            Page 546
            Page 547
            Page 548
            Page 549
            Page 550
            Page 551
            Page 552
            Page 553
            Page 554
        Friday, May 3
            Page 555
            Page 556
            Page 557
            Page 558
            Page 559
            Page 560
            Page 561
            Page 562
            Page 563
            Page 564
            Page 565
            Page 566
            Page 567
            Page 568
            Page 569
            Page 570
            Page 571
            Page 572
            Page 573
            Page 574
            Page 575
            Page 576
            Page 577
            Page 578
            Page 579
            Page 580
            Page 581
            Page 582
            Page 583
            Page 584
            Page 585
        Saturday, May 4
            Page 586
            Page 587
            Page 588
            Page 589
            Page 590
            Page 591
            Page 592
            Page 593
            Page 594
            Page 595
            Page 596
            Page 597
            Page 598
            Page 599
            Page 600
            Page 601
            Page 602
        Monday, May 6
            Page 603
            Page 604
            Page 605
            Page 606
            Page 607
            Page 608
            Page 609
            Page 610
            Page 611
            Page 612
            Page 613
            Page 614
            Page 615
            Page 616
            Page 617
            Page 618
            Page 619
            Page 620
            Page 621
            Page 622
            Page 623
            Page 624
            Page 625
            Page 626
            Page 627
            Page 628
            Page 629
            Page 630
        Tuesday, May 7
            Page 631
            Page 632
            Page 633
            Page 634
            Page 635
            Page 636
            Page 637
            Page 638
            Page 639
            Page 640
            Page 641
            Page 642
            Page 643
            Page 644
            Page 645
            Page 646
            Page 647
            Page 648
            Page 649
            Page 650
            Page 651
            Page 652
            Page 653
            Page 654
            Page 655
            Page 656
            Page 657
            Page 658
            Page 659
            Page 660
            Page 661
            Page 662
            Page 663
            Page 664
        Wednesday, May 8
            Page 665
            Page 666
            Page 667
            Page 668
            Page 669
            Page 670
            Page 671
            Page 672
            Page 673
            Page 674
            Page 675
            Page 676
            Page 677
            Page 678
        Thursday, May 9
            Page 679
            Page 680
            Page 681
            Page 682
            Page 683
            Page 684
            Page 685
            Page 686
            Page 687
            Page 688
            Page 689
            Page 690
            Page 691
            Page 692
            Page 693
            Page 694
            Page 695
            Page 696
            Page 697
            Page 698
            Page 699
            Page 700
            Page 701
            Page 702
            Page 703
            Page 704
            Page 705
        Friday, May 10
            Page 706
            Page 707
            Page 708
            Page 709
            Page 710
            Page 711
            Page 712
            Page 713
            Page 714
            Page 715
            Page 716
            Page 717
            Page 718
            Page 719
            Page 720
            Page 721
            Page 722
            Page 723
            Page 724
            Page 725
            Page 726
            Page 727
            Page 728
            Page 729
            Page 730
        Saturday, May 11
            Page 731
            Page 732
            Page 733
            Page 734
            Page 735
            Page 736
            Page 737
            Page 738
            Page 739
            Page 740
            Page 741
            Page 742
            Page 743
            Page 744
            Page 745
            Page 746
            Page 747
            Page 748
            Page 749
            Page 750
            Page 751
            Page 752
            Page 753
            Page 754
            Page 755
            Page 756
            Page 757
            Page 758
            Page 759
            Page 760
            Page 761
            Page 762
            Page 763
            Page 764
            Page 765
            Page 766
            Page 767
            Page 768
            Page 769
            Page 770
            Page 771
            Page 772
            Page 773
            Page 774
            Page 775
        Monday, May 13
            Page 776
            Page 777
            Page 778
            Page 779
            Page 780
            Page 781
            Page 782
            Page 783
            Page 784
            Page 785
            Page 786
            Page 787
            Page 788
            Page 789
            Page 790
            Page 791
            Page 792
            Page 793
            Page 794
            Page 795
            Page 796
            Page 797
            Page 798
            Page 799
            Page 800
        Tuesday, May 14
            Page 801
            Page 802
            Page 803
            Page 804
            Page 805
            Page 806
            Page 807
            Page 808
            Page 809
            Page 810
            Page 811
            Page 812
            Page 813
            Page 814
            Page 815
            Page 816
            Page 817
            Page 818
            Page 819
            Page 820
            Page 821
            Page 822
            Page 823
            Page 824
            Page 825
            Page 826
            Page 827
            Page 828
            Page 829
            Page 830
            Page 831
            Page 832
        Wednesday, May 15
            Page 833
            Page 834
            Page 835
            Page 836
            Page 837
            Page 838
            Page 839
            Page 840
            Page 841
            Page 842
            Page 843
            Page 844
            Page 845
            Page 846
            Page 847
            Page 848
            Page 849
            Page 850
            Page 851
            Page 852
            Page 853
            Page 854
            Page 855
            Page 856
            Page 857
            Page 858
            Page 859
            Page 860
            Page 861
            Page 862
            Page 863
            Page 864
        Thursday, May 16
            Page 865
            Page 866
            Page 867
            Page 868
            Page 869
            Page 870
            Page 871
            Page 872
            Page 873
            Page 874
            Page 875
            Page 876
            Page 877
            Page 878
            Page 879
            Page 880
            Page 881
            Page 882
            Page 883
            Page 884
            Page 885
            Page 886
            Page 887
            Page 888
            Page 889
            Page 890
        Friday, May 17
            Page 891
            Page 892
            Page 893
            Page 894
            Page 895
            Page 896
            Page 897
            Page 898
            Page 899
            Page 900
            Page 901
            Page 902
            Page 903
            Page 904
            Page 905
            Page 906
            Page 907
            Page 908
            Page 909
            Page 910
            Page 911
            Page 912
            Page 913
            Page 914
            Page 915
            Page 916
            Page 917
            Page 918
            Page 919
            Page 920
            Page 921
            Page 922
            Page 923
            Page 924
            Page 925
            Page 926
            Page 927
            Page 928
            Page 929
            Page 930
            Page 931
            Page 932
            Page 933
            Page 934
            Page 935
        Saturday, May 18
            Page 936
            Page 937
            Page 938
            Page 939
            Page 940
            Page 941
            Page 942
            Page 943
            Page 944
            Page 945
            Page 946
            Page 947
            Page 948
            Page 949
            Page 950
            Page 951
            Page 952
        Monday, May 20
            Page 953
            Page 954
            Page 955
            Page 956
            Page 957
            Page 958
            Page 959
            Page 960
            Page 961
            Page 962
            Page 963
            Page 964
            Page 965
            Page 966
            Page 967
            Page 968
            Page 969
            Page 970
            Page 971
            Page 972
            Page 973
            Page 974
            Page 975
            Page 976
            Page 977
            Page 978
            Page 979
            Page 980
            Page 981
            Page 982
            Page 983
        Tuesday, May 21
            Page 984
            Page 985
            Page 986
            Page 987
            Page 988
            Page 989
            Page 990
            Page 991
            Page 992
            Page 993
            Page 994
            Page 995
            Page 996
            Page 997
            Page 998
            Page 999
            Page 1000
            Page 1001
            Page 1002
            Page 1003
            Page 1004
            Page 1005
            Page 1006
            Page 1007
            Page 1008
            Page 1009
            Page 1010
            Page 1011
        Wednesday, May 22
            Page 1012
            Page 1013
            Page 1014
            Page 1015
            Page 1016
            Page 1017
            Page 1018
            Page 1019
            Page 1020
            Page 1021
            Page 1022
            Page 1023
            Page 1024
            Page 1025
            Page 1026
            Page 1027
            Page 1028
            Page 1029
            Page 1030
            Page 1031
            Page 1032
            Page 1033
            Page 1034
            Page 1035
            Page 1036
            Page 1037
            Page 1038
            Page 1039
            Page 1040
            Page 1041
            Page 1042
            Page 1043
            Page 1044
            Page 1045
            Page 1046
            Page 1047
            Page 1048
            Page 1049
            Page 1050
            Page 1051
            Page 1052
            Page 1053
            Page 1054
            Page 1055
            Page 1056
        Thursday, May 23
            Page 1057
            Page 1058
            Page 1059
            Page 1060
            Page 1061
            Page 1062
            Page 1063
            Page 1064
            Page 1065
            Page 1066
            Page 1067
            Page 1068
            Page 1069
            Page 1070
            Page 1071
            Page 1072
            Page 1073
            Page 1074
            Page 1075
            Page 1076
            Page 1077
            Page 1078
            Page 1079
            Page 1080
            Page 1081
            Page 1082
            Page 1083
            Page 1084
            Page 1085
            Page 1086
            Page 1087
            Page 1088
            Page 1089
            Page 1090
            Page 1091
            Page 1092
            Page 1093
            Page 1094
            Page 1095
            Page 1096
        Friday, May 24
            Page 1097
            Page 1098
            Page 1099
            Page 1100
            Page 1101
            Page 1102
            Page 1103
            Page 1104
            Page 1105
            Page 1106
            Page 1107
            Page 1108
            Page 1109
            Page 1110
            Page 1111
            Page 1112
            Page 1113
            Page 1114
            Page 1115
            Page 1116
            Page 1117
            Page 1118
            Page 1119
            Page 1120
            Page 1121
            Page 1122
            Page 1123
            Page 1124
            Page 1125
            Page 1126
            Page 1127
            Page 1128
            Page 1129
            Page 1130
            Page 1131
            Page 1132
            Page 1133
            Page 1134
            Page 1135
            Page 1136
            Page 1137
            Page 1138
            Page 1139
            Page 1140
            Page 1141
        Saturday, May 25
            Page 1142
            Page 1143
            Page 1144
            Page 1145
            Page 1146
            Page 1147
            Page 1148
            Page 1149
            Page 1150
            Page 1151
            Page 1152
            Page 1153
            Page 1154
            Page 1155-1158
            Page 1159
            Page 1160
            Page 1161
            Page 1162
            Page 1163
            Page 1164
            Page 1165
            Page 1166
            Page 1167
            Page 1168
            Page 1169
            Page 1170
            Page 1171
            Page 1172
            Page 1173
            Page 1174
            Page 1175
            Page 1176
            Page 1177
            Page 1178
            Page 1179
            Page 1180
            Page 1181
            Page 1182
            Page 1183
            Page 1184
            Page 1185
            Page 1186
            Page 1187
            Page 1188
            Page 1189
            Page 1190
            Page 1191
            Page 1192
            Page 1193
            Page 1194
            Page 1195
            Page 1196
            Page 1197
        Monday, May 27
            Page 1198
            Page 1199
            Page 1200
            Page 1201
            Page 1202
            Page 1203
            Page 1204
            Page 1205
            Page 1206
            Page 1207
            Page 1208
            Page 1209
            Page 1210
            Page 1211
            Page 1212
            Page 1213
            Page 1214
            Page 1215
            Page 1216
            Page 1217
            Page 1218
            Page 1219
            Page 1220
            Page 1221
            Page 1222
            Page 1223
            Page 1224
            Page 1225
            Page 1226
            Page 1227
            Page 1228
            Page 1229
            Page 1230
        Tuesday, May 28
            Page 1231
            Page 1232
            Page 1233
            Page 1234
            Page 1235
            Page 1236
            Page 1237
            Page 1238
            Page 1239
            Page 1240
            Page 1241
            Page 1242
            Page 1243
            Page 1244
            Page 1245
            Page 1246
            Page 1247
            Page 1248
            Page 1249
            Page 1250
            Page 1251
            Page 1252
            Page 1253
            Page 1254
            Page 1255
            Page 1256
            Page 1257
        Wednesday, May 29
            Page 1258
            Page 1259
            Page 1260
            Page 1261
            Page 1262
            Page 1263
            Page 1264
            Page 1265
            Page 1266
            Page 1267
            Page 1268
            Page 1269
            Page 1270
            Page 1271
            Page 1272
            Page 1273
            Page 1274
            Page 1275
            Page 1276
            Page 1277
            Page 1278
            Page 1279
            Page 1280
            Page 1281
            Page 1282
            Page 1283
            Page 1284
            Page 1285
            Page 1286
            Page 1287
            Page 1288
            Page 1289
            Page 1290
            Page 1291
            Page 1292
            Page 1293
            Page 1294
            Page 1295
            Page 1296
            Page 1297
            Page 1298
            Page 1299
            Page 1300
            Page 1301
            Page 1302
            Page 1303
            Page 1304
            Page 1305
            Page 1306
            Page 1307
            Page 1308
            Page 1309
            Page 1310
            Page 1311
            Page 1312
            Page 1313
            Page 1314
            Page 1315
            Page 1316
            Page 1317
            Page 1318
            Page 1319
            Page 1320
            Page 1321
            Page 1322
            Page 1323
            Page 1324
            Page 1325
            Page 1326
            Page 1327
            Page 1328
        Thursday, May 30
            Page 1329
            Page 1330
            Page 1331
            Page 1332
            Page 1333
            Page 1334
            Page 1335
            Page 1336
            Page 1337
            Page 1338
            Page 1339
            Page 1340
            Page 1341
            Page 1342
            Page 1343
            Page 1344
            Page 1345
            Page 1346
            Page 1347
            Page 1348
            Page 1349
            Page 1350
            Page 1351
            Page 1352
            Page 1353
            Page 1354
            Page 1355
            Page 1356
            Page 1357
            Page 1358
            Page 1359
            Page 1360
            Page 1361
            Page 1362
            Page 1363
            Page 1364
            Page 1365
            Page 1366
            Page 1367
            Page 1368
            Page 1369
            Page 1370
            Page 1371
            Page 1372
            Page 1373
            Page 1374
            Page 1375
            Page 1376
            Page 1377
            Page 1378
            Page 1379
            Page 1380
            Page 1381
            Page 1382
            Page 1383
            Page 1384
            Page 1385
            Page 1386
            Page 1387
            Page 1388
            Page 1389
            Page 1390
            Page 1391
            Page 1392
            Page 1393
            Page 1394
            Page 1395
            Page 1396
            Page 1397
            Page 1398
            Page 1399
            Page 1400
            Page 1401
            Page 1402
            Page 1403
            Page 1404
            Page 1405
            Page 1406
            Page 1407
            Page 1408
            Page 1409
            Page 1410
        Friday, May 31
            Page 1411
            Page 1412
            Page 1413
            Page 1414
            Page 1415
            Page 1416
            Page 1417
            Page 1418
            Page 1419
            Page 1420
            Page 1421
            Page 1422
            Page 1423
            Page 1424
            Page 1425
            Page 1426
            Page 1427
            Page 1428
            Page 1429
            Page 1430
            Page 1431
            Page 1432
            Page 1433
            Page 1434
            Page 1435
            Page 1436
            Page 1437
            Page 1438
            Page 1439
            Page 1440
            Page 1441
            Page 1442
            Page 1443
            Page 1444
            Page 1445
            Page 1446
            Page 1447
            Page 1448
            Page 1449
            Page 1450
            Page 1451
            Page 1452
            Page 1453
            Page 1454
            Page 1455
            Page 1456
            Page 1457
            Page 1458
            Page 1459
            Page 1460
            Page 1461
            Page 1462
            Page 1463
            Page 1464
            Page 1465
            Page 1466
            Page 1467
            Page 1468
            Page 1469
            Page 1470
            Page 1471
            Page 1472
            Page 1473
            Page 1474
    Appendix
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
Full Text

1 EB102





JOURNAL

OF THE


House of Representatives

Of the Eighth Regular Session of the Legislature began and
held at the Capitol, in the City of Tallahassee, in the State,
of Florida, on Tuesday, the 2d day of April, A. D., 1901,
being the day fixed by the Constitution of the State of
Flotida, for the meeting of Legislature.

TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 1901.

The House was called to order by Dr. Wm. Forsythe'
Bynum, of Live Oak, Suwannee County, Fla,, the former Chief'
Clerk of the House of Representatives, at 12 o'clock M.
The certified list of the Secretary jof State of members+
elected to the present Legislature, was called and the follow-
members answered to their names:
MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, 1901
J. M. Rivers of Alachua.
J. B. C. Thomas of Alachua.
George R. Blair of Baker.
D. M Gornto of Bradford.
I. W. Pinholster of Bradford.
K. B. Raulerson of Brevard.
R. H. Buford of Calhoun.
W. K. Jackson of Citrus.
William H. Wilson of Clay.
Guy Gillen of Columbia.
L. W. A. Rivers of Columbia.
R. H. Burr, Jr., of Dade.
R. E. Brown of DeSoto.
John C. L'Engle of Duval.
Napolean B; Broward of Duval.
J. Emmett Wolfe of Escambia.
C. Moreno Jones of Escambia.
J. F. C. Griggs of Franklin.



*,. .'







2



R. H. M. Davidson of Gadsden.
Mortimer Bates of Gadsden.
R. H. Hunter of Hamilton.
"H. M. Lee of Hamilton.
William A. Fulton of Hernando.
J. L. Young of Hillsborough.
J. W. Williamson of Hillsborough.
M. A. Parish of Holmes.
M. Jacoby of Jackson.
J. R. Shomaker of Jackson.
Thomas L. Clarke of Jefferson.
J. A. Sledge of Jefferson.
John H. Osteen of Lafayette.
J. S. Godfrey of Lake.
Ben Dowd of Lake.
Francis A. Hendry of Lee.
Geo. P. Raney of Leon.
Edwin M. Hopkins of Leon.
Charles W. McElroy of Levy,
William H. Gunn of Liberty.
J. Ellis Blanton of Madison.
J. H. Redding of Madison.
Crawfori P. Pa,'ih of Manatee.
William K. Zewadski of Marion.
William J. Chambers of Marion.
Joseph Y. Poiter of Monroe.
E. W. Russell of Monroe.
A. J. Jobn-on of Nassau.
John G. McGiffin of Nassau.1
W. L. Pa'mer of Orange.
George W. Crawford of Orange.
J. W. Watson of Osceola.
Henry C. McRae of Pasco.
M. S. Dowden of Polk.
J. L. Close of Polk.
John P. Wall of Putnam.
Frank McRae of Putnam.
Ernest Amos of Santa Rosa.
J. H, Hfarvell of Santa Rosa.
Frank M. Corbett of St. Johns.
John W. Davis of St. Johns.
J. C. B. Koonce of Sumter.
B. F. Umstead of Suwannee.
John H. Grant of Suwannee.
C. E. Duckwo th of Taylor.
C. L. Smith of Volusia.









3



T. J. Sparkman of Volusia.
John K. WVhah y of Wakulla.
Daniel Campben of Walton.
Stephen W. Anderson of Washington.
State of Florida, ):st
Office of Secretary of State I
I, Jno. L. Crawford, Secretary of State of the State of
Florida, do hereby certify that the above and foregoing is a
true and correct list of the members of the House of Repre-
sentaives of the State of Florida, elected on the 6th day of
November, 1900, as shown by the election returns on file in
this office.
Given under my hand and the Great Seal of the
State of Florida, at Tallahassee, the Capital,
this the 2d day of April, A. D. 1901.
[Seal] JOHN L. CRAWFORD,
Secretary of State.

The following members came forward and took the oath of
office prescribed by the Constitution of the State of Florida
before His Honor, M. H. Mabry, Associate Justice of the
Supreme Court of the State of Florida
Messrs. Amos, Anderson, Bates, Blair, Blanton,
Brown, Broward, Buford, Burr, Campbell, Chambers,
Clarke, Close, Crawford, Cobbett, Davidson, Davis, D)wd,
Dowdlen. Diickworth, Fulton, Gillen, Godfrey, Gornto, Griggs,
Grant, Gunn, Harvell, Hendry, Hopkins, Hunter, Jackson,
Jacoby, Johnson, Jones, Koonce, Lee, L'Engle, McElory, Mc-
Giflin, McRae of Pasco, McRae of Putnam, Osteen, Palmer,
Pinholster, Raney, Raulerson, Redding, Rivers of Alachua,
Rivers of Columbia, Shomaker, Sledge, Smith, Sparkman,.
Thomas, Umstead, Wall, Watson, Whaley, Williamson, Wil-
son, Wolfe, Young, and Zewadski---64.
The Chief Clerk announced a quorum present.
Hon. W. K. Zewadski, of Marion, moved that the House
proceed with a permanent organization.
Which was agreed to by House.
Mr. Raney, of Leon, nominated Hon. J. W. Watson, of Os-
ceola, as Speaker.
Upon roll call the vote was:
Messrs. Amos, Anderson, Bates, Blair, Blanton, Brown,
Broward, Buford, Burr, Campbell, Chambers, Clarke, Close,
Crawford, Corbett, Davidson, Davis, Dowd, Dowden, Duck-
worth, Fulton, Gillen, Godfrey, Gornto, Griggs, Grant, Gunn,








4



Harvell, Hendry, Hopkins, Hunter, .Jackson, Jacoby, John-
son, Jones, Koonce, Lee, L'Engle, McElroy, McGiltin, McRae,
of Pasco, Mclae of Putnam, Osteen, Palmer, Pinholster,
Raney, Raulerson, Redding, Rivers of Alachua, Rivers of
Columbia, Shomaker, Sledge, Smith, Sparkman, Thomas,
Umstead, Wall, Whaley, Williamson, Wilson, Wolfe, Young
and Zewadski-64.
The Chief Clerk announced Hon. J. W. Watson elected as,
Speaker.
Ti e Chief Clerk appointed Messrs. McGiftin, of Nassau,.
Zewadski of Marion, and Raney of Leon, to escort the
Speaker to the chair.
The Speaker-elect, being conducted to the chair, in a few
appropriate remarks extended his thanks to the House for the
honor conferred upon him, and stated that he did not wish to
consume their time with a lengthy speech.
Mr. Parrish of Homes, and Mr. Parrish of Manatee, ap-
peared and were sworn in by Hon. Claude L'Engle of Duval,
Notary Public State at large.
Mr. Raney, of Leon, nominated Dr. Wm. Forsyth Bynuum,.
of Live Oak, Fla., for Chief Clerk.
Upon a call of the roll the vote was:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Amos, Anderson, Bates, Blair, Blanton,
Brown, Broward, Buford, Burr, Campbell, Chambers, Clarke,,
Close, Crawford, Corbett, Davidson, Davis, Dowd, Dowden,
Duckworth, Fulton, Gillen, Godfrey, Gornto, Griggs, Grant,
Gunn, Harvell, Hendry, Hopkins, Hunter, Jackson, Jacoby,
Johnson, Jones, Koonce, Lee, L'Engle, McElroy, McGiftin,
McRae of Pasco, McRae of Putnam, Osteen, Palmer, Parrish
of Holmes, Parrish of Manatee, Pinholster, Raney, Raulerson,
Redding, Rivers of Alachua, Rivers of Columbia, Shomaker,
Sledge, Smith, Sparkman, Thomas, Umstead, Wall, Whaley,
Williamson, Wilson, Wolfe, Young and Zewadski-66.
The Speaker declared Dr. Wm. Forsyth Bynum elected,
Chief Clerk.
Mr. Raney, of Leon, made the following nominations.
Assistant Chief Clerk-J. G. Kellum.
Reading Clerk-Nat W. Marion.
Assistant Reading Clerk-G. J. Strozier.
Engrossing Clerk-H. J. Drane.
Enrolling Clerk-R. E. Dickinson.
. Recording Clerk-J. E. King.
Sergeant-at-Arms--J. F. Dorman.
Messenger-John T. Parish.
Door-Keeper-J. C. Sumner.
Janitor-J. E. Brock.











Pages-Lyman Helvenston, Hampton Chambers, Frank
'Clark, Jr., Michel Harvin.
Chaplain-Rev. W. E. H. Mabry.
All of whom were, on motion of Mr. Palmer, of Orange,
-elected by acclamation and were sworn in by the Hon. W. L.
Palmer, of Orange, as Notary Public.
Uoon motion of Mr. Griggs, of Franklin, the Rules of the
last House of Representatives were adopted for the govern-
ment of this House until further ordered.
Mr. Zewadski of Marion, moved that a committee
of three be appointed to notify the Governor, also
a committee of three be appointed to notify
the Senate that the House of Representatives was organized
and ready for business.
The Speaker appointed Messrs Zewadski of Marion, David-
idson of Gadsden, and Palmer of Orange, a committee to
notify the senate, and Messrs. Henry of Lee, L'Engle of
Duval, and Young of Hillsboro, a committee to notify the
Governor.
The committees, after a brief absence, returned and reported
that they had performed the duties assigned them and were
discharged.
Mr. Zewadski moved that the Speaker appoint a Bill Clerk
for the Hunse.
Mr. Wolfe moved that action on the motion relative to a Bill
"Clerk be postponed until to-morrow.
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Wolfe, of Escambia, asked the courtesy of the floor be
extended to Messrs. J. S. Beard, Daniel Sheehan, Joseph
Brown and J. B. Vaughn, of Pensacola.
Mr. Griggs of Franklin, asked the courtesy of the floor be
extended to the Hon. Robt. McNamee, ex-Speaker of the
House of Replresentatives, Florida Legislature, also his wife.
At the repuest of Mr. Corbett, of St. Johns, the courtesy of
the floor was extended to N. W. Mier of St. Johns county.
Mr. Young, of Hillsborough, asked that the privilege of the
floor be extended to Judge F. M. Simonton and F. M. Loomis,
of Hillsborough county.
Mr. Jacoby asked that tle courtesy of the floor be extended
to J. W. Kehoe, H. H. Lewis and A. L. Messer, of Jackson
county.
Mr. Rivers, of Alachua, offered the following resolution:
House Resolution:
Resolved, That the Chief Clerk and the Assistant Chief
Clerk have printed 200 copies of a Calendar of Bills and Res-
olutions for the use of its members from day to day, and that








6



each be paid the sum of seventy-five dollars for the extra ser-
vice rendered.
Which was passed over under the rules.
Mr. Palmer, of Orange, offered the following resolution:
Concurreut Resolution:
Be it resolved by the House of Representatives, the Senate
concurring, That a committee of seven (four from the House
of Representatives and three from the Senate) be appointed
to which shall be referred all measures and resolutions pro-
posed for the relief of the Supreme and'Circuit Courts of the
State.
Which was passed over until tomorrow under the rule.
The following message was received from His Excellency,
the Governor.
State of Florida, Executive Department,
Tallahasse, Fla., April 2, 1901.
Hon. John W. Watson,
Speaker of the House of Renpesentattives:
My Dear Sir-In obedience to the mandate of the Consti-
tution, which directs that the Governor shall communicate by
Message to the Legislature, at each regular session informa-
tion concerning the condition of the State, and recommend
such measures as he may deem expedient, I have the honor
of submitting the following statement and recommendations.
Very respectfully,
W. S. JENNINGS.
Governor of Florida.
On motion of Mr. Zewadski, of Marion, the message was
orderdered spread upon the Journal.











flessage of the Governor.

STATE OF FLORIDA


EXECUTIVE OFFICE, April 2, 1901.
Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives:
In obedience to the mandate of the Constitutioi., which di-
rects that "the Governor shall communicate by Message to
the Legislature, at each regular session, information concern-
ing the condition of the State, and recommend such meas-
Sures as he may deem expedient," I have the honor of submit-
ting the following statements and recommendations:
Financial.

The financial standing of Florida is of the best, she has no
floating debt, and has moneys in all her various funds, as
shown-by the Treasurer's Report, including $277,S85.10 in
the general revenue fund, which makes a creditable showing.
This fund, however, would be somewhat reduced if the items
advanced by the State Treasurer on account of expenditures
in excess of appropriations for the tHospital for the Insane,
and for the State Board of Health, amounting to about
$50,000 and $125,000 paid during the month of January and
about $70,000 to defray the expenses of the Legislature were
deducted.
The bonded indebtedness of the State amounts to $1,032,-
500. One issue of these bonds bear interest at 6 pe:: cent and
the other 7 per cent., as specially mentioned elsewhere; one of
which issues has matured, and the other will mature January
1, 1903. These matured 7 per cent bonds have been purchased
by the Trust Funds of the State. and are now held by such
State funds except $900, which are held by individuals, and
provision should be made for refunding them at a lower rate
of interest, not to exceed 3 per cent. per annum.
It will be observed that there has not been a dollar paid on
these issues of the bonded indebtedness of Florida, except that
there are now in the sinking fund, State bonds amounting to
.$242,50 which bonds should be destroyed by Legislative
authority.
The interest paid on the State debt in 1900 amounted to
$6,9l1. The State's credit will guarantee a re-:ly sale of









8



lier bonds bearing 3 per cent. interest, and thus relieve the
tax payers of one-half of this burden.
It must be borne in mind that the demands of the State In-
stitutions are great, those of the Hospital for the Insane are
approaching an expenditure of $100,000 per annum, and the
necessary appropriations for the various Schools, the State
Capitol .Building, and other Departments and Buildings, sug-
gests the most rigid economy in every step of Legislation, the
application and enforcement of the law, and the greatest ef-
fort is demanded to preserve our financial standing to avoid
making the burden of taxation heavier.
Reports of Cabinet Officers.
In transmitting herewith the bi-ennial reports o. the Sec-
retary of State, Comptroller, Treasurer,' Attorm- y-General,
'Superintendent of Public Instruction and Commi. sioner of
-Agriculture I can only invite your attention to a careful
:study of these reports as they are filled with statiticical data
and information that can not be obtained elsewhere, and no
.member of the Legislature can afford to pass these important
documents by without a most careful study in order that lie
may understand the present financial condition of the State,
its needs and requirements and thus better fit himself for the
task inposec upon him.
reportss of Other State Officers.

I beg to invite your attention to the reports of the State
officers and appointees transmitted herewith. These reports
consists of the report of the Railroad Commissioners, the State
(Chemist, the Adjutant-General, the State Health Officer, the
Superintendent of the Hospital for the Insane, the Secretary
and Treasurer of the Board of Trustees of the Internal Im-
provement Fund, all of which reports have been published and
are transmitted herewith and are of great importance.
Comiptroller's WTirrT'ants Issued for 1'99.
By reference to the Comptroller's report, it will be seen
that warrants were issued in 1899, aggre'gating .$?,366.31,
distributed as follows:
Expenses Executive Dleartment.. . ... $ 39,5?2 71
Expenses Judicial Department. ..... .... 121,959 51
Expenses Legislative Department. ..... .. 65,016 47
Expenses Assessment and Collection of Revenue 66,412 05
"Expenses Florida State Troops ...... 12.016 70
Expenses maintenance of Lunatics.. .... .. 71,716 35










9

Expenses of Educational Institutions. ...... 182,508 29
Expenses of State Chemist and Laboratory. .. 3,669 66
Miscellaneous. .. ........... .. 164,541 57

$727,3'66 31

Comptroller s Warrants Issued for 1900.
Expenses Executive Department... ....... .$ 39,192 45
Expenses Judicial Department.. ......... 99,175 22
Assessment and Collection of Revenue. ...... 58,776 45
Florida State Troops. ...... .... .. ..... 8,362.43
Maintenance of Lunatics. .......... .. 68,302 63
Educational Institutions. ............. 177,831 34
State Chemist and Lahoratry. ... .... .. .. 3,892 28
Miscellaneous. ...... ..... .......... 230,873- 88

$666,404 68



66"
98"



Public Lands and Agricultural Statistics.
'^. *'1' 1'k061 a1anuel punH uo spu3[ [-ooqaos
"6'97 ...... 0061 PU 6681T U1 PIOs IIO4LL



~97' L1('T



. o v zs '' ,
saa o C9"TIg'9T

"msa oa L '86g'iTP

50.10011 7g'O '
s*o5Ut' 1g"'0&'5



S. ....' '..0061T UI pos spiUrq [oogS
. ". '6681 "U PIos pUPT1O.OS

............ 1 ""061 '[ "-4 *
pcUiiq uo spuBj[ uaMiAolduI [Iu.mI.-LuI
S" *. 00.T Puv 6681 1 PPIos 113oL

006OO U puos'spB-r] 4IuUiOmAoidluI, a4joluJ
6681 UT PIos spUTsj[ jIuIoU5AojdmI [i1uhstTuj

TC061 T '48 Anu,, v'punq u0o spun,[ duiw,3
"*" 0061T pU 6681 UT pTos spuI[ Moj,

"" "". "... '0061 Pl~os spu5 [ d-IuIi,
"" ... 6681 PIos spftq d([0iu(u\



.: pa:i3 .1pxa a Isa osajaa jo.Slo snal. lu [i!otj
0.14 a0.1nl1'!.i1'd V Jo .lpuoi.:siuluioj aq o JO 4jodaj aqimp TIo.I
"1\\1v[ qq )d(t.l),-).cI aqqC uII sn sa.ianp jaOilo Lpns iauoj
-aOCd [[r[t- -up osu[j OX.1 S 011T JO .uo.s.[ATadnts oAV-q osvp uInmqs
OH oJI 'pln[uiUIJ Jo 1nahj1n 0.t4 dOaio iyes p[.we sppunI oTiqnd
Si 10 o04 T!PUOI.Id sl.i ,,i 145^ IJO, ,o uo1TSiAj1dns11 OAV4 JI5V anIS Jln
-,,\ jo ,1.".' : 03Juo0 01J.3 } rU '. )!.o.i<- uo.I110 -1'.no ,q) LOJL











Seminary lands sold in 1899. ... 1,94.32 acres
Seminary lands sold .in 1900,. .. ,l-:.10 acres

Total sold for 1899 and 1900.. . 2,034.42 acres
Semlin ary lands on hand January 1, 1901 28,3 ;.92 acres
The Bonded Debt of Florida.
The bonded debt of Florida is now $1,032,500, consisting
of 7 per cent. bonds issued in 1871, to mature January 1,
1901, and 6 per cent. bonds issued in 1873, to mature Jan-
uary 1, 1903, as follows:
Seven per cent Bonds of 1871.
Amount issued. ... ... .. ... $350,000 00
Deduct amount in sinking fund 82,300.00 '47,7(0 00

Six per cent. Bonds of 1873.
Amount issued ..... .... ... $925,000 00
Deduct amount in sinking fund 160,200 00 $^64,800 00

$1,0L2,500 00
Of the seven per cent bonds issued in 1871, there are now
$269,700.00 outstanding as valid obligations against the
State.
Of this amount, there was on January 1st, 1901, in the
State School, Seminary and Agricultural Colloge Funds
$255,700, leaving in the hands of individuals $12/'00. Since
January 1st, 1901, the State School Fund has bought
$11,100 leaving now in the hands of individuals $ 00, which
do not bear interest since January 1st, 1901, and will be taken
up when presented.
These bonds matured January 1st, 1901, and the Legis-
lature should provide for "redeeming or refunding them" at
"a lower rate of interest." Constitution of Florida, Article
IX, Section 6.
As all these bonds of 1871 are now held by the several edu-
cational funls of the State, except $900 which will be taken
up by the State school fund when presented, it would be ad-
visable if these bonds are to be refunded to provide for the
Execution of one manuscript bond, payable to each fund, cov-
ering the amount of the bonds held by them respectively. This
will avoid the expense of issuing lithograph bonds and pre-
vent the possibility of the loss of the bonds
Of the bonds issued in 1873 there are now $7C4.800 out-
standing as valid obligations against the State, of this amount
thero was on January 1st, 19'01, in the State Slchool, Semi-'
nary and Algricultural ColleoP' funds $586,000, leaiing in the.
hands of individuals .$178,800.









11



These bonds will mature and become payable on January
ltt, 1'90)3, therefore it is incumbent upon this Legislature to
provide for "redeeming or refunding" them "at a lower rate
of interest." Constitution of Florida, Article IX, Section 6.
The bonds of this issue now held by the educational funds.
of the State could be converted into manuscript bonds, as
recommended for the seven per cent bonds.
The report of the State Treasurer for January 1st, 1901,
shows that the three permanent educational funds of the
State own Florida State bonds amounting to $841,700, and
also bonds of other States amounting to $106,000. and that
a little more than $30,000 belonging to these funds then re-
mained uninvested.
The bonds of other States belonging to these funds, can be
sold and the proceeds invested in Florida State bonds. This,:
with the amount on hand uninvested, and the proceeds from
the probable sale of school and seminary lands during this
year and the next will enable the educational fund of the State
to take up as investments the entire bonded debt of this.
State by January 1st, 1903, when the bonds issued in 1893
mature. This will not reduce the bonded debt of the State
from its present amount, viz: $1,032,500, but it will put.
the State in the position of controlling in her own trust
funds the entire debt of the State.
Bonds and Other Papers.
My attention was called to the fact that there is an old
safe in the watchman's room underneath the Treaurer's office
in the Capitol building, said to contain bonds and other pa-
pers. Its contents not being known, the safe having been
securely locked for several years and the key left with the
State Treasurer, and believing that the interests o" the State-
could be best subserved by bringing the matter to the atten-
tion of the Legislature, the Governor directed: the State
Agents. Messrs. W. V. Knott, J. P. Cobb and J. E. King, to
open the said safe in the presence of the State Trefsiurer and
in the presence of each other and make a complet:- inventory
and list of the contents thereof.and report the same in detail
to be transmitted to the Legislature.
In obedience thereto their inventory and report is trans-
mittel herewith, which will show in detail the contents of the
said safe: Among the items will be observed three thousand'
(3,000) bonds of the Jacksonville Pensacola and Mobile Rail-
Company of $1.000 each with coupons, dated Jrnuary 1st,.
1870, payable to the State of Florida, and amounting to $8,--
98 4,360. which are known as the M. S. Littlefield bonds.









12



One thousand (1,000) bonds of the Florida CeoLral Rail-
road Co. of $1,000 each with coupons, dated January 1st,
1st, 1870, and amounting to $3,376,000 payable t) the State
"of Florida, endorsed on the back by Harrison Reed, Governor
of Florida.
One hundred (100) first mortgage bonds of the South
Florida Railroad Company of $10,000 each, date 1 November
4th, 1871, payable to the State of Florida, with coupons,
-amounting to $3,306,000.
There were many other items contained in this iafe consist-
ing of coupons, detached, Comptroller's paid warr i ts, Treas-
:urer's certificates, several thousand in number, as will appear
by the report, all of which is submitted.
General Revenue Fund.
This fund consists of the annual tax levy authorized by the
Legislature, the licenses collected for the State, tie receipts
from insurance companies and other items enuimenated in the
"Treasurer's report.
The expenditures from this fund cover all the generall ex-
penses of the State government, including the expl:ises of the
Legislature and the appropriations made by the Legisla.ture
for the assessment and collection of revenue, the interest on
the State debt, the maintenance of the several St-.e Colleges
.nd Seminiaries, the HTospital for the Insane, the Inl.:tituto for
the Blind, )eaf and Dumb, for jurors, the salaries of all
State officers and clerks, and all other pprolpriaticn made by
the Legislature when. no other fund is specially mentioned.
The tax levy for general revenue purposes for the year 1900
'was 2j mills on the dollar, and it is hoped the Legi :lature will
be able to reduce this rate in the future since the annual pay-
ments of interest on the State debt will be reduced if the ma-
turing State bonds are renewed at a lower rate of interest.
It is reasonable to suppose the receipts for general revenue
purposes from other sources will be increased in the future.
State Board of Health Fund.
The Legislature of 1899 authorizedI the levy of o half mill
on the dollar for the expenses of the State Board of Health,
and the receipts to this fund for 1900 were: From one-half
mill tax, $43,556.10; from sale and redemption of tax certifi-
,cates, $1,415.02, making a total of $41,971.12. TIh expenses
"of the State Board of Hehltll for 1900 exceeded th< receipts
owingr to unusual dtlmands on the fund, and it limv become
r,(cssa'ry for the Legislature to supplement the State Board








13

of Health Fund by an appropriate n from the General Reve-
nue Fund.

Pension Tax Fund.

Under Chapter 4670, Acts of 1899, an annual tax levy of
one mill upon the dollar is collected for pensions. There are
now on the Pension Roll 780 persons, and the number is
steadily increasing.
The Sinkinq Fund.
The collection of a special tax for raising a sinking fund
for the ultimate redemption of the bonded debt of the State
has been suspended for a number of years, and as a conse-
quence, the bonded debt has not been diminished. The
bonds now in the sinking funds should be cancel: or other-
wise disposed of by the Legislature and the cash carried in
the funds should be converted into the general revenue fund..

Principal of State School Fund.
Ine principal of the State School Fund, as sb- wn by the
r'reasulrerls report of January 1, 1901, consists.of $696,200
invested in bonds of several States, and of $30,720.38 unin-
vested at that time. This fund is derived from ihe sale of
the lands granted by the United States to the StSie, for the
support of public schools, by the Act of Congre-: approved
March 3, 1845. The report of the Commissioner of Agricul-
ture shows that there were on the 10th of January, 1901, 295,-
977.86 acres of school lands unsold. The uninvested portion of
the fund, as well as the proceeds from the sale of the school
lands are being invested by the State Board of Education as
rapidly as the bonds required by Section 267 of the Revised
Stat;tutes can be purchased at reasonable rates.

Interest of State School Fund.
The interest on the bonds of the State School .i'und is re-
quired by Section 7, Article 12 of the Constitution of Flori-
da, as amended in 1894 to be distributed "for the support and
maintenance of public free schools, among the several coun-
ties'of the State in proportion to the average atterid; nce upon
the schools in said counties respectively." The TLgislature
during the last four years has made appropriate us out of
these funds for the clerical assistance and in:iiltcntal ex-
penses of the Superintendent of. Public Instrucficn.








14



Agricultural College Fu11d.

By Act of Congress approved July 2, 186., the United
,Iates granted certain lands to the State of Floril. to be sold
-nd the proceedss invested in United States or State securities
to constitute a perpetual fund, thea capital of wlr ih shall re-
main forever undiminished, and the interest of which shall
.be inviolably appropriated to the endowment, -!. port and
mnintenar.ce of at least ont college where the le, iinlg object
shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical
studies, and including military tactics, to '.ach such
branches of learning as are related to agrii u!-;ural and
mechanic arts. The proceeds from the sale of tli- land were
invested in State bonds and this constitutes the pincieial of
the Agricultural Fund which is shown by the Treasurer's re-
port to be $153,800. The annual interest of tli's amount
has been $9,1107. This, with the appropriation made by the
Legislature, has made the annual receipts in the A ielicultural
*College Fund for current expenses. Some of tte Florida
State bonds held by this fund matured January i, 1901, and
others will mature January 1, 1903. If these lorlds are re-
newed by the Legislature at a lower rate of interest as pro-
vided by Section 6, Article 9, of the Constitutiolh o' Florida,
the annual receipts of interest on the principal vill be re-
duced.

Seminary Fund.

By Act of Congress approved March 3, 18-15, it( United
States granted to the State of Florida two entire. townships
of land for the use of two seminaries of learnina0, one to be
located east and the other west of the Suwannee river. From
the )proceeds of sales of lands there are now in the principal
of the Seminary Fund, $)T7,700.00 invested in Florida State
bonds. From this the fund has derived an annual interest
of $5,937.00, which amount has been equally divicl d between
the West Florida Seminary, at Tallahassee, and the East
Florida Seminary, at Giiinesville. The Legi-leture has
made appropriations to each of these Seminaries to provide
suitablle buildings and to meet current expenses. The re-
newal of the matured Florida bonds in this fund will prob-
ably reduce the annual interest receipts. The rc.,-rt of the
Commissioner of Agriculture shows that ihcre were
"28,383.9? acres of land belonging to this fund, ori January 1,
190-1, tlhe proceeds from which when sold will be invested
in State bonds.








15



"The M.orrill Educational Fund.
By act of Congress, approved August 30. 1890. th-e United
States annually appropriates a sum of money whAi-, now ag-
gregates $25,000 per 'annum to this State "in id of land
grant colleges of agriculture and mechanic arts.. The ap-
propriation is equally divided between the Agri.'itural Col-
lege for white students, at Lake City, and the Ncrmal and
Industrial College for colored students, at Tallahlnsee, to be
applied only to instruction in agriculture, the mre Ianic arts,
the English language, and the various branches of mathe-
matical, physical, natural and economic science, with special
reference to their applications in the industries of life, and
to facilities for such instruction."
E.iperij ea t Station Fund.
By act' of Congress approved March 2, 1887, the United
States appropriates annually to the State $15,00!. which is
used at the Experiment Station at Lake City fP the pur-
poses defined in the act cited.
One Mill School Fund.
Section 6, Articlel2, of the Constitution prov';c that "a
special tax of one mill on the dollar of all taxa;,; property
in th- State, in addition to the other means pro, added, shall
be levied and apportioned annually for the support: an-d main-
tenan:ce of public free schools." The receipts iii this fund
for 1900 were: one mill tax collected, $88,166.60". from sale
and exemptionn of tax certificates, $5,229.32, making a total
of $-3,385.92, which was distributed to the seve:'a counties
of th. State as provided by Section 6, Articlel2 o the Con-
stitution, after paying the printing and other expci ses in the
office of Superintendent of Public Instruction.
The attention of the Legislature is called to t e imperfect
condition of the law regulating the conveyan'ue cf school
lands the title to which is in the State under the A( of Con-
gress. approved March 3, 1845. As the laws (.' 'his State
now read, there is no direct authority in any officer or person
to0 convey the tile to purchasers. The Cons-tl,:iion, Sec-
tion 3, Article 12 provides that the Governor, retary of
State, Attorney-General, State Treasurer and State Superin-
tendcnt of Publi.. Instruction shall constitute a body corpor-
ate t). be known as the State Board of Education of Florida,
of whie; the Goernor shall be President and the Superin-
teodent of Public Instruction Secretary. This board "shall
have the manag-.nent and investment of all State school
funds under such regulations as may be prescribed by law."







6.



Section 234 of 'iL Rlevised Statutes vests said board "with
full power to perform all corporate acts for educational pur-
poses." Secti_ 2 935 authorized the board "to obtain possess-
ion of and cake charge, oversight and management of all
lands granted or held by the State for'educational purposes,
and to fix the terms of sale, rental or use of such lands, and
to do whatever may be necessary to preserve them from tres-
pass or injury, and for their improvement." Section 151 of
the Revised Statutes of Florida provides that deeds signed
by the ofmeers or trustees making the sale and impressed with
the seal of the "Department of Agriculture of the State of
Florida" shall be operative and valid without witnesses to the
execution thereof, but nowhere is authority directly given to-
any one to convey the title to school or seminary lands the
title to which is in the State under the Act of Congress above
mentioned. This should be remedied in justice to persons
who purchase these lands, by an act confirming all titles here.
tofore sought to be ]passed and to provide a definite mod' of
conveyance for the future.
Relief of the Saupreme Court.
Many years ago the Supreme Court Docket became con-
gested, and for the past several years much has teen said and
wiitten upon the subject, yet we find the problem unsolved.
Each Legislature since 1893 has considered to some extent
various plans for relief, and bills have been introduced look-
ing to the solution of this condition. During the sessions of
the Legislature of 1893 and 1895, an impression was made
upon my mind as a member of the House of Representatives,
that all plans submitted were subject to a Contsitutional ob-
jection, andtha ththe Supreme Court Justices were opposed to
the enactment of any law upon that subject. I am advised
that at subsequent sessions of the Legislature of 1897 and
13'99, an impression .again prevailed that the Court was op-
posed to the enactment of any law upon this subject. This,
however, I am now authoratively prepared to state was not
authorized by the Justices nor was such an impression created
by them, or with their consent, and I am glad to be able to
state that the present Supreme Court Justices are perfectly
willing that such a law be enacted and given a fair trial, their
only anxiety in the matter being that a law be so framed as
not to violate the provisions of the Constitution. It is conceded
that the question involves many Constitutional considera-
tions.
The power of the Government of the State is divided by
the Constitution into three departments, Legislative, Execu-








17



tive and Judicial, which must be maintained and respected.
The Judicial power of the State is vested in the Supreme
Court, and other courts as therein stated. The Supreme
Court, in the language of the Consitution, shall consist of
three Justices. Thus it is clear that the Legislature has no,
authority under the provisions of the Constitution, to enact.
a law providing for additional Justices, or to direct the Ju-
diciary in its work, or to clothe other persons (except as,
stated therein,) with Judicial functions.
A study of the decisions upon this subject of other States,.
suggests with much force the grave Constitutional rocks that.
must be guarded against in order to enact an effectual law,,
and the delicacy with which the Court itself must approach-
the consideration of such a law. If a law on this, or any
other subject, is enacted by the Legislature that is in viola-
tion of the Constitution, it is the Court's sworn duty to de-
clare such law unconstitutional. Nothing short of that,
could be expected of the Court, nor anything else than the'
faithful discharge of its duties would meet the approval of
the people of' Florida. Many of the States have enacted-
laws creating a Supreme Court Commission, to enable the
Court to dispose of the accumulated cases, which, when.
properly framed, have been declared Constitutional. In
California a law was passed authorizing the Justices of the
Supreme Court to employ suitable persons learned in the
law to assist the Justices in their work, and to perform such,
duties as the Jastices should require under rules and reg-
ulations to be prescribed by the Court. This law was held
to be Constitutional. These Commissioners were not vested
with Judicial powers or official duties.
The operation of the law was a success, and I recommend
the enactment of a similar law, carefully prepared to guard
against Constitutional objections, authorizing the Justices of
the Supreme Court to select and employ three suitable men
learned in the law to assist them in their work, and that an,
appropriation be made to pay such Commissioners of the
Supreme Court a like sum as compensation as the Supreme.'
Court Justices receive.
Taxation on Banks.
Thep assssmnnt of bank stocks and property presents many
difficult problems. We have private banks which do not
make statements or reports of their financial condition or-
capital to any official, others are carrying on a banking
business under special charters, many State banks are or-
ganized under the general banking act, some with the mini--
2 H








18



"inum capital of stock, others with the nmaxilum, there are
-atso many national banks, some with $50,000 capital stock,
others with $100,000 and upwards with other resources, un-
divided profits and surplus, with many other items of value,
.many times greater than their capital stock, for Which they
make no showing upon the tax books.
An examination of the assessment rolls, shows perhaps
.greater inequality in such assessments than that of any other
property in the State, and in view of the fact that the county
assessors do not have access to the records and reports of our
SState banks or national banks, having no means of reviewing
,same, and are thereby unable to make uniform assessments
upon bank stocks and property, I therefore recommend that
,a law be enacted authorizing the State Comptroller, who is
the custodian of the records, has supervision over the State
Alanks, and access to the records of the national banks, to
assess, with the assistance and advice of the Attornev-(Gen-
notify the assessors of the valuations placed upon such
stock.
Ta1.ratioin.
One of the most important questions for your considera-
tion is that of taxation. I took occasion to refer to this sub-
ject in my inaugural address Which I take the liberty of re-
producing here as expressing my views on this subject:
Section 1, Article IX of the Constitution reads "Tlie Leg-
:islature shall provide for a uniform and equal rate of taxa-
tion, and shall prescribe such rules and regulations. as shall
secure just valuations of all property both real and per-
sonal, exempted property excepted."
This is a subject that has perplexed men of experienced
minds from time imnmemorial and will continue to do so
while the subject lasts. It has been ascertained that under
-our present system of valuations, property in some of the
counties is assessed at 90 per cent. of its value, while in
other counties it is assessed at less than 20 per cent. of its
value. In 1871, the Legislature created a State Board of
Equalization to determine the relative value of real estate in
tlte different counties. This Board made its report to the
Legislature of 1872, which. report was confirmed. Since that
time, nearly thirty years, there las been no power or boarn
1of equalization to determine the relative values of real estate
in the different counties, resulting in a policy of local depres-
sion of valuations which thas placed our State in the awkward
"position of maintaining an uneven burden of government and










a higher rate of taxation than Would otherwise have been re-
quired. That a remedy should be provided to relieve those
who are bearing unjust burdens and to provide for a uniform
and equal rate of taxation must be apparent. I am convinced
that such is the will and the wish of the people of Florida.
"and suggest the creation of a State Board of Equalization
whose powers shall be prescribed by law.

Tax Sa'ls and Redeilption Department.

"The several laws regulating the sale and redemption' of
the tax sale certificates held by the State are found to be
in a very unsatisfactory condition. There are many thousands
of these certificttes'in their original form as forwarded by
"the tax collectors of the various counties, in, the custody of
"the State Treasurer, Vwho is authorized to make sales and
a silg the certificates held by the State.
Tlhe importance of this Department, both to the State and
"to the various counties, may be fully appreciated when it
is unde-rstood that the State has received during the year
1900 from the ale and redemption of tax sale certificates
held by the State, the sum of $114,469.89, and that of this
sum $53,988.45 has been remitted to the counties.
Many of the counties, : contend that the county should re-
ceive ips full proportion of the interest received from sales
mid redemil:tions, and siave been answered, I am informed,
that the State pays 1al the expenses of advertising the lands
for tlhe non-payment of taxes, and the expense of maintain-
ing this Department. It is .-bo expressly provided that at
the expiration of two years from the dates of such certifi-
cates purchased by the State, that the title to the lands de-
scribed in the certificates becomes vested in the, State, with-
out deed or other evidence .title, and under this theory
lands so purlchiised by the Stte, being iSiate, property, are
exempt under the provisions of the Constitution from fur-
ther taxation. Much inconvenience has also: been experi-
enced by those whoselands have .been sold for the non-pay-
ment of taxes, who desire to redeem their lands under the
present system, which requires'a certificate of. the clerk of
the circuit court of the county where the land is situated.
siting forth a description of the property, date of sale and
number of sales against the same, such certificates to be for-
lrded to the Capital and returned to the county where, the
lands are situated.
In considering this subject the Executive is mindful of








20



its magnitude, not only as a source of general revenue to the
State, but for the reason that the operation of this law is
inconvenient, complicated and expensive.
In my opinion a new law upon the subject should be enacted
and I therefore recommend that a law be framed to compre-
hend the entire subject, taking up the entire system of State
taxation on properties, with a definite village for State pur-
poses, and a separate definite village for county purposes, re-
quiring each county to bear its proportionate expense of the
advertising and cost incident to collection of the same to be
audited by the State Comptroller, and receiving each its pro-
portion of the taxes and interest arising from the sale and
redemptions, the State receiving its just proportion of the'
taxes and interest.
In my opinion the tax certificates held by the State should
be returned to the clerks of the circuit courts of the counties:
from whence they came, where the lands are situated, the
clerks to have charge of and execute deeds for the sales thereof
under rules a.nd regulations to be prescribed by law, that all
redemption anil sales be made by the clerks of the circuit
courts, and that they be directed to keep a complete record
of all such certificates and sales, making stated reports and
remittances to the proper officers of all redemption and sales of
property sold for the non-payment of taxes, a record of all
such tax sales to be kept in each office in such form as the
State Comptroller shall prescribe, a like record to be kept by
the Comptroll-r in which shall be kept a complete list of all
certificates and reports of sales and redemptions made by the
various clerks of the circuit courts, and that such law provide
that all lands sold; for the non-payment of taxes shall re--
main upon the tax books.
State Board of fHealth.
Questions have arisen of vital importance to our health
laws. The Quarantine Station erected on Mullet Key was
built without first procuring a title to the land upon which
it is situated, and the only right of occupancy we hold under
is a temporary license, or as the reading is, "revokable license"
at the pleasure of the War Department. During the past
month the War Department notified the State Board of Health
to vacate Mullet Key. Unfortunately all of our important
quarantine stations are located on Government property where
we hold only "revokable license" at the pleasure of the War
Department.
It is plain that the Marine Hospital Service, which is acting
under powers delegated by the War Department, are undertak-
iFg to usurp the powers of our State Board of Health and









21



"State contr l o(f the protection of the health of our citizen-
ship. It may be argued that the Marine Hospital Service can
operate the quarantine stations or plants, and thus rid the
'State of the heavy expense and commercial shipping interests
of taxation, the Government service being free to such inter-
ests. It may be only a short time when the Treasury Depart-
ment will revoke the permission given to the State authori-
ties for the occupancy of Pensacola Quarantine Station and
that at Fenanndina, which are both on military reservations
of the Government. This will no doubt lead to an ejectment
from Santa Rosa Island, Amelia Island, and probn-,bh G oa-)r-
illa Island, Charlotte Harbor. The President of the State
Board of Health, under the circumstances, recommends in his
report to the Board, that the Mullet Key station be sold to the
General Government. This report I am advised was not
,adopted by the Board at its meeting held in the City of Jack-
sonville in February last, and the whole matter was referred
to the Executive for investigation and consideration. I
requested Attorney-General Lamnar to confer with the Sec-
retary of War at Washington upon the subject, which con-
"ference was held on or about the 10th of M\arch, and after
considering his report of such conference, and an investigation
"of the matter, during the limited time I have had opportunity
to consider it, I have reached the firm conclusion that. the
.State should not sell its plant or quarantine station at Mullet
Key, or lease or surrender its control to the General Govern-
ment. When the State yields its power to control entries of
infected vessels to our ports, it yields the power and the right
to protect the citizenship of Florida from epidemics. One in-
fected vessel in 1878 gave yellow fever and desolation to the
Mississippi Valley, from. Port Eads to Gallipolis, 0., and
"Chattanooga, Tenn. One infected vessel entering the port
of Savannah in 1876 and another entering Brunswick the
,same year gave serious loss; an infected vessel entering the
'port of Pascagoula caused the death by yellow fever of many
good Mississippians and one who had been an honored citizen
",of this State It only requires one patient from an infected
vessel to form a focus from which an epidemic may arise-
"Extract from twelfth annual report of the State Health Of-
ficer of Florida.
I am informed that to remove this plant from Mullet Key,
that the State might continue to operate it, is met with a
-serious obstacle that there is no other land that the State has
or can acquire, suitable for such location. This, however.
ecan be overcome by the expenditure of a small sum over and








29'



above -what a suitable location would cost, if the State couhl(
procure one, by the construction or purchase of a suitable
barge upon which this plant could be placed and operated,.
which can be done to a greater advantage than a stationary
plant, on account of its being portablle, and thus more useful.
Therefore, I strongly urge that no sale or lease of the plant
at Mulllet Kev, or at any of the stations owned and operated
by the State be granted or authorized, and I recomnnend that
the State Board of Health be empowered and directed to pro-
ceed to purchase or construct a suitable barge, and continue
to operate it, as in the wisdom of. the Board and the State
Health Officer may be required.
In 1889 the Executive found it necessary to call an extra
session of the Legislature to enact a law upon this subject in
compliance with section 3 of Article 2 of the Constitution of
the State. Governor Fleming in his message to that Legisla-
ture in reference to the epidemic of the year 1888, said, "Dur-
ing the past year a great shadow rested upon our State. Var-
ious communities within her borders were stricken with yellow
fever. Death claimed for many of its victims some of the.
most highly esteemed and useful of our citizens whose loss
will be sorely felt. for many years to come. Grief and afflic-
tion have overwhelmed many of, our people. Business was
sorely interrupted throughout the State and in places entirely
destroyed, and our people have sustained pecuniary losses which,
can not bes estimated." It is unnecessary for me to say more.
The causes that actuated the establishment of the State Board
of Health have not been removed. The chances of epidemics
have been increased many fold by the activity of commerce
that has been permitted by our beneficent laws and the import-
ance that Florida bears to foreign infected ports. The effi-
ciency of the operation of the State Board of Health is no
longer an experiment; it has been and is a success; we do not
follow in the scientific prevention of epidemics, but lead the
world, having the best system known to civilization, being the
model for the plan that the General Government is operating
under. This high standard should not be relaxed, but im-
proved. Money economically expended for the protection of
the health and lives of the citizenship of Florida is well spent.
Many new demands have been made upon the State Board
of Health and upon the Health Officer, the Board of Health
requiring much of the time of its agents in various sections
of the State and the consequent expenditure of money. One
important item of such expenditure has been caused by the
prevalence throughout the State of small pox, the State-








23



Health Officer has been called upon by almost every com--
munity, and the Board has responded with liberality to stamp
out this loathsome disease. I therefore respectfully reconm-
lmend that a compulsory vaccination law be enacted, and that
the necessary appropriations for the efficient work of the State
Board of Health, and a deficiency appropriation be made to,
cover the amount advanced by the State Treasurer with the-
consent of the Governor, in excess of the appropriation,
niounting to $19,799.67, as shown by the Treasurer's report.
filed with the Governor.
State Capitol Building.
For some years past the question of the removal of the-
State Capital has been occasionally mentioned, and this ques-
tion was passed upon by the State Convention held in the
eity of Jacksonville June 20, 1900, in which it was declared
that the question of the removal of the seat of Government
should be settled by the white Democratic electors of the State
at a primary election to be held at the time of the holding of
the State election, November 6, 1900. It was further de.-
c(hlred b the Convention, as expressed in the platform, "that
if Tallahassee .shall receive a plurality vote, then the Legis-
lature shall provide better and safer accommodations for the
Statee's records and business." Part of section 25.
In accordance with this provision of the platform, the ques-
tion of the removal of the Capital was submitted to such-b
"primary election, and the returns of such primary election .)r
this onestion were canvassed by the State Democratic Execu-
tive Committee on the 20th day of November, 1900, and -
certifilate of the result of said election has been filed in the
Executive office by Hon. Frank Clark, Chairman of the Com-
mittee, attested by Hon. James E. Crane, Secretary of the
C(on,] ittee in which it is stated, "that the returns did show
fthl the City of Tallahassee did receive, not only a plurality
of the votes cast threat, but did receive a majority over all of
the candidate cities for the State Capital location,2' Thus it
is made apparent that a necessity exists for additional room,
better and safer accommodations for the State's records and9
husinerss, and that the seat. of Government shall remain at
Tallahassee.
The departments are greatly crowded and are in need of'
more room. Two plans have been suggested, one that suita-
ble additions be made to the present Capitol buildings, the'
nftbr theb a separate building be erected for certain depart-
ments. These are questions for your consideration and de-
termiinationi. I respectfully reconmmelnd the erection of suit'-








24



able structures such as the necessities of our prosperous and
growing State demands. My present information leads me to
favor the erection of additions as wings to the present Capital
building, which I am advised can be constructed of suitable
material, made commodious, comfortable and substantial of
-approved architectural design, within the cost of $75,001).
State Auditor.
One of the most important positions is that of State Audit-
or, authorized by the Act of the Legislature of 1897,
Chapter 4587, Laws of Florida. Under this author-
ity Mr. W. V. Knott was employed and the results
,of his work, have demonstrated the wisdom of the
law, and thousands of dollars have been saved
-to the State and the counties by his examinations of acconitls.
The appropriation made for this position is wholly l.il-e-
quate as his salary is meagre and much of same is reqJti'red
to be paid as traveling expenses and thus limits his usefulness.
"There are more demands, and of the most urgent cla racter.
made upon his time than he is able to comply with, and I
therefore recommend, that the expenses of the Traveling Aud-
tor be paid upon the approval of statements rendered in addi-
tion to his salary, to the end that his time can be given to the
investatgation of accounts for the State and of the various chun-
ties.
Education.
Our Democratic Platform declared in favor of the most lib-
eral policy in the development of the Public School System,
pointing with pride to the record made and insisting upoi
,energetic advances in the same direction, and 1 tlherfore,
"recommend that liberal 'appropriations be made for the sup-
-port, not only of our State Institutions, but of the public
school system throughout the State, and I beg to call your
.special attention to the condition of the buildings at the State
Agricultural College at Lake City. This Instituion is in
.great need of a substantial, commodious main building, and I
recommend that an appropriation be made to construct such
"building as found necessary at that institution, not to exceed
$50,000. It is of the utmost importance that the barracks be
enlarged, repaired and furnishcld, and I also recommend a
suitable appropriation be made for that purpose.
South Florida Mili/ary and Educational Institute.
Under the act of the Leyislature passed during the session
of 1895 (establishing the Sou tlh Florida4 Militiay ;lnd Edia-








25



tional institute at Bartow, placing it under the direction and
control of the State Board of Education, suitable grounds were
selected, containing 13.50 acres of land, upon which has been
erected a commodious school building containing offices, class
rooms and quarters sufficient to accommodate the faculty and
cadets. This school has prospered, and its high rank is ac-
knowledged by those familiar with its work. In view of the
fact that the State owns all other educational institutions
that comes under the management and control of the State
Board of Education, I recommend the purchase of these
grounds and buildings that the State may have further con-
trol of the improvements and betterments needed,
Florida Hospital for the Insane.
The Florida Hospital for the Insane, near Chattahoochee,
in Gadsden county, is situated on a tract of land formerly
known as the "Chattahoochee Arsenal," which was granted
and donated to the State of Florida by an Act of Congress,
approved December 15, 1870, for "educational purposes," as
stated in the first section thereof. It is further enacted in
the second section of said law, that "the Secretary of War is
hereby' authorized and directed to transfer said property to
the Board of Internal Implrovement of the State of Florida
to 1be held by them in trust for the use, benefit and extension
,of the purposes of this grant or for such other public purposes
as said board may deem proper." In 1877 Hon. Geo. P.
Raney, Attorney-General of the State, made application to
have the title to this property convoyed to the trustees of the
Internal Improvement Fund, and on October 30, 1877, sub-
:mitted to the board a communication from Brigadier-General
S. V. Benet, Chief of Ordnance, in which it is shown that the
Judge Advocate General of the Army, to whom the request
was referred, had expressed to the Secretary of War the opin-
ion that the State authorities of Florida, having been in act-
ual occupation of the lands and buildings of the Apalachicola
"or Chattahoochee Arsenal at the date of the Act of Congress
donating them to the State was complete, and that no formal
deeds were necessary to be given to the State of Florida under
said Act, stating further that the appurtenances on the land
are embraced in a deed of J. W. King, attorney for Daniel
AMteliett, dated February 17, 1834, and recorded in the
clerk's office of Gadsden county, requesting that the proper
authorities constituting the Board of Internal Improvement
of the State of Florida, file in his office a suitable reIeit for
said property. Thus llti'i' to be a on- stion as to wheth-
er th is titlr- stands vs\: in te 'tat- of Florida. or wheliber









26

it is vested in the Board of Trustees of the Internal Improve-
ment Fund of the state of Florida, to be held by them in trust
for the use, beliefit and extension of the purposes of the
grant, or for such other public p!ur-poses as said board may
deem proper, as stated in the Act and to which your attention
is invited.
The following memoranda will give some idea of the build-
ings and improvements upon the property and when con-
structed:
1. Old laundry building one story, wood, constructed in
1894.
2. Dynamo room, one story brick, constructed 1834, addi-
tion 18917.
3. Workshop, one story, brick, constructed 1834.
4. Electric power house, wood, constructed 1897.
5. Stables, one story, brick, constructed 1834.
6. Commissary, one story brick with basement, con-
structed 1834.
7. Superintendent's office, one story brick with basement,
1896.
8. Administration residence, three-story brick with base-
ment, 1834.
10. Tower building, three-story brick with tower, 1834.
11. Water tower on top of tower building, 60,000 gallons,
1896.
12. Annex to tower building, two-story brick, 1899.
13. Steam laundry plant, wood, 1899.
14. Team heat and power house, wood, 1896.
15. I lored male building, three-story brick, 1890.
17. White female, three-story brick, 1834, third story
1896.
18. White convalescent building, 1834, additions 1896..
19. Creamery building, one-story wood, 1898.
22. Bakery and store room,one-story brick, 1834.
23. Steam cooking plant, one-story wood, 1899.
24. Supervisor's residence.
25. Three attendants' cottages.
26. Barn, cow shed and stalls.
27. Water station and plant.
I beg to transmit herewith for your careful consideration,
the report of this institution made by Hon. J. W. Trammell,
Superintendent, dated December 31, 1900, to the Board of
Commissioners of State Institutions, which report sets forth
statistical data as well as a general report of the condition,
management and progress of the institution for the biennial
period ending December 31, 10aO.








27



It will be observed from the Superintendent's recommenda-
tions that the hospital is in great need of more storage room.
The press ent stock building inside the walls he suggests might
be changed so as to meet this requirement without great expend-
iture of funds, and a stock lot be constructed at a convenient
point outside the institution walls. This recommendation I
especially urge as a necessity. The present building used as
a stable within the brick walls is situated within a few feet of
buildings occupied by patients and its removal would greatly
improve the sanitation. This building was constructed in
1834 by the Federal Government, one side of which being the
wall of the enclosure of the institution, this wall could b.,
raised to make another story to this building, making it a two,
story building to be used as a general commissary building
where all supplies can be kept and distributed from, and a
stable constructed outside the walls thus removing it from he
premises used for general hospital purposes.
I also recommend that an appropriation be made for buii.ld-
ing material aiid improvements separate and apart from the-
appirolpriation for the maintenance of the institution, al-oe
that a deficiency appropriation law be enacted to cover t1 e
amounts being carried by the State Treasurer in excess of ap-
pIrol)riation for the maintenance of this institution, which
amounted to $8,939..61 on December 31, 1900, as shown by
the Treasurer's report filed. with the, executive, the above.
amount with bills due that were paid January consumed the
entire appropriation of $35,000 made for the first six months
of 1901.
State Prisoners.
The ;.olloA iii statistical table wil. show the cost of m, i-
tenance of State Prisoners each year from 1876 to 1901 inclu-
sive, the number of convicts each year, the names of coi raln-
tors or lessees, when leased, and for what amount leased:

187t, cost of maintenance.. .. ... .. $20,646 5
1877, cost of maintenance. .... ........ .. 2,5009 0)
1878, cost of maintenance. ............... 2,500 03


No. of Convicts.
1879, Contract, H. A. Wise, State to receive $100 per
annum .. .. . .. .. .... .. .. .. ...... .. 163:
1880. Contract, H. A. Wise, State to receive $100 per
annum............... ....... .... 151








28



1881, Contract, East Florida Ry Co.., $15 each.. ...129
1882, Contract, East Florida Ry Co., $15 each....... .149
1883, Contract, H. N. Wood, Agt. C. K. D. $4,600 per
annum.. ........ .... .. ..... ....... 135
1884, Contract, H. N. Wood, Agt. C. K. D. $4,600 per
annum.. .... ...... .... .. ...... .. .... 162
1885, Contract, H-. N. Wood, State to pay him, $8,500.. 197
1886, Contract, C. K. Dutton, no expense or revenue to
State. .. .. ....... .. ...... .. 236
1887, Contract, C. K. Dutton, no expense or revenue to
State. ...... .... ........ .. 281
1888, Contract, C. K. Dutton, no expense or revenue to
State. ... ... ...... ............ 339
1889, Contract, C. K. Dutton, no expense or revenue to
State .. ....... .. .... .. ... 319
1890, Contract, E. B. Bailey $15 per convict, per annum 388
1891, Contract, E. B. Bailey, $22.50 per convict, per
annum. ................ .......... .. 409
1892, Contract, E. B. Bailey, $22.50 per convict, per
annum ................ .. ..... .. ..453
1893, Contract, E. B. Bailey $22.50 per convict, per
annum .... .......... .. ........ .. .482
1894, Contract, Bailey, Cranford and West, $21,000 per
annum. .......... .. .. .. ... 530
1895, Contract, Bailey, Cranford and West, $21,000 per
annum ............. ... ... ..... 617
1896, Contract, Bailey, Cranford and West, $21,000 per
annum.... .............. .. .. ... .. 688
1897, Contract, Bailey, Cranford and West, $21,000 per
annum ...... .. .. .. .. ... ... 656
1898, Contract, West, Knight, Varnadoe and Camp,
$21,000 per annum..... .............. 692
1899, Contract, West, Knight, Varnadoe and Camp,
$21,000 per annum... .. .. .. .......... .717
1900, Contract, West, Knight, Yarnadoe and Camp,'
$21,000 per annum. ................ .. 797
1901, Contract, West, Knight, VarnAdoe and Camp,
$21,000 per annum. ..... .. .. .. ...... .. 800
The present law provides that the sum arising from the
'hire of State convicts shall be distributed to the counties in
proportion to the number of State prisoners sentenced from
each county to the State penitentiary during the sentence.
In 1897 a law was enacted authorizing the (construction of
buildings for the establishnIent of a State Reformatory School
lor juvenile offenders the sum of $1, 500 for the ]purchase of
.iroulndl $10,000 for building, $1,000 for furnishing said








29



buildings, $5,000 for maintenance for the first two years, and'
$5,000 additional for buildings, all of which sum to be paid
out of the funds arising from the hire of State prisoners.
In 1897 a law was enacted authorizing the Governor to ap-
point a Supervisor of State Convicts, at a salary of $125 per
month, payable out of revenue derived from the hire of con-
victs.
The State also pays out of such funds the sum of $10 to
each prisoner when discharged, as a matter of incidental ex-
penses, authorized by law.
The following statistical table will show the distribution of
the revenue and funds arising from the hire of State prison-
ers, during the present contract, beginning January 1, 1898 :

1898.
Total to counties. ................. ... $10,416 18
Incidentals as shown by reports transmi-ted.... 6,035 73

1899.

Total to counties.. ........ ... ....... $ 9,831 28
Incidentals as shown by reports transmitted. ... 13,462 70,

1900.

Total to counties. .. .... ..... ... .. $10,660 32
Incidentals as shown by report transmitted. 7,546 69-


Incidpental items embrace appropriations for building State,
REformiatiory School and uipwards of two thousand dollars per
annum paid discharged prisoners.
During the session of the Legislature of 18'99, a committee
was appointed to investigate and inspect the various convict
camps and report their findings of the care, treatment and
maintenance of the convicts, which report was unfavorable,.
and the Legislature enacted the law authorizing the employ-
ment of a supervisor of convicts, above mentioned. It is by
said law made the duty of the supervisor at intervals not to-
exceed sixty days, or oftener when required, to visit and in-
spect the convict camps of the State, and to make monthly
reports setting forth in detail the number of convicts at each
camp, the quantity and kind of their average daily food, cloth-
ing, bedding, punishment, condition of hospital, cells, etc. A
marked improvement is reported in the care, maintenance -*7ud








30



provision for the conv\icts under this arrangement' as will
more fully appear by reference to the annual report of the
Supervisor of ,Convicts transmitted herewith.
The report of the supervisor for the month ending Febru-
ary 28, 1901, shows that there are 800 convicts at the various
camps of the lessees and sub-lessees, as follows:
At Wade, Fla., W. N. Camp, lessee...... ... ..... 112
At Dutton, Fla., W.. N Camp, lessee............ .... 87
At Elliston, Fla., W. N. Camp, lessee........ ... 84
At Duton, Fla., Dutton Phos. Co., sub-lessees. 49
At Floral City, Fla., W. J. Hillman, sub-lessee.. .. 45
At Summerfield, Fla., W. T. Hillman, sulb-lessee.. ... 44
At Cordeal, Fla., Buttgenbach & Co., sub-lessees .... 163
At Floral City, Fla., Buttgenbach & Co., sub-lessees. ... 50
At Thompson, Fla., Myers Brothers, sub-lessees.. .... 30
At Romeo, Fla., C. HT. HaIgraves sub-lessee ..... .. 44
At Waller, Fla., Edward & Durham, sub-lessees ..... 60
At Brooksville, Fla., G. W. Yarn, sub-lessee...... .. .31
Three reported sick temporary.
Thus it will be observed that the condition, health, care and
maintenance of the State prisoners has not only improved, but
has reached a very satisfactory condition.
The supervisor from time to time, made unfavorable re-
ports as to the condition of some of the camps, which received
prompt and vigorous attention from the Commissioner of Ag-
riculture and Board of State Institutions, and in'one instance
it was found necessary to direct the supervisor to return to a
camp and remain there until his proper requirements were
complied with, or to abolish the camp. These instructions
were promptly complied with, and are now being observed.
The reports of State prisoners show at present, white males
105, white females 1, colored males 666, colored females 28,
making a total of 800.
The lessees and sub-lessees are working the prisoners in the
two leading industries, about oiie-half in the mining of phos-
phate, and one-half in the manufacture of naval stores, lum-
ber mills, etc. It will b)e observed that the lessees pay the
State about $26.40 per capital per anmnum, the sub-lessees pay
the lessees amounts ranging from $90 to $180 per capital per
annum. The $180 contracts being for picked men. Sub-
lessees paying the higher prices not bearing the expense of
prisoners from the date and place of sentence to the head-
quarters and during the period up to date of distribution.
Sub-lessees have paid similar prices as here mentioned for
several years past. In 1890 Mr. Wilevy a railroad contractor
and builder, as sub-lessee of State prisoners, paid, so I am in-








31



formed, $12 per month per convict for 75 prisoners, and dur-
ing the years 1892 and 1893, the Marion Phosphate Com-
pany paid $100.00 per day for the labor of 100 convicts, the
lessee furnishing the guards and maintaining the prisoners,
and there are other similar instances not necessary to mention
here. This information and these figures have but recently
been authoritatively obtained. It is now ascertained that the
labor of the State prisoners are reasonably worth upward of
$130 per capital per annum, without pick or choice, net to the
State, the lessees paying all expenses after sentence is pro-
nounced, which is equivalent to upwards of $10-1,000 per an-
num net to the State. It is assumed that the average num-
ber of convicts will not fall below 900 for the next four years,
which would be equivalent to $4-68,000 for four years.
The Legislature of 1899 enacted a law in which it is stated
in the preamble, that the present system of leasing the con-
victs deprives the State of thousands of dollars, as the lessees
invariably pool their bid and secure them at a nominal sum
and sub-lease them at a big profit, and believing that if the
lease system is to be continued that under proper manage-
ment same can be done in such a way that the State will re-
ceive a proper remuneration for the services of the convicts,
and that they will receive better and more civilized treatment.
Section one of the said act authorizes the Governor to appoint
a committee of three citizens to investigate, consider and re-
port to the next Legislature the most humane practical and
profitable method of working the State convicts, and in ac-
cordance therewith my predecessor, Hon. W. D. Bloxham,
appointed as such committee, Senator.E. S. Crill of Putnam,
Representative J. W. Watson of Osceola, and Judge J. T. Ber-
nard of Leon, who have given this subject much attention,
and who have shown a special interest in this work by procur-
ing statistical data and conferring with State officials, etc., in
their researches for information, and the committee will
make its report to your body, therefore I refrain from making
any recommendation for the present upon this subject.
Reformatory School.

The report of the Board of Managers of the State Reforma-
tory School is transmitted herewith, and your attention is in-
vited to its contents, as it is the first bi-ennial report, showing
its condition and progress, and in approval of the recoln-
mendations therein, I recommend that longer sentences be
imposed and that the managers of the institution should he
vested with the discretion as to the length of time that those








32



sentenced to the Reformatory School should remain in the
school, and that such a law be enacted.
I submit a statement prepared by State Agent W. V. Knott,
showing the financial condition, the amount of appropria-
tions, receipts and disbursements of this institution for your
consideration.

Building gs.

Appropriation 1897. ....... .. $10,000 00
Appropriation 1899. ..... .... 5,000 00

Total.. .. ......... $15,000 00
Paid by State. .... ...... .$ 14,350 41

Purchase of Grounds.



Appropriation 1897.. ... .. $1,500 00
Paid by State .. ... ...........$

Furn ishinhg Buildings.

Appropriation 1897.. .. ..,. $1,000 00
Paid by State.. ...... 1,000 00
Paid from $1,400 donation
of citizens.. .... .... 322 43
Total... ............... .... .$



ImpIroving Grounds.

Paid from $1,400 donation
Total .......................$ 1,4

Maintenance Teams and Farming Im plemeints.

Paid by State for the period ending
March 31, 1901. .. ......$ 3,125 00
Paid by counties to February 7,
1901. .... .. ......... 836 38
Balance of the $1,400, donation of
citizens. .. ...... 6'9 88
From rent of land...... ........ 27 50
From sale of wood.... ........ 5 00
From sources not stated........ 49 60 4,1



1,065 22



1,322 43



007 67



L13 36



$21,859 11



.








33
Of the $4,113 36 there is
cash On hand Feb.
"7, 190'..... .... $234 ;
Due ftom counties for
quarter ending March
31, 1901, Feb. 7,
1901 ............ 162 50 $397 06



Recapitula ion.

Tot;l from State. ... ........ ... 19,540 63
Total from counties....... ... 833 38
Donation from citizens of iMariania 1,409 00
Rent cf land.. ..... ....... 27 50
Sale of wood.. ......... ... 5 00
Sources not stated .. ........ 49 60

$21,859 11
Appeals in Criminal Cases.
My attention has been called to the lax system of appeals in
criminal cases, which permits in some instances, great delays
in the enforcement of sentences of the lower courts, and final
disposition of cases in the Supreme Court; therefore I recom-
mend that a law be enacted regulating appeals in criminal
cases or by an amendment limiting the time in which a sup-
ercedeas bond may be granted, and requiring writs of error be
returnable to the Supreme Court to any day of any term with-
in thirty (30) days of sentence.
Supervisor of Convicts.

The care, maintenance ad humane trtratment of the State
prisoners is one of the greatest responsibilities resting upon
the State officials, and especially upon the Commissoner of
Agriculture, who is given the supervision of the State prison-
ers by the Constitution. This work demands great courage and
vigilance, the importance of which should have attention
every day, of one man, and possibly more. The present com-
pensation of the Supervisor of State Convicts, which includes
his traveling expenses, is inadequat-, and I therefore recom-
mend that the expenses of the Supervisor of Convicts be paid
by the State upon vouchers approved by the Commissioner of
3 H








31



Agriculture, and that the Supervisor be subject at all times
to the direction of the Cominissioner of Agriculture.
Harbor Masters.

Many complaints have reached the Executive from the ports
of the State concerning the arbitrary movement of vessels,
and the consequent cost which it is urged imposes unreason-
able charges upon commerce, the law upon the subject not be-
ing uniform nor complete in its operation, therefore I recom-
mend that a law be enacted upon this subject, prescribing a
:salary for Harbor Masters, their deputies and other port offi-
cials to be paid out of fees, such fees to be regulated by law,
directinop such officials to make full and complete reports of
work performed, and of amounts collected to some of the
State Boards or Departmlents, who should be authorized to
hear grievances and correct evils.

Foreign Building and Loan Associations.
The law requiring the admission of Foreign Building and
"Loan Associations and other similar corporations and associa-
tions doing business in the State for profit should be so
amended as to require security to the investor, therefore, I
recommend that Chapter 4158, Laws of Florida, be amended
so as to require security to be deposited with the State Treas-
urer of the State of Florida subject to the indebtedness of
.such associations within the State.
The third bi-ennial report of Messrs. R. W. Williams, Louis
C. Massey, and John C. Avery, Commissioners for the Pro-
motion of Uniformity of Legislation in the United States,
.appointed by the Governor under authority of Chapter 4447,
.Laws of Florida, is transmitted herewith.
Uniformity of Legislation.

It is observed from this report that the State Boards of
Commissioners held their ninth conference in the city of Buf-
falo, N. Y.. ,n August, 1899, their entire time being devoted
to the careful preparation and consideration, of a law govern-
ipig divorces, and that the tenth conference of the said Boards
of Commissioners was held in the city of Saratoga, N. Y.,
in August, 1'.00, and that at this conference a law governing
-divorce procedure was given careful consideration and adopted
.a copy cf which proposed law as recommended nd adopted
at such conference is attached to their report, and your espe-
cial attention is invited to this important work.








35



Third Con gressional District.
Under a recent Act of Congress on apportiionment, Florida
was allowed an additional representative in Congress, and
the power to re-district the State being vested in the Legis-
lature, I beg to call your attention to this subject and recom-
mend that the State be re-districted, creating three Congres-
sional Districts.
Constitutional Amendments.
STATES ATTORNEYS.
I recommend that a Constitutional Amendment be pro-
-ose1d reantiing a States Attorneyship for each Senatorial Dis-
trict in order that our laws may be more faithfully executed.
SUPREME COURTS JUSTICES.
I recommend that a Constitutonal Amendment be proposed
authorizing the Legislature to increase the number of Justices
of the Supreme Court, or create an additional Supreme Court
o.r division thereof at the pleasure of the Legislature.
CIRCUIT COURT JUDGESHIPS.
I recommend that a Constitutional Amendment be pro-
posed authorizing the Legislature to create additional Circuit
Court Judgeships for the State at large, with power to act
in either circuit to meet growing demands or otherwise at the
nlonasre of the Legislature.
"TAX ON FRANCHISES, ETC.
I recommend that a Constitutional Amendment be pro-
posed autliorizing the imposition of a license tax on all corpor-
ate franchises, and a tax on inheritance, gifts and devises.
Amendmcients of the Laws.
Sections 1265, 1266 and 16 267. of the Revised Statutes, being
part of Chapter 521 Laws of 1853, require the SuDremne Court
to review questions of fact, on appeal in order to present tlhe
evidence submitte.- in the lower courts, where the questions of
fact are usually passed upon by a jury who have the oppor-
tunity of viewing the witnesses and are given the province of
being the judges of the facts where to a great extent the find-
ing of the jury is conclusive.
Much of the time of the Supreme Court is taken up in ex-
amining questions of fact required under these sections, there-
fore, I recommend that these sections of the Revised Statutes
be repealed, and that a law be enacted in lieu thereof, requir-
ing only sich evidence as may be necessary to present the









T i iv' 1 ..... io ,f ', :. i lit i2:' l"i', I iiI I "
the general 4ol-''," in Noveilmber lia-t plrollilbitinlg special leg-
islation upon the subject, of (h;rt'- 't, et, makes it important
that the qenerai law upon this sul.ject be revised, to whicl
task your attention is especially invited.
Many complaints have reached the Executive wherein it is.
shown that the operation of Chapter 4032, Laws of Florida,
in many of the counties is being invoked for the collection of
debts, in violation of the Constitution, and there is little
doubt in my mind from the information at hand that there
are now many county convicts serving under se-ntences im-
posed under this law for debt. I recommend that this law be
repealed.
Florida Fishe ries.
In transmitting the report of Messrs. John Y. Detwiler, of
Volusia county, and John G. Ruige of Franklin county, Com-
missioners of Fisheries, I beg to call your attention to the fact
that the Legislature has not made any appropriation for the
expenses of the Commissioners, as provided for by Section -157
of the Revised Statutes,' consequently what has been done has
been accomplished through the generosity of the commisione-
ers at their own expense, as shown by their report, to which,
your attention is especially directed.
This report is full of valuable information and suggestions
that should lead to a proper development of this industry.
It will be observed that the commissioners have, since sub-
mitting their previous report, received from the United States
Fish Commission 2,016,000 shad fry which were distributed
in the various waters of the State as therein shown.
It will also be observed in their report, that the commis-
sioners are of opinion that the oyster industry is one of Flori-
da's great resources, and under proper conditions would"
afford a greater revenue than at present.
Their report also calls attention to the fact that a survey
and investigation of the grounds for the development of the
sponge industry of Florida, should lead to a large revenue to
the State and become a large factor in her marine products.
In a recent publication which has reached me since the report
of the commissioners was filed, taken from the statistical bul-
S letin of the United States Commission of Fish a.nd Fisheries,
covering the extent of this industry as at present established,
it is shown that during the past year 2,245 persons were em-
ployed in the sponge industry in Florida, producing a yield
of 364,990 pounds of sponges taken, with a market value of
$`67,685. These statistics also show the yield and value of









37



"the sponge fisheries of Florida for the years 18'95, 1896, 1899
and 1900, as follows.
Knd 1895 1896 1899 1900
Kinds lbs. Value Lbs. Value Lbs. Value Lbs. Value
Sheepswool.231,275 $363.167 149,.24 $248.196 153.700 $332,390 181,311 $483,2V7
"Yellow 29.509 11,798 23,655 9,3 8 55.800 16,205 55.178 44,045
(4ass ..... .. 21.387 5.464 44,617 11.508 78.900 14,319 109.265 33.263
SOther........ 23,95 6.502 18,315 3.990 1-.000 5 000 19,236 7,1'4
Total.... ..306,120 $386,871 236,311 $273,012 304,400 $367,914 364,990 $567,685
This will give some idea of the present value of this indus-
try, and I may add that this industry is also unknown to the
:tax books of Florida.
NaIal S'taions, Ports and Harbors.

It was my pleasure to accept an official invitation and to at-

tend the Naval Parade at Pensacola on February 18, which
was p)ariticilpated in by the marines from the battleships Ala-
bama, Kersarge and Massachulsetts, the. Chipley Light In-
fantry Luverne Rifles of Alabama, and the Governor's
Guards. which parade was reviewed by Admiral Farquhar,
Admiral Endicott, the captains and officers of the battleships,
.and myself and staff. After which it was my privilege to re-
ceive Secretary Long, Admiral Farquhar, Admiral Endicott,
General Haywood, the captains and officers of the warships
named, and found they were much interested in the harbor at
Pensacola. It was gratifying to note the appreciation on the
part of the Federal Government of the advantages of Pensa-
cola Bay for a naval station, and the recognition that no other
waterway on the Gulf Coast or on the Atlantic south of
Hampton Roads or Newport News, affords a better ground
for tactical maneuvers than does Pensacola Bay. The many
natural advantages of this climate and bay has become a pro-
found conviction, and at the same time the Government
recognizes the commercial advantages of this great waterway,
:and there is great hope that the Federal Government will be
.advised by Secretary Long, Admiral Farquhar and his officers
%and the officers of the battleships to make such port a perma-
inent naval station, especially for the winter months. This
would mean much to Pensacola and to the State of Florida,
-such a decision on the part of the Federal Government would
-aid materially in the development of this splendid harbor, the
increase in the width of the channel to 500 feet and other
-projects, dry docks, etc., of magnitude for harbor improve-
-nents, and the probable recommendation to have one of the
-argcst battleships yet planned for our navy named, "Flori-








38



da," and to this end, I recommend that. the Legislature-
memorialize Congress to name one of the modern battleships.
"Florida."'
Our delegation in Congress loses no opportunity to present
to that body the interest and importance of our waterways,
both for our national service in time of war, and for peaceful
domestic commerce. The improvement of our waterways and
harbors is at present of paramount importance. Deep water to-
our port cities of Jackso.nville, Fernandina, Tampa, Key
West, Pensacola and other ports would be of inestimable
value. A comparison of these harbors with the best, such as,
Boston harbor, is not discouraging. At Boston harbor the
Federal Government is now excavating a channel 1,200 feet
wide and 30 feet deep on the southerly side of Broad Sound
between President roads and the ocean. It is also excavating
a channel 1,000 feet wide and 27 feet deep, and other great
projects of improvements in the harbor which will require an
expenditure of $8,000.000. which is authorized by the River
and Harbor Bill, making a contract for $3,600,000 for the
one port.
Carrying lWeapons.
Section 20 of the Declaration of Rights, Constitution of
1885, reads, "The right of the people to bear arms in de-
fense of themselves, and the lawful authority of the State
shall not be infringed but the Legislature may prescribe the
manner in which they may be borne.
The second Article of the Amendment to the Constitution
of the United States securing to the people to keep and bear
arms, is held to be a restriction only upon the powers of the
National Government and not upon those of the several
States. Miller vs. Texas. 153 U. S. 35.
The Statutes forbidding the carrying of concealed, danger-
ous and deadly weapons upon the person, and the exhibition
of the same has been held to be a valid exercise of the Legis-
lative power by the Supreme Courts of various States, and by
the Supreme Cour- of the United States. The abuse of the pri-
vilege of e. rrying weapons and the flagrant violation of the
law las become alarming. In recent years laws have been en-
acted in various States on this subject, and in 1895 the law
was enacted in this State requiring any person who sought to-
carry a Winchester or repeating rifle to execute a bond to be
approved by the County Commissioners which has been effect-
ive, but it is limited to a certain kind of weapon.
It is estimated now that there are upwards of ten thousand'
laborers employed by the naval stores manufacturers and:







39



ilhosilate mines, and that 75 per cent of such laborers carry
deadly weapons, which is dangerous to the safety and )business
of the citizenship of Florida. Seven ld6aths have been re-
ported t tthe Executive Department during the past forty
days, including two brave and gallant officials, a sheriff and a,
deputy in the discharge of their official duty, attributed'
solely to the fact that irresponsible and desperate persons,
were permitted to carry deadly weapons.' The citizenship of
Florida is entitled to ,rotection at your haiads. The carrying
of sueh weapons by irresponsible persons should be prohibited
and I recommend with much confidence that you enact a law
requiring any person to execute a good and sufficient bond to'
be approved by the Board of County Commissioners in each
county and procure a permit from such Comnissioners before-
they shall be permitted to carry deadly weapons of alny kind,.
and providing heavy penalties to make such law effective.
Good Roads.
One of the, most important issues before the American peo-
ple, and especially those of Florida, is the construction of good
roads. I have noted with much satisfaction the interest
taken in this subject by the leading citizens of the State and
the press. The agricultural, manufacturing and commier-
cial, as well as the social, religious, educational and business.
interests of the country are greatly interested in the object to.
,b obtained by the uniform construction of good roads
throughout the State.
At the annual meeting of the State Convention of County
Comnmissioners held in the city of Jacksonville on February
20 last, a valuable and interesting report was read to the con-
vention, in which it is shown that a great work has been ac-
complished throughout the State in the improvement of our
highways, and that public sentiment is aroused to a degree
that promises much that is solid and substantial on these lines..
In many sections of the State a large amount of work has been
done on our highways, which has but increased the desire for
more and better roads. It was also suggested that this is one-
of the most important questions to be considered by the Leg-
islature. and I beg to add my hearty approval thereto.
State Troops.,
Thie 17th Section of the Democratic Platform declares in?
favor of a liberal policy towards the Florida State Troops andI
the Florida Naval Militia, and in the encouragement of our
citizen soldiery in their patriotic service. In sympathy with
this expression and believing as I do that when the nation ort
State is in danger the volunteer soldier is the country's best







40



-defender, and that such organizations are our elements of
strength and safety, I recommend that appropriations be
made suffleient to defray the necessary expenses of the annual
encampment of the State Troops to the end that the troops
may have a term of encampment instructions.
The Coilfederate Soldiers of Florida.
Many of the States have published in suitable book form a
"history and roster of their soldiers engaged in the several wars
with the record of each officer and soldier. Florida has no such
record or roster of her soldiers and sailors who served in the
war between the States, and therefore, I heartily recommend
that a law be enacted authorizing an appropriation for the
compilation and publication of a brief history and complete
roster of all who served in the war between the States enlist-
ing from the State of Florida.
Confederate Home.
I am pleased to transmit the report of Hon. Francis P.
Fleming, President of the Confederate Soldiers' and Sailors'
Home Association for th year 1900 Prom this report it
will be observed that this association is doing a grand work,
and are in need of a hospital, which it has neither th-e means
to establish or to maintain. When it is considered that the
property of the home consists of 7.62 acres of land, a building
of seven rooms (besides a small kitchen), which cost $4.,250,
:all of which was paid for by private donations, as shown by
the report. and that they are in great need of this addition to
,cost about $500, with the earnest request that the State appro-
priate that sum for such purpose, to aid in the good work that
is being accomplished by this association, the reqi-uest mnuis
reasona.lble, serving and entitled to your cnaril':
.,-consideration, and I therefore recommend that an approp.ria-
tion be granted as requested.
Pe(nsioins for ConUfedl'rate Soldi,'s.
The Legislature of 1899 enacted a law on this subject
-which is just being fairly put into operation, as it required
an entire change in the applications, not only of those who
desired to file or renew applications, but also those who were
drawing pensions under the old law..-
An investigation shows that the present law is more liberal
in its operation than any previous law upon the subject, when
the number of pensioners is taken as the base of liberality.
'Under the old law there were 525 pensioners on the roll,
while under the present law there are 780, with many appli-








41



nations on file that will undoubtedly be granted by the Board
of Examiners when some clerical omissions and additional
proofs are supplied to bring them within the provisions of the
law.
Soldiers of the Indian Wars in Florida.
Section 1,657 of the Revised Statutes of the United States,
being an act of Congress approved March 19, 1836, provided
that "the volunteers of militia who have been received into
the service of the United States to suppress depredations in
Florida, shall be entitled to the benefits which are afforded to
persons wounded or otherwise disabled in the service of the
United States."
In 1892 Congress passed an act granting pensions to the
survivors of the Indian Wars of 1832 to 1842, inclusive,
known as the Black Hawk War, Creek War, Cherokee dis-
turbances and the Seminole War, approved July 27th, which
provides "that the Secretary is authorized and directed to
placeon the pension roll the nannies of the surviving officers
and enlisted men, including marines, militia and volunteers
of the military and naval service of the United States, who
served for thirty days in the Black Hawk War, the Cherokee
ilisturLanecs or the war with the Seminole Indians, embrac-
ing a period from 1832 to 1842, inclusive, and were honor-
ably dis-harged." There is now a bill pending before Qon-
a'ress providing for pensions of soldiers of Florida who served
in the Indian Wars of 1857 to 1859.
An order was issued by the Secretary of War, dated April
4, 1895, which provides "that the Secretary of War shall,
uponl the application of the Governor of any State. furnish to
such Novernor a transcript of the military history of any reg-
iment or company of his State, under such regulations as the
Secretary of War may prescribe, at the expense of the State.
Under this provision of law transcripts of the military rec-
ords of organizations credited to the several States will be
furnislld to the Governors of the States to which such organ-
. ization: were credited, upon the request of the Governors and
at the expense of the States, under the following regulations:
All applications -for transcripts of records under this law
should be made over the signature of the Governors of the
States in intrPst, should be addressed to the Secretary of
W aar, an, should designate specifically the records of which
tranlscripts are desired. Upon receipt of such application
:tfrom the Governor of any State, he will be furnished with
an cstii'a. of the cost of making -he transcripts specified in
"bi's id:1' ;--i ran. md will ic notiified that funds s'uffi:ient to








42



cover the estimated cost should )be deposited with the dilsburs-
ing clerk of the War DIepartment. No work of this character
will be undertaken until an amount sufficient to cover its
probable cost shall have been deposited with the disbursing
clerk, and he shall have certified that fact to the Chief of the
Record and .Pension Office. *
The transcripts which will be furnished will be literal
copies of the military records of regiments, companies, troops
and bIatteries. No conlpilation, consolidation or summariz-
ing of records will be undertaken, and no copies of records
other than, those herein specified will be furnished. Items of
information relative to individual officers and enlisted men
except as such items may be included in the copies of regi-
mental, company, troop or battery records, hereinbefore pro-
vided for, will not be furnished to complete the records of
State or of regimental or other associations. Not more
than one copy of any record will be furnished to any State.
Persons not in the employ of and under the legal control of
the War Department will not be allowed to copy or have ac-
cess to any of the records filed in the Record and Pension
office. In view of the fact that. provision has been made by
law so that any State can obtain transcript, of the original
records of the organizations credited to it and because the
dilapidated condition of the rolls and other records of the
volunteer armies, caused by the constant. handling to which
they.have been subjected during the past thirty years, makes
it necessary that a strict rule for their preservation shall be
adopted, it is hereby ordered that hereafter no copies
of records pertaining to military organizations credited to, the
several States shall be furnished except to the Governors of
the States as hereilnefore provided, or as otherwise speci-
fically required by law."
Reference is also made to the subject in the Adjutant-Gen-
eral's report, ending December 31, 1896, in which report, it
is stated that "an act was passed by the Legislature making it
the duty of the Adjutant-General to examine the Indian War
muster rolls, and record the names thereon, in order that
proof may be obtained by survivors who may be entitled to,
pensions from the United States Governmlent. The act fur-
ther states that the Governor of Florida shall collect from
the office of the Secretary of War a true copy of all tlhe
muster rolls of the Florida State Troops engaged in the In-
dian Wars. In accordance with your instructions, I com-
municated with the Secretary of War, enclosing him a copy
of this act, and requested himi to advise me what it would cost
to have copies of their muster rolls made out. His estimate








43



of the cost was $1,700. As there was no appropriation made-
to meet this expense, the copies of the muster rolls could not
be procured, and I have been unable to carry out the require-
mients of this act."
Section 4,748 of the Revised Statutes require that an ap-
p,licationl should be filed by the applicant setting forth the
company and regiment in which the applicant served, the'
inme of the commanding officer of the company or organiza-
tion, date of enlistment, discharge, etc.
In view of the fact that all of these records are now in the
hands of the War Department, in Washington, and that there,
are no muster rolls or other evidence of service in the hands
of the Adiutanit-General or other officer of Florida, it seems
inmpossibe for those who served in the Indian Wars of Flor-
"ida, or their survivors, to make the required proof without
having these records, or a transcript of them, as required by
the Secretarv of War, and as directed by the laws of Floiida,
Act of 1895. These Indian War soldiers sacrificed nearly'
all they had when they enlisted in these wars for the pres-
ervation of the lives and property of her citizens against the
devastations of bloodthirsty Indians, and are deserving of the
serious attention of the Legislature. These wars occurred
some sixty years ago, and during the past twenty years nu-
mnerous applications for pensions have been received at the,
office of the Adjutant-General of Florida, and most of the
survivors now being dead, the facilities of proving claims for
pensions outside of these muster rolls have practically ceased,
and can not be supplied, under the provisions of the law
above quoted, without an appropriation of $1700 required to,
be deposited for that purpose, and I therefore recommend
that a bill be passed appropriating such sum that these tran-
scripts may be procured as contemplated by the law of 1895,.
in order that these deserving soldiers and their survivors may
receive what is justly due them, and that the State may have
a record of the soldiers who served in these wars. It is esti-
mate(d tha there are more than one hundred entitled to pen-
sions under the provisions of this law, with back pay from,
1892.
Indian War Claim.

Tlhe Iindian Trust Fund of the United States holds $132,-
000 Florida State bonds which are interest bearing at the rate-
of 7 per cent. per annum from November 27, 1873, the time
to which interest was paid by the State of Florida. These
bonds were issued by the State to raise funds for the sup-








44



pression of hostilities growing out of the Seminole War of
1855-1857, and were purchased by the authorities of the
United States for the Indian Trust Fund, and have been so
held since.
*There is no question as to the validity of these bonds issued
by the State of Florida now held by the Government in the
Indian Trust Fund, neither does there seem to be any doubt
,as to the validity of the claim of the State of Florida against
;the Federal Government for necessary expenses incurred in
the suppression of Indian hostilities, which claim is largely
in excess of this obligation. The fact still remains, however,
that these claims have not been adjusted, yet the approval
,and recognition of the executive Departments of War and the
"Treasury has been had, sustained by numerous reports of
committees of Congress, and bills have passed both the Senate
;and House at different sessions of Congress, directing the pay-
ment of the claims, but unfortunately not passing each
House during the same session.
United States Senators Hon. S. R. Mallory and Hon.
James P. Taliaferro, under date of February 21, 1901, ad-
vise that "a bill for the settlement of the Indian War Claim
.as reported and now pending in the Senate of the United
,States is the same as heretofore reported and passed and
,provides for the payment of the amount found due by the
Secretary of the Treasury, namely $261,f34, with interest
.at 7 per cent. from January 1, 1858, until paid, deducting
from this amount $132,000 of Florida ,oinds held by the
Federal Government with interest at 7 per cent. per annum
from November 27, 1873, the date to which interest was paid
by the State of Florida, which makes the account stand as
follows:
Claim of the State, principal. $2161,934.00
Interest to Jan. 1, 1901 ....... 788,421.34 $1,050,355.34
Claim of Government, print. 132,000.00
-Interest to Jan. 1, 1901 ..... 251,790.0.00 383,79 0.00

Bal. due State of Florida Jan. 1, 1901 $666,565.34
In addition to this large sum found to be due the State of
Florida from the General Government, the State has another
*valid and just claim against the Federal Government, same
being 5 per centum of the net proceeds of the sale of lands
-within the State of Florida, as provided by Act of Congress,
.approved March 3, 1845, oeltitle.d "An Act Suppllemental to
an Act for the admission of Florida into the Union." the
Departments at Washington holding that as the State has
xnot paid the amount held by the IndiaL Trust Fund, that the








45



moneys arising from the 5 per centum of the sales of such-
lands can not be paid.
The records here show that no part of this 5 per centumn
has been paid to Florida, and the accumulation of same since-
the State was admitted into the Union, as shown by statement
of the Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, dated March 9,
1901, to Treasurer Whitfield, is as follows:
CREDIT STATE OF FLORIDA, FIVE PER CENT. FUND, PROCEEDS.
OF SALES OF LANDS.

April 6, 1872, Interior Civil Warrant, 560 $ 4,063.75
Dec. 5, 1881, Interior Civil Warrant, 1,909 .... 2,170.58:
June 8, 1882, Interior Civil Warrant, 1,070 .. 4,186.83
June 27, 1884, Interior Civil Warrant, 1,697 .. 11,231.28
Jan. 24, 1885, Interior Civil Warrant, 250 .... 16,580.94
Mar. 15, 1887, Interior Civil Warrant, 418 .. .. 6,902.18
April 10, 1888, Interior Civil Warrant, 2,108 .. 8,868.53
Nov. 8, 1888, Interior Civil Warrant, 228 .... 31,683.02
Dec. 28, 1889, Interior Civil Warrant, 1,225 .. 619.64
Jan. 8, 1892, Interior Civil Warrant, 1,565 .... 221.56
May 17, 1893, Interior Civil Warrant, 1,982 .. 632.16
Mar. 29, 1894, Interior Civil Warrant, 1,813 .. 298.14
Feb. 27, 1895, Interior Civil Warrant, 1,870 .. 278.36
Dec. 5, 1895, Interior Civil Warrant, 1, 174 .... 111.79"
Jan. 27, 1897, Interior Civil Warant, 1,523 .. .. 162.98
April 5, 1898, Interior Civil Warrant 2,405 56.51
Jan. 16, 1899, Interior Civil Warrant, 1,419 .. .. 50.66'
Jan. 25. 1900, Interior Civil Warrant, 1,485 .. 22.06'

Total ................ .. .... $88,140.97'
Swamp Land Indemnity.
Settlements made by the United States Treasury in favor of
the State of Florida on account of Swamp-Land Indemnity,
which amounts were retained and covered into the Treas-
ury as payments by the State for interest on her stocks or
bonds held in the Indian Trust Fund:



May 18, 1881,, Settlement 34,732, Warrant
740.. ....... .. .... .... ........ $
June 16, 1882, Settlement 35,949, Warrant 1,131
Nov. 27, 1882, Settlemient 36,183, Warrant 2,219
Dec. 19, 1882, Settlement 38,113, Warrant 2,339.
Apr. 19, 1883, Settlement 38,663, Warrant 741.1
Apr. 27, 1883, Settlement 39,353, Warrant 1,690.



4,628.4(0
4,511.57
5,825 27
2,177.35
1,5 12.6
283.62







46



Jan. 29, 1884, Settlemnent 37,472, Warrant 308. 308.06
Jan. 29, 1884, Settlement 37,473, Warrant 309. 5,729.93

Total .. .......... ...... .. $25,007.02
Oct. 6, 1859, Settlement 10,459, Warrant 811.. $42,038.55
This amount was paid to the State.

State Expert Agents.
In obedience to Chapter 4,849, Laws of Florida, 1899, au-
thorizing the Governor to have'examined whenever he may
deem it necessary, by expert agents appointed by him, "the
books, vouchers, records and all matters connected with the
office of any State official, and to have such examination made
as to all State officials handling State funds at least once in
every two years, as of the 31st day of December of the year
preceding the meeting of the Legislature, and to transmit the
result of such examinations, with his message to the Legisla-
ture," I appointed Messrs. F. L. Robertson, J. P. Cobb, J. F.
Dorman, W. G. Powell, L. W. Zim and J. E. King, as such
expert agents, and transmit the result of such examinations
with this message. These reports cover the result of such
examinations made of the State Treasurer's Department, the
Comptroller's Department and the Department of the
Colnmiissioner of Agriculture, in detail, together with
,an inventory of the property of the State at the
Hospital for the Insane, which reports it will be ob-
served, contain many pages of statistical data, the result
of much research and emblracing much useful information.
to all of which your attention is invited. The examination of
the Tax Redemption Department not being completed, the re-
sult can not be transmitted herewith, but will be duly trans-
mitted upon completion.

ConcluSioln.
It is incumbent upon you, the Legislative Department of
the Governtient, at this, the beginning of a new century, to
aid in every way possible the development and prosperity of
the State. Economy should prevail, yet nothing should be
done or regarded that is inimical to the rights of the citizen,
and to the vast interests you represent.
I am mindful that I have recommended several appropria.-
tions that may seem too. liberal, especially for public build-
ings, yet it. is my judgment that expenditures for public
buildings should be sufficient to make substantial and per-
ing1ent improvements, as an economic 'measure. Upon the








47



Legislature rests the full responsibility for the enactment of
all laws and the granting of all appropriations.
It affords me great pleasure to welcome you to the Capital
of our State, and to assure you of my hearty co-operation in
all measures tending to awise and frugal government, and to
the progress and development of the various industries of the
State, with a zealous care for the rights, interests, honor and
happiness of the whole people of Florida.
The citizens of the State of Florida are intensely in earnest
in their desire for peace and tranquility, and that justice may
be accorded equally to all the people and their interests.
May He who is supreme over all protect you and yours
during your deliberations, and continue His blessings upon
this State and our people, giving to her all possible success
consistent with the end of His providence.
SW. S. JENNINGS
Governor.




Appendix,


Pardons, Reprieves, etc.
As required by Section II, of Article 4, of the Constitu-
tion, I herewith submit a tabulated statement of fines re-
mitted and reprieves, pardons and commutations granted
since the convening of the regular session of the Legislature
of April 4, 1899.









STATEMENT OF FINES REMITTED
And Reprieves, Pardons and Commutations Granted since the Convening of Regular Session of the Legislature, April 4,1899.

Name Crime Sentence Date Sentence Date of Pardon or Reprieve, etc.


Oliver Bell....... Murder.................. Life at hard labor.. Fall Term, 1893.. Pardoned Jar nary 4, 1899.
W H Trainor..... Aggravated assault....... 6 months.......... Fall Term, 1898... Pardoned January 4. 1899.
Frank Stakeley... Murder 2d degree......... Life............ ..... prin Term ... Pardoned January 4, 1899.
W Higgenbothen. Murder ... ............ Life. ........ .Fall Term. 1892.... Pardoned January 4, 1899
Bill Oats..... Murder 3d degree........ 14 years ........ October, 1899. .Pardoned February 21. 1899.
Geo H Drawdy .. Larceny bull yearling.... $100 and 60 days.. Spring Term, 1878 Kestore to citizenship Peb 24. 1899.
A B Welch...... Larceny of cow... ............... ...... Spring Term 1881 Restored to ilizonshil Fe). 27, 1899
Mack Hogan...... Assault to murder........ 3 years ............ February, 1898 ... Pardoned March 13, 1899.
John T Wilson... Selling liquors.......... $t.000 and 6 months. F;!ll Ter,' 1898... Pardoned March 20. 1899
J)seph T Jorden.. Assault to rape. ........20 years............ Spring Term. 1895 Pdrdoned April 10, 1899.
John Hays....... Aggravated assault. .... year............. Fll term, 1898 ... Pardoned Alay 2 1899
J J Cribbs... ...... Larceny ................... months .......... Fll Term, 186... Restored to citiz-nship Mav 19. 1899
SJ Cribbs. .... Larceny.......... "...... 6 months ........Fall Term, 1886 .. Restored to citizenship May 19, lb99;
C E Darby....... Altering order for money 18 months .. .... Spring Term. 1898 Pardo.ned Ma' 19, 1899.
Jas V Wilson...... Grand larceny.......... 3 years........... June Term, 1898.. Pardoned May 24, 1899.
Wm Padgett...... Manslaughter ............. 15 years........... Fall Term, 1897 .. Pardoned May 31, 1899
Jefferson Vaughn Larceny of a calf....... 1 year... ..........ept. Term, 1898.. Pardoned June 6. 1899
W H Leverett.... Forgery...... .............. Fall Term, 1898... Pardoned June 29. 1899.
Tucker Swain.... Accessory to assault and bat 10 years .......... Nov. Term, 1897.. Pardoned Juiy 10. 1899.
John Green...... Petty larceny ......... 60 days............ April Term, 1898.. Partdoned Auzust 8. 1899.
Kernal Johns..... Larceny of cows...... 2 years.......... April Term1899.. Pardoned September 22, 1899.
Jas Blackburn.... Obtaining money false pre. 6 months............. arch Term, 1893 Pardoned Septemb-r 22. 1899.
John Reynolds.... Larceny of cows.......... 2 years............. April Term, 1899 Pardoned September 22. 1899.
s-ac T '" r- er... '""er ........... ..... f......... ...... Vir'er term 91 el'' n d'n 1W v S' it Oct 19,1899.
I ert_ t an... amy ............... years... ..... .... term. lY .. ar o tober 2 8
SQ een.. e .. ..... .. .... fe.............. r 89 .. ar tobe 2 8
Se.... ... ........... .. ears. ... .. 18 ... ar v e 9.
SI .... .. ........... r I 99 ) v e 9








dA r
CL E
.ame, L I
Rleuben Ha
Joe Fisher,
John Brow
David Engl
W W Rawl
Wesley Mo
Wm H Cle%
"Will Beasle
D Coley...
John Marti
Mart Martir
Frank Pain
Frances A J
barah Fair.
Robt L Eve
Radford Ya
B F Lander
Green War
James H Bc
Reuben Cre
Robt Willia
Jerry Whid

Simpson Jio

Thos Merce



ace.... .. ....a. ......... 8..
th ... eny ....... ears............... r 899 e r
iver... L .................. i e................. r r 896 e
rris... .... o be hanged ......r 89 ... o e r i o n.25, 1900.
Jr.... Larceny ................... 1 month .......... Dec. Term, 1893.. Restored to citizenship Jan. 27, 1900.
ning.. Larceny of animals...... 1 year........... Sring Term, 1898 Pardoned Fedruary 8. 1900.
ish... Larceny of pistol..... $10 and costs....... July 27, 1898...... Restored to citizenship Match 12. 1900.
ins ... Assault to murder....... 2 years.... ........ Dec. Term. 1897.. Restored to cit zenship March 12, 1900.
bley.. Murder. ...... Life............... Fall Term, 1897... Pardoned av 29, 1900
veland. Selling liquor........... 500 and costs...... Fall Term, 1892... Pardoned April 15, 1900.
y...... Murder ........................Li Spring Term. 189. Pardoned April 16, 1900.
...... Peddling................ ,300 or 8 months.... Feb. Term. 1900.. Par. on cond'n leave. State Apl 16, 19u0
n...... Larceny of a'hog.......... 18 months.. .. Fll Term, 1899... Pardoned April 20, 1900.
........ Larceny of a hog......... 2 years.......... Fall Term, 1899 .. Pardned April 20, 1900.
ler...... Entering building night... $500 and costs (paid) Mar(h Term, 1895 Restored to citizenship April 33, 1900.
Fohns'n Wanslaughter in 4th (leg.. 6 months........... Spring Term, 1894 Restored to citiz-nship April 30, 1900.
....... manslaughter ..... ......10 years ... ..... Spring Term, 1897 Pardoned April 30 1900.
ns... Larceny of animal........ $200 and costs (paid) Fall Term, 1897... Restored to citizenthip May 26, 1903.
ts.... Mayhem.... ... ... 2 years.......... ..... Fall Term, 1895... Restored to citizenship May 26, 1900.
S...... Larceny........ .....50 and costs (paid) Fall Term, 1897... Restored to citizenship July 3, 1900.
d.... Assault to murder... ....3 years........... Fall Term, 1899. Pardoned May 26, 1900
)wman Forgery ....... ... 1 year .............. Fail Term, 1892... Restored to citizenship Oct. 9, 1900.
ws... Larceny of animal. 1 year.............. Spring Term, 1900 Pardoned October 13. 1900.
ms.... murder 1stdegree.... To be hanged....... Spring Term, 1899 Com. to life imprisonm't Oct. 30, 1900.
den... Larceny of animal... 3G0 and cost, com- Pardoned and restored te. ci'iz-nslip
muted to $150 (pd) Spring Term, 1899 October 13, 190.
hnson. Murder............... To be hanged, com-
mutel to life..... Fall Term, 1892... Pardoned November 10, 1900
r........ Murder......... ... Life ............ Fall Term. 1897.... Conditional pardon Nov. 26, 1900.
Pardoned during years 1899 and 1900 .............. .... ............ 39
Conditional pardons during years 1899 and 1900.................... 4
Restored to citiz nship during years 1899 add 1900.................. 14
Sentences commuted during years 1899 and 1900... ................. 3



Total...............,. ........... .... .... ,.,....... 59



414










5'



On motion of Mr. Chambers the House adjourned until 3
o'clock p. m. to-miorrow.



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 1900.

The House was called to order by the Speaker at 3 o'clock
p. in.
The roll being called the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Amos, Anderson, Bates, Blair, Blan-
ton, Brown, Buford, Burr, Campbell, Chambers, Clarke, Close,
Orawfbrd, Corbett, Davidson, Dowd, Dowden, Duckworth,
Fulton, Godfrey, Gornto, Griggs, Grant, Gunn, Ilarvell, Hop-
kins, Hunter, Jackscn, Jacoby, Johnson, Jones, Koonce, Lee,
L'Engle, McElioy, McGiftin, McRae of Pasco. McRae of Put-
nam, Osteen, Parrish of Holmes, Parrish of Manatee, Pinhol-
ster, Raulerson, Redding, Rivers of Alachua, Rivers of Colum-
bia, Shomaker, Sledge, Smith, Thomas, Umstead, Wall, Wha-
ley, Williamson, Wilson, Wolfe, Young and Zewadski-59.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Chaplain.
Mr. Raney of Leon, was excused indefinitely upon motion
of Mr. Hopkins of Leon.
By Mr. Fulton of Hernando:
Concurrent Resolution No. 2:
Appointing a special committee to re-district the congres-
sional districts.
Passed under the rules.
On motion of Mr. Harvell of Santa Rosa, the courtesies of
the floor was extended to Mr. P. A. McArthur of Santa
Rosa county.
House Concurrent Resolution No. 3:
By Mr. Blair of Baker.
For appointment of committee to visit East Florida Semi-
nary and South Florida Military and Educational Institute.
Was read and went over under rules.
House Resolution No. 2:
By Mr. Koonce of Sumter:
Be it resolved by the House, That the Chief Clerk of the
House is hereby instructed to have printed immediately, for
the use of the members, 200 copies of the Rules of the last
House of Representatives.
Informally passed upon motion of-Mr. Wall of Putnam.










House Concurrent Resolution No. 4:
By Mr. Davis of St. Johns:
PIoviding for a committee to visit the State Blind Deaf and
)amrb Institute at St. Augustine.
Went over under rules.
House Concurrent Resolution No. 5:
By Mr. Jackson of Citrus:
Providing for a committee to visit the convict camps of the
"Stute.
Went over under the rules.
House Concurrent Resolution No. 6:
.Hy Mr. Uinstead of Suwannee:
Providing for a committee to visit the Agricultural College
at Lake City.
House Concurrent Resolution N9. 7:
By Mr. Pinholster of Bradford:
Relative to visiting the convict camps and provided for
recommendations of legislation on the convict system of the
State.
Went over under rules.
House Concurrent Resolution No. 8:
By Mr. Jacoby of Jackson:
Providing for a committee to visit the Reformatory at Mar-
anna.
Went over under the rules.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS AND JOINT RESOLU-
TIONS.
By Mr. L'Engle of Duval:
House Joint Resolution No. 7:
Proposing amendments to sections two and four of Article
five of the Constitution of the State of Florida.
Which was read the first time and referred.to the Commit-
tee on Constitutional Amendments.
By Mr. Buford of Calhoun:
House Bill No. 1:
To be entitled an act to regulate the carrying of revolvers
:ahd pistols.
Which was read the first time and referred to the Judiciary
Comniittee.
By Mr. Williamson of Hillsborough:
House Bill No. 2:
To be entitled an act to amend Section 3, of Chapter 4047,
of the Acts of the Legislature of Florida, of 1891, the same
being entitled an act to amend an act entitled an act to pro-









vide for the appointment of a .Board of Examiners and
to regulate the practice of denti-try in i e State of Florida,
being Chapter 4047, of the Lawsof Florida, approved May 25,
A. 1). 1891.
Was read the first time and referred to Committee on
Judiciary.
By Mr. Blanton of Madison by request:
House Bill No. 3:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 1497 of the
Revised Statutes, relative to cost, charges and attorneys fees
in suits for partition.
Read- the first time and referred to Committee on Judi-
ciary.
House Bill No. 4:
By Mr. Parish of Manatee.
.An act to provide for* the construction and maintenance of
drains by the several counties of the State of Florida, and to
provide for assessments of the costs thereof against the prop-
erty benefitted thereby, and further, to provide for the collec-
tion and enforcement of such assessments, and to legalize all
contracts for drains which heretofore may have been entered
into, and assessments made therefore, by the County Commis-
sioners of any county in the State of Florida under Chapter
4807 of the Laws of Florida.
Read the first time and referred to Committee ot Canals
and Drainage.
House Bill No. 5:
By Mr. Hunter of Hamilton:
A bill to be entitled an act to repeal an act entitled an act
to organize a municipal government for the town of Genoa,
Florida, same being Chapter 4311, Laws of Florida, and ap-
proved May 26, 1893.
Read first time and referred to City and County Organiza-
tions.
House Bill No. 6:
By Mr. Dowden of Polk:
A bill to be entitled an act to protect sheep from dogs and
to provide for the collection of damages by the owner of
sheep killed or damaged by dogs from the owners of said
dogs.
Read for the first time and referred to the Committee on
Judiciary.
Mr. John E. King was sworn in office of Recording Clerk
by Hon. D. M. Gornto, Notary Public for the State at large.
On motion of Mr. Williamson of Hillsborough, the Hon.
John K. Gresham was granted the courtesy of the Hall.









53

Mr. Rivers of Alachua offered the following resolution:
House Resolution No. 5:
Be it resolved by the House of Representatives, That the
Secretary of State be requested to furnish to the Sergeant-at-
Arms of the House of Representatives as many copies of the
Revised Statutes and subsequent acts of the State of Florida
as the House may need.
Which was read and adopted.
Mr. Koonce of Sumter offered the following resolution:
Be it resolved by the House of Representatives: That the
Chief Clerk be instructed to have printed daily 500 copies of
the Journals of the House, and that same be printed in pam-
phlet form.
Which was read and adopted.
The following resolution offered by Mr. Wolfe of Escambia:
House Resolution:
By Mr. Wolfe of Escambia:
Resolved, That there be added to the Standing Commit-
tees of the House a committee to be called the Committee on
Labor.
Was read and adopted.
House Resolution relative to printing 200 calendars daily of
Bills and Resolutions for the use of the House.
Was read the second time and adopted.

ORDERS OF THE DAY.

House Concurrent Resolution relative to the appointment
of a Joint Committee, to which shall be referred all Meas-
ures and Resolutions p proposed for the relief of the Supreime
and Circuit Courts of the State.
Which was read the second time and passed and ordered to
.be certified to the Senate.
The motion made by Mr. Zewadski of Marion, relative to
the appointment of a Bill Clerk by the Speaker on yesterday
was taken up.
On motion of Mr. Wolfe the motion was amended so that
a Bill Clerk be elected by the House.
The motion to elect a Bill Clerk was agreed to.
The House proceeded to the election of a Bill Clerk.
The roll being called,
The vote was:
For Dickenson-Messrs. Amos, Anderson, Bates, Blair,
Blanton, Brown, Broward, Butord, Burr, Campbell, Cham-










bers, Clarke, Close, Crawford, Corbett, Daviydon, Davis,
Dowd, Dowden, Fulton, Godfrey, Gornto, Griggs, Grant,
Gunn,' Harvell, Hendry, Jackson, Jacoby, Jones, Koonce,
L'Engle, McElroy, McGiffin, McRae of Pasco, McRae of
Putnam, Osteen, Palmer, Parrish of Holmes, Parrish of Man-
atee, Pinholster, Raulerson, Redding, Rivers of Alachua,
Shomaker, Smith, Sparkman, Thomas, Williamsom, Young
and Zewadski-51.
For Duncan-Messrs, Duckworth, Gillen, Hopkins, Hunter,
Lee, Rivers of Columbia, Sledge, Umstead, Wall, Whaley,
Wilson and Wolfe-12.
The Speaker declared Mr. George B. Dickenson of Orange
elected Bill Clerk.
On motion of Mr. Parrish of Manatee the HIouse adjourned
until 10 o'clock a. m., tomorrow.




THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1901.

The House met pursuant to adjournment.
The Speaker in the chair.
The roll being called the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Amos, Anderson, Bates, Blair, Blan-
ton, Broward, Buford, Burr, Clarke, Close, Crawford, Corbett,
Davis, Dowd, D)owden, Duckworth, Gillen, Godfrey
Harvell, Hendry, Hopkins, Hunter, Jackson, Jacoby, John-
son, Jones, Lee, L'Engle, McElroy, McGiffin, McRae of Put-
nam, Osteen, Parrish of Holmes, Parrish of Manatee, Pin-
holster, Redding, Rivers of Columbia, Shomaker, Sledge,
Smith, Sparkman, Thomas, Wall, Wilson, Young and
Zewadski-46.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Chaplain.
On motion of Mr. Zewadski the reading of the .Jornal be
dispensed with indefinitely unless called for by members.
Which was agreed to.
The Speaker reported the following Standing Committees:









STANDING COMMITTEES.

Judiciary.

MR. ZEWADSKI of Marion, Chairman.
Messrs. RANEY, KOONCE,
PALMER, DAVIDSON,
WOLFE, BROWN,
CLARKE, GORNTO.



Finance and Taxation.

MR. L'ENGLE of Duval, Chairman.



Messrs. FULTON,
GRIGGS,
McGIFFIN,
JONES,



DAVIS,
WALL,
RUSSELL,
REDDING.



Commerce and Navagation.
MR. McGIFFIN of Nassau, Chairman.
Messrs. GRIGGS, PARISH
YOUNG, atee,
RUSSELL, BROWA
JONES.



of

RD.



Railroads and Telegraph.
MR. DAVIDSON of Gadsden, Chairman.
Messrs. CAMPBELL, CRAWFORD,
CORBETT, HENDRY,
SMITH, CLOSE.
Corporations.



MR. GRIGGS of Franklin, Chairman.
Messrs. WOLFE, PARISH
ANDERSON, SPARK
CHAMBERS, RAULE]
Constitutional Amendments.
MR. RANEY of Leon, Chairman.



Messrs. PALMER,
CLARKE,



AMO)S,
DAVIDS



, of Holmes,
NIAN,
RSON.





SON,



Man-



J







56

Mining and Phosphate.

MR. JACKSON of Citrus, Chairman.



Messrs. SLEDGE,
RIVERS of Alachua,
GUNN,



JOHNSON,
GILLEN,
McELROY.



Public Printing.
MR. PARISH of Holmes, Chairman.



-Messrs. BATES,
BURR,



HUNTER.



BLAIR,
SHOEMAKER,



Engrossed Bills.
MR. MIScRAE of Pasco, Chairman.



Messrs. GODFREY,
GRANT,
OSTEEN,



THOMAS,
KOONCE,
JACOBY.



Enrolled Bills.
MR. DAVIS of St. Johns, Chairman.
:Messrs. WHALEY, CHAMBERS,
DOWDEN, HOPKINS.
State Institutions.
MR. WOLFE of Esoambia, Chairman.



iMessrs. CLARKE,
REDDING,:
YOUNG,



CAMPbELL,
AMOS,
R ANEY.



Public Lands.



MR. WILSON of Clay, Chairman.



LMessrs. SPARKMAN,
GILLEN,
OSTEEN.



BATES,
BUFORD,
RIVERS of Colum-
bia.



Militia and State Troops.
MR. SMITH of Volusia, Chairman.
Messrs. PORTER, BURR,
GRANT, HAR ELL.









Privileges and Elections.
MR. GORNTO of Bradford, Chairman.
Messrs. HUNTER, McGIFFIN,
BUFORD, PORTER,
PALMER, GRIGGS.
Education.
MR. UMSTEAD of Suwannee, Chairman.
Messrs. DOWDEN, RIVERS of Colum-
WILLIAMSON, bia,
THOMAS, REDDING,
BROWN, LEE,
BROWARD.
Public Roads and Highways.
MR. PALMER of Orange, Chairman.
Messrs. BRO WARD, GODFREY,
JACOBY, WILLIAMSON,
GORNTO, HOPKINS.
Claims.
MR. WALL of Putnam, Chairman.
Messrs. AMOS, PIN HOLSTER,
DUCK WORTH, YOUNG,
JACKSON,
RIVERS of Columbia.
Fisheries.
MR. RAULERSON of Brevard, Chairman.
Messrs. PAR RISH of Manatee, HENDRY,
McELROY, CORBETT,
GRIGGS, CRAW FORD.
Public Health.
MR. PORTER of Monroe, Chairman.
Messrs. ZEWADSK I McGIFFIN,
YOUNG, BUFORD.
Temperance.
MR. HUNTER of Hamilton, Chairman.
Messrs. DUCK WORTH, JOHNSON,
SLEDGE, GILLEN,
WILSON; GUNN.









Census.
MR. PINHOLSTER of Bradford, Chairman.
Messrs. BLANTON, DOWD,
BLAIR, GUNN.

Rules.

MIR. KOONCE of Sumter, Chairman.
Messrs. JACOBY, RIVERS of Alachua
DUCKWORTH, WALL.

Unfinished Business.
MR. REDDING of Madison, Chairman.
Messrs. UMSTEAD, DOWD,
SHOEMAKER, WILSON.
Journal.

MR. McELORY of Levy, Chairman.
Messrs. HARVELL, SHO MAKER,
McRFAE of Putnam, GILLEN.

Legislative Expenses.
MR. RUSSELL of Monroe, Chairman.
"Messrs. ANDERSON, BLAIR,
JONES, BROWN,
BLANTON, RIVERS
of Alachia.

City and County Organization.

MR. CLARKE of Jefferson, Chairman.
Messrs. WILLIAMSON, GORNTO,
GODFREY, FULTON,
CHAMBERS, JACKSON.
Agriculture.
MR. DO WDEN of Polk, Chairman.
Messrs. SPARKMAN, McRAE of Putnam,
HARVELL, CRAWFOR)D,
BATES.








539



Immigration.

MR. CLOSE of Polk, Chairman.



Messrs. ANDERSON,
COR BETT,



WHALEY.

Indian Affairs.



MR. CRAWFORD of Orange, Chairman.



Messrs. RAULERSON,
UMSTEAD,



PARRISH of
Holmes,



McRAE of Pasco.
"Canals and Drainage.
MR. HENDRY of Lee, Chairman.



Messrs. M TRAE of Putnam,
SLEDGE,
THOMAS,



CLOSE,
PARISH of Manatee,
JOHNSON.



State Pensions.
MR. GRANT of Suwannee, Chairman.



Messrs. L'ENGLE,
PINHOLSTER,
LEE,



DAVIS,
KOONCE,
WHALEY.



Appropriations.
MR. FULTON of Hernando, Chairman.
Messrs. WOLFE, HENRY,
DOWDEN, CAMPBELL.
Game.
MR. BROWN of DeSoto, Chairman.



Messrs. JACOBY,
McR RAE of Pasco,



SMITH,
HOPKINS.



INTRODUCTION OF BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS.
By Mr; Harvell of, Santa Rosa:
House Resolution No. 3:
That no committee be allowed to employ any clerical aid
without the consent of House.
Which was adopted.



BUTR R,
DOWD,








60



By Mr. Davis of St. Johns:
House Resolution No. 4:
To provide for appointment of a committee to investigate
the failure of the Industrial Insurance and Banking Company,
to( make returns to the Comptroller of the State of Florida as
required by law, and to suggest needed legislation in reference
thereto.
By Mr. Zewadski of Marion:
House Resolution No. 4:
Resolved, That the Judiciary Committee be allowed a
clerk.
Which was adopted.
By Dr. L'Engle of Duval:
House Resolution No. 6:
Resolved, That the Committee on Finance and Taxation be
allowed a clerk.
Which was adopted.
By Mr. Wilson of Clay:
House Bill No. 8:
A bill to be entitled an act providing a punishment for
the violation of all laws in the State of Florida where the pun-
ishment is not otherwise provided for by statute.
Which was read the first time and referred to Judiciary
,Committee.
By Mr. Wilson of Clay:
House Bill No. 9:
A bill to be entitled an act to empower the courts of the
State of Florida to review the action of the County Commis-
sioners of the several counties of the State of Florida by writ
of mandamus.
Which was read the first time and referred to Committee
on Judiciary.
By Mr. Rivers of Columbia:
House Bill No. 10:
A bill to be entitled an act to prohibit persons from hunt-
ing or fishing on enclosures without the consent of the
owner.
Which was read the first time and referred to Committee
on Judiciary.
By Mr. Rivers of Columbia:
House Bill No. 11:
A bill to be entitled an act to repeal -section 10 of an act
entitled an act to require railroads in the State of Florida to
fence their tracks, to provide the time and manner in
which fence shall be constructed, and to provide a
!penalty for failure so to do and to provide








61



the measure of damages for cattle killed or irn
jured by trains or engines on railroads not fenced, and pro-
viding for the payment of attorney's fees and double dam-
ages for the killing or injury to domestic live stock under
certain conditions by the companies refusing or neglecting to
fence their roads as required. Approved June 5, 1899, and
designated as Chapter 4706, Laws of Florida.
Which was read the first time and referred to Committee
on Railroads and Telegraphs.
By Mr. Jackson of Citrus:
House Blil No. 12:
A bill to be entitled an act limiting the time in which elec-
tions held under Article 19 of the Constitution may be con-
tested.
Read the first time and referred to Committee on Privi-
leges and Elections.
By Mr. Burr of Dade:
House Bill No. 13:
A bill to be entitled an act providing for arrests without
warrants.
Which was read the first time and referred to Committee
on Judiciary.
By Mr. Broward of Duval:
House Bill No. 14:
A bill to be entitled an act to divide the State of Florida
into three Congressional districts, in accordance with an act of
Congress of the United States. Approved the day of

Which was read the first time and laid over to await the
appointment of a special committee.
By Mr. Jones of Escambia:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 3, Chapter
4569, Laws of Florida, entitled an act to establish a Battalion
of Naval Militia of the State of Florida, approved June 4,
1897.
Which was read the first time and referred to the Commit-
tee on Militia.
By Mr. Jones of Escambia:
House Bill No. 16:
A bill to be entitled an act for the relief of Leslie E. Brooks
for services as stenographer in Circuit Court of Escambia
county, Florida.
Which was read the first time and referred to the Commit-
tee on Judiciary.








62



By Mr. Young of Hillsb.orougl:
House Bill No. 17:
A bill to be- entitled an act to make valid certain instru-
Inents defectively acknowledged, and to make the record of
the same notice to all parties.
Which was read the first time and referred to CommiLtee
on Judiciary.
By Mr. Parish of Holmes:
House Bill No. 18:
A bill to be entitled an act to regulate tle carr ying of
pistols.
Which was read the first time and referred to the ('ommit-
tee on Jutdiciary.
By Mr. Hendry of Lee:
House Bill No. 19:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 1 of Chapter
4179 etit.itled an act to provide a Board of Phosphate Conm-
inissioners and an Inspector of Phosphates, anm to deftine their
duties and their authority to grant the right to mine phos-
phate in the beds of navigable waters of the State of Florida
upon certain conditions, and to prohibit persons from mining
unlawfully the same.
Which was read the first time and referred to the Commit-
tee on Mining and Phosphate.
By Mr. Zewadski of Marion:
House Bill No. 20:
A bill to be entitled an act creating three Congressional
Districts in the State of Florida, and defining the boundaries
of same, and repealing Sections 57 and 58 of the Revised
Statutes of the State of Florida.
Read first time and passed informally.
By Mr. Zewadski of Marion:
House Bill No. 21:
A bill to be entitled an act requiring a special license tax to
be paid by telegraph companies doing business in this State.
Which was read the first time and referred to the Commit-
tee on Railroads and Telegraph.
By Mr. Zewadski of Marion:
House Bill No. 22:
A bill to be entitled an act to require persons running or
operating log-timber or turpentine carts or wagons, or per-
sons habitually hauling heavy loads on or over the public
roads in this State, to keep the portion of such road used by
them in repair.








63



Which was read the first time and referred to the Com-
mittee on Public Roads and Bridges.
By Mr. Zewadski of Marion:
House Bill No. 23:
A bill to be entitled an act in relation to special damages
recoverable of a telegraph company.
Which was read the first time and referred to the Judi-
ciary Company.
By Mr. Zewadski of Marion:
House Joint Resolution No. 24:
Proposing an amendment to Sections 2 and 4 of Article 5
of the State of Florida relating to the Supreme Court.
Which was read the first time and went over under the
Rules.
By Mr. Zewadski of Marion.
House Joint Resolution No. 25:
Proposing an amendment to Section 8 of Article 5 of the
Constitution of the State of Florida relating to the Judicial
Circuits.
Which was read the first time and referred to Committee
on Constitutional Amendments.
By Mr. Zewadski of Marion:
House Joint Resolution No. 26:
Proposing amendments to Sections 8, 9 and 10 of Article 5,
of the Constitution of Florida, relating to the Judiciary De-
partment.
Which was read the first time and referred to the Commit-
tee on Constitutional Amendments.
By Mr. Zewadski of Marion:
House Bill No. 27:
A bill to be entitled an act enlarging the chancery jurisdic-
tion in the appointment of receivers.
Which was read the first time and referred to the Commit-
ee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Zewadski of Marion:
House Bill No. 28:
A bill to be entitled an act to allow and regulate church in-
surance companies to do business in this State.
Which was read the first time and referred to Committee
on Judiciary.
By Mr. Zewadski of Marion:
House Bill No. 29:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 4 of Chapter
4338, Laws of Florida, being an act to provide for establishing,
working and repairing, and maintaining the public roads and








64



Bridges of the several counties of this State, and to provide
penalties for failure thereof.
Which was read the first time and referred to Committee
on Judiciary.
By Mr. Dowden of Polk:
House Bill No. 30:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Sections 37 and 57 of
Chapter 4869, being an act entitled an act to abolish the pres-
ent municipal government of the city of Lakeland, in the
county of Polk and State of Florida, and to establish, organ-
ize and constitute a municipality to be known as Lakeland,
and to provide for its jurisdiction, powers and privileges.
Which was read the first time and referred to Committee on
City and County Organization.
By Mr. Harvell, of Santa Rosa:
House Bill No. 31:
A billto be entitled an act to regulate the carrying of con.
cealed weapons in the State of Florida.
Which was read the first time and referred to Committee on
Judiciary.
By Mr. Amos of Santa Rosa:
House Bill No. 32:
A bill to be entitled an act to re-apportion the State of
Florida into Congressional Districts.
Which was read the first time and laid over awaiting the ap-
pointment of a Special Committee.
By Mr. Smith of Volusia:
House Bill No. 33:
A bill to be entitled an act providing for the admission to
the practice of law in the Courts of this State of the gradu-
ates of the law departments of the John B. Stetson university.
Which was read the first time and referred to the Commit-
tee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Smith of Volusia:
House Bill No. 34:
A bill to be entitled an act in relation to the use of bicycles
on sidepaths, for licensing bicycles for appointing sidepath
commissioners, and for construction, maintenance, regulation
and preservation of sidepaths by defining the powers and du-
ties of commissioners.
Which was read the first time and referred to Committee
on Public Roads and Highways.
By Mr. Rivers of Alachua:
House Bill No. 35:
A bill to be entitled an act to provide for a uniform system







65



of text books for the public schools of the State of Florida,
and to provide for commissioners for the selection therefore.
Which was read the first time and referred to the Commit-
tee on Education.
By Mr. Williamson of Hillsborough:
House Bill No. 36:
A bill to be entitled an act making an appropriation for a
cruise instruction and for the transportation of the Naval;
Militia of the State of Florida for the years 1901 and 1902,.
and to provide for the expenses necessary for the proper:
equipment, instruction and maintenance of the Florida Naval
Militia.
Which was read the first time and referred to the Com-
mittee on Appropriations.

ORDERS OF THE DAY.

House Concurrent Resolution No. 6:
Relative to appointing a joint committee to visit the State
Agricultural College at Lake City.
Was passed informally.
House Concurrent Resolution No. 8:
Proposing appointment joint committee to visit the Re-
formatory at Marianna and State Insane Asylum.
Mr. Blanton of Madison offered the following amendment
"And report the number of inmates."
Which was adopted and the Resolution passed over in-
formally.
By Mr. Campbell of Walton:
House Concurrent Resolution for appointment of a joint.
committee to visit the State Normal School.
Was read first time and went over under the Rules.
Mr. Davis of St. Johns, offered the following:
House Concurrent Resolution No. 11:
Resolved by the House of Representatives, Senate concur
ring, that a joint committee of five (5), three (3) on part of
the House and two from the Senate, be appointed to take up,
consider and report the most economical, practical and effi-
cient manner of visiting and inspecting the different State In-
stitutions, convict camps, canals, etc., of the State andj report
as early as practical.
Which was read and passed informally.
By Mr. Blair of Baker:
House Concurrent Reolution No. 3.
For appointment of a committee to visit East Florida Sem-
5 H







66



inary and South Florida Military and Educational Institute.
Which was read second time and adopted.
By Mr. Davis of St. Johns:
House Concurrent Resolution No. 4:
Relative to appointing joint committee to visit and report
uipon the condition of the State Blind, Deaf and Dumb Insti-
tute situated at St, Augustine. Fla.
Which was read the second time and adopted.
H-ouse Resolution No. 5:
Relative to proposing a committee to visit the convict
'camps of the State.
Was read and adopted.
By Mr. Hen dry of Lee:
House Memorial No. 37:
To the Congress of the United States in regard to water-
"way across the Peninsular of Florida from the Atlantic
)cean to the Gulf of Mexico.
Which was read the first time.
Mr. Fulton of Hernando gave notice that he would move
for a reconsideration of the vote taken on the motion of Mr.
Zewadski of Marion, that exhibits of the Governor's Message
be printed in the Journal on to-morrow.
On motion of Mr. Shomaker of Jackson, Judge Wells of
"Washington, was invited to the privilege of the Hall.
On motion of Mr. L'Engle of Duval, the privilege of the
Hall was extended, to the Hon. D. U. Fletcher of Duval
county.
On motion of Mr. McRae of Pasco, the privilege ef the Hal
,was extended to the Hon. G. W. Bowen of Pasco county.
On motion of Mr. Smith of Volusia, the privileges of the
floor were extended to the Hon. Thomas A. Davis of Sea-
breeze, Fla.
The following members being absent on special business at
roll call this morning, appeared and answered to their names:
Messrs. Brown, Campbell, Chambers, Davidson, Gornto,
(Griggs, Gunn, Grant, Koonce, McRae of Pasco, Umstead,
"Whaley, Williamson and Wolfe--14.
On motion of Mr. Wolfe of Escambia, the House adjourned
aintil 10 o'clock a. m. to-morrow.







67

FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1901.

House met pursuant to adjournment.
The Speaker in the chair.
The roll being called the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Amos, Anderson, Bates, Blair, Blanton,
Brown, Broward, Buford, Burr, Campbell, Chambers, Clarke,
,Close, Crawford, Corbett, Davidson, Davis, Dowd, Dowden,
Duckworth, Fulton, Gillen, Godfrey, Gornto, Griggs, Grant,
Guinn, Harvell, Hendry, Hopkins, Hunter, Jackson, Jacoby,
"Johnon, Jones, Koonce, Lee, L'Engle, iVcElroy, McGiffin,
M of Holmes, Parrish of Manatee, Pinholster,-Raney, Raulerson,
Redding. Rivers of Alachua, Rivers of Columbia, Shomaker,
:Sli1g. Smith, Sparkman, Thomas, Umstead, Wall, Whaley,
Williamson, Wilson, Wolfe, Young and Zewadski-96.
A quorum present.
Prayer by Chaplain.
Journal corrected,
Hon. E. W. Russell and lion. Joseph T. Porter, Represen-
tatives elected from the County of Monroe, and George B.
Dickenson, Bill Clerk appeared and took the oath of office
before the Hon. W. L. Palmer, Notary Public for the State
of Florida.
The Speaker offered the following report, also the follow-
ing House Bill No. 38, which were read the first time and 300
copies ordered printed of th3 Report and Bill.

To the Legislature of the State of Florida:
GENTLEMEN: Chapter 4710, Laws of Florida, reads as fol-
lows:
"Whereas, The present convict system of this State is a
shame upon the name of Florida, and is in no manner satisfac-
tory to the citizens of the State, and
"Whereas: The Committee appointed to investigate the
various convict camps of the State, in their report to this Leg-
islature, fully sets forth the inhuman and cruel treatment the
.convicts receive at some of the camps, and
"Whereas, The present system of leasing the convicts de-
prives the State of thousands of dollars, as the lessees invaria-
bly pool their bid and secure them at a nominal sum and sub-
lease them at a big profit, and believing that if the lease system
is to be continued, that under proper management same can be








68



done in such a way that the State will receive a proper remu-
neration for the services of the convicts, and tha they will re-
ceive better and more civilized treatment; therefore,
Be it enacted by the Legislature of Florida:
Section 1. That the Governor of the State be authorized toc
appoint a conunittee of tree citizens of this State whose
duties it shall be to take up, investigate, consider and report
to the next Legislature the most humane, practical and profit-
able method of working the State convicts.
Section 2. That for the purpose of carrying out the provis-
ions of this Act the sum of five hundred dollars is hereby ap-
propriated out of any funds not otherwise appropriated,"
Under this Act this committee was appointed by Governor
Bloxham.
The Legislature of 1899 thus expressly put its seal of con-
demnation upon the present lease system of this State, and by
this act of the Legislature the people of this State have every
reason to expect that a change for the better be made in the
convict system of the State. It is not necessary for us to go,
into details as to the defects found by the last committee of the
Legislature that visited the various convict camps. Abuses
then existing as to the treatment of the )prisoners, under the
frequent visits of the Supervisor of State Convicts and Convict:
Camps, have been reduced to a minimum, and we feel that the
results obtained fully justify the expectations entertained
when the law was passed providing for a Supervisor of State
,Convicts; through the State Supervisor of Convicts the State
came more nearly in touch with the prisoners than it possibly
could through an administrative officer who has numerous
daily duties requiring his time and attention. While the
improvement has been and is all that could be expected under
the present system, it does not meet the demands of an en-
lightened convict system in accord with the more humane
treatment of prisoners.
The question of the most humane, practical and -'
working of State convicts is one that is far reaching in any
light in which it may be viewed and is claiming the attention
of some of the best minds of this country. Bearin in mind
that we are dealing with a class of people who have been con-
victed of crimes under the laws of the State, and are suffering
the penalty of the law, and realizing that the number of con-
victs is constantly increasing, the question as to how our con-
victs shall be employed to obtain the best results for the good
of the convict and the least burden to the tax payer is one that
deserves your most careful consideration. You should not
lose sight of the fact that whatever of good there is in the con-







69



"vict should be encouraged, that as far as possible reform may
acUcomlpany punishment. That the convict should be employed
:for his own good is morally certain and does not admit of suc-
cessful contradiction.
The question of labor within prison walls, or labor in the
fields, mines, mills and on turpentine farms, while condemned
in some sections, under proper restrictive legislation the em-
ploynicnt of convicts in the open air should have a more hu-
manizing influence on prisoners than confinement within
prison walls. There can be no question that the sunlight,
healthy and balmy air, and out-door exercise is better for the
"health of the convicts than confinement in a prison neces-
sarily limited in the space that must be occupied by each con-
vict.
While we have no desire to criticise the present lease con-
tract, our investigation shows that the sub-lessees are paying
:for the convicts they employ, under their sub-leases, prices far
in excess of the price the original contractor leased them 'at,
prices ranging from $60 to $180 per year for each convict.
The policy of the State, however, as to her convicts should not
rest entirely on the profits that might be derived from their
hire. Our criminal laws are made for the safety of our peo-
ple and property, and the administration of our convict sys-
tem should look to the moral welfare and reformation as well
.as the safe keeping of the convicts, utilizing the labor of the
convicts, making the same profitable is also perfectly proper,
so long as their safe keeping, health and moral welfare is
looked after. Labor is an absolute necessity in all penal insti-
tutions; the well being of 'the convict requires it; idleness in
prison results in making the convict more vicious with all its
attending evil.
A careful examination of the different systems relative to
the care of convicts leads us to the following conclusions:
A change should be made in our present system of leasing
and caring for our convicts. It is safe to say that while at
this time the convicts are in demand at remunerative prices
for their labor, the day will come when the State will have to
care for and work them. We believe this an opportune time
for the State to reform her mode of handling her prisoners.
The State should not part with her absolute control of the
convicts, their labor being disposed of in the most humane and
"practicable manner.
The State convicts should be controlled by a Commission of
three members, whose duties and powers should be prescribed
!by law.








70



The State Reform School Farm at Marialnna, in Jackson
county, should be established as a State Penitentiary, where
all females, aped, infirm and all convicts under the age of fif-
teen years, should be placed and employed at such farm work-
as they are able to perform.
The Commission should also be given power to establish two
more farms at such points as nray be most acceptable in the
different sections of the State, when in their opinion it may be
necessary. In this connection, the establishing of one or both
of the farms at some point where there is plenty of hard rock
accessible to transportation, should. if possible be done, using
the convicts at such times as not otherwise employed, in pre-
paring rock for the roads and streets of the State, the State
furnishing the rock to such counties as want to make rock
roads, at cost price at the.farm, and disposing of the surplus
to municipalities and railroads for street making and M ballast-
ing railroads. We believe permanent and better roads would
result from this than in any other way of using convict labor.
E. S. CRILL,
J. W. WATSON,
J. T. BERNARD,
Members of Committee.
House Bill No. 38:
A bill to be entitled an act to create a Prison Comnmission for
the State of Florida to define their duties, powers and compen-
sation; to provide for the purchase of certain lands, and for the
erection thereon of a penitentiary in which to keep and main-
tain certain State convicts; and to provide for the utilization
of convict labor thereon; to place,the State Reform School
under the charge and control of said commission; to provide
for the hiring of certain convicts; to provide for an appropri-
ation to carry out the purposes of this act and for other pur-
poses.
Which was read the first time and three hundred copies.
ordered printed.
MESSAGES FROM THE SENATE.

The follow message from the Senate was read:
Senate Chamber,
Tallahasse, Fla., April 3, 1901.
Hon. John W. Watson,
Speaker qf the House qf Represenuttives:
Sir-lam directed by the Senate to inform the House of
Representatives that the Senate has adopted-









71

Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 1:
Resolved by the Senate, the House of Representative con-
curring, That a committee composed of three from the Senate
and five from the House of Representatives be appointed, to@
whom shall be referred all bills and resolutions relating to the.
re-districting of the State into Congressional Districts, and
whose duty it shall be to prepare and submit a bill dividing-
the State of Florida into three Congressional Districts or
otherwise providing for the election of a Congressman from
the State of Florida.
And respectfully requests the concurrence of the House of
Representatives thereto.
Very respectfully.
T. J. APPLEYARD,
Secretary of the Senate.
Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 1, contained in the above
message, was read the first time by its title and went over
under the rules.
The following message from the Senate was read:
Senate Chamber,
Tallahassee, Fla., April 5, 1901.
Hon. John W. Watson:
Speaker of the House of _Representatives:
Sir-I am directed by the Senate to inform the House of
Representatives that the Senate has adopted-
. Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 2:
Concurrent Resolution authorizing the appointment of a
committee to examine into the condition of the State Build-
ings at Tallahassee.
Be it resolved by the Senate, the House of Representa-
tives concurring, that a committee of two from the Senate and
three from the House be appointed to investigate the condi-
tion of the State buildings at Tallahassee and to report what
repairs are necessary and what additional buildings are neces-
sary, if any.
And respectfully repuests the concurrence of the House of
Representative thereto.
Very respectfully,
T. J. APPLEYARD,
: Secretary of the Senate.
Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 2, contained in the above
message, was read the first time by its title and went over
under the rules.











The following message from the Senate was read:
Senate Chamber,
Tallahassee, Fla., April 4, 1901.
lHon. John W. Watson,
Speafke; of the House of Representatives:
Sir-I am directed by the Senate to inform the House of
Representatives that the Senate has adopted-.
Senate Concurrent Resolutinn No. 3:
Be it Resolved by the Senate, the House concurring, That
a committee to be composed of one on the part of the Senate
and two from the House be appointed to visit the East Flor-
ida Seminary at Gainesville, the Deaf Dumb and Blind Asy-
lum at St. Augustine, and the South Florida Military and Ed-
ucational Institute at Bartow, examine into and investigate the
present condition of each and ascertain what improvements,
if any, should be made, and the cost and present value of
property belonging to and connected with the South Florida
Military and Educational Institute, and report with as little
delay as possible their findings to the Legislature, to the end
that it may be advised in the matter of appropriations.
And respectfully request the concurrence of the House of
Representatives thereto.
Very respectfully,
T. J. APPLEYARD,
Secretary of Senate.
Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 3, contained in the above
above message, was read the first time by its title and went
over under the rules.
The following message from the Senate was read:
Senate Chamber,
Tallahassee, Fla., April 4, 1901.
Hon. John W. Watson,
Speaker of the House of Re)presentatives:
Sir-I am directed by the Senate to inform the House of
Representatives that the Senate has adopted-
Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 4:
Resolved by the Senate, the House of Repr.esentatives con-
curring, That a committee composed of one from the Senate
and two from the House of Representatives be appointed to
visit the Agricultural College, located at Lake City, and re-
port on its conditions, progress and requirements.








73



And respectfully requests the concurrence of the House of
Representatives thereto.
Very respectfully,
T. J. APPLEYARD,
Secretary of the Senate.
Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 4, contained in the above
message, was read the first time by its title and went over
under the rules.
The following message from the Senate was read:
Senate Chamber,
Tallahassee, Fla., April 14, 1901.
Hon. John W. Watson,
Speaker of the House of Representatives:
Sir-I am directed by the Senate to inform the House of
Representatives that the Senate has adopted-
House Concurrent Resolution No. 1:
Relative to appointing a joint committee to which all meas-
ures and resolutions proposed for the relief of the Supreme and
Circuit Courts of the Stute shall be referred.
With the following amendments:
Strike out "seven" and insert "ten."
Strike out "four" and insert "six."
Strike out "three" and insert "four."
And respectfully request the concurrence of the House of
Representatives thereto.
S Very respectfully,
T. J. APPLEYARD,
Secretary of the Senate.
Was read and the House concurred in Senate amendments
to House Concurrent Resolution No. 1, relative to the ap-
pointment of a joint committee on relief of Supreme and
State Courts on motion of Mr. Dowden of Polk.
The following message was received from the Governor:
State of Florida, Executive Department,
Tallahasse, Fla., April 5, 1901.
Hon. John W. Watson,
Speaker of the House of Representatives:
My Dear Sir-I have the honor to inform you by direction
of the Board of Commissioners of State Institutions, that the
Board has important data and information that should be
communicated to your House, and the members of the Board










should be pleased to confer with proper committee at your
pleasure,
I have the honor to remain with much respect,
W. S. JENNINGS,
Governor and President of the Board of State Institutions.
Which was read and the Speaker appointed Messrs. Zewad-
ski of Marion, L'Engle of Duval, and Griggs of Franklin, a
committee as suggested in the message by the Governor.
Mr. Parrish of Manatee, offered House Joint Resolution and
Memorial No. 39, to Congress asking for a survey of the Up-
per Manatee river in Manatee county, Florida, from Rye, Fla.,
to Ellenton, Fla.
Which was read the first time and referred to the Commit-
tee on Commerce and Navigation.
Mr. L'Engle of Duval, asked that the privileges of the Hall
be extended to Hon. W. McL. Dancy.
Which request was granted.
Mr. Griggs of Franklin, offered Concurrent Resolution
No. 40, memorializing Congress in regard to the future im-
provement of the Cahttahoochee, Flint and Apalachicola
rivers and Apalachicola bay.
Which was read.the first time and referred to the Commit-
tee on Commerce and Navigation.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS.
By Mr. Jackson of Citrus:
House Concurrent Resolution No. 11:
Proposing a special committee to investigate the acts and
doings of the Board of| Commissioners of State Institutions
and the Commissioner of Agriculture.
Which was read the first time and laid over under the.
rules.
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS.
By call of counties:
By Mr. Rivers of Alachua:
House Bill No. 41:
A bill to be entitled an act to provide for the
redemption of tax certificates now held or that may hereafter
be held by the State of Florida after the expiration of two
years from the date of the tax certificate, and to repeal Chap-
ter 4673 of the Acts of Florida of 1899 relating thereto.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Finance and Taxation.








75



By Mr. Rivers of Alachua:
House Bill No. 42:
A bill to be entitled an act to prescribe the jurisdiction of
County Judges' courts, and to provide for Justices of the
Peace issuing warrants returnable thereto, and to repeal Sec-
tion 2847 of the Revised Statutes of the State of Florida, re-
lating to the jurisdiction of County Judges' courts.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary:
By Mr. Rivers of Alachua:
House Bill No. 43:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 9, Chapter
4322, of the Laws of the State of Florida, entitled an act for
the assessment and collection of revenue.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to the
Committee on Finance and Taxation.
By Mr. Gornto of Bradford:
House Bill No. 44:
A bill to be entitled an act to'repeal Section 2053 ofthe Re-'
vised Statutes relative to estrays.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Wilson of Clay:
House Bill No. 45:
A bill to be entitled an act providing that no nolle prosique
shall be entered in any criminal case without the consent of
the court in open court.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Wilson of Clay:
House Bill No. 46:
A bill to be entitled an act providing the method for the
State Attorney advising the grand jury on any matter pend-
ing before them for their investigation and for the preserva-
tion of such advice.'
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Wilson of Clay:
House Bill No. 47:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 1184, of the-
Revised Statutes of the State of Florida, relating to imprison-
ment for debt.
Which was read the first time]jby its [title and referred to-
the Committee on Judiciary.









By Mr. Jackson of Citrus:
House Bill No. 48:
A bill to be entitled an act to repeal Chapter 4559 Laws of
_Florida of 1897, entitled an act to prohibit the taking or catch-
ing of fish with gill net or sein from the waters of Homosassa
river and its tributaries.
"Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
fthe Committee on Fisheries.
By Mr. Burr of Dade:
House Bill No. 49:
A bill to be entitled an act to prohibit State Attorneys,
"County Solicitors and other prosecuting officers in this State
from accepting employment as attorneys or otherwise, from
any corporation engaged in the carrying of freights and pas-
sengers, or either, within the State of Florida, and to provide
penalties for its violation.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Burr of Dade:
House Bill No. 50:
A bill to be entitled an act to fix the fare for passengers on
.all railroad trains in this State at three cents per mile, and to
provide penalties for its violation.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Railroads and Telegraphs.
By Mr. Burr of Dade:
House Bill No. 51:
A bill to be entitled an act to require all corporations oper-
ating street railways iqi any of the towns or cities of the State
"-to provide separate cars or compartments for white and negro
Passengers and to provide penalties for its violation.
Which was read for the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Corporations.
By Mr. Burr of Dade:
House Bill No. 52:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 2598 of the
Revised Statutes of Florida, the same being entitled carnal
intercourse with unmarried females under the age of sixteen
years.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Burr of Dade:
House Bill No. 53:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 2396, of the
-the Revised Statutes of Florida, the same being entitled
.Rape and forcible carnal khnwledge.










Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Davidson of Gadsden:
House Bill No. 54:
A bill to be entitled an act for the relief of Wm. H. Ellis
of Gadsden county.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee'on Judiciary by request.
By Mr. Bates of Gadsden:
House Bill No. 55:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Sectiop 1, of an act-
entitled to provide annuities for disabled soldiers and sailors
and wives of deceased soldiers and sailors of the State of Flor-
ida, being Chapter 4670 of the Laws of Florida.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to.
the Committee on Militia.
By Mr. Young of Hiillsborough:
House Bill No. 56:
A bill to be entitled an act prescribing the mode of pro-
ceedure for the exercise of the powers of eminent domain by
cities, towns, counties, corporations, public and private, and
individuals.
Which was read the first time by its title andJ referred to.
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Young of Hillsborough:
House Bill No. 57:
A hill to be entitled an act to legalize and validate all the
sections of the County Commissioners for Hillsborough county,
Florida, in and about the opening of a certain public road
known as the Ballast Point and Port Tampa road, and in
making of certain contracts, and granting a right of way in,
reference to the same.
Which was read the firstatime by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Young of Hillsborough.
H house B ill N o. 58: e'li -- th -... o*'
A bill to be entitled an act to legalize the action of the
County Commissioners of Hillsborough county, Florida, inr
granting a right of way to the Tampa Electric Company over
a certain public road.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Shomaker of Jackson:
House Bill No. 59: w
A bill to be entitled an act to require the several Boards of







78

Public Instruction of the several counties of the State to make
monthly reports of all receipts and disbursements of money to
the County Commissioners of their respective counties.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to the
Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Clarke of Jefferson:
House Bill No. 60:
A bill to be entitled an act to establish a law uniform with
the laws of other States relative to divorce procedure and
divorce from the bond of marriage.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Clarke of Jefferson:
House Bill No. 61:
A bill to be entitled an act to repeal an act entitled an act
to amend Section 260 of the Revised Statutes of the State of
Florida, entitled "Census by Supervisors" and Section 261 of
such Revised Statutes entitled "On Failure of Supervisors
Superintendents to take Census," being Chapter'4679, Laws of
Florida, approved June 1, 1899.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Clarke of Jefferson:
House Bill No. 62:
A bill to be entitled an act to prohibit the carrying away or
concealing of the personal property of another with malici-
ous or mischievious intent but without intent to steal and pre-
scribing a penalty for the same.
Which was read the.first time by its title and referred to the
Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Godfrey of Lake:
House Bill No. 63:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 145 of the
Revised Statutes of the State of Florida.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. McElroy of Levy:
House Bill No. 64:
A bill to be entitled an act to regulate the purchase, sale
and transfer of stocks of goods, wares and merchandise in
bulk.
Whlch was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. McElroy of Levy:







79



House Bill No. 65:
A bill to be entitle an act to punish the vendee for the
fraudulent purchase of goods, wares or merchandise from
vendor.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Harvell of Santa Rosa:
House Joint Resolution No. 66:
Proposing an amendment to Section 8 of Article 12 of the
Constitution of the State of Florida.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Constitutional Amendments.
By Mr. Harvell of Santa Rosa:
House Bill No. 67:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend paragraph 14 of
Section 242 of the Revised Statutes of the State of Florida,
in reference to the duties of the Boards of Public Instruc-
tion.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Education by request.
By Mr. Koonce of Sumpter:
House Bill No. 68.
A bill to be entitled an act to provide for the admission of
evidence effecting the credibility of such witnesses.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Campbell of Walton:
House Bill No. 69:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 2697 of Chap-
ter 8 of the Revised Statutes of Florida.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Campbell of Walton:
House Bill No. 70:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 2696, Chapter
8, of the Revised Statutes of Florida.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Raulerson of Brevard:
House Bill No. 71.
A bill to be entitled an act for the protection and preserva-
tion of food fishes, to prohibit the catching or taking of fish
with seines or drag nets and to prescribe the minimum length
of bar and size of mesh for other nets in the waters of Indian
river, Banana river and creek, the St. Lucie river and sound
and their tributaries in Brevard and Dade counties.








80



Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Fisheries.
By Mr. Porter of Monroe:
House Memorial No. 72:
Memorial from the Board of Health praying that a Resolu-
tion or Memorial to Congress shall be passed protesting against
transfer of Tortugas group of Islands from custody of the U.
S. Treasury Department as Quarantine Station to the U. S.
Navy department .
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Public Health by request.
By Mr. Porter of Monroe:
House Memorial No. 73:
Memorial from State Board of Health, praying for passage
of act providing for coinpulsory vaccination in the State of
Florida.
Which was read the firsttime' by its title and referred to
the Committee on Public Health.
ORDERS OF THE DAY.
Mr. Fulton of Hernando, pursuant to previous notice move
to r:con.sider the vote taken on the motion of Mr. Zewadski
of Marion, that exhibits of the Governor's Message be printed
in the Journal on to-morrow.
Which was not agreed to.
House Concurrent Resolution No. 7:
Relative to visiting the convict camps and providing for
recommendations of Legislation on the convict system of
the State.
Was read the second time and on motion of 1Mr. Wolfe of
Escambia was indefinitely postponed.
House Concurrent Resolution No. 9:
Relative to the appointment of a joint committee to visit
the State Normal School.
Was read the second time, aud on motion of Mr. Wall of
Putnam was passed informally.
House Concurrent Resolution No. 6:
Relative to the appointment of a committee to visit the
Agriicultural College at Lake City.
Was info-rmally passed.
Mr. (unn of Liberty, was granted a leave of absence in-
definitely.
Mr. Wall of Putnam, offered the following:
House Resolution:
Resolved, That the hour of meeting of the House shall be 10
o'clock a. m. until further orders.








81

Which was read and adopted.
Mr. Zewadski of Marion offered the following:
House Resolution:
Resolved by the House of Representatives, That a comr-
mittee be appointed to wait on the Board of State Institu-
tions to receive any data or information they have relative to
Ihe matters and duties coming under their supervision to be
immediately laid before the House.
Which was read and adopted.
On motion cf Mr. Wall of Putnam, the House adjourned
until 10 o'clock a. m. to-morrow.


SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 1901.

The House met pursuant to adjournment.
The Speaker in the chair.
The roll being called the following members answered to,
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Amos, Anderson, Bates, Blair, Blanton.
Brown, Broward, Buford, Burr, (aminpb1, Chambers,
Close, Crawford, Corbett, D);viblson, Davis, Dowd,
Dowden, Duckworth, Fulton, Gillen, Godfrey, Gornto,
Grant, Harvell, Hendry, Hopkins, Hunter, Jackson, Johnsonz,
Jones, Koonce, Lee, MoElory, McRae of Pasco, McRae of Put-
nam, Osteen, Palmer, Parrish of Holmes, Parrish of Manatee,
Pinholster, Raney, Raulerson, Redding, Rivers of Alachula,
Rivers of Columbia, Smith, Sparkman, Thomas, Umstead,
Wall, Watson, Whaley, Williamson, Wilson, Wolfe, Young,
and Zewadski--60.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Chaplain.
On motion Mr. L'Engle of Duval, Mr. Anderson of
Washington, Mr. Griggs of Franklin, and Mr. Jacoby and
Mr. Shomaker of Jackson were excused until Monday.
On motion of Mr. Dowd of Lake, Hon. C. S. Noble of Lake,,
was granted the privileges of the Hall.
On motion of Mr. Zewadski of Marion, the privileges of
the floor were extended to Dr. Forbes of DeLand, and Mr.
Liddon of Ocala.
On motion of Mr. Sparkman of Volusia, the privileges of
the floor were granted to John Y. Detwilder of Volusia county..
On motion of Mr. Fulton of Hernando, the courtesies of the
floor were extended to Mr. A. C. Croom of Hernando county..
6 I H








82



Mr. Harvell of Santa Rosa offered the following:
THouse Resolution No. 11:
Be it resolved by the House of Repiesentatives, That the
Journal of the House and Calendar be placed on the desks of
,each member not later than 8:30 a. m.,, each morning until
otherwise ordered by the House.
Mr. Koonce of Sumter offered "the following correction of
.House Journal:
Correction of House Journal of April 5, page 13:
The title of House Bill No. 68 should be: "A bill to be
-entitled an act to provide for the admission in evidence the
testimony.of parties convicted of crime, and providing for the
admission of evidence effecting the credibility .of such wit-
"nes ses."
Mr. Koonce of Sumter made the following report:
House of Representatives,
Tallahasse, Fla., April 6, 1901.
lion. John W. Watson,
Speaker of the House of representatives:
Sir-Your Committee on Rules beg to report that they
havee considered the matter of standing rules for the guidance
of the House and recommend the adoption of the standing
"rules of the session of 1899 as printed in phamplet form with
'the following changes:
First: In Rule 10 strike out the word "enabling" and in-
sert in lieu thereof the word "enacting."
Second:" Amend Rule 18 so as to read as follows: "No
-member speaking shall be interrupted by another without the
-consent of the member who has the floor, except by rising to
.call to order."
Third: Amend Rule 33 so as to read as follows: "No rule
,or order of the House of Representatives shall be dispensed
with or repealed unless two-thirds of the members present
shall consent thereto, and no bill shall be taken up for consid-
erationout of its regular order, except by unanimous consent,
unless the bill shall be one of public importance and its con-
,sideration asked for by a committee."
Fourth: Amend Rule 43 so as to make it read as follows:
"c'Rule 48: Concurrent resolutions shall receive two read-
iugs on two separate days and shall be determined by a viva-
voce \vote unless otherwise ordered by two-thirds of the mem-
ibers present. All other resolutions than joint or concurrent
resolutions shall be determined by a viva-voce vote upon the
jiret.reading, unless otherwise decided by two-thirds of the








83



members present; every bill and every joint resolution, or res-
olution for the appropriation of the public money and memo-
rials shall receive three' separate readings on three separate
days previous to the final passage of such bill, resolution or
memorial, unless two-thirds of the members present shall de-
cide otherwise, and the Clerk shall give notice of each
whether it be the first, second or third readings. When any
measure requiring three readings shall be on its third reading
.and a motion to indefinitely postpone the same shall be made
and seconded and the yeas and nays shall be called on such
notion, it shall be the duty of the Speaker not to put the
question of the indefinite postponement of the measure, but
to put in the place thereof the question of the passage of the
measure on its third reading and to direct the call of the roll
thereon upon its final passage."
Fifth: Amend Rule 52 by adding to the standing commit-
tees,.a Committee on Labor.
Sixth: Amead Rule 57 so as to make the Orders of the
Day as follows:
1st. Select Orders of the Day.
2d Consideration of messages from the Senate.
3d. Consideration of bills and resolutions on their third
reading.
4th. Consideration of bills and resolutions on their second
reading.
5th. Consideration of bills and resolutions on their first
reading.
6th. Consideration of communications from the Governor
:and other papers addressed to the House of Representatives
or Speaker thereof.
We also recommend that 500 copies of the standing rules,
-together with the standing committees be published for the
use of the members of the House.
Very respectfully,
J. C. B.KOONCE,
Chairman of Committee.
Which was read and adopted and 500 copies of the rules
as amended ordered printed.







84



STANDING RULES

OF THE

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.



OF THE DUTIES AND POWERS OF THE SPEAKER.

Rule 1. The Speaker shall take the chair every day at the
hour to which the House of Representatives shall have ad-
journed, shall call the members to order, and on the appear-
ance of a quorum shall proceed to business.
Rule 2. He shall preserve decorum and order, may speak to
points of order in preference to other members, and shall de-
cide all questions of order, subject to appeal to the House of
Representatives by motion regularly seconded, and no other
business shall be in order till the question on the appeal shall
have been decided.
Rule 3. He shall declare all votes, but if any member rises
to doubt a vote, the Speaker shall order a return of the num-
ber voting in the affirmative and the negative, without any
further debate on the subject.
Rule 4. He shall rise to put a question, or to address the
House of Representatives, but may read sitting.
Rule 5. In all yea and nay votes the Speaker's name shall
be called last.
Rule 6. When.the Iouse of Representatives shall deter-
mine to go into a committee of the whole House of Repre-
sentatsqes, the Speaker shall appoint a member who shall
take the chair.
Rule 7. On all questions and motions whatsoever, the
Speaker shall take the soiise of the House of Representatives
by yeas and nays, provided five of the members present shallt
so r quire. When the e(as and nays are taken the roll of the
Houue of R(piesenlaves hail be called in alphabetical order,
and no member shall be allowed to vote who shall not be upon
the floor of the House of Representatives at the time his name
is called, or before the roll-call is finii.hed.
Rule 8. He shall propound all questions in the order in
which they are moved, unless the subsequent motion be pre-
vious in nature, except that in naming sums, and fixing times,.
the largest sums and longest times shall be put first.








85

Rule 9. After a motion is stated or read by the Speaker it
-shall be deemed to be in possession of the ousne of Repre-
sentatives, and shall be disposed of by vote of the House of Rtep-
resentatives, but the mover may withdraw it at any time before
a decision or amendment, except a motion to reconsider,
which shall not be withdrawn after the time has elapsed within
which it could be originally made.
Rule 10. When a question is under debate, the Speaker
shall receive no motion but to adjourn, to lay on the table, for
the previous question, to postpone to a day certain, to commit,
to amend, or to postpone indefinitely, which several motions
shall have precedence in the order in which they stand ar-
ranged, and a motion to strike out the enacting clause of a bill
shall be equivalent to a motion to postpone indefinitely. If
an amendment to any subject under consideration be laid on
"the table or postponed, such action shall not carry the subject
matter with it.
Rule 11. He shall consider a motion to adjourn as always
first in order; and that motion, and the motion to lay on the
table, to take up from the table, and for yeas and nays, shall
be decided without debate. The introduced of a resolution,
bill, or motion, shall be allowed to speak five minutes when he
desires to discuss the same before the motion to lay on the
table shall be put.
Rule 12. He shall put the previous question in the follow-
ing form: "Shall the main question now be put?" and all
debate upon the main question and pending amendments shall
be suspended until the previous question shall be decided.
After the adoption of the previous question, the sense of the
House of Representatives shall forthwith be taken on pending
amendments in their regular order, and then upon the main
.questions.
Rule 13. On the previous question their shall be no debate.
Rule 14. When two or more members happen to rise at
once, the Speaker shall name the member who is first to speak.
Rule 15. All committees shall be appointed and announced
by the Speaker, unless otherwise specially directed by the
House of Representatives.
Rule 16. The Speaker shall have the right so name any
,member to perform the duties of the Chair; but such substitu-
tions shall not extend beyond an adjournment.

OF THE DUTIES, RIGHTS AND DECORUM OF THE
MEMBERS.
Rule 17. Every member, when about to speak, shall rise








86



and respectfully address the Speaker; shall confine himself to.
the question under debate, and avoid personality, and shall sit
down when he has finished. No member shall speak out of
his place, without leave of the Speaker.
Rule 18. No member speaking shall be interrupted by an-
other, without the consent of the member who Las the floor,
except by rising to call to order.
Rule 19. No member shall speak more than twice on one
question without first obtaining leave of the [louse of Rep-
resentatives; nor more than once, until the other members who
have not spoken shall speak, if they desire it.
Rule 20. When a vote has passed, it shall be in order for.
any member of the majority to move for a reconsideration
thereof on the same or the succeeding day, and such motion
(except in the last week of the session) shall bIe placed first
in the orders of the day for the day succeeding that on which
the motion is made; and when a motion for reconsideration is,
decided, that decision shall not be reconside-ed, and no ques-
tion shall be twice reconsidered; Provided, however, That a
motion to reconsider a vote, upon any collateral matter, shall
not remove the main subject under consideration from before
tr"e House of Representatives, but shall be considered at the.
time when it is made.
Rule 21. Bills, resolves and other papers, except orders of
notice, in reference to which any member has a right to move
a reconsideration, shall remain in the possession of the Clerk
until the right of reconsideration has 'expired; Provided, That
the operation of this rule slirll be suspended during the last
week of the session.
Rule 22. No member shall be obliged to be on more toan
two committees at the same time, nor chairman of more than
one.
Rule 23. No member shall be permitted to stand up to the
interruption of another, while any member is speaking, or to-
pass unnecessarily between the Speaker of the House of Rep-
resentatives and the person speaking; nor shall any member
be permitted in the alleys, or the area in front of the Chair
during the session of the House of Representatives.
Rule 24. Every member who shall neglect to give his at-
tendance in the House of Representatives for more than six
days after the session commences, shall, on making his ap-
pearance therein, be held to render the reason of such neg-
lect; and in case the reason assigned shall be deemed by the
House of Representatives sufficient, such member shall be en-
titled to receive pay for his travel, but not otherwise; and no
member shall be absent more than one day without leave oit







87



the House of Representatives, and a vote of leave of absence
shall be inoperative, unless the member obtaiinng it shall
avail himself of it within five days.
Rule 25. When any member shall be guilty of a breach of
either of the rules and orders of the House of Representa-
tives, he may be required by the House of Representatives, on
motion, to make satisfaction therefore, and shall not be al-
lowed to vote or speak, except by way of excuse, till he ,has
done so.
Rule 26. No member shall be permitted to vote, or serve
on any committee, in any question where his private right is
immediately concerned, distinct from the public interest.
Rule 27. Every member who shall be in the House of Rep-
resentatives when a question is put, when he is not excluded'
by interest, shall give his vote, unless the House of Repre-
sentatives, for special reasons, shall excuse him. Any mem-
ber desiring to be so excused on any question shall make ap-
plication to that effect before the calling of the yeas and nays;:
and such application shall be accompanied by a brief state-
ment of reasons, and shall be decided without debate.
Rule 28. Every motion shall be' reduced to writing, if the
Speaker shall so direct.
Rule 29. Any member may call for the division of a ques-
tion when the sense will admit of it. A motion to strike out
and insert shall be deemed indivisible; but a motion to strike
out, being lost, shall neither preclude amendment nor a mo-
tion to strike out and insert.
Rule 30. Motions or reports may be committed or recom-
mitted at the pleasure of the House of Representatives.
Rule 31. No motion or proposition of a subject different
from that under consideration shall be admitted under color of
amendment.
Rule 32. The unfinished business in which the House of
Representatives was engaged at the time of the last adjourn-
ment shall have the preference in the order of the day, next
after motions for reconsideration.
Rule 33. No rule or order of the House of Representatives
shall be dispensed with or repealed unless two-thirds of the
members present shall consent thereto, and no bill shall be
taken up for consideration out of its regular order, except by
unanimous consent, unless the bill shall be one of public
importance and its consideration asked for by a committee.
Rule 34. When a vote is doubted, the members for or
against the question, when called on by the Speaker, shall rise
and stand until they are counted.








88

Rule 35. All questions relating to the priority of business
to be acted upon shall be decided without debate.
Rule 36. When a motion is made to refer any subject, arfd
different committees shall be proposed, the question shall be
taken in the following order: A Standing Conmmittee of the
House of Representatives, a Joint Standing Committee, a Se-
lect Committee, a Joint Select Committee.
Rule 37. It shall be.the duty of each member of the House
be instructed to inqure into the expediency of amending any
existing law or laws, to point out the amendment which he
deems expedient, in writing, to accompany his motion, or to
furnish a written statement thereof to such committee, if by
them required.
Rule 38. 1No stranger shall be admitted to the seats of
'members, or upon the floor of the House of Representatives,
without leave of the Speaker or consent of the House of Rep.
resentatives.

OF PETITIONS, MEMORIALS, ETC.

Rule 39. All papers addressed to the House of Represen-
tatives, except petitions, memorials, and remonstrances, shall
be presented by the Speaker, or a member in his place, and
shall be read by the Speaker, Clerk, or such other person as
the Speaker may request, and shall be taken up in the order
in which they were presented, unless where the House of Rep-
resentatives shall otherwise direct.
Rule 40. Every member presenting to the HIouse of Repre-
sentatives a petition, memorial, or remonostrance, slall endorse
his name thereon, with a brief statement of the nature and
"object of the instrument, and the reading of the same from
the Chair shall, in all instances, be dispensed with, unless
:specially ordered by the House of Representatives.
Rule 41. All reports, petitions, memoilials, remonstrances,
:and papers of a like nature, shall be presented during the first
hour of each session.of the House of Representatives, and at
,no other time; and the Speaker shall call on the several divis-
ions, in regular succession for such paper.
Rule 42. All applications for the use of the House of Repre-
sentatives Chamber shall be made to, and decided upon by. the
Committee on Public Buildings, subject, however, to the con-
trol and order of the House of Representatives.
A ,








89

ON BILLS, RESOLUTIONS AND GRANTS.

Rule 43. Concurrent resolutions shall receive two readings
on two separate days and shall be determined by a viva-voce
vote unless otherwise ordered by two-thirds of the members
present. All other resolutions than joint or concurrent resolu-
tions shall be determined by a viva-voce vote upon the first
reading, unless otherwise decided by two-thirds/of the mem--
bers present; every bill and every joint resolution, or resolution
for the appropriation of the public money and memorials shall
receive three separate readings on three separate days previous
to the final passage of such bill, resolution or memorial, unless
two-thirds of the members present shall decide otherwise, and
the Clerk shall give notice of each whether it be the first, second
and third readings. When any measure requiring three read-
ings shall be on its third reading and a motion to indefinitely
postpone the same shall be made and seconded and the yeas
and nays shall be called on such motion, it shall be the duty of
the Speaker not to put the question of the indefinite postpone-
ment of the measure, but to put in the place thereof the question
of the passage of the measure on its third reading and to direct
the call of the roll thereon upon its final passage.
Rule 44. All bills and resolutions when introduced shall be
written or printed without interlineations, on not less than one
sheet of paper, with suitable margins, ,and space between the
several sections.
Rule 45. At the second reading of any bill or resolution it
shall be in order for any member to move its commitment to
-a Committee of the Whole House; to amend; that it lay on the
table; for its indefinite postponement; for its postponement to
a day certain not beyond the session; for itscommitmentto a
Standing Committee, or to a Select Committee, which motions
shall have precedence in the order above stated.
Rule 46. It shall be in order to amend the title of any bill or
resolution upon its second or third reading.
Rule 47. All bills or resolutions to be engrossed shall be
executed in a fair, round hand, and without erasure or inter-
lineations.
"Rule 48. Before a bill or resolution requiring three readings
,shall be read the third time, it shall be carefully engrossed,
under the directionof the Committee on Engrossed Bills, and
uponn the third reading of the bill or resolution it shall not be
committed or amended without the consent of two-thirds of the
members present.
Rule 49. When a bill or resolution shall have passedd its
third reading, it shall be certified by the Clerk, endorsing







90



thereon the day of its passage, and be transmitted to the Sen-
ate, accompanied with a message stating the title of the bill or
resolution, and asking the concurrence of that body, and the
date of its transmission entered upon the Journal.

COMMITTEES-THEIR POWERS AND DUTIES.

Rule 50. Bills committed to a Committee of the Whole
House of Representatives shall be read and debated; or
amended by clauses or secti ons, leaving the title or preamble
to be last considered. The body of said bill shall not be in-
terlined or defaced, but all amendments, noting the page and
line, shall be duly entered by the Clerk on separate paper, as
the same shall be agreed to by the committee, and so reported
to the House of Representatives. After report the bill shall
again be subject to be debated and amended by clauses or sec-
tions.
Rule 51. It shall be the duty of the Committee on Enrolled
Bills to report at any time.
Rule 52. The following Standing Committees shall be ap-
pointed at the commencement of each session of the Legisla-
ture:



Judiciary,
Commerce and Navigation,
Corporations,
Mining and Phosphate,
Engrossed Bills,
State Institutions,
Militia and State Troops
Education,
Legislative Expenses,
City and County Organization,
Immigration,
Canals and Drainage,
Appropriations,
Public Health,
Census and Apportionment,
Unfinished Business,
Public Buildings,



Finance and Taxation,
Railroads and Telegraphs,
Constitutional Amendments,
Public Printing,
Enrolled Bills,
Public Lands,
Privileges and Elections,
Public Roads and Hioghways.
Claims,
Agriculture,
Indian Affairs,
State Pensions,
Fisheries,
Temperance,
Rules,
Journal,
Organized Labor,



and each of those committees shall consist of not less than five
nor more than nine members of the House.
Rule 53. All papers relative to any business before the
House of Representatives shall be left with the Clerk by any
member who shall obtain leave of absence, and may have any
such papers in his possession.








91



Rule 54. The chairman of any committee, except the Stand-
ing Committees, who shall have business referred to them,
shall make report of their doings therein within four days af-
ter such reference.
Rule 55. All committees may report by bill, resolve or
otherwise.
Rule 56. Messages shall be transmitted to the Governor or
Senate by the Clerk or Sergeant-at-Arms.

RULE 57-ORDER OF BUSINESS.

1. Reading of the Journal.
2. Correction of the Journal.
3. Introduction of memorials, petitions or other papers ad-
dressed to the House. of Representatives or to the Speaker
thereof.
4. Introduction of resolutions and consideration of all reso-
lutious other than joint or concurrent resolutions.
5. Introduction of bills by call of counties.
6. Report of Standing Committees.
7. Report of Select Committees.



ORDERS OF THE DAY.

1. Select order of the day.
2. Considerations of messages from the Senate.
3. Consideration of the bills and resolutions on their third
reading.
4. Consideration of bills and resolutions on their second
reading.
5. Consideration of bills and resolutions on their first read-
ing.
6. Consideration of communications from the Governor and?
other papers addressed to the House of Representatives or the
Speaker thereof.
Rule 58. The rule of Parliamentary practice comprised in'
Rules and Practice, House of Representatives of the Unitedi
States, shall govern the HIouse of Representatives in all cases;
to which they are applicable, and in which they are not in-
consistent with the Standing Rules, order of the House of
Representatives, or the Joint Rules of the two branches of the.
Legislature.








92



JOINT RULES.

Rule 1. While bills are on their passage between the two
houses, they shall be on paper, and under signature of the
Secretary or Clerk of each house, respectively.
Rule 2. After a bill shall have passed both houses, it shall
be duly enrolled on parchment by the Clerk of the House of
Representatives, or Secretary of the Senate, as the bill may
have originated in one or the other house, before it shall be
presented to the Govlernor of the State.
Rule 3. When bills are thus enrolled, they shall be exam-
ined by a joint committee of two from the Senate and two
from the Hodse of Representatives, appointed as a standing
committee for that purpose, who shall carefully compare the
enrollment with the engressed bill as passed by the two
houses, and correcting any errors that may be discovered in
ithe enrolled bills, making their report forthwith to their re-
spective houses.
Rule 4. After examination and report, each bill shall be
signed in their respective houses-first by the Speaker of the
House of Representatives, then by the President of the Sen-
ate.
Rule 5. After a bill shall have been thus signed in each
House, it shall be presented by the said committee to the
"Governor of the State for his approbation, it being first en-
dorsed o i the back of the roll, certifying in which House, the
same originated, which endorsement shall be signed by the
Secretary of the Senate or Clerk (as the case may be) of the
House in which it did originate, and shall be entered on the
Journal of each House. The said committeee shall report the
,day of presentation to the Governor, which time shall also be
carefully entered on the Journal of each House.
Rule 6. All orders, resolutions and votes, which are to be
presented to the Governor of the State for his approbation,
shall, in the same manner, be previously enrolled, examined,
and signed, and shall be presented in the same manner and
by the same committee as provided in case of bills.
Rule 7. Before being put upon its passage, every resolu-
tion, in either House, to which the concurrence of the other
may be necessary (except on a question of adjournment) shall
receive two readings, which (unless two-thirds of the mem-
'bers present decide otherwise) shall be upon two different
.days; and the Clerk upon proceeding thereto shall give notice
whether the same be the first or second of such readings; and
all such resolutions upon their passage shall be notified as








93



of course, and without the necessity of any motion or vote too
that effect, by the Clerk or Secretary respectively of the
House so passing said resolution to the other.
Rule 8. Joint resolutions shall, prior to their passage, re-.
ceive three readings, which (unless two-thirds of the mem-
bers present shall decide otherwise) shall be upon three differ-
ent days; and the Clerk, upon proceeding thereto, shall give
notice whether the same be the first, second or third of such
reading; and upon their passage, such resolutions shall be
notified by the House so passing the same to the other, in like-
manner to that prescribed in joint rule No. 7 for con-
current resolutions.

Mr. Zewadski of Marion made the following report:
House of Representatives,
Tallahassee, Fla., April 6, 1901.
Hon. J. W. Watson,
Speaker of the House of Representatives:
Sir-Your committee appointed for the purpose of waiting
upon the Board of State Institutions to ascertain what data
and information that said board wished to transmit to the
House, beg leave to report that it has performed the duty as-
signed, and further report that said board has in its possession
a number of bids, unopened, for the leasing of the Sta e con-
victs, which are held subject to the action of the Legislature.
W. K. ZEWADSKI,
J. C. L'ENGLE,
J. H. GRIGGS,
Committee.
Which was read and adopted.
On motion of Mr. Rivers of Alachua, Capt. T. E. Bridges
was granted the privilege of the Hall.
On motion of Mr. Zewadski of Marion, Mr. Porter of Mon-
roe was added to the Committee on State Institutions.
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS.
By Mr. Rivers of Alachua:
House Bill No. 74:
A bill to be entitled an act fixing a license tax for running
hacks or other conveyances for the transportation of passen-
gers.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to.
the Committee on Mining apd Phosphate.








94



By Mr. Goirnto of Bradford:
House Bill No. 75:
A bill to be entitled an act to repeal Section 2054 of the
Revised Statutes.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Buford of Calhoun:
House Bill No. 76:
A bill to be entitled an act to prohibit shooting at or into
dwelling bouses or steamboats, and to provide punishment
for same.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Rivers of Columbia:
House Bill No.-77.
A bill to be entitled an act to prohibit bribery in elections
in the State of Florida, and fix penalties therefore.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Privileges and Elections.
By Mr. Broward of Duval:
House Bill No. 78:
A bill to be entitled an act as to the incorporation of the
social clubs or societies not for propft.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Corporations.
By'Mr. Wolfe of Escambia:
House Bill No. 79:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 2169 of the
Revised Statutes of tae State of Florida' relating to the
amount of capital and par value of shares of banking com-
panies.
Which was read the first time by, its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Wolfe of Escambia:
House Bill No. 80:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 1259 of the
Revised Statutes of the State of Florida, relating to the terri-
torial powers of constables.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Williamson of Hillsborough:
House Bill No. 81:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 2643 of the
Revised Statutes of Florida, relating to tramps.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Agriculture.








95



By Mr. Russell of Monroe:
House Bill No. 82:
A bill to be entitled an act to establish a rule of evidence
for the proof of book accounts.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Hussell of Monroe:
House Bill No. 83:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 6, of an act
entitled an act to prescribe the powers of the Boards of Com-
missioners of Pilotage and Port Wardens in and for the Ports
of this State; approved June 12, 1891, being Chapter 4046 of
the Laws of Florida.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Russell of Monroe:
House Bill No. 84:
A bill to be entitled an act to provide for fixing the amount
of bail bonds in certain criminal cases by the judges of the
Criminal Courts of Record of this State, and the approval of
,said bonds by the several Sheriffs of this State.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Russell of Monroe:
House Bill No. 85:
A bill to be entitled an act to repeal an act entitled an act
to authorize the County of Monroe to bond itself in the sum
of $500,000, for the purpose of constructing a public highway
and necessary trestling and draw bridges to connect the island
of Key West with Key Largo. Approved May 25, 1895.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
Sfthe Committee on City and County Organization.
By Mr. Amos of Santa Rosa:
House Bill No. 86:
A bill to be entitled an act to provide for the service of
process upon unincorporated societies.
Which was read the first time and referred to the Commit-
tee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Amos of Santa Rosa:
House Joint Resolution No. 87:
Proposing amendments to Sections 2 and 4 of Article 5 of
the Constitution of the State of Florida.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Constitutional Amendments.







96



By Mr. Campbell of Walton:
House Bill No. 8_:
A bill to bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 2378
of the Revised Statutes of the State of Florida defining justi-
fiable homicide.
Which was road the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.

BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS ON SECOND READING.

House Concurrent Resolution No. 11:
Proposing a special committee to investigate the acts and
doings of the Board of Commissioners of State Institutions
and the Commissioner of Agriculture.
Which was read the second time and on motion of Mr.
Wolfe of Escambia the resolution was indefinitely postponed.
Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 1:
Resolved by the Senate, the House of Representatives con-
curring, That a committee composed of three from the Senate
and five from the House of Representatives be appointed, to
whom shall be referred all bids and resolutions relating to the
re-districting of the State into Congressional Districts, and
whose duty it shall be to prepare and submit a bill dividing
the State of Florida into the three Congressional Districts or
otherwise providing for the election of a Congressman from
the State of Florida.
Which was read the second time and adopted.
Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 2:
Concurrent Resolution authorizing the appointment of a
committee to examine into the condition of the State build-
ings at Tallahassee.
Be it resolved by the Senate, the House of Representatives
concurring, That a committee of two from the Senate and
three from the House be appointed to investigate the condi-
tion of the State buildings at Tallahassee, and to report what
repairs are necessary and what additional buildings are neces-
sary, if any.
Which was read and on motion of Mr. Palmer of Orange
the resolution was amended by striking out the words "three'
and "four" and sub. tituting the words "six" and "three."
The resolution was adopted as amended.
Senute Concurrent Resolution No. 3:
Be it resolved by the Senate, the House concurring, That..
a committee to. be composed of one on the part of the Senate
and two from the House be appointed to visit the East Flor-
ida Seminary at Gainesville, the Deaf, Dumb and Blind Asy-







97

lum at St. Augustine, and the South Florida Military and Edu-
cational Institute at Bartow, examine into and investigate the
present condition of each and ascertain what improvements,
if any, should be made, and the cost and present value of
property belonging to and connected with the South Florida
Military and Educational Institute, and report with as little
delay as possible their findings to the Legislature, to the end
that it may be advised in the matter of appropriations.
Which was read the second time and passed informally.
Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 5:
Resolved by the Senate, the House concurring, That a com-
mittee composed of one from the Senate and two from the
House of Representatives be appointed to visit the Agricul-
tural College, located at Lake City, and report on the con-
dition, progress and requirements.
Which was read the second time and passed informally.
.On motion of Mr. Blanton of Madison, the House adjourned
until 10 o'clock a. m. Monday, next.



MONDAY, APRIL 8, 1901.
The House met pursuant to adjournment.
The Speaker in the chair.
The roll being called, the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Amos, Anderson, Bates, Blair, Blanton,
Brown, Broward, Buford, Burr, Campbell, Chambers, Clarke,
Close, Crawford, Corbett, Davis, Dowd, Dowden
Duckworth, Fulton, Gillen, Godfrey, Gornto, Granit,
Harvell, Hendry, Hopkins, Hunter, Jackson, .Jacohy,
Johnson, Jones, Koonce, Lee, L'Engle, McElroy, MAGiflin,
McRae of Pasco, McRae of Putnam, Osteen, Palmer, Parrish of
Holmes, Parrish of Manatee, Pinholter, Porter, Raney, Hauler-
son, Redding, Rivers of Alachua, Rivers of Columbia, Russell,
Shomaker,.Sledge, Smith, Sparkman, Thomas, Umstead, Wall,
Whaley, Williamson, Wilson, Wolfe, Young and Zewadski
-65.
A quorum present.
Prayer by Chaplain.
Correction of Journal.
Mr. Davidson of Gadsden was granted a leave of ab nce
for three, days.
7H







98

INTRODUCTION OF RESOLUTIONS.

"By Mr. Harvell of Santa Rosa:
House Resolution No. 11:
Resolved, That the Chairman of the Committee on Educa-
-tion be allowed a clerk.
Which was adopted.
By Mr. Gornto of Bradford:
House Resoultion No. 12:
Resolved, That the Committee on Pensions, Census and
IPrivileges and Elections be allowed a clerk between them
:who shall be engaged by said Committees or either of them.
Which was adopted.
By Mr. McGiftin of Nassau:
House Resolution No. 13:
Be it Resolved by the House of Representatives that all
.'Bills, Memorials or Joint Resolutions be read and recorded by
their titles as written at the head of the document, and not by
"the endorsement on the outside.
Which was read and adopted.
The Speaker announced the appointment of the following
-Ieommittees under Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 1, Re-
districting the State into Congressional Districts: Messrs. Ful-
ton of Herniando, Zewadski of Marion, Broward of Duval,
,_Russell of Monroe, and Jones of Escambia.
| For the relief of the Supreme and Circuits Courts: Messrs.
Palmer of Orange, Clarke of Jefferson,' Wolfe of Escambia,
-.Koonce of Sumter, Gornto of Bradford, Raney of Leon.
Standing Committee on Organized Labor.
M.3essrs. WOLFE, CHAMBERS,
|CORBETT,, JACKSON,
: M LMG;FGIFFIN, LEE.
On motion of Mr. Young of Hillsborough, the privileges of
t.:hefloor were extended to Hon. H. C. MacFarlane of Tampa.
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS.

,'By" Mr. Blair of Baker.
SHouse Bill No. 89.
A bill to be entitled an act to cause the marks and brands
'to be displayed on all hides of cattle offered for sale in the
SState of Florida.
* Which was read the first time by its tit'e and referred to
v the Committee on Judiciary.







99



"Bv Mr. Gornto of Bradford.
House Bill No. 90.
A bill to be entitled act for the relief of W. W. Tumblin.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Claims.
By Mr. Gillen of Columbia:
House Bill No. 91:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Chapter 4032 of the
"Laws of Florida entitled an act in relation to obtaining money
.or any other personal property under false promises, or for
violation of contra cts and providing penalties therefore.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
.the Collniittee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Wolfe of Escambia:
loiWe Bill No. 92:
A bill to be entitled an act prohibiting judges of courts and
pro ecuting attorneys thereof to be partners in the practice of
law, and the partners of judges from practicing law before
such judges.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Coiniittee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Lee of Hamilton:
House Bill No. 93:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend an act entitled an act
to provide annuities for disabled soldiers and sailors, and
"wives of deceased soldiers and sailors of the State of Florida
l)ppproved June 2, 1899.
whichh was read the first time by its title and referred to
-the Committee on Pensions.
By Mr. Fulton of Hernando:
House Bill No. 94:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 3 of an act
entitled an act to regulate the inspection and sale of beef, and
to repeal Chapter 3613, Laws of Florida, approved February
16, 1885, also Chapter 3897, Laws of Florida, approved May
31, 1889, the same being Chapter 4048, Laws of Florida, Acts
of 1891.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Agriculture.
By Mr. Williamson of Hillsborough:
House Bill No. 95:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 2 of Chapter
4680 of ths Acts of 1x99, the same being an act entitled an
act to provide for county adoptions of Uniformity of Text
Books in the public free schools of this State.








100



Which was read the first time by its t'tle and referLed to.
/ the Committee on Education.
By Mr. Williamson of Hillsborough:
H use Bill No. 96:
A bill to be entitled an act in relation to the examination-
and licensing of pilots by Pilot Commissioners.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to-
the Committee on Commerce and Navigation.
By Mr. Parrish of Holmes.
House Bill No. 97:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 1 of Chapter
4032, Laws of Florida, the same being an act entitled an act
in relation to obtaining money or any other personal property
under false promises, or for violation of contracts and provid-
ing penalties therefore, approved June 8, 1891.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Clarke of Jefferson.
House Bill No. 98.
A bill to be entitled an act authorizing ani requiring the
Comptroller to duplicate certain Comptioller's Warrants, lost
or destroyed before coming to the hands of payees thereof.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to,
the Committee on Judiciary:
By Mr. Dowd of Lake:
House Bill No. 99:
A bill to be entitled an act to establish a standard of weights
and measures of the State of Florida.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Agriculture.
By Mr. Raney of Leou:3
House Bill No. 100.
A bill to be entitled an act to provide for the appointment.
and compensation of stenographers in the Circuit Courts.
Which was readithe first time byits title and referred to
the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Hlendry of Lee:
House Memorial 101:
"A memorial to Congress of the United States of America
relating to lands for the Seminole Indians of Florida.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred to the
Committee on Indi n Affairs.
By Mr. Zewadski of Marion:
House Bill No. 102:
A bill to be entitled an act for the relief of Mrs. L. P. Olin.