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 Members and Attaches of the Legislature...
 List of Members of the House of...
 Errata
 April 1905
 May 1905
 June 1905
 Index


FHR UFLAW



Journal of the House of Representatives of the session of ..
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027772/00043
 Material Information
Title: Journal of the House of Representatives of the session of ..
Alternate Title: Journal of the House of Representatives, State of Florida
Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Florida of the session of ..
Physical Description: v. : ; 23-32 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Legislature. -- House of Representatives
Publisher: State Printer
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: April 1905
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Legislative journals -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
General Note: Title varies slightly.
General Note: Description based on: 1907.
Funding: Digitized for the Florida House of Representatives, the Office of the Clerk.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida House of Representatives. African American History Collections at the Office of the Clerk.
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 003417935
oclc - 12901236
lccn - sn 85065608
System ID: UF00027772:00043
 Related Items
Preceded by: Journal of proceedings of the House of Representatives of the Legislature of the State of Florida
Succeeded by: Journal of the Florida House of Representatives

Table of Contents
    Members and Attaches of the Legislature of 1905
        Page 1
    List of Members of the House of Representatives, Session of 1905
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Errata
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    April 1905
        Tuesday, April 4
            Page 1
            Page 2
            Page 3
            Page 4
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
        Appendix
            Page 1
            Page 2
            Page 3
            Page 4
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
        Wednesday, April 5
            Page 1
            Page 2
            Page 3
            Page 4
        Thursday, April 6
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
        Friday, April 7
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
        Monday, April 10
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
        Tuesday, April 11
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
        Wednesday, April 12
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
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            Page 76
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            Page 81
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            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
        Thursday, April 13
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
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            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
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            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
        Friday, April 14
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
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            Page 139
            Page 140
            Page 141
            Page 142
            Page 143
            Page 144
        Saturday, April 15
            Page 145
            Page 146
            Page 147
            Page 148
            Page 149
            Page 150
            Page 151
            Page 152
            Page 153
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            Page 155
            Page 156
            Page 157
            Page 158
            Page 159
            Page 160
            Page 161
            Page 162
            Page 163
        Monday, April 17
            Page 164
            Page 165
            Page 166
            Page 167
            Page 168
            Page 169
            Page 170
            Page 171
            Page 172
            Page 173
            Page 174
            Page 175
            Page 176
            Page 177
            Page 178
            Page 179
            Page 180
            Page 181
            Page 182
            Page 183
        Tuesday, April 18
            Page 184
            Page 185
            Page 186
            Page 187
            Page 188
            Page 189
            Page 190
            Page 191
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            Page 193
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            Page 204
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            Page 207
            Page 208
            Page 209
            Page 210
            Page 211
            Page 212
        Wednesday, April 19
            Page 213
            Page 214
            Page 215
            Page 216
            Page 217
            Page 218
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            Page 240
            Page 241
            Page 242
            Page 243
            Page 244
            Page 245
        Thursday, April 20
            Page 246
            Page 247
            Page 248
            Page 249
            Page 250
            Page 251
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            Page 263
            Page 264
            Page 265
            Page 266
        Friday, April 21
            Page 267
            Page 268
            Page 269
            Page 270
            Page 271
            Page 272
            Page 273
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            Page 276
            Page 277
            Page 278
            Page 279
            Page 280
            Page 281
            Page 282
            Page 283
            Page 284
            Page 285
        Monday, April 24
            Page 286
            Page 287
            Page 288
            Page 289
            Page 290
            Page 291
            Page 292
            Page 293
        Tuesday, April 25
            Page 294
            Page 295
            Page 296
            Page 297
            Page 298
            Page 299
            Page 300
            Page 301
            Page 302
            Page 303
            Page 304
            Page 305
            Page 306
            Page 307
            Page 308
            Page 309
            Page 310
            Page 311
            Page 312
            Page 313
            Page 314
            Page 315
            Page 316
        Wednesday, April 26
            Page 317
            Page 318
            Page 319
            Page 320
            Page 321
            Page 322
            Page 323
            Page 324
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            Page 342
            Page 343
            Page 344
            Page 345
            Page 346
            Page 347
        Appendix
            Page 348
            Page 349
            Page 350
            Page 351
            Page 352
        Thursday, April 27
            Page 353
            Page 354
            Page 355
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        Friday, April 28
            Page 381
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            Page 383
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            Page 409
            Page 410
            Page 411
            Page 412
            Page 413
        Saturday, April 29
            Page 414
            Page 415
            Page 416
            Page 417
            Page 418
            Page 419
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            Page 437
            Page 438
            Page 439
            Page 440
            Page 441
            Page 442
    May 1905
        Monday, May 1
            Page 443
            Page 444
            Page 445
            Page 446
            Page 447
            Page 448
            Page 449
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            Page 453
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            Page 455
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        Tuesday, May 2
            Page 458
            Page 459
            Page 460
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            Page 473
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            Page 476
        Wednesday, May 3
            Page 477
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            Page 479
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            Page 531
        Appendix
            Page 532
            Page 533
            Page 534
            Page 535
            Page 536
            Page 537
            Page 538
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        Thursday, May 4
            Page 568
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        Friday, May 5
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        Appendix
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            Plate
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        Appendix
            Plate
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        Monday, May 8
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        Tuesday, May 9
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        Wednesday, May 10
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        Thursday, May 11
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        Friday, May 12
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        Saturday, May 13
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        Monday, May 15
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        Tuesday, May 16
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        Wednesday, May 17
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        Thursday, May 18
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        Friday, May 19
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        Saturday, May 20
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        Monday, May 22
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        Tuesday, May 23
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        Appendix
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        Wednesday, May 31
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    June 1905
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        Friday, June 2
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    Index
        Page 2428
        Index to Members
            Page 2429
            Page 2430
            Page 2431
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        Index to House Bills and House Joint Resolutions
            Page 2441
            Page 2442
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            Page 2469
            Page 2470
            Page 2471
            Page 2472
            Page 2473
        Index to Senate Bills and Joint Resolutions in the House of Representatives
            Page 2474
            Page 2475
            Page 2476
            Page 2477
            Page 2478
            Page 2479
        Index to House Concurrent Resolutions
            Page 2480
            Page 2481
        Index to House Resolutions
            Page 2482
            Page 2483
            Page 2484
            Page 2485
        Index to Unclassified Subjects in the House
            Page 2486
            Page 2487
            Page 2488
            Page 2489
Full Text





Q o



MEMBERS AND ATTACHES



OF THE




Legislature of 1905.



L:



:u.. r -:
r
"t
:
-i -
''










I/ 5"


.LIST OF MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTA-
TIVES, SESSION OF 1905.



Alachua-J. A. Rosborough, Windsor.
Alachua-O. M. Tillman, Campville.
Baker-L. q. Cobb, Olustee.
Bradford-J. L. Hill, Lake Butler.
Bradford-E. S. Matthews, .Starke. .
SBrevard-C. F. Olmstead, Ft. Pierce. r
Calhoun-Jno. D. Pirrong, Wewahitchka.
Citrus--J. W. Knight; Floral City..
Clay-Willianm E. Baker, Melrose.
Columbia-A. J. P. Julian, Lake City.
Columbia-E. G. Persons, Ft. White.
Dade-Graham W. King, Ojus.
SDeSoto-Albert W. Gilchrist, Punta Gorda.
Duval-H. H. Buckman, Jacksonville.
Duval-S. H. Melton, Jacksonville.
Escambia-J.)I ainpbell Avery, Jr.,.:Pensa6ola.
Escambia-J. T. Fillingim, Bluff Springs.
Franklin-William J. Oven, Apalachicola.
Gadsden--J. Baxter:(a nmpbelj Quincy.
Gadsden-William L. Taylor, Branchville.
Hamilton-John Bradshaw, Jennings.
Hamilton-John L. Smith. Jasper.
Hernando-C. S. Wilson, Brooksville.
Hillsborough--John S. Taylor, Largo.
i:Hillsborough-G. B. Wells, Plant .ity.
Holmes-D. J. Paul, Westville.
Jackson-Jefferson T). Stephens, Marianna.
Jackson-J. N. Wilson, Sneads.
Jefferson-W. M. Girardeau, Monticello.
Jefferson-Jas. A. Sledge, Monticello.
Lake--S. P. Kirkland, Altoona.
Lake-Chas. S. Noble, Montclair.
Lee-F. J. Wilson, Buckingham.
Leon-John L. Robison, Woodville.
"- Levy-C. W. McElroy, Judson.









3



LaFayette-Jos. W. Brown, Mayo.
Liberty-E. C. Herndon, Orange.
Madison-J. Ellis Blantop, Lee.
Madison-C. L. Leggett, Greenville.
Manatee-A. T. Cornwell, Bradentown.
Marion-Carlos L. Sistrunk, Ocala.
Marion-E. L. Wartmann, Citra.
Monroe-Chas. L. Knowles, Key West.
Monroe-E. P. Roberts, Key West.
Nassau-William J. Carleton, Kings Ferry.
"*Nassau-B. G. Dyal, Dyal, Fla.
Orange-Geo. W. Crawford, Conway. :
Orange-William H. Jewell, Orlando. 7 '
Osceola-J.. W. Watson, Kissimmee.
Pasco-J. B. Johnston, Dade City. ,
Polk-A. T. Williams, Green Pond...
Polk-A. B. Canter, Fort Meade. .-
Putnam-G. F. Sprague, Crescent City.
Putnam-John P. Wall, Putnam Hall.
Santa Rosa-J. H. Harvell, Bagdad.
Santa Rosa-A. J. Peaden, Oak Grove.
St. Johns--C. J. DuPont, Matanzas.
St. Johns-H. H. Floyd, Armstrong.
Sumter-W. C. G. Kilgore, Wildwood.
Suwannee-W. R. Dorman, Live Oak.
Suwannee-J. M. Hall, O'Brien.
Taylor-L. W. Blanton, Perry.
Volusia-Chas. L. Smith, Daytona.
Volusia-Thomas J. Sparkman, Port Orange.
Wakulla-Frank W. Duval, Crawfordville.
Walton-W. A. McCallum, Dorcas.
Washington- William A. Bryan, Chipley.

"*Died during session.







4



OFFICERS AND ATTACHES OF THE HOUSE OF REP
RESENTATIVES OF 1905.



"Albert W. Gilchrist, Speaker. .
J. G. Kellum, Chief Clerk, Gainesville, Florida.
A. C. Stephens, Assistant Chief Clerk, Jennings, Flor-
ida.
Geo. B. Dickenson, Bill C!e-k, .Maiflanid, Florida.
Nat R. Walker, Reading Clerk, Crawfordville, Florida.
G. J. Strozier, Assistant Reading Clerk, WTinter Gar-
den, Florida.
A. S. York, Engrossing Clerk, Lake Butler., Florida.
B. F. Umstead, Enrolling:' lerk, Welborn, Florida.
W. K. Jackson, Recording Clerk, Invirness, Floriia.
Geo. E. Hawkins, Sergeant-at-Arms, Welborn, Florida.
J. D. Coleman, Chaplain, Woodville, Florida.
David Bryan, Janitor, Ft. Pierce, Florida.
Dick Bennett, Page, Jacksonville, Florida.
Harry Fanning, Page, Blountsitown, Florida.
Geo. Reddick, Page, Reddick, Florida,
Francis Eppes, Page, Tallahassee( Florida.













ERRATA.



On page 6, line 20, "Taylor of Hernando" should read
"Wilson of Hernando."
On page 6, line 27, "George R. Dickinson" should read
"George B. Dickinson."
On page 3, line 19, Journal of April 5th, "House Res-
olution No. 5, should read "House Concurrent Resolution:
No. 5."
On page 38, line 32, "No. 7" should read "No. 1."
On page 130, eighth line from bottom of page, "House,
Resolution No. 5," should read "House Concurrent Reso-
lution No. 5."
On page 219, line 5, "Engrossed Bills," should read
"Miscellaneous Legislation."
On page 239, line 26, "No. 24" should be "No. 54."
On page 252, line 28, "Chattahoochee" should read "Ca-
loosehatchee."
On -pa'e 277, line 18, "3248" should read "5248."
On page 277, line 31, "No. 116" should read "No. 106."'
On page 280, line 29, "185" should read "135" and "181"
should read "184."
On page 282, line 6, "183" should read "143."
On page 306, second and third lines should read "Mr..
Kirkland offered the following amendment to House Bill
No. 78."
On page 306, 6th line should read "Mr. Noble moved the.
adoption of the amendment."
On page 309, line 15, "87" should read "81."
On page 313, line 20, "-Ch!ai'rman of the Committee"
should read "Chairman of the Joint-Committee."
On page 436, line 8, "9" should read "7."
On page 438, between lines 15 and 16 should be inserted
"Wh'Vic!h was agreed to."
On page 440, line 3, "House" should read "Senate."
On page 593, line 20, "third" should read "second."
On page 826, line 15, "House" should read "Senate."
On p:;o.te 827, lines 28, 35, and 43, "House" should re-,d
": Se n.r it ."











On page 834, line 9, "372" should read "369."
On page 1078, between lines 2 and 3 insert, "House Bill
No. 451."
On page 1085, line 18, "House" should read "Senate."
On page 1316, line 25, "246" should read "346."
On page 1316, lines 33 and 34 should read, "Mr. Canter
moved that House Bill No. 346 be indefinitely postponed."
On page 1377, line 20, "313" should read "393."
On page 1389, lines 22 and 23 should be stricken out.
On page 1394, lines 26 and 27 should be interchanged.
On page 1402, in last line of page, "second" should read
-'third."
On page 1403, line 19 should read "On the adoption of
the report of the Hospital for the Insane."
On page 1455. line 28 should read "of Representatives
that the Senate has adopted."
On page 1630, line 22, should read "Which was not
agreed to," and after line 22 insert "and House Bill No.
509 was ordered placed on the calendar of bills on third
reading."
On page 1670 the first four lines should be stricken out.
On page 1670, in line 26, "second" should read "third,"
and after line 27, page 1670 should be inserted the last five
lines of page 1669.
On page 1855, in line 33 and 34 after the words "of the"
should read "House of Representatives thereto."
On page 1858, in line 28, the word "joint" should be
omitted.
On page 1863, line 21 should read "whom was referred."
On page 1875, in line 18, the figures "392" should be
"292."
On page 1887, after line 28, the following should be
inserted, "penalty for v'olhtionm of tl)i act."
,Op :ae lST17, line 2 should be omitted.
On page 1944, in line 10 the words, "refuse to" should
be omitted.
On page 1955, in line 33, the word "Senate" should b3
"9H.ouse."
On pame 1957, after the 8th line should be inserted the
words "And Senate Bill No. 394 was read a second time
by its title only."
On page 2001. afterr the Inst line, the following vwovd
should be inserted: "And House Bill No. 424 count : in'd









3

in the above report was referred to the committee on En-
roled Iiils."
On page 2002, lines 16 and 17 should be omitted.
On page 2018, in line 38 the word "yeas" should be
nayss."
On page 2022, in line 20, after the word "from" the
words "office for" should be inserted.












JOURNAL
-OF'THE-

House of Representatives


Of the Tenth Regular Session of the Legislature, under
the Constitution of A. D). 1865, began and 'held at the
Capitol, in the city of Tallahassee, the. State of Florida,
on Tuesday, the 4th day of April, A. D...1905, being the
day fixed by the Constitution of the State of. Florida for
the meeting of the Legislature.

TUESDAY, APRIL 4, 1905.

The House was called to order by Mr. J. G. Kellum, of
Gainesville, Alachua County, Floriua, Acting Chief Clerk
of the House of Representatives, at 12 o'clock m.
The certified list of the Secretary of State, of members
elected to the Legislature for the session of 1905, was
called as follows:

MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF.REPRESENTA-
TIVES, 1905.

J. Campbell Avery,, Escambia County.
W. E.. Baker, Clay County.
J. E. Blanton, Madison County.
L. W. Blanton of Taylor County.
John Bradshaw, Hamilton County.
William A. Bryan, Washington County.
Joseph W. Brown, Lafayette County.
H. H. Buckman, Duval County.
J. B. Campbell, Gadsden County.
A. B. Canter, Polk County.
Win. J. Carleton, Nassau County.
L. C. Cobb, Baker County.
A. T. Cornwell, Manatee County.
ro" o--e W. (Craw-ford. Oran-Te County.
W. R. Dorman, Suwannee County.
1 H. B.






9



V. J. DuPont, St. Johns County.
F W. Duval, Wakulla County.
B. G. Dyal, Nassau County.
J. T. Fillingim, Escambia County.
I. H. Floyd, St. Johns County.
A. W. Gilchrist, DeSoto County.
W. M. Girardeau, Jefferson County.
J. M. Hall, Suwannee County.
J. H. Harvell, Santa Roisa County.
E. C. Herndon. Liberty County.
J. L. Hill, Bradford County.:
Wm. H. Jewell, Orange County.
John B. Johnston, Pasco County.
A. J. P. Julian, Columbia County.
W. C. G. Kilgore, Sumter County.
Graham W. King., Dade County.
S. P.'Kirklaud, Lake County.
J. W. K,-ighlt, Citrus County.
C. L. Knowlei. Monroe County.
C. L. L(.crgett, Madison County..
W. A. McCallum, Walton County.
C. W. 3McElroy, Levy County.
E. S. Matthews, Bradford Couinty.
S. H. Melton. )uval County.
C. S. TNlile, -take County.
Claud F. Oli4ptead, BIiyv'd County.
VW. J. Oven, Fr.nklin County.
D. J. Paul. Holmes Counhty.
A. J. Peaden, Snia Ros'a County.
E. G. Persols, Columnbia County.
"J. D. Pirrong, Calhoun County.
NW. A. Rawls, Leon County.
E. P. Roberts, Monroe County.
J. L. Robison, Leon County.
J. A. Posborough,, Alachna County.
C. L. Sistrunk, Marion County.
J. A. Sledge, Jefferson County.
J. L. Smith, Hamilton County.
Charles L. Smith, Volusia County.
T. J. Sparkman, Volusia County.
G. F. Scraiue, Putman County.
J. D. Stephens, Jackson County.
W. L. Taylor, Gadsden County.
J. Tavlor, Hillsborough County.
O. M. Tillman: Alachua County.







3



J. P. Wall, Putnam County.
E. L. Wartman, Marion County.
J. W. Watson, Osceola County.
G. B. Wells, Hillsborough County._
A. T. Williams, Polk County.
C. S. Wilson, Hernando County.
J. N. Wilson, Jackson County.
F. J. Wilson, Lee County.

STATE OF FLORIDA.
sS.
Office Secretary of State

I, H. Clay Crawford, Secretary of State of the State of
Florida, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a correct
list of the members of the House of Representatives of the
State of Florida, elected on the eighth day of November,
1904, ais shown by the election returns on file in this of-
fice.
Given under my hand and the Great Seal of the
(Seal.) State of Florida, at Tallahassee, the Capital,
this, the 4th day of April, A. D. 1905.
H. CLAY CRAWFORD,
Secretary of State.

The following members came forward and took, the
oath of office 1,r.-cribod by the Constitution of the State
of Florida, before Hon. James B. Whitfield, Chief
Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of Florida:'

Avery, Ewscn min i County.
Itaker, Clay County.
Blanton, Madison County.
Blanton, TayIlor County.
Bradshaw, Hlamilton County.
Bryan, Washington County.
Brown, Jos. W., Lafayette County.
Buckman, Dural County.
Cnmpbell, Gadsden County.
Canter, Polk County.
Carleton, Nassau .County.
Cobb, Baker County.
Cornwell, Manatee County.
Crawford, Orange County.
Dorman, Suwannee County.








4



DuPont, St. Johns County.
Duval, Wakulla County.
Dyal, Nassau County.
Fillingim, E,cnmbia County.
Floyd, St. Johns County.
Gilchrist, DeSoto County.
Girardeau, Jefferson -County.
Hall, Suwannee County.
Harvell, Santa Rosa County.
Herndon, Liberty County.
Hill, Bradford County.
Jewell, Orange County.
Johnston, Pasco County.
Julian, Columbia County.
Kilgore, Sum+er County.
King, Dlade county .
Kirkland. Lake County.
Knight, Citrus County.
Knowles, Monroe County.
Leggett, Mad;son County.
McCanllum. Walton County.
McElroy, Levy County.
Matthews, Bradford County.
Melton, Duval County.
Noble, Lake County.
Olmstead, Brevard County.
"Paul, Holmes County.
Peaden, Santa Rosa County.
Persons, Columbia County.
Pirrong, Calhoun County.
Rawls, Leon County.
Roberts, Monroe County.
Robison, Leon Coun ty.
Rosborough, Alachua County.
Sistrunk, Mafrion County.
Sledge, Jefferson County.
Smith, Hamilton County.
Smith, Volusia County.
Srarkman, Volusia County.
Sprague, Putnam County.
Stenhens, Jackson County.
Taylor, Gadsden County.
Taylor, Hillsborough County.
Tillman, Alachua County.
Wall, Putman County.










Wartinan, Marion County.
Watson. Osceola County.
Wells, Hillshorough County.
Williams, Polk County.
Wilson, Hernando County.
Wilson. Jackson County.
Present 66.
Mr. J. G. Kellum, Acting Chief Clerk, announced a
quorum present.
Mr. Avery of. Escambia County moved that the House
proceed with a permanent organization. Which was
agreed to by the House.
Mr. Avery of Escambia nominated Hon. Albert W. Gil-
christ of DeSoto as Speaker.
Upon roll call the vote was:
For A. W. Gi!christ, Speaker:
Messrs. Avery, Baker, Blanton of Madison, Blanton of
Taylor, Bradshaw. Bryan, Brown, Buckman. Campbell,
Canter, Carleton Cobb, Cornwell, Crawford, Dorman,
DuPont. Duval, Dval. Fil'noiin. Floyd, Gilchrist, Girar-
deau, Hall, Harvell, Herndon, Hill, Jewell, Johnston, Jul-
ian, Kilgore. King, Kirkland, Knight, Knowles, Leggett,
McCallum, McElroy, JMatthews, Melton, Noble, Olmstead,
Paul, Peaden, Persons, Pirrong, Rawls, Roberts, Robison,
Rosborough, Si'.trunk, Sledge, Smith of Hamilton, Smith.
ofVolusia, Sparkman, Sprague, Stephens, Taylor of
Gadsden, Taylor of Hillsborough, Tillman. Wall, Wart-
man, Watson, Wells, Williams, Wilson of Hernando,
Wilson of Jackson.--66..
Mr. J. G. Kellum, Acting Chief Clerk, announced, the
Hon. Albert W. Gilchrist elected as Sneaker.
The Acting Chief Clerk a)ppoin ted Messrs. Watson of
Osceola, Pirron,' of Calhoun and Crawford of Orange to
escort the Speaker to the chair.
The Sneaker being conducted to the chair extended
his thanks to the House for the honor conferred upon
hi m in i+h followin. .words:
Mr. Chairman and Getnlemen:
This is a condition toward which I have long longingly
looked. To be nominated as the presiding officer of the
House of Representatives produces a satisfactory sensa-
tion; to be nominated and electedin such a manner is
indeed gratifying. Satisfactory and gratifying as it now
is it will be far more satisfactory, and far more gratify-
inlg if at the end of the session,; when each one will have









6



done his duty as best it seems. to have earned the respect
and the esteem and the friendship of every member of
this House and of every one connected wtih it. Gentlemen
I thank you.
Mr. Avery of Escambia, nominated Mr. J. G. Kellum of
Gainesville, Fla., for Chief Clerk.
Upon roll call the vote was:
For J. G. Kellulm-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Avery,
Baker, Blanton of Madison, Blanton of Taylor,
Bradshaw, Bryan, Brown, Buckman, Campbell,
Canter, Carleton, Cobb, Cornwell, Crawford,
Dorman, DuPont, Duval, yal, Fillingim,
Floyd, Girardeau, Hall, Harvell, Herndon, Hill, Jewell,
Johnston, Julan, Kilgore, King, Kirklaii, Knight,
Knowles, Leggett, McCallum, McElroy, Matthews, Mel-
ton, Noble, Olmntead, Paul, Peadon, Persons, Pirrong,
Rawls, Roberts., Robison, Rosborough, Sistrunk, Sledge,
Smith of Hamilton, Smith of Volusia, Sparkman,
Sprague, Stephens, Taylor of Gadsden, Taylor of Hills-
borough, Tillman, Wall, Wartinan, Watson, Wells, Wil-
liams, Taylor of Hernando, Wilson of Jackson.-66.
The Speaker declared Mr. J. G. Kellum elected Chief
Clerk.
Mr. Avery of Escambia made the following nomina-
tions:
For Assistant Chief Clerk-A. C. Stephens, of Hamil-
ton.
For Bill Clerk-Geo. R. Dickinson of Orange.
For Reading Clerk-Nat R. Walker of Wakulla.
For Assistant Reading Clerk-G. J. Strozier, of
Orange.
For Engrossingll Clerk-A. S. York, of Bradford.
For Enrolling Clerk-B. Umstead of Suwannee.
For Recording C lerk-W. K. Jaekson, of Citrus.
For Sergeant-at-Arins- Ceo.. HEawkins, of Suwannee.
F For Messener-W- B. Lanier, of Columbia.
For Door Keeper-Dan Wiggins, of Leon.
For .Tanitor-T. S. Bryan of t)Hde.
For Pames-Francis Eppes of Leon, Geo. Reddick of
Marion, Harry Fannin of Calhoun, Dick Bennett of
Duval.
For Chaplain-J. D. Coleman.
All of whom on motion of Mr. Wilson of Hernando,
were elected by acclamation and were sworn in by Hon.
Chief Justice J. B. Whitfield.











Oh motion of Mr. Watson of Osceola, a committee con-
sisting of Messrs. Watson of Osceola, Julian of Columbia
and Matthews of Bradford were appointed to await upon
"the Senate and inform the Senate that the House was
organized and ready to proceed to business.
After a brief absence the c(,omlmittee returned and re-
ported that they had performed the duty assigned to
them and were discharged.
On motion of Mr. Watson of Oseeola a committee con-
sisting of Messrs. Johnston of Pasco, Girardeau of Jeffer-
son and Melton of Duval were appointed to wait upon
His Excellency, the Governor, and inform him that the
House was organized and ready to receive any message or
communication that he may be pleased to make.
After a brief absence the committee reitrunei and re-
ported that they had performed the duty assigned them
and were discharged.
Mr. Wall of Putnam moved that -he rules of the House
of Representatives for the session of 1903 be adopted for
the use of the Ffouse until the committee on rules report-
ed otherwise, whilh was adopted.
A committee of three from the Senate, Messrs. Raney,
'Zim and West, appeared at the bar of the House of Rep-
resentatives and announced that they were instructed by
the Senate to inform the Hor-s thti t that body was or-
ganized and ready to proceed to business.
Mr. Noble of Lake offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That the House of Representatives, by a ris-
ing vote return thanks to the ladies of Tallahassee for
their thoughtfulness in the beautiful display of flowers
that greeted the eyes of the members on its first day of
assembling.
Which was unanimously adopted.
Mr. Wells of H illsborough offered the following resolu-
"tion :
"House C.onlerr; t Pesol'tio: No. 1:
Be it resolved by the House of 'Representatives, the
Senate concurring, That the d,1ily journals of the Senate
and House for the session of 1905 be bound together in
pamphlet form, the proceedings of the Houue to appear
first, t.e proceediinms of t!O te to follow. The said
journal to be paged numerically, beginning at page 1, and
follow numerically until end of session.
That there shall be published daily for the use of the
'House and Senite and executive department 1,200 copies









8



of said journal, ten copies to be furnished each member
of the Legislature ,the remainder to be distributed to the
executive department.
That at the end of the session, the said journal to be
bound in two volumes, designated as volumes one and
two, journal of the Legislature of Florida, 1905.
That each member of the Legislature for 1905 be furn-
ished with substantially bound volumes of the said
journal.
That in addition 300 bound volumes shall be furnished
the various departments of the State government.
The resolution weit over under the rules.
Mr. Wall of Putnam moved that the House set the time-
of adjournment of the House of Representatives each
dav nt 1 o'clock.
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Wall of Putnam moved that when the House ad-
journ it adjourn until 10 o'clock tomorrow.
Which was agreed to.
A communication was received from the Governor as:
follows:
State of Florida,
Executive Department.
Tallahassee, April 4, 1905.
Hon. AlIrrt W. Cilahrit.
Rneaker of fhe House of Rc,)re'rentatirn-cs.
SIR-I have the honor to transmit herewith biennial
message of the Covernor, accompanied by the reports of
the administrative officers, other State officers and ap-
pointees, which are as follows:
Report of the Secretary of the State:
Report of the Attorney-General of the State.
Report of the Comptroller of the State.
Report of the Treasurer of the State.
Report of the SnTerintendent of Public Instructioni.
Report of the Commissioner of Agriculture.
Report of the Adjutant-General of the State of Floridar.
Seventh annual report of the Railroid Commission.
Report of the State Chemist of the State of Florida.
SReport of the Secretnry and Treasurer of the Trustees
of the Internal Improvement Fund.

Thirteenth annual report of the Stf+e eBord .of Hf-lt!!
:Report of the Commission on Uniformity of Legisla-
tion.








9,

Report of Fish Commission.
Report of the Soldiers' anrd Sailors' Home.
Which are sent to you for your consideration.
Very Cvespectfuly,
N. B. BROWARD,
Governor.

The message and documents upon motion of Mr. Wall
were ordered spread upon the journal.

REPORT ON THE OLD CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS'
AND SAILORS' HOME ASSOCIATION FOR THE
YEAR 1904.
Jacksonville, Fla., January 1, 1905.
To His Excellency, the Governor of Florida,
SIR-I have the honor to submit this my annual report
of the condition and operation of the Old Confederate
Soldiers' and Sailors' Home Association for the year
1904.
The occupancy of the Home during the year is shown,
by Schedule A hereto attached aggregating as follows:
Occupancy January 1st. 1904 ...............10
Admitted during the year .................... 7

Total ............. ...... ............. T
D ied ...... .. ..... ....................... 3
Discharged and furloughed .... .. .... 3 6

Remaining in H-ome January 1st, 1905.... ...... 1I1
Schedule "B" herewith appended is the financial reornr
of the Treasurer for the year, of moneys received and ex-
pended by him, showing balance on hand, $9.46.
Besides what passed through the hands of the Treas-
'rer, the Mlrtha Reid Chapter United Daughters of Con-
federacy of Jacksonville. extended during the year for.
the aid of the Home, $166.58.
Other (C'. of the State, during the same time, the
aggregate of $93.60. -
The appropriation for the Home by the Legislature of
1903 of the sum of fifteen hundred dollars for additions
and other iimnrovements has been utilized and expended
for the erection of a two-story addition to the main build-
ing, giving a commodious dining room and two addi-
tional bedrooms, also closet and bathroom with a sewer-
connection, which is carried to the river.









10



There has also been erected a new outbuilding, includ-
ling a stable, feed, tool and wagon house, which was great-
.ly needed. There was purchased for the Home during
the year a substantial covered spring wagon. The ex-
pense of this and a small amount on account of the build-
ing improvements was paid out of a small special fund in
,the hands of the President.
The above improvements during the past year have
added greatly to the utility, comfort and convenience of
the institution.
The deaths reported the past year and the year pre-
vious are forcibly reminders of the fact that the Confed-
erate veterans are rapidly passing away. Anyone old
enough to have participated in the war between the
States is now well advanced in years, and inasmuch as
only those under physical disability are admitted.to the
Home, the combination of age and physical infirmity
readily accounts for a large percentage of deaths. Ex-
cept in rare instances where the remains are taken in
charge by the relations, the dead are given a Christian
burial by the authorities of the Home and laid to rest in
a lot in Ever,'roen cemetery purchased and owned by the
Martha Reid Chapter IT. D. C. The names of the dead
are perpetuated in neat headstones, furnished by the
same organization of noble women. To them and to
other chapters of the State for their well timed aid in
money and other kind and loving ministrations to the
needs of- the ine,,tes of the Home, I beg to express my
grateful appreciation.
There are now several persons in the Home feeble and
"helpless and with the means at our command it is impos-
sible to give.i tim t'at care and attention which they
should have. As tiine passes these conditions become
more intensive and exacting. These conditions would
be grnt.y relieved by a small hospital in connection with
the HoT)e, anid for that iurpose we could uiilize a small
Out-buiilding on the premises, with some alterations and
additimos, at a cost not exceeding one thousand dollars.
"Another great need of the institution is the means to
'employ two good nurses for the care of the helpless. I,
therefore, ear;netl v recommend the appropriation by the
Legislature of ofe tlousaid dollars for fitting up a hos-
pitl, and one thousand dollars a year for the employ-
ment of nurses fmd other necessaries in its maintenance,
'besides the current appropriation heretofore made.









11



The State cannot expend the same amount in a more
worthy charity than that which is appropriated for the
Confederate HkiAle, which shelters the old and decrepit
veteran who, in his youth, served his country with practi-
cally no pay, half fed and half clothed, ever ready to bare
his breast to the storm of the battle and endure every
hardship and suffering, which the war between the States
,entailed. Respectfully submitted,
(Signed.) F. P. FLEMING.


SCHEDULE "A."

Beneficiaries occupying the Confederate Home during
the year 1904.

OCCUPANTS OF THE HOME JANUARY 1, 1904.

J. L. Daniel, J. F. Clark, C. H. Nelson, C. Lassiter,
Chas. H. Elder. J. S. Cooley, W. M. Daniel, L. B.
Andrew, John J. McCormick, J. D. McIntosh..... 10

ADMITTED SINCE JAN. 1, 1902.

W. B. Briggs, C. M. HIooner, James Kennedy, H. C.
Bradford, James N. O'Neill, P. J. Courter, Henry
C. Groverstein ........... .................... 7

17
t' DIED.

L. B. Andreu, C. H. Nelson, J. J. McCormick......3

DISCHARGED AND ON FURLOUGH.

C. M. Hooper, W. H. Daniel, W. B. Briggs...;...3 6

Remaining .in the Home Jan. 1, 1905......... 11

SCHEDULE "B."

Account of Treasurer, Old Confederate Soldiers' and
Sailors' Home Association for the year ending December
31st, 1904:








12



RECEIPTS.

1904-
To balance on hand Jan. 4th, 1904...........$ 3.7G
Jan. 9th, received from State, 4th quarter, 1905. 1,791.75
April 9+h, received from State, 1st quarter, 1904 377.75
July 22d, received from State, 2nd quarter, 1904 317.74
Oct. 15th, received from State, 3rd quarter, 1904 276.39
----------------&.
$2,767.39
DISBURSEMENTS.

By cash, shoes and clothing....... ........$ 23.87
By cash, provisions and feed........ ........ 872.51
By cash, medicine and attendance ............ 10.95
By cash, furniture .......................... 4.75
By cash, repairs und addition to Home........ 1,503.10
By cash, matre;o and cook .................... 149.00
By dash, superintendent .............. ...... 60.00
By cash, funeral L. B. Andrews.. ........... 45.00,
By cash, funeral C. R. Nelson................ 40.00
By cash, funeral John McCormick............ 45.00
By cash, sundries .......................... 3.75

Balance on hand Jan. 14, 1905............. .$2,767.39



"Report on the Promotion of Uniformity of Legislation
in tie United States:

Tal!nah:see. Fla., Feb. 12, 1903.
To His Excellency, W. S. .Jennings,
Governor of the State of Florida.
It is roovired by law. Cha'. 4447, that the Commission-
ers for the Promotion of Uniformity of Legislation in the-
United States shall report to the Governor prior to each
session of the Legislature.
The conference of Commissioners of Uniform State
Laws s made up of commnlissions w'ra:td by the different
States, meeting in conference and organizing themselves
into a: national body for the better, accompTlishment of
theb work for which its members were appointed by the
States. The State commissioners for the promotion of







13

unifromity of legislation in the United States held th ir
eleventh annual conference at Denver, Colorado, in 'Au-
gust, 1901. The conference adopted and recommended
to the varoius legislatures for passage a law relative to
insurance policies, a copy of which is attached hereto.
The State Commissioners for the Promotion of Uni-
formity of Legislation in the United States held their
twelfth annual conference at Saratoga, New York, in-Au-
gust, 1902. Several matters of great importance received
consideration and are now in the hands of committees.
.An act on sales is being drafted and will probably be
ready for consideration at the next coriferencee.

AN ACT TO ESTABLISH A LAW UNIFORM WITH
"THE LAWS OF OTHER STATES RELATIVE 'TO
INSURANCE POLICIES.

Be' It enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:
Section 1. No policy or insurance shall be rendered in-
valid by reason of any statement, representation or war-
ranty,- made by the insured, unless the same shall be
material to the risk, or made with intent to defraud.
Section 2. No policy of insurance shall contain any
condition, provision or agreement, which shall directly
or indirectly deprive the insured or the beneficiary of the
right to trial by jury on any question of fact arising un-
der said policy, and all such conditions, provisions or
agreements shall be void.
Section 3. This act shall apply to certificates of Fra-
ternal and Mutual Benefit associations as well as to all
other forms of insurance.
Sec. 4. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent herewith
are hereby repealed.
The President of the American Bar Association in
1902, Hon. U. M. Rose, in his address, speaks as follows
of the Negotiable Instruments Law, which was adopted
by this State a few years since: "The Conference of
Commissioners on Uniform State Laws very carefully
compiled our Negotiable Instruments Law, and this has
already been passed.by Congress for the District of Co-
lumbia and in twenty States, so that it seems now to b'
aillmost sure that it will soon become the law throughout
oulr whole country. Thus, seemingly, the day cannot be
far distant when the law relating to this important sub-
ject will be substantially the same wherever the English-







14



language is spoken and a vast number of discordant de-
cisions will have passed into oblivion."
It is perhaps not out of place briefly to call attention
to some views expressed of the Conference of State Com-
missioners. An eminent jurist has said in reference to
this Conference: "Whatever works for unity, certainty
and universality in the law, works for justice and
equality before the ilaw, and however slow and difficult
in its initiation, is sure to win when its salutary oper-
ations can be demonstrated. Improved facilities in busi-
ness intercourse, unshackled trade between the States,
greater certainty in inter-state contracts, less uncer-
tainty and delay in inter-state litigation, mutuality of
rights, and citizenship, without regard to State Lnes, pro-
tection of the integrity of the family from external as-
saults-these comities, amities, and conveniences (shall
I say moralities?) of good neighborhood are evidently
desirable things in themselves. Are they not objects,
also, worthy of attainment, in that they tend to cultivate
and develop that oneness of spirit, that like-mnidnedness
which alone makes an 'indestructible union of inde-
structi'fle States?'"
An eminent writer expresses this opinion: It is "the
most inllportant jmi.Stic work underta-ken in the Unitld
States since the'adoptin of tle Federal Constituiion. In
the more than one hundred years that have elapsed sincir
that time, there has been no official effort to obtain
greater harmofhy of law among the statess of thle Union;
and it is the first time since the debates on the Co stitu-
tion that accredited representatives of the several States
have met together to discuss any legal question from a
national point of view. This movement has passed be-
yond the s-t.. of experiment and may fairly now be
called national." '"
This, like all other matters, must have its financial
side. The Commissioners, even though they may be will-
ing to give their time, labor and best ability to make the
work of the Conference a success, cannot attend the
meetings at distant points without incurring the ex-
penses of traveling and hotels. Unless the records of the
meeting are preserved d n- ni-+ed o that thb ny t,,
circulated among the Commissionerrs and others, the.
work could not progress and would soon be 'lost. This
printing cannot be had without being paid for. This
State has no appropriation for any of these expenses.







15



Other States pay the expenses of their Commissioners,
and a pro rata of the Conference expenses. A few of the
States appropriate liberally for the expenses of its Com-
nissioners, This State is able to pay the expenses of its,
commissioners and put itself upon an equal footing with
other States in that respect. It is therefore recom-
meunded that an appropriation sufficient to, pay the ex-
penses of the. Commissioner or Commissioners of this
State who may attend the Conference be made.
Attached hereto is a copy of "An Act to establish a
law uniform with the laws of other States relative to in-
surance policies." The Conferrence of Commissioners
recommends its adoption, by the Legislature.
The writer was present and participated in aill the Con-
ferences since last report.
Respectfully submitted,
R. W. WILLIAMS,
Commissioner for the Promotion of Uniformity of Legis-
lation in the United States.
To "*' EI--J! e-.v. N R. r ow rd. Governor of Florida:
SIR: The Commissioners for the Promotion of Uni-
foriiny or 0.1egllailotu in the United States are required
to report to the Governor prior to each session of the
Legislature. (Chap. 4447, Laws of Fla., approved May
9, .1895.)
The Thirteentlh Conference of Commissionerrs on Uni-
form State Laws, consisting of commissions created by
the different States, usually three from each Stale, was
held 9t Hot Springs, Va., in Auggust, 1903. The time
was devoted principally ,to hearing and considering re-
ports from different committees having in charge the
preparation of laws for consideration of the Conference.
The Fourteenth Conference was held at St. Louis, Mo.,
in September, 1904. At that Confeirrence draft of a law
relatirj-t to the sale of goods, which had been prepared
and distributed some months before, was carefully con-
sidered, each paragraph, sentence and word. It is ex-
pected that this law will be perfected at the Conference
to be held in August, 1905, and be recommended to the
various States for adoption.
A proposed uniform law on partnership is in course of
preparation. Laws recommended by the Conference of
Commissioners for adoption by the various States are
attached to, and accompany, the reports of the Commis-
sioners of this State for 1901 and for 1903, and also-









recommendations or suggestions in reference to appro-
priations to carry on the work of the (Conference.
Respectfullysubmi itted,
(Signed) R. W. WILLIAMS,
Tallahassee, Fla., March 20, 1905.
Commissioner for the Promotion of Uniformity of Legis-
lation in the United Stales.
On motion of Mr. Wall of Putniam the House adjourned
until 10 o'clock tomorrow.

(For Governor's Message see a ppend i x.)




















'APPENDIX



2 H. B.

















MESSAGE OF THE GOVERNOR.

Gentlemen of the Senate and. House of Representatives:

In conformity with the requirement of the Constitution,
which directs that the Governor shall communicate by mes-
sage to the Legislature, at each regular session, information
concerning the condition of the State, and recommend such
measures as he may deem expedient, I herewith submit the
following matters for your consideration.
The printed reports, relating to the administration of the
several departments and bureaus, the educational, charita-
ble, and penal institutions of the State, containing much in-
formation will be placed before you and should receive your
careful consideration, as it is only by a familiarity with
their contents that you can intelligently legislate for the
various needs of the State.
.Never in the history of our State were all of its material
conditions more encouraging. Blessed with a salubrious
climate and cheerful surroundings, our people enjoy excel-
lent health. Stimulated by an honorable ambition to pro-
gress, and encouraged by the fruitful results of effort, intel-
ligently and industrially directed, remarkable strides have
been made in developing the almost limitless resources of
the State and in improvements of former conditions. Our
seaport facilities, our pine forests, our phosphate deposits,
our fish and oyster supplies, our farm and pasture lands,
our fruit groves, our vegetable farms, our tobacco planta-
tions, our excellent schools, our low rate of State taxation,
our tr::nsipotation facilities and public accommodations,
and the general high standing of our people and the bright
outlook for the future are attracting to the State a large
and desirable class of-immigrants, who are joining with us
in energetically forging ahead in the good work of progress
and development.







4

If we are true to our obligations to insure to the people
of the State an honest, firm, impartial, and economical ad-
ministration of just laws, affording to all equal rights, we
have nothing to fear for the future. JIf the spirit of our
fundamental principles of government is observed and
rigidly enforced, Florida, with her vast area of fertile land
and balmy climate, and her boundless resources yet unde-
veloped, will in time become one of the foremost states of
the Union.: .
FINANCIAL.

The financial condition of Florida is most excellent, as
will be seen from the following extract from the reports of
the Comptroller and the State Treasurer:

GENERAL REVENUE FUND FROM WHICH ALL AP-.
T PROPRIATIONS ARE PAID.

1903. -January1. Balance............... .. $228,042.26
Receipts for 1903.........740721.20

S" $: 968,763.46
Warrants issued, 1903... 702,463.05

1904. January 1I. Balance...............$266,300.41
: :; :Receipts for 1904...... 639,775.80

$906,076.21
', Warrants issued, 1904..... 616,657.89

1905. January 1. Balance. ................$289,418.32

GENERAL SCHOOL (ONE MILL) TAX.

1903. January: 1. Balance......: .........$ 8,451.79
Receipts in 1903........ 103,995.43

$112,447.22
SWairants issued 1903..... 100,105.90








: :.,,.., :!: ,.A ^ ,,i.. ::

1904. January 1. Balance.................$ 12,341.32
Si .. Receipts in 1904... .... 15,400.61

$127,741.93
S .. 0;;: : Warrants issued in 1904.. .121,019.40
,.. : r ..
1905. --January 1. Balance........ .,....... $ 6,722.53

COMMON SCHOOL 6 Nf PRINCIPAL.

19031' January 1. Balance... ..... .$ 2,000.62
Reeipts i I 3 ......... 459,574.59

v. -. .1 1,575. 21
Bonds purchased in 1903.. 403,079.28

1904. January 1. Balance..................$ 59,495.93
S* Receipts in 1904... :.0.: 23,920 64

S ..-.. $ 82,416.57
-. i: Bonds purchased in 1904.. 78,987.25

1905. January 1. Balance ..... ... $ .3,42.32

COMMON;SCHOOL FUND, INTEREST.

1903. January 1. Balance................. .$ 17,894.48
: Receipts in 1903. ... .. .130,134.94

$148,029.42
Warrants of distribution,
S. 1903 ..............*. 132,669.10
1904. January 1. Balance .... ........$ 15,360.10
Receipts in 1904.......... 32,106.50

$.. $47,466.60
Warrants of distribution,
"1904 .. 0 .....s...... 30,787.33

1905. January 1. Balance ................$16,679.27
". '.
'1






6

SEMINARY FUND, PRINCIPAL.

1903. January 1. Balance................$ 912.76
Receipts for 1903 ...... 22,757.33

$ 23,670.09
Bonds purchased in 1903.. 23,615.25

1904. January 1. Balance..... ........ 54.84
Receipts in 1904......... 745.33

$ 800.17
Bonds purchased in 1904.. 776.00

1905. January 1. Balance..................$ 24.17

SEMINARY FUND, INTEREST.

1903. January 1. Balance ................$ 2,643.00
Receipts in 1903.......... 1,479.00

$ 4,122.00
Warrants issued 1903..... 4,122.00

1904. January 1. Balance..... ..........$
Receipts in 1904.......... 3,945.00
Warrants issued 1904...... 2,958.25

1905. January 1. Balance...............$ 986.25

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH FUND.

1903. January 1. Balance................$ 21,528.60
Receipts in 1903.......... 50,492.44

$ 72,021.04
Warrants issued 1903..... .28,35.55

1904. January 1. Balance .... ..........$ 43,655.49







fje': er-c-*r- \F
,..
( 7
.t' Z*
v
I I
B
3'



1905. January 1. Balance............... $ 65,996.60'

HIRE OF STATE CONVICT FUND.



190-3. January 1.



Balance ........ .. $ 38,002.8
Receipts in 1903......... 156,687.78

$194,690.61
Warrants, 1903. ......... 129,079.89



*y 1.



1904. January





1905. January



1903. January 1.



1904. January 1.



Balance. .............
Receipts, 1904...........



.$ 65,610.72
.158,001.22



$223,611.94-
Warrants, 1904. ....... 139,441.60-



ry 1. Balance .................$ 84,170.34'

INDIAN WAR CLAIM FUND.



Balance .................. $692,946.00
Receipts in 1903..........

$692,946.00
Warrants, 1903........... 658,093.29

Balance. ................$ 34,852.71
Receipts in 1904..........

$ 34,852.71
Warrants, 1904........... 9,852.71



1905. January 1. Balance ...................$ 25,000.00



Receipts in 1904.......... 54,316.84'

S" : $ 97,872.33
Warrants issued 1904..... 31,975 7S"








o. .. .
PENSION TAX FUND.
1903. January 1. Balance................$ 63,613.64
RIeceipts ............. .. 122,928.64

$186,542.56
,. Warrants. ...... ........ 179,395.51

1904. January 1. Balance. ..............$ 7,147.05
Receipts. ..... ......... 266,944.29

$274,091.34
Warrants. ...........266,720.19

1905. January 1.- Balance..................$ 7,371.15
The balances in the several funds of the State, as shown
by the foregoing Comptroller's abstract of accounts, is as
follows:
General revenue. ........................$289,418.32
General school fund (1 mill tax).... ... .. 6,722.53
Common school fund, (principal) ............. 3,429.32
Common school fund, (interest)....... .. .... 16,679.27
Seminary fund, (principal)............. .... 24.17
Seminary fund, (interest)................... 986.25
State Board of Health fund ... ........... ... .65,996.60
Hire of convict fund..................... 84,170.34
Indian war claim fund...................... 25,000.00
Pension fund .... ....... .. .................. 7,371.15

S$499,797.95
From an examination of the Treasurer's report, I find
that the General Revenue Fund, out of which the adminis-
trative expenses of the government and all appropriations
other than those provided for by specific levy are paid, is
raised by a direct levy of one-half mill and the other sources
of revenue indicated in the table given below.

'




#-. .







9



"GENERAL REVENUE FUND.

Composed of ............. ......... ... ..$639,775*80
Direct taxes ...............$158,288.80
License taxes, general, insur-
ance, telegraph and express
etc. .. ........... 332,432.01
Tax certificates. .............. 87,515.04
Corporation charter tax....... 16,827.00
Fertilizer stamp tax.......... 28,520.93
Miscellaneous ............. 16,192.02

$639,775.80 $639,775.80
The various items that go to make these resources of gen-
eral revenue other than direct taxation are constantly in-
creasing, and by careful and painstaking legislation may.
without any injustice to any interest affected be yet further
increased so as to insure a fund sufficient to meet all the
proper and necessary expenditures*of the State govern-
ment without increasing the taxav- ofne-half of one
mill. /
In this connection, I wo L>recommend that'such legisla-
tion be enacted as will ex I the license tax Jw to cover
those profitable businesses not now contributing proper
share towards the expenses of the government ich atf-
fords them protection.

TAX ON FRANCHISES.

Immensely valuable franchises and special privil ,'eK
granted by the State and protected by the law are unjustly
allowed to avoid contributing to the expense of maintaining
the government under which those holding them prosper
and accumulate wealth. Every encouragement should be
extended to enterprise and capital to assist in developing
the vast resources of our State, according to every one
equal protection of the law and requiring of :all an equita-
ble contribution to the expenses of government honestly,
fairly and economically administered.






10



STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION.

Notwithstanding the improvements in the methods of tax
assssmenits, the burden of direct taxation in general falls
heaviest on those least able to bear it; and it seems to me
to be important and just that this burden should be made
as, equal as possible under our system, and as a means to
that end I recommend that a State Board of Equalization
of Assessments be created, given such powers and duties as
will in your judgment most nearly meet this end.

STATE TAXES.

The total assessed valuation of all property for purposes
of State and County taxation for the year 1904 for the en-
tire State was $117,064,840. The total State tax levy for
the year 1904 was at the rate of four mills on the dollar, or
forty cents on each hundred dollars of property as assessed.
This levy is distributed as follows, viz: For pensions, un-
der Chapter 5108, ;k.of 1903, two mills; for the State
School Fund, updjer Sect Io6, Article XII, of the Constitu-
tion, one mill "for State Bo$'r f Health,- one-half of one
mill, under S4ction 1 of Chapt 93, Acts of 1899; for Gen-
eral RevenrO purposes, one-ha lfof one mill, under Chapter
5107, Actn903, which authorized a levy of three mills for
genera revenue purposes, but by executive order this levy
was educed to one-half of one mill for 1904. All of the one
mil tax for the State School Fund is distributed to the sev-
era counties of the State under Section 6, of Article XII of
th'e Constitution. The one-half of one mill levy for the
"state Board of Health is used exclusively by the' State
Board of Health for its purposes. The one-half of one mill
levy for general revenue purposes goes,into the general rev-
enue fund, which. together with licenses, taxes and other
receipts into the general revenue fund, is used to meet all
the appropriations made by the Legislature for all the de-
partments of the government, and for the maintenance oil
all State institutions, colleges and hll other current ex--
penses.
The amount of State taxes assessed in the year 1904 in






11

each of the several counties of the State on account qf the
one-half of one mill general revenue tax above mentioned,
is as follows:
i State General
Counties. Revenue Taxes.
Alachua ......... ................ ... $ 2,298.2'5
Baker ......... ....... .................... 428.03
Bradford .......... .......... .............. 934.83
Brevard ......................... ... 1,469.57
Calhoun .......... ......... ............... 597.70
Citrus ............................... 631.61
Clay ............ ......................... 607.32
Columbia ................ ................. 1,114.62
Dade ...... ... ....... .. ............... 2,060.07
DeSoto .................. ................ 1,589.39
Duval .. ... ..... .......... ............. 6,125.73
Escambia ............ .... ...... .... .... 3,323.52
Franklin ............ .......... 445.18
Gadsden ......... ....................... 643.48
Hamilton ........ ........ ... .... ..... 758.96
Hernando .............. ......... .. .. 552.24
Hillsboro ugh .......... ............ ........ 4,879.56
Holmes ........... ........... .............. 499.05
Jackson .......... ... .. ............. 1,157.23
Jefferson ..... ....... .......... ....... 818.77
Lafayette ............. ........ .. .......... 573.41
Lake ......... .... .. ...... ............. 1,172.35
Lee ............ ....... .................. 843.54
Leon .......... ...... .................... 1,251.09
Levy ....... .................. 859.01
Liberty ........... .... .............. 315.11
M adison .......... ............. ........... 1,061.58
"M anatee .......... ... ...... .. ..... 979.70
Marion .......... ....... .. ..... .... .... 2,226.56
on ,r-)N .. 927.45.
Monro................................. 927.45


Osceola ............ ......... ............. 756.30
Pasco .......... ..... .. .................. 753.54
Polk .......... .... .... ............... 2,148.75







12



Putnamn ... ......... ...1...... 1,353.76
Santa Rosa .............................. 906.96
St. Johns .. .. ............ .... ............ 1,364.28
Sumter ..................... ......... 751.26.
Suwannee .......... .... .... ..... ..... 1,282.47
Taylor ...... ... .ov. .. ............ 6I63.14
Volusia .......... .... ... .. ..... 1,911.31
,W akulla .. ........ ...... ....... ............ 355.10,
"Walton .......... ........... ........... 1,078.10
Washington ...... o .... .o... ....... 1,011.19

Total .... .. .... ......... ........$58;532.20-

: COUNTY TAXES.

The funds used by the counties for all county purposes,
:including county schools, are derived from tax levies made
by the counties, from amounts sent to counties by the State,
from fines collected, from license taxes, from poll taxes,
from hlire, of county convicts, school sub-district tax, etc.
During the last two years the State Comptroller and
State Treasurer have collected and remitted to the counties
of the State the following amounts, viz:
From One Mill School Tax Fund. ........ $220,070.40.
From interest on State School Fund, including
amoIunt of, interest received from Indian War
Claim Fund ..... ....... ....... .......... 163,271.05
Fromn hire State Convict Fund............ .254,086.85

Making a total of ......................$637,428.30
The counties levied taxes in the year 1904 as follows:
Total Special
Counties. Total School and Road
"County Taxes. Taxes.
Alachua .... ..........$ 49,992.04 $ 8,537.13
Baker ....... ........ 11,262.39 282.77
Bradford... .... i. 23,539.01 3,280. 24
S. S. S. D 8,798 .23_
Brevard ...... ........ 40,108.61 S.R.D. 4,248.91
,Calhoun ........ ...... 17,712.74 964.37





13



Citrus ...............
Clay ................
Columbia ............
Dade .................
DeSoto ...... .......
Duval .. .....
Escambia ..... ......
Franklin............
Gadsden .. .... ..
Hamilton ... .. .. ..
Hernanido .. .....
Hillsborough. .. ..
Holmes ...............
Jackson .. ...
Jefferson .............
Lafayette ... .
Lake ...............
Lee .................
Leon ........... ...
Levy ........ ,- .. ..... ,
Liberty ... .. .... ...
Madison ....... .. ..
Manatee .........
Marion .... ........
Monroe ...... ...... .

Nassau ....... .....
Orange .. .... .
Oseeola .. ........
Pasco. ..............
Polk ..
Polk. ....... .........
Putriam .. ...... ..
Santa Rosa ..... . .
St. Johns.. ..... ......
Sumter ..... .......
Suwannee ...........
Taylor ..... ...... ...
Volusia ... .......
Wakulla .........



18,388.13
13,875.32
30,624.94
62,740.22
.59,372:10
175,575.47
82,671.95
8,218.03"
,15,673.62-
,d4,935.38
15,071.28
134,43,2.37
13,2' ,46
27,521.03
14,052.88
17,345.03
26,825.88
24,224.26
26,349.83
17,173.64
14,807.04
23,391.71
37,202.20
63,114.12
25,464.19

31,513.57
52,943.73
21,738.81-
12,647.70
555,217.05
28,121.24
21,668.96
38,666.05
19,686.73
31,364.94
16,465.44
44,629.00
9,232.38



3,835.13
3,643.77
2,269.20

2,811.39
24,490.77


"1,570.52
1,623.96
2,825.25
22,548.47
599.05
1,264.19

1,185.71
3,671.45
3,238.02

3,421.82
Road 484.51
359.62
5,563.40
9,258.88

S. S.D. 1,743. 15
S. R. D. 848.82
6.217.21
953.23
4,460.54
7,080.29
457.19
92.31

1,163.84
3 3,237.28
366.49
5,914.51
C .. .








14



Walton ...... ........ 25,853.41 1,505.13
Washington...... .... 21,920.95 1,088.37

$1,536,562.83 $155,905.12
To the amounts remitted to the counties from the State
as above given, and the collection from the county tax levy
are to be added the receipts in the counties from county
license taxes, fines collected, etc., all of which aggregate a
large revenue received by the counties and it seems appar-
ent that by proper practice of true economy the county tax
levies could be reduced.
Legislation to require a strict legal application of all
county funds to proper purposes and a rigid accounting for
all moneys received would tend to relieve the burdens of
taxation now carried by the people for county purposes.

ECONOMY IN APPROPRIATIONS.

While this showing of financial condition is cause for
congratulation to our people, and to the wise and efficient
administration of our State affairs by those in whom that
responsible duty has been vested, yet it will be only by the
strictest economy in your appropriations and expenditures
that this condition of State affairs can be maintained. I
desire to call your attention to the fact that the balances
contained in the various funds as of the first of January,
1905, have been by the requisitions and apportionments
made in January very materially reduced, as is shown by
the Treasurer's balance sheet as of the first of March now
in my hands; and in addition thereto, there are the large
demands that are yet to be made out of this fund for legis-
lative expenses.

OUTSTANDING BONDS OF FLORIDA-BY WHAT
FUNDS HELD.

The entire bonded debt of the State consists of $267,700
of three per cent. refunding bonds, issued November 26th,
1901, in pursuance of Chapter 4947, Acts of 1901, to mature
January 1, 1951, in exchange for an eqial amount of ma-








15



tured seven per cent. bonds of 1871; and $333,867.00 of
three per cent. refunding bonds issued December 26, 1903,
also issued under Chapter 4947, Acts of 1901, to mature
January 1, 1953, in exchange for an eo.-al amount of -ma-
tured six per cent. bonds of 1873, making the total bonded
debt of the State $601,567. All of the outstanding bonds
of the State are held and owned by the State Educational
Funds and bear three per cent. interest, as follows:
Agricultural College (now University of Flor-
ida) Fund ............................ .$135,800.00
Seminary Fund .... ......................... 97,600.00
State School-Fund ........................ 368,167.00

$601,567.00
SOURCES OF REVENUE FOR EDUCATIONAL FUNDS.

The receipts in the principal of State School Fund are
derived from the sale of State school lands (sixteenth sec-
tions); from occasional escheats; and from the United
States government under the provisions of an Act of Con-
gress approved March 3, 1845, by which the State of Flori-
da is entitled to receive for school purposes five per cent.
of all sales of United States lands in the State.
Prior to the settlement of the Indian War claims in 1902,
the amounts thus due the State from the United States gov-
ernment were withheld from the State by the officials of
the United States pending an adjustment of the mutual
claims between the United States and the State of Florida
growing out of expenses incurred in suppressing Indian
hostilities in Florida prior to 1860, and the purchase by the
United States for the Indian Trust Fund of bonds of the
State of Florida issued in 1857 for the purpose of raising
money to meet the expenses above mentioned-which bonds
had not been paid. These mutual claims between the
United States and the State of Florida were adjusted and
settled under the provisions of an Act of Congress ap-
proved May 27, 1902, and in that settlement the amounts
withheld from the State, as stated above, aggregating
$88,362.11, were paid to the State, and under Chapter 5117,
Acts of 1903, the said amount was paid into the principal







16



of the State School Fund. In future the State should re-
ceive from the United States annually the amounts accru-
ing to the State for school purposes on this account.
During 1903 the receipts in this fund from sales of State
School Lands amounted to $89,123.57; during 1904, the re-
ceipts were $20,415.13.
The receipts in' the principal of State School Fund are
invested in United States or State bonds, as directed and
limited by law, and the interest on these bonds is by con-
stitutional provision distributed "among the several coun-
ties of the State in proportion to the average attendance
upon schools in the said counties respectively."
"-The principal of the Florida Agricultural College Fund
was derived from the sale of all of the lands .granted by the
United States to the State of Florida for that purpose, and
consists of $135,800 of Florida State bonds and $18,000 of
North Carolina State bonds. The interest is used bythe
University of Florida, formerly the Florida Agricultural
College, at Lake City, Fla.
The principal of the East and West Florida Seminary
Fund consists of the proceeds of the sales made of lands
granted by the United States to the State for a permanent
fund for the use of two seminaries of learning, one to be
located east and the other west of the Suwannee river. This
fund is invested in $97,600 of Florida 3 per cent. refunding
bonds, $2,200 of Tennessee State bonds, $15,000 of Alabama
State bonds, and $7,500 of Virginia Century bonds, the in-
terest of which is equally divided semi-annually between
the East Florida Seminary at Gainesville, and the West
Florida Seminary (now the Florida State College) at. Talla-,
hassee. '..
The amount received by the several educational funds of
the State from interest on the bonds held by them in 1904
was as follows:
State School Fund ....... ......... ...... ....$47,466.60
Agricultural College Fund ...................3,945.00
Seminary Fund ... ........................ 5,520.38








17



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE FUND.

Florida 3 per cent. Refunding Bonds........, $135,800.00
Bonds of other States.................... 18,000.00

$153,800.00
SEMINARY FUND.

Florida 3 per cent. Refunding Bonds..........$ 97,600.00
Bonds of other States ...................... 24,700.00

$122,300.00
STATE SCHOOL FUND.

Florida 3 per cent. Refunding Bonds. .......$ 368,167.00
Bonds of other States...................... 680,400.00

$1,048,567.00
Total Florida Bonds in Educational Funds...$ 601,567.00
Total Bonds of other States in Educational
Fund ................................ 723,300.00

$1,324,867.00
BONDS IN EDUCATIONAL FUNDS.
The following statement shows the" bonds in the educa-
tional funds of the State January 1, 1905:

BONDS IN AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE FUND.

One Florida 3 per cent. Refunding Bond. ..... .$131,900.00
One Florida 3 per cent. Refunding Bond....... 3,900.00
Eight North Carolina 4 per cent. Bonds, $1,000
each, coupons Nos. 50 to 60 attached........ 8,000.00
Ten North Carolina 6 per cent. Bonds, $1,000
each, with coupons Nos. 46 to 74 attached.... 10,000.00

$153,800.00



3 H. B.







18



BONDS IN SEMINARY FUND.
One Florida 3 per cent. Refunding Bond...... .$ 76,600.00
One Florida 3 per cent. Refunding Bond....... 21,000.00
Twelve Tennessee 3 per cent. bonds, at $100
each. ................................. 1,200.00
One Tennessee 3 per cent. bond, at............ 1,000.00
Fifteen Alabama Class A, 5 per cent. bonds,
$1,000. ............. ... .. .... .......... 15,000.00
Six Virginia Century bonds at $1,000 each..... 6,000.00
Three Virginia Century Bonds at $500 each.... 1,500.00

S. $122,300.00



BONDS IN STATE SCHOOL FUND.



One Florida 3 per cent Refunding Bond .... $
One Florida 3 per cent. Refunding Bond.....
Thirty-four Alabama "B" 5 per cent. Bonds,
$1,000 each ............................
Twenty-one Alabama "A" 5 per cent. Bonds,
$1,000 each ................. .. ..... .
Two Alabama "A" 5 per cent. Bonds, at $500
each ............ .....................
Seven Alabama "C" 4 per cent. Bonds, at
$1,000 each ... ...... .........
Three Alabama Registered 5,per cent. Bonds at
$1,000 each ....................... ...
Seventy North Carolina 4 per cent. Bonds, at
$1,000 each .............................
Nine North Carolina 4 per cent. Bonds, at $500
each .............................. .
Five North Carolina 4 per cent. Bonds, at $100
each ............................... .
Twenty North Carolina 4 per cent. Bonds at
$50 each ...................... .......
One hundred Tennessee 3 per cent. Bonds, at
$1,000 each ..........................
One hundred Tennessee 3 per cent. Bonds, at
$1,000 each ................... .. .



242,800.00
125,367.00

34,000.00

21,000.00

1,000.00

7,000.00

3,000.00

70,000.00

4,500.00

.500.00

1,000.00

100,000.00

100,000.00







19



Sixty Tennessee 3 per cent. Bonds, at $1,000
each .................................. 60,000.00
Two Tennessee 3 per cent. Bonds, at $1,000
each ............ .....2,000.00
Two Tennessee 3 per cent. Bonds at $1,000
each............ ................ ..... 2,000.00
Ninety-nine Tennessee 3 per cent. Bonds, at
$100 each ............................... 9,900.00
Six Tennessee Registered 3 per cent. Bonds,
at $5,000 each ........................... 15,000.00
One hundred and fifty-one Virginia Century

Bonds, at $1,000 each.................... 151,000.00
Seventy-seven Virginia Century Bonds, at
$500 each ................... .......... 38,500.00

$1,048,567.00
MORRILL AND HATCH FUNDS.

The State receives from the United States, under an Act
of Congress approved August 30, 1890, the suni of $25,000
annually. This is known as the Morrill Fund given by the
United States to aid in the support of "Colleges of Agricul-
ture and Mechanic Arts." The amount is equally divided
between the Florida Agricultural College, (now the Uni-
versity of Florida) for white students at Lake City, and the
Normal and Industrial School for colored students at Tal-
lahassee.
The State also receives from the United States, under an
Act of Congress approved March 2, 1887, the sum of
$15,000 annually. This is known as the Hatch Fund, and
it is used at the Experiment Station at Lake City under
the direction of the Trustees of the Florida Agricultural
College (now University of Florida.)

ONE MILL SCHOOL TAX.

Section 6, of Article XII of the State Constitution pro-
vides that "A special tax of one mill on the dollar of all







20



taxable property in the State, in addition to the other
means provided, shall be levied and apportioned annually
for the support and maintenance of public free schools."
The receipts in this fund in the year 1903 from the-one
mill tax amounted to $99,502.62; in 1904, to $108,635.19.
The proceeds of this tax levy are distributed to the several
counties in accordance with the constitutional direction,
"among the several counties of the State in proportion to
the average attendance upon schools in the said counties
respectively."
STATE AUDITOR.

Upon the efficient and careful discharge of duties of this
important officer depend in great degree the high standing
and effectiveness of those who are responsible for the col-
lection and disbursement of the State's finances.
Owing to the large extent of territory required to be cov-
ered by this important officer and the constantly increasing
volume of business upon which he must pass, it is a physi-
cal impossibility for the Auditor to cover the entire State
and make the proper and necessary examination of ac-
counts required to bring this department up to its full effi-
ciency and value to the State.
I therefore recommend that additional force be provided
for this department in order that its efficiency and value
may be increased.
In connection with this department, and to facilitate its
operation, there should be prescribed a uniform system of
records, books and blanks to cover the transactions of the
various offices and departments, thus securing a uniform
system of records and accounts throughout the State and a
better and easier check upon all financial transactions be-
tween the State and the various officials through whose
hands the public moneys pass.
The auditing department could be of great service in
properly starting and instructing the various officials in the
proper method of keeping such a uniform system of records
and accounts. I recommend the passage of such laws as
will carry out the suggestion I have outlined above.








21



INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING.

We have in the State, supported by State appropriations,
six institutions of higher education:
The University of Florida at Lake City.
The East Florida Seminary, at Gainesville.
The Florida State College, at Tallahassee.
The South Florida Military Institute, at Bartow.
The St. Petersburg Industrial and Normal Institute, at
St. Petersburg, which receives some State aid.
The State Normal, (for whites) at DeFuniak, and
The State Normal, (for colored) at Tallahassee.
The business of educating the youth of our State, like any
other business, should proceed along lines of definite pur-
pose, aid the only way to secure the best results from these
institutions is to establish some definite plan for their work
and progress and adhere strictly to it, making each of these
institutions bear its relative and co-ordinate part in the ac-
complishment of the great business of educating the young
men and young women of this State.
I do not believe that the management of these colleges
and seminaries should be put in the attitude of beggars be-
fore the Legislature for the means of existence,
but that intelligent and careful investigation into the needs
of each institution, keeping in view its part in the scheme
of higher education in this State should be made, and upon
the results of such investigation, proper budgets should be
prepared, in which provision should be made. for their
economical and efficient maintenance, and- such further pro-
visions for extensions and improvement, in teaching force,
building, and equipment, as the growing population of our
State, and the increasing interest in educational matters
demand.
In my judgment, the needs and requirements of these in-
stitutions can never be intelligently and properly consid-
ered until an efficient system of management, control and
supervision over them is provided. In other words, the
Legislature, the Governor, and the people should have some
official or board that they could hold responsible for the








22

progress and advancement of the great educational inter-
ests of this State.
I therefore recommend that such a thorough and syste-
matic reorganization of these schools be provided for, as
will accomplish, as nearly as possible under the existing
conditions, the end outlined above, and that the funds out
of which they shall be supported, be raised by a specific
levy for that purpose, after a careful estimate of their re-
spective needs, and that they be no longer dependent upon
the general revenue fund for their support. It is the con-
stant purpose of each State administration to reduce the
levy for general revenue purposes to that point where the
expenditures made and amount raised shall be equal; which
condition of affairs, if attained, would leave no balance in
the Treasury for the maintenance of these higher institu-
tions of learning.

THE COMMON SCHOOLS.

The common school is the corner stone of our political
structure and the basis of all education.
If we would have a stable government, intelligently ad-
ministered, we must educate our children in order that they
may be able to understandingly consider all questions of
public interest with broad and enlightened views. From
the doors of our common schools, where the great majority
of .the children of the State receive their education, must
come our law makers, our officials, our business men, our
farmers, and all who help to make and maintain the State.
Therefore I consider it of utmost importance that your
careful investigation and study be given to the needs of our
common schools.
From the statistics, as reported by the State Superinten-
dent of Public Instruction (Table No. 2) I find that the
average length of the school term in this State is 105 days,
or 5 1-4 months. From this report I find that the longest
average term by counties is 150 days in Monroe, while the
shortest is 57 days in Lafayette.
If we examine Table No. 2, and eliminate from it those
counties having the large cities, such as Duval, Monroe, Es-








23



cambia, Dade, Hillsborough and St. Johns, we will find
that the average length of school term for the inland coun-
ties, in which are most of the rural schools, will fall consid-
erably below the average length of 105 days, showing that
in the country/ schools the length of term is too short to ac-
complish much effective work. A further examination of
this report reveals the fact that the average attendance is
only 70 per cent. of the enrollment, (Table No. 4) and that
the enrollment is only 69 per cent. of the entire estimated:
school population (Table No. 3); that the average number:
of days schooling provided for the school population is fifty
(Table No. 5); that the average expenditure per capital of
school population is $5.05; and that the average expendi-
ture per capital of enrollment is $7.37 (Table No. 24), and
the average expenditure per capital of attendance is $10.58
(Table No. 25). From these figures it is evident that the
rural schools have a term that is too short, and that the at-
tendance falls far below what it should, if our people are to
get the full benefit of the public school system, and it is to
the interest of the State that some remedy be found for this,,
condition of affairs.
In my opinion the public schools should receive the great-
est possible consideration at the hands of our educational
boards and officers, as it is here that the majority of the
boys and girls of our State receive, in the first six or seven
years of their school life practically all their schooling. We
should strive to give, then, to the country boy or girl, the
most efficient and talented teachers that can be secured, and
surround these comparatively few years of his or her school
life with every opportunity for mental and moral growth.
It is more essential that this efficiency be maintained in the
country teachers, than in the teacher in the city or town, as
.from the nature of the surroundings of the city teacher;
the graded system of schools, the opportunity for observa-
tion and contact with other teachers in his or her grade of
work; the teacher may improve his faults of scholarship
and method. On the other hand, the country teacher, with
no information as to methods employed, often without ex-
perience, and working in mixed grades, as is the case in
:.ost country s:.hoojs, must rely upon his own efficiency and







24



training and ability to give to these country boys and girls
all the possible benefit of their too few years of school life.
The salary offered in most of the country schools is too
small to permit fully capable and efficient teachers, how-
ever devoted to the work they may be, to accept these posi-
tions, if they can possibly secure others.
In my opinion, therefore, it should be the policy of our
educational department and the Legislature, to afford such
State aid as may be appropriate for the maintenance of
longer terms and the securing of more efficient teachers to
those communities, where, because of sparsely settled dis-
tricts and lack of funds, the schools are below the average,
thus raising their standard and efficiency; rather than to re-
quire as a condition of such aid, that the school shall
already have reached such a standing as not to need it.
I believe that it would encourage and arouse the ambi-
tion of scholars and teachers of every school in the State,
if they were to have placed before them the standing and
work accomplished by the other schools in the State doing
the same grade of work, and that it would be an aid to uni-
formity in the work accomplished and the methods used.
Therefore with a view to intelligently accomplishing this
purpose and determining its feasibility I would recommend
that with their regular report for the last month of their
school, the teachers be required to make a report to their
County Superintendent of Public Instruction throughout
the State, showing the standing of each class, in each study,
and all other data necessary to show the progress and work
of each class for the year, and further that the teachers be
required to report the number of children in each school
district, of school age, the number enrolled, and the number
not enrolled, together with the reasons for non-attendance
and failure to.enroll, and that no teachers be paid their sal-
ary for the last month of'their school term until such report
is filed. From this data much valuable information would
be obtained upon the natural, and to my mind, vital ques-
tion, as to why only 69 per cent. of the children of school
age in our State are enrolled in the common schools, and
why only 70 per cent. of that enrollment are in attendance,
and put the Educational Department and the various






Tm:.j. L


school officers in a position to acdt"i'elligently in securing a
feasible solution of this important question.
These reports to be sent to the State Superintendent and
by him compiled and tabulated a'd printed in his'report,
which I recommend be made annually instead of bi-ennially
as is now the case.
The data in this bi-ennial report requires the most care-
ful study and consideration, and under the present method
of issuing the report the Legislature will have adjourned
before proper consideration can be given to those impor-
tant matters contained in this report.
I further recommend that printed copies of such part of
this annual report as contain the reports from the various
counties, showing the standing of the classes in each of
the schools of the said counties be issued in pamphlet form
by the State Superintendent, and that a copy be furnished
to each teacher in the State of Florida by the County Su-
perintendents of their respective counties.
As the best results in education, as in any other business,
,can be accomplished only by having some definite system
or plan, I therefore recommend that a committee be care-
fully selected to examine the school laws, regulations and
rules of the various departments, for the purpose of formu-
lating and codifying the school laws into a uniform system,
embracing the whole scheme of our public education, from
the common schools to our higher institutions 6f learning,
with special reference to a more exact and accurate system
,of accounting and devising a proper check upon all school
receipts and expenditures.
I also recommend that a conservative outline or course of
;study be devised and prepared for the guidance of our
teachers and school officers, and as a standard for their
work, by the State Superintendent, with such expert and
professional assistance as you may see proper to furnish
him with a view to meeting the needs of the rural schools,.
as well as those more advanced, in the larger towns and
,cities of our State.








26



ADOPTION OF UNIFORM SYSTEM OF TEXT BOOKS.

Believing as I do that this uniformity of the educational
system of this State is essential to its growth and-protec-
tion, I therefore recommend the adoption by the State of a
Uniform System of Text Books for the State thus enabling
the reports I have suggested to be made with ease and "ac-
curacy, and affording at a view the standing of every
school. The books and methods of adoption should re-
ceive your careful consideration.
If the Uniform School Book System is adopted by you,
the mode of selecting the best books to be adopted will be a
very important matter, and I suggest for your considera-
tion that a committee composed of nine of the best educa-
tors in the State be selected for that purpose as follows:
One from each Judicial Circuit iri the State, to be selected
by the Circuit Judge of the circuit, together with the State
Superintendent of Public Instruction.
And that they report their selections to the Governor, as
the Chairman of the Board of Commissioners of State Insti-
tutions, and that the Board of Commissioners of State Insti-
tutions advertise for bids for furnishing the books so se-
lected, and that the company or companies offering to furn-
ish the books through dealers in Florida to the children
for the least money shall receive the contract. My infor-
mation is that, under the uniform school book system,
which system has been adopted by all of the Southern
States except Florida and Arkansas, and also adopted by
other states, a saving to the children in money of 25 or 30
per cent. is the result of the adoption in those states of the
Uniform School Book System.

STATE CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS.

School for Blind, Deaf and Dumb.

Surely no more sacred trust has been committed to our
care and protection than the maintenance and protection
of this institution.
In a very especial way it is our duty to provide the means








27



whereby the blind, deaf and dumb among us may be trained
and equipped to act their part in life. The report of the
school for Blind, Deaf and Dumb at St. Augustine has been
placed before you and the requirements therein set forth
are, in my judgment, reasonable and ought to be provided
for.
It is not enough to simply give to this institution the
means of bare existence, but the appropriation must be
made large enough to enable it to provide for the necessary
equipment and teaching force to meet the ends for which
it was designed. It is not a college or asylum in the ordi-
nary acceptance of those terms, and it must be borne in
mind that only teachers especially fitted can be used in such
an institution and that the teaching force must be larger in
proportion than in other institutions of learning.
I therefore earnestly recommend that you make every
provision for the efficient maintenance of this institution
that a wise and enlightened civilization demands and cau-
tious and prudent legislation admits.

"Hospital for the Insane.

The Florida Hospital for the Insane, located at Chatta-
hoochee, has grown to be one of the most important charges
upon the care and protection of our State. I call to your
attention the report of the Superintendent showing the
work and results of this institution for the years 1903 and
1904.
From this report you will find that the admissions to the
Hospital for 1903 were:

Resident, Jan. 1, 1903............................ 697
New patients, 1903 ......................... ....... 237

Total, 1903 ................................... 934
Rem-toved from Hospital, 1903, (all causes).......... 200

Resident Jan. 1, 1904 ............................ 734
New patients, 1904 ................................ 305








28



Total, 1904 ................................ .1,039
Removed from Hospital, 1904, (all causes)... ..... 292

Resident Jan. 1, 1905 ................. ......... 747
From the report we also find that the daily average of
patients treated was for:
1903 ...... ....................717
1904 .... ...... ............... 759
From these figures some idea is gained of the magnitude
and constant increase in the amount of work done at this
institution, and the care necessary in properly treating
and providing for so many patients.
The need of more help in the medical department of this
institution, to wlich your attention has been called by the
Superintendent in his report, has been relieved by a recent
resolution of the Board of Commissioners of State Institu-
tions, under whose supervision the Hospital is maintained,
providing for an assistant physician for the Hospital.
The cost of maintenance of the Hospital was for the year:
1903 ............... ...................$ 85,071.10
1904 .......... .................... .... 87,475.23

A total of the bi-ennial term of 1903 and 1904
of ........ .......... ............. .....$172,546.37
Which is an average for each patient per day for 1903 of
33 cents, and for 1904 of 32 cents.
In considering the needs of the Hospital it must be borne
in mind that this is not a penal institution, but that its in-
mates are entitled to be provided with every comfort and
care which can be prudently and economically provided for
by the Legislature. I recommend that your careful consid-
eration be given to the recommendation of the Superinten-
dent as to the necessity for more accommodations for the
increase of patients at the Hospital.
And it seems to me essential that every provision should
be made for the proper separation of the races as therein
recommended, whether by new building at Chattahoochee
or elsewhere, as may be determined.
I also recommend that a carefully selected committee
from your body visit the Hospital and make a thorough ex-







.29



amnination into the need for new buildings and better equip-,
ment, and report their findings to you as a basis for your
action in this important matter.
I would suggest that the appropriation made for the
maintenance and support of this institution be made a
charge upon and paid out of the fund derived from the hire
of the State convicts before the distribution of said fund as
now provided by law.

STATE REFORM SCHOOL.

It is our duty to maintain a reform school in this State
where young offenders may be confined and taught'some
useful employment, free from the contaminating influences
and vicious habits of hardened criminals. It needs no ar-
gument to convince any thinking man that a boy of tender
years should not be confined in penitentiary with hardened
criminals or subjected to the contact with them in the con-
vict camps. Therefore, proper legislation should be en-
acted, providing for the maintaining of a State Reform
School on such basis as to enable its management to accom-
plish the results for which it was instituted, the reform and
training in some useful industry of juvenile offenders, to
the end that they should be made good citizens and an aid
and benefit to the State, rather than a tax upon her in the
form of hardened criminals.
Suitable provision should be made for the separation of
the races and sexes at the reform school, and sufficient ap-
propriation to enable the management to provide proper
teachers and to provide for the establishment of suitable
industrial training, to the end that when released from the
school its inmates may be enabled to earn a living for them-
selves and not be a charge upon the State.
The purposes and aims of this institution should be to en-
force as little restraint as is compatible with the safe keep-
ing of the persons committed to the school and that the
idea of confinement and punishment should not be em-
phasized.
I recommend that such laws as may be necessary to ac-
complish these results be enacted by your body.







30



I also recommend that under such proper restrictions as
may be necessary, the commitment of juveniles, other than
offenders, be permitted and that the terms of commitment
of both, offenders and other juveniles, be for such periods
as will accomplish the reform desired and that such enact-
ment be made as will accomplish this, in my judgment, very
essential requirement.
I would further recommend that the maintenance of the
State Reform School be paid out of the hire of convict fund
and be a charge upon the same.
Some immediate measure is necessary for the relief of
the present institution, as the present appropriation of
$2,500 is exhausted and the Trustees are now in debt more
than $2,000.
HIRE OF STATE CONVICTS.

The Board of Commissioners of State Institutions las re-
cently entered into a contract for the lease of the State con-
victs to C. H. Barnes & Co., of Jacksonville, Fla., at a uni-
form bid for the entire number of convicts, now estimated
at 1,200, of $207.70 per capital.
The problem of the proper and best solution of the con-
vict question in our State is one of the gravest importance,
and about which there has been and will be endless discus-
sion
Under the terms of the present lease, extracts from which
appear below, the utmost care has been taken to provide for
their humane treatment by lessees. Provision has been
made for their welfare, requiring proper hospitals, medi-
cine and care while sick, and precautions taken to prevent
cruelty or inhumanity while under sentence.
The large number of convicts will require additional su-
pervision, as it will be impossible for one supervisor to visit
the various camps frequently enough to guard against the
improper handling or treatment of the prisoners, and I,
therefore, recommend that provision be made to employ at
least one additional supervisor of convicts and convict
camps.
It will be seen from the copy of the present contract
that every power is reserved by the Board of Commission-







31



ers of State Institutions which will enable them to take
every precaution necessary to provide for their humane
treatment at any time it 'may become necessary. The
present lessees have made great improvement in their pro-
vision for the health and sanitary condition of the camps,
and while isolated cases of ill treatment may have occurred
from time to time, yet on the whole the evils of the lease
system have been largely alleviated under the present con-
tract.
From the figures of the contract recently entered for the
ensuing years from January 1, 1906, it is shown-that on the
basi. of 1,200 convicts, the revenue derived from the lease
will be $1,000,000 for the four year contract.
This will afford ample means to properly provide for the
inspection of the convicts and convict camps in a thorough
manner, and so maintain the State Reform School as to ac-
complish the purpose for which it was organized, as I have
recommended in this message.

EXTRACTS FROM CONVICT LEASE CONTRACT.

"The said C. H. Barnes & Co., will receive all persons who
may be sentenced to imprisonment in the State prison of
said State of Florida by any court of competent jurisdiction
in said State, after the first day of January, A. D. 1906
(nineteen hundred and six) and during the period of four
years, ending December the 31st, 1909.
"That the said C. H. Barnes & Co. will receive said peir-
sons so sentenced, at the County site of the County wherein
they or any of them were sentenced, or are held in confine-
ment, upon notice from the Commissioner of Agriculture or
the Sheriff of the County. And the said C. H. Barnes & Co.
agree that they will not permit or cause or suffer any of the
prisoners to be received under the provisions of this instru-
ment, to be worked or made to labor before sunrise or after
sunset on any date, or to be made to work on the Sabbath
day, or to be removed or worked or employed, or taken, or
go beyond the limits of said State; and that they, the said
C. H. Barnes & Co., shall at all times, during said period of
four years, without expense or cost or liability upon the







32



part of said State or of any officer, or of any county or offi-
cer thereof, maintain all such persons received and kept by
them sentenced as aforesaid, or that may be sentenced as
aforesaid; and provide custody, maintenance and support
for them and each of them; and provide and furnish all and
every of such persons, comfortable quarters and lodging,
good and comfortable clothing, including bedding and blan.-
kets, wholesome food, and when any of them shall be sick
or disabled, necessary medicines and medical attendance,
and proper personal care. Their allowance of food and
clothing, including bedding and blankets, to be prescribed
by the Board of Commissioners of State Institutions of said
State from time to time; and that the said C. H. Barnes &
Co., will employ and keep employed, a physician or Doctor
of Medicine-of skill and experience during said period of
four years to visit and attend on, examine, treat and care
for, and watch over all and each of such prisoners received
and kept by them, and will secure his regular attention to
examination, treatment and care of them in such manner
and such frequency and fidelity as may be satisfactory to,
or prescribed by the Board of Commissioners; and they, the
said C. H. Barnes & Co., will provide a good and effective
and sufficient guard of police for the custody of such pris-
oners, and for securing them and preventing their escape,
such guards to be subject to approval by the Commissioner
of Agriculture of said State, and that they, the said C. H.
Barnes & Co., will keep such persons in safe custody and
under good discipline ,and will use prompt diligence and
make proper efforts to arrest all such prisoners received,
taken and kept by them, who may escape, and pay all ex-
penses of such efforts and arrests, and will in all things
comply with the requirements of the Commissioner of Agri-
culture of said State, from time to time; and that the said
C. H. Barnes & Co., will fully and promptly do and perform
and exercise all such duties, acts, powers and things what-
soever required or contemplated, or implied by, or in the
provisions of said Statutes to be done, or performed by con-
tractors thereunder, the same as if specially set out in this
instrument, and afford all proper facility and aid to the per-







33



formance of any duty imposed by said Statutes, or of any
officer or officers of said State or of any County. '

"It is mutually agreed and understood by the parties to
these presents that the said State Prison shall be at such
place within the State of Florida, and for such period of
time, as the Commissioner of Agriculture and the Board of
Commissioners of State Institutions may from time to time
designate. The said Commissioner of Agriculture, party
of the first part, reserving the right at all times and with-
out notice, to change the location of said prison, with the
approval of the Board of State Institutions, and exercise
full control thereof at any and all times during said con-
traet.

"The said C. H. Barnes & Co. further covenant and agree,
that a Central Hospital shall be established and maintained
by them immediately upon receiving the said prisoners on
the 1st day of January, A. D. 1906. That said Hospital
shall be located at such place as may be designated by the
Commissioner of Agriculture. Said Hospital shall be es-
tablished and maintained at the expense and cost of the
said C. H. Barnes & Co. They further agree to purchase
the Hospital and premises, including buildings, farming in-
terests, 'stock and supplies now located at Ocala, Florida,
and owned by the Florida Naval Stores and Commission
Co., if so required to do by the Commissioner of Agricul-
ture. It being understood and agreed, that the said C. H.
Barnes & Co. shall transfer and convey said properties at
the expiration of this agreement as the Commissioner of
Agriculture may designate to the State of Florida, or to
such person or persons as may become the lessees of said
prisoners after the said C. H. Barnes & Co., and that they
shall transfer and convey the same without profit or inter-
est upon the cost thereof.
"That the said C. H. Barnes & Co. shall establish such
rules and regulations for the conduct and management of
said Hospital as may be prescribed by the Board of Com-
missioners of State Institutions.
4 H. B.







i *
',That C. H. Barnes & Co. shall pay all expenses of con-
"ducting and maintaining said Hospital, including the phy-
sician's expense to the headquarters camp on the distribu-
tion day of each month, which trip shall be made by the
physician to examine and pass upon the physical condition
of all prisoners newly sentenced. The Hospital physician
shall determine when any prisoner shall go to, or remain in
the Central Hospital with the approval of the Commissioner
of Agriculture. That the physician shall be chosen and se-
lected by the Commissioner of Agriculture and his salary
to be paid by the said C. H. Barnes & Co.
"That no prisoner shall be permitted to leave the stock-
ade before sunrise and must be returned by sundown. That
the said C. H. Barnes & Co. shall establish in each stockade.
when practicable, water works and sewerage system for
sanitary purposes, at their own expense. That at each
camp a vegetable garden shall be maintained for furnish-
ing vegetables for the prisoners.

"That each camp shall be supplied by'said C. H. Barnes
& Co., with one iron cot bedstead for each prisoner, such
as is now used by the Dutton Prison Camp.
"The said C. H. Barnes & Co. shall at all times enforce
in the camps and upon the work, such regulations as may
be prescribed by the Board of Commissioners of State Insti-
tutions, from time to time, for the health, humane treatment
and.safe custody of the prisoners. Allowances for escapes
shall be made within the discretion of the Board of Com-
missioners of State Institutions."

COUNTY CONVICTS.

An investigation will show that at least 75 per cent. of
the complaints in regard to the treatment of convicts has
come from camps where the county convicts are worked or
leased. Some measure should be provided which shall
remedy this evil, and provisions for the inspection and
proper care of all county convicts and convict camps should
be made mandatory upon the county authorities, and I







35



recommend the enactment of such laws as may be necessary
to meet these needs.

PENSIONS.

It should be the policy of this State to provide, as liber-
ally as its means permit, a pension for every needy and de-
serving Confederate soldier, or, his widow, who entered the
service of the Confederate States from Florida. Her pen-
sion roll should be a proud record for every name upon it,
and it should be the care of those noble patriots, who sacri-
ficed their youth and hopes for their State in Civil War;
that the integrity of that record should not be smirched.
The Legislature, by the provisions of the pension law,
should not reduce the old soldier 'to a condition of pau-
perism before he can become qualified; and at 'the same
time it must so guard the qualifications, that by its very
liberality it may not so increase the number of pensioners
eligible under the provisions of the law, as to deprive those
absolutely deserving of this aid from the State.
The pension roll of the State, under the operation of the
existing law, has increased from 1,675 in 1902, to nearly
3,000 in 1904, and there are now on file several hundred ap-
plications, upon which no action has been taken because the
funds available for the payment of pensions, under the
present levy of two mills, is exhausted. Conservative esti-
mates of the increase in the pension roll, by the action of
the Board upon these applications now on file and to be
filed, show that a levy of four mills 'will be necessary to
meet the demand for pensions.
I therefore recommend that the pension law be so amend-
ed as to make the pensions payable by the county, for the
following reasons:
First-I believe the County Commissioners would make a
more careful examination of the applicant's rights to a
pension, where the money would come out of the County
Treasury, than when it is drawn from the State Treasury.
Second-The applicant could get a more speedy hearing,
make his proofs easier, and would not be subject to delays
that are now caused by waiting on the examination of his







36



papers in turn, where there are seven or eight hundred ap-
plications ahead of him, to be considered by the State Pen-
sion Board. I believe that the rights of the applicant
should be carefully protected by law, and if, according to
the law, he or she is entitled to a pension, they should in
no case be treated as paupers in the discretion of the Coun-
ty Commissioners; but that their rights should be clearly
defined and laws enacted fixing severe penalties against
false swearing, false affidavits, etc. The members of the
forty-five Boards of County Commissioners, by their loca-
tion in the several parts of each county, are in much better
position to detect fraud and prevent granting a pension to
an unworthy applicant, than is the State Board, located at
Tallahassee, with no opportunity at all for investigation,
but required to pass solely upon the regularity of the pen-
sion papers as to form, etc., instead of upon the merits of
the applicant. Any attempt at careful examination by the
State Board means delay, which entails hardship upon
those justly entitled to the money so much needed by them.

SOLDIERS HOME.

The report of the Old Confederate Soldiers and Sailors
Home Association has been presented to me by the Presi-
dent, Hon. Francis P. Fleming, showing the operation of
that institution for the year 1904.
This is a most worthy object of your aid and as only those
who on account of age and physical disability are entitled
to its aid, proper accommodations for their treatment and
care when sick or disabled should be provided.
I therefore recommend that an appropriation of one thou-
sand dollars for the establishment of a hospital be made,
and additional appropriations not to exceed one thousand
dollars a year for maintenance of such hospital be provided.

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH.

I call your attention to the very complete and valuable
report of the State Board of Health, and especially to the
important recommendations made by the State Health Offi-








37



cer in regard to the accurate collection of vital statistics,
the licensing of embalmers, and the proper record of bur-
ials.
I especially call to your attention the State Health Offi-
cer's recommendation in regard to prohibiting spitting on
the walls and floors of public buildings, railroad cars, other
public conveyances, and sidewalks and pavements, as a
means of preventing the spread of tuberculosis and other
pulmonary diseases. I am informed from reports on this
subject that by proper sanitary and preventive regulations,
the prevalence of this disease has been largely decreased in
England and other parts of Europe. In New York, the sta-
tistics show that in twenty years the death rate from
tuberculosis has been decreased 40 per cent., and many of
the States are taking proper measures to prevent the spread
of this disease and the control and care of its victims.
It is well recognized by medical authorities that almost
the sole means of the spread of this dread disease is by the
tuberculosis germs contained in the sputum, which in va-
rious ways contaminates the surroundings of the persons
affected, and which after remaining exposed in the public
places and streets is, in the form of dry dust and otherwise,
blown about and breathed into the lungs and finds lodgment
there.
It is estimated that. ". person with this disease coughs
up and expectorates in twenty-four hours about two hun-
dred million tubercular germs." Some conception of the
size of these germs may be had when we realize that "one
hundred million of these germs may be contained in a tea-
spoonful of milk and be drunk as milk."
Therefore, as our State, with our salubrious climate, has
become a resort for people from all parts of our country,
who are affected with these pulmonary diseases, we should
take especial care that while welcoming these sufferers to
the benefits of our climate, we should at the same time take
every precaution within our means and which medical
science advises, to prevent the spread of this disease
amongst our own people.
A subject that is receiving attention from the health au-
thorities of other States is the proper sanitation of barber








38



shops, and the utensils and instruments used in them, and I
believe this to be an important matter that should receive
attention.
I also recommend that the State Board of Health be em-
powered to make rules and regulations for the maintenance
of proper sanitary conditions in railroad depots and pas-
senger cars, and provide for their inspection, and the en-
forcemen it f such rules and regulations.

RAILROAD COMMISSION.

I believe that no agency has contributed more to mate-
rial progress and prosperity, than the wise, able and con-
servative administration of our Railroad Commission Law,
and I call your attention to their report now before you.
I recommend that a constitutional amendment be submit-
ted to the people, making the Railroad Commission a con-
stitutional branch of the State government.
I recommend that a law be enacted, empowering the Rail-
road Commission to employ a competent civil engineer,
whenever, in their judgment, they deem it necessary, to in-
spect the railroad road beds, tracks, and condition of roll-
ing stock, and report his findings to the Railroad Comrmis-
sioners; and that they be empowered and required to make
rules which shall require that the road beds, tracks and
rolling stock be maintained in such safe condition as will
ensure the safety, comfort and convenience of the people.
I also recommend that the Railroad Commissioners be re-
quired to investigate the sufficiency and fitness of cars for
the safe and comfortable transportation of passengers,
and for the safe and expeditious transportation of freight.
And that the Railroad Commissioners be empoivered to
make and enforce reasonable regulations requiring rail-
roads to construct and maintain depots for the safety, com-
fort and convenience of passengers, at all points where the
same is necessary, and that they be empowered to enforce
the rules and regulations of the State Board of Health, in
regard to the maintenance of their ears and depots in a sani-
tary condition.
I also recommend that a law be enacted providing for in-









39



vestigation by a competent civil engineer, under the direc-e
tion of the Railroad Commission, of the causes of all acci-
dents on any of the railroads in this State, resulting in the-
death or injury of any person or persons, which in their
judgment shall require investigation; that it shall be the'
duty of the general manager or superintendent of such rail-
road to inform the Railroad Commission of all such acci-
dents immediately after their occurrence; that it shall be
the duty of the Railroad Commission whenever, by com-
plaint or otherwise, it comes to their knowledge that any
railroad bridge or trestle, or portion of any track or railroad
is out of repair or in an unsafe condition, to order an inves-
tigation of the same by a competent civil engineer; and that
the Railroad Commissioners be given power to enforce the
recommendations of the said engineer as to the repairs or
improvements necessary to put such track, trestle or rail-
road bridge in such a safe condition as may be necessary
for the safety, comfort. and convenience of the passengers.

RAILROAD SWITCHES.

I recommend that the Railroad Commission be empow-
ered to ascertain by such investigation as may be necessary,
the safest switching device for use on railroads, and that
they be empowered to require the use of such switch as they
may determine, by the railroads operating in this State.

PRIMARY ELECTION.

I recommend that the Primary Law be so amended as to
make the calling of primary elections mandatory upon the
committee, now empowered to call the primary election, in-
stead of optional, as it now is.
I also recommend that all persons, who may be candi-
dates before any primary election in this State, be re-
quired to file with the committee calling the primary elec-
tion a sworn itemized statement of all expenses incurred by
him in said primary election, and to state therein the source
of all contributions to his campaign fund, and fixing a se-
vere penalty for failure to file such statement.








40

I further recommend that the law be amended so as to
provide severe penalties for:
Miscounting of votes by inspectors and clerks in all elec-
tions; and for
Bribery or intimidation of voters in any election. And
I further'recommend that any person accepting a bribe be
exempt from punishment, who will inform or testify against
the person or persons who bribe or intimidate him in any
way.
I further recommend that a law be enacted requiring the
payment by counties of all such expenses of holding pri-
mary elections in the same manner as the expenses for hold-
ing general elections are now paid.

JUDICIARY.

The growth of the State is shown by the noticeable in-
crease in the business of the courts.
The recent addition to the number of the Justices of the
Supreme Court has enabled that tribunal to dispose, of
cases that have for years been accumulating on its docket
because three judges were unable to dispose of the ever in-
creasing business brought to them. Only nineteen cases
remained undisposed of at the beginning of the present Jan-
uary term of the Supreme Court; but nevertheless, one hun-
dred new. cases have been brought to the January term.
This is an increase of about thirty per cent. in the number
of cases usually brought to the Court at a single term, and
it indicates that there is a marked increase in the business
of the Court for the future. Notwithstanding the creation
of another circuit court in the State, all of the eight circuit
judges have a constantly growing increase of business.
It behooves the people of the State to maintain a high
standard for their judicial officers, and this cannot be done
unless the compensation allowed by law is sufficient to meet
the ordinary expenses of competent officials who have fami-
lies to support and children to educate and provide for.
The greatly increased cost of all the necessaries of life
makes the salaries heretofore established for judges entire-
ly inadequate. The salaries of officers and clerks in the ad-







41



ministrative departments have recently been increased, but
the salaries of the Justices of the Supreme Court remain at
the sum fixed by law in 1871, when the cost of living was
fifty per cent. less than now. Furthermore, from the na-
ture of the duties devolving upon all judges, both Supreme
and Circuit, it is improper for them to engage in any other
money making business or enterprise, and consequently
they are solely dependent upon their salaries for a present
livelihood, and for the future rainy day, and the salaries
should be sufficient to enable them to save something for
the future after they shall have retired from the service of
"the public to which they give their best years.
If we are to maintain the high standing of our
State Judiciary, we must provide that their compensation
:shall be such as will reasonably justify men of the highest
.ability and attainments in accepting these positions, with-
out injustice to themselves and those dependent upon them
for support.
LIFE INSURANCE.

Life insurance has become a very popular source of accu-
7mulating estates by the people of our country. In the first
place, it is a cash estate that is easily handled by the widow
,or orphan. In the next place, it is accumulated by the pay-
ment of premiums in comparatively small sums at a time,
and in most instances it constitutes an estate that is not
drawn upon and that can never be in debt. In fact this
.mode of creating an estate has become so popular that
there was paid out in this State by our citizens last year to
thirteen insurance companies premiums aggregating
$1,527,322.49 and the losses paid to citizens in this State
aggregated $428,579.30, which shows there was paid out
last year $1,098,743.18 more than was paid in losses, and as
all of the companies of which I write are outside of the
'State of Florida, it is evident that $1,098,743.18 more went
out of the State than what was brought in as estates to our
people; thus it is shown that the excess paid out over the
amount received in return would equal a ten mill tax on the
present assessed valuation of Florida.
As it is always desirable that as much of the people's









42



money shall remain at home as is possible, does it not argue
strongly in favor of State insurance? May not the State
issue policies and receive premiums therefore and after set-
ting aside the proper reserve fund for the safe conduct of
the business have a large surplus to be turned into the reve-
nue fund of the State, thereby relieving direct taxation to
that extent?
If we will take as a basis the last twelve years business
done in the State as per the State Treasurer's report, which
is as follows:



Risks in
Florida.
....$ 5,460,967
.. 6,045,900
4,793,443)
5,254,013
.. 4,242,191
5 5,010,627
... 6,482,133
.. 7,801,768
... 7,619,224
..8,373,234
... 8,682,640



1904 ..... 10,815,667

$80,581,807



Losses in
Florida.
$ 95,091.52
65,063.70
178,152.43
186,080.44
254,408.78
213,461.68
432,457.68
265,455.32
305,383.66
292,536.24
413,540.48
428,579.30

$3,130,211.23



Receipts in
Florida.
$ 518,221.96
587,741.38
554,578.46
567,528.32
568,697.86
602,715.87
739,818.50
918,525.41
1,040,363.48
1,184,914.05
1,355,246.15
1,527,322.49

$10,165,676.93



It is apparent that the amount of losses paid in twelve
years has only been about 30 per cent. of the gross receipts
for premiums of the life insurance companies doing busi-
ness in this State. By placing a comparatively small
amount of money to the credit of the fund to cover any im-
mediate loss that might occur the business can be estab-
lished and become a great source of revenue, and in my
judgment become very popular.
I therefore recommend that the Legislature enact such
laws and take such measures as will he necessary to estab-
lish a life insurance business conducted by the State.
If you consider this idea practical and beneficial to the



Year.

1893 .
1894
1895
1896
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903








43



State, I suggest that we have an organization sufficient in
nearly every detail to commence work, as blanks could be
furnished by the Comptroller and sent to the various bond-
ed County officers, they to fill out blanks for applicants and
refer them to the proper physician or physicians for exami-
nation, the physician to make his report to the County offi-
cer sending him the applicant, said application and report
of physician, together with the premium, to be forwarded
by the said County officer to the Comptroller, he to audit
the same, and, if found correct, turn the money and papers
over to the Treasurer. Upon the receipt of the money and
papers, the Treasurer shall file with the Secretary of State
the applicrtion and his receipt for the premium, and the
Secretary of State shall thereupon issue a policy to be
valid when signed by the Governor, and forward the same
to the applicant.
Of course this is suggested merely as the outline of a plan
which might be perfected and adopted.
AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT.
Division of Chemistry..
This department, under its present management, is in a
most efficient state and proper provision should be made to
meet its needs as indicated by the report of the State
Chemist.
Its financial operations for the past two years show the
following:
1903-Inspection fees ..........$22,761.58
1904-Inspection fees ............. 28,518.18--$51,279.76

1903-Total expenses ................. $6,145.16
1904. .Total expenses .............. 6,556.61-$12,701.77

Balance to credit of Chemistry Divis-
ion for 1903 and 1904. ........... $38,577.99
I desire to call your attention especially to the recommen-
dation of the State Chemist as to the adoption of the United
States Stadard of Pure Foods, Drugs and Chemicals, the
enactment of Pure Food Laws and Pure Stock Food Laws,







44



and would recommend the passage of suitable laws on these
subjects.
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.

I especially call your attention to the great amount of
very valuable information contained in the carefully com-
piled report of the Commissioner of Agriculture, the greatly
increased value of farm products for the past two years,
as compared to the value of farm products in his report of
two years ago, and much other valuable statistical informa-
tion concerning our industries and the resources of our
State, and their great value even in their undeveloped con-
dition.
FLORIDA STATE TROOPS.

The report of the Adjutant General is laid before you,
showing in detail the work of his department.
The Adjutant General has been untiring in his efforts to
raise the standard and efficiency of the Florida State
Troops and has given every attention to the smallest detail
that would help in this important branch of our govern-
ment. The duties of the Adjutant General require his ab-
sence from his office for a great part of each year pnd there
is absolute necessity for a clerk in his office, and I recom-
mend that you inake provision for this clerical assistance
in his office.
We should provide for the economical maintenance of our
State Troops and should encourage -them in every under-
taking for the betterment of the service and improvement
of its membership, in order that this voluntary service
may be attractive to our young men.
The self sacrificing service of our citizen soldiery has
always been given at the call of our State, and we cannot
repay too highly this loyalty to our institutions in times of
disorder and lawlessness.

ATTORNEY GENERAL'S REPORT.

I desire to call your attention to the very full and valua-
ble report of the Attorney General, together with the sug-







45



gestions and recommendations contained therein as to the
changes necessary in our Statute law.
The recommendations from the Attorney General and
the Circuit Judges of the State should receive your careful
consideration, as they are the views of those skilled in the
law and who have had occasion to know wherein are its de-
ficiencies, and their suggestions should be of great weight
in determining your legislation on these subjects.

GAME WARDENS AND PROTECTION OF FORESTS.

The protection of the wild game is a matter of interest
and importance to the whole State.
The present system, which leaves to the counties, at their
pleasure the appointment of Game Wardens, and lax en-
forcement of the game laws will, in a few years, result in
the complete destruction of the game of this State.
I believe that game wardens charged with the rigid en-
forcement of carefully drawn game laws, providing for a
sufficient license to be paid by those persons hunting or
taking game, to pay the expenses of executing the game
laws, would be of great benefit to the State. These game
wardens could, under a proper law for the protection of our
forests from fire, be made also fire wardens and be of untold
value to this State, for it is of vital importance that steps
for the protection of the forests from fires be promptly un-
dertaken, and that such laws as are necessary for the pro-
tection of this valuable resource be passed at this session
of the Legislature.
Untold damage is being done every year by burning the
woods, often through malice, negligence or thoughtlessness.

FISH AND OYSTERS.

Among the vast natural resources of our State none is
more important nor can with proper protection and regula-
tion be made to return more to our citizens than the fish
and oyster industry. With the number of bays, rivers and
lakes, the natural habitat of vast numbers of valuable food
fishes, proper legislation with a view to the protection of






46



the resources rather than the protection of those interests
connected with it, rigidly enforced, will be of incalculable
value to the State.
In. our extensive oyster beds and numerous available loca-
tions-for their planting and extension in our State, the
wasteful and extravagant methods of taking oysters now
in vogue should be regulated so as not to injure the beds;
while a system of license fees and rentals, as practiced in
other States, would produce a sufficient,revenue to properly
police and protect the grounds now used, and to plant
others, making a most valuable addition to the State's al-
ready growing natural resources.

PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO ANIMALS.

I recommend that the law for the prevention of cruelty
to animals be so amended as to,prohibit shooting tame, live
pigeons for sport.

SALE OF LIQUOR TO INDIANS.

I am informed that intoxicating liquors are sold -to the
Seminole Indians, and that the traffic is indulged in to a
deplorable extent. I therefore recommend that the sale of
spirituous, vinous or malt liquor to the Seminole Indians
be prohibited by law, and that adequate penalties be pro-
vided for the violation of the law.

STATE CENSUS.

In accordance with Section 5 of Article 7 of the Consti-
tution, it becomes your duty to provide for the enumeration
of all the inhabitants of the State by counties during this
year.

CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS.

On account of local conditions existing in a few of the
counties of this State, it is difficult or impossible to have






47



grand juries find indictments or to obtain convictions
against offenders.
I recommend that this condition receive your careful con-
sideration, and that you provide such legislation as may be
necessary to prevent such failure to enforce the law.

CONCLUSION.

I have given you such information concerning the af-
fairs of the State, as reasonable limits of time and space
will permit.
I trust we are impressed with the high and responsible
duties we are called upon to discharge, and that your delib-
eration will be with single devotion to the welfare and pros-
perity of the people of this State.
In conclusion, I deem it my duty to impress upon you the
utmost importance of an early and careful consideration
of the bills providing for the necessary appropriations; and
for the assessment and collection of revenue and such laws
relating to the maintenance of the educational institutions
of the State as may after proper. consideration of their
needs and efficiency be determined upon. Otherwise there
is not only danger, but every probability that this impor-
tant legislation will be hastily enacted and consequently
more or less imperfect. I trust, therefore, that these im-
portant matters of interest to the whole people will re-
ceive prompt action at the beginning of your session, and
not be left to the rush and confusion of your closing days.
N. B. BROWARD,
Governor.
















JOURNAL
-OF THE-

House of Representatives



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5th, 1905.

The House was called to order by the Speaker at 10
o'clock, a. m.
The roll being called, the following members answered
to their names:
Mr. Speaker-Messrs. Avery, Baker, Blanton of Madi-
son, Blanton of Taylor, Bradshaw, Bryan, Brown, Buck-
man, Campbell, Canter, Carleton, Cobb, Cornwell, Craw-
ford, Dorman, DuPont, Duval, Dyal, Fillingim, Floyd,
Girardeau, Hall, Harvell, Herndon, Jewell, Johnston,
Julian Kilgore, King, Kirkland, Knight, Knowles, Leg-
gett, Mc(CallunI, McElroy, Miatthews, Melton, Noble,
Olnmstead, Peadon, Persons, Pirrong, Rawls, Roberts,
Robison, Rosenborough, Sistrunk, Sledge, Smith of Ham-
ilton, Smith of Volusia, Sparkman, Sprague, Stephens,
"Taylor of Gadsden, Taylor of Hillsborough, Tillman,
WVall, Wartman, Watson, Wells, Williams, Wilson of
HIernando, Wilson of Jackson, Wilson of Lee.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Chaplain.

INTRODUCTION OF RESOLUTIONS.

By Mr. Wells of Hillsborough:
House Resolution No. 1:
Be it resolved by the House of RIeprsentativ s, That
every resolution and bill introduced in the House of Rep-
resentatives, -1shall, unless otherwise ordered by the
House, be printed and that each member of the House be
furnished one copy of such bill.
5 H. B.'










Mr. Wells of Hillsborough moved the adoption of the
resolution.
Mr. Johnston of Pasco moved to lay the resolution on
the table.
Which was agreed to.
By Mr. Noble of Lake:
House Resolution No. 2:
,Resolved, That the Sergeant-at-Arms be requested to
place on the desk of each member of the House, a copy
of the Revised Statutes and a copy each of the acts of
1893, 1895, 1897, 1899, 1901, and 1903.
Mr. Noble moved the adoption of the resolution.
Mr. Jewell of Orange offered the following amendment
to the resolution:
Amend by striking out "each member of the House"
and insert in lieu thereof "the Representatives of each
county."
SMr. Jewell moved the adoption of the amendment.
Which was agreed to.
The motion then required upon the adoption of the
resolu ion as amended.
Which was agreed to.
By Mr. Noble of Lake:
SHouse Resolution No. 3:
.Resolved, That the Sergenat-at-Arms be requested to
place on the desk of each menmbera copy (if possible a
bound one) of the House Journal of 1903.
Mr. Noble moved the adoption of the resolution.
Whicll was not agreed to.
By Mr. Harvell of Santa Rosa:
House Resolution No. 4:"'
Be it resolved by the House of Representatives of the
State of Florida, That no committee of this House be al-
lowed a clerk without the consent of the House.
Mr. Harvell moved the adoption of the resolution.
Which was agreed to.
By Mr. Noble of Lake.
House Concurrent Resolution No: 2.
A resolution in reference to a committee of five to visit
and investigate, and report on the affairs, of the Florida
East Coast Line and Transportation Company, and to
find what benefit has accrued to the citizens of Florida in
the way of transportation since their charter was
granted.
Which was read and went over under the rule,..








3



By Mr. Johnston of Pasco:
S I House Concurrent Resolution No. 3.
A resolution in reference to a committee of five-two
from the Senate and three from the House-to visit, in-
vestigate and report on the condition of the Florida Coast
Line Canal and Transportation Company, extending from,
the Halifax River to the Bisayne Bay, and to ascertain
what extension of time should be granted said company
to complete said canall.
Which was read and went over under the rules.
By Mr. .Kirkland of Lake:
House Concurrent Resolution No. 4.
A resolution relative to the lpplointnment of a committee
to visit South Florida Military Institute, at Bartow, and
St. Petersburg Industrial and Normal Institute, at St.
Petersburg, Fla.
Which was read and went over under the rules.
By Mr. Knight of Citrus:
House Resolution No. 5.
A resolution in reference to a committee of three-two
on the part of the House and one on the part of the Sen-
ate-to visit the Hospital for the Insane, at Chatta-
hoochet.
.Which was read and went over under the rules.
By Mr. Persons of Columbia:
House Concurrent Resolution No. 6:
A resolution in reference to a committee of three, two
from the House and one from the Senate, to investigate
and report on the condition of the University of Florida
at Lake City.
Which was read and went over under the rules.
By Mr. Floyd of St. Johns:
House Concurrent Resolution No. 7:
A resolution relative to visiting the convict camps and
providing for recommendations of legislation on the con-
vict system of the State.
Which was read and went over under the rules.
By Mr. Baker of Clay:
House Concurrent Resolution No. 8:
Relative to the appointment of a committee to visit,
investigate and report upon the condition of the Florida
Institute for the Deaf and Blind located at St. Augus-i
tine.
Which was read and went over under the rules.



1








4



By Mr. DuPont of St. Johns:
House Concurrent Resolution No. 9:
A resolution relative to the appointment of a commit
tee to visit the Florida School for the Blind, Deaf an(
Dumb at St. Augustine, Fla.
Which was read and went over under the rules.
By Mr. Canter of Polk:
House Concurrent Resolution No. 10:
A resolution relative to a committee to visit the Mil
itary College at Bartow and the St. Petersburg Norma:
and Industrial School at St. Petersburg, Fla., and report
upon their condition and needs.
Which was read and went over under the rules.
By Mr. Bryan of Washirgvton:
House Concurrent Resolution No. 11.
A resolution relative to the appointment of a committe-
to visit and report upon the condition of the State Reform
School at Marianna.
Which was read and went over under the rules.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS.

By Mr. Rosborough of Alachua:
House Bill No. 1.
A bill to be entitled an act to define vagrancy in the
State of Florida and to provide for the punishment of the
sane.
Which was read the.first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Tillman of Alachua:
House Bill No. 2.
A bill to be entitled an act appropriating funds for the
purchase and improvement of property, the construction
of buildings and for the aid, mlinienance and promotion
of the Seminary east of the Suwannee RiNvor, known as
the East Florida Seminary.
Which was read the first time by its title and reference
deferred until the appointment of the committees.
By Mr. Wells of Hillsbclrolu'.h:
House Bill No. 3.
A bill to be er ll tied an act to legalize and validate
Ordinance No. 347 of the city of Tamipla, entitled "An ordi
nance to provide for the issuing of bonds olf the city of
Tampa, and for the expenditure and disbursing of funds
received from the sale of said bonds," passed by the City








5



Council of the city of Tampa on the 27th day of Septem-
ber, A. D. 1904, and approved on the 29th day of Septem-
ber, A. D. 1904, by'the Mayor of the city of Tampa; and
to legalize and validate the special election held on the
8th d'ay of November, A. D. 1904, by the qualified electors
of the city of Tampa, under section 7 of said Ordinance
No. 347, and to legalize and make valid any and all bonds
issued, or which may hereafter be issued, by the city of
Tampa under said Ordinance No. 347 and the proceedings
or resolutions of the City Council of said city under said
ordinance.
Which was read the first time by its title and reference
to committee deferred until the appointment of standing
committees.
Mr. Watson moved that Mr. C. S. Wilson'of Hernando
be elected Speaker pro tem.
Which was agreed to.
The Speaker announced the appointment of the follow-
ing as a Commnittee on Rules:-
Mr. Sistrunk of Marion, Chairman; Johnston of Pasco,
Watson of Osceola, Noble of Lake, Bryan of Washington,
Rawls of Leon, Wall of Putnam, Smith of Hmilton, Wil-
son of Hernando.
On motion of Mr. Kirkland of Lake, Mr. Noble was
granted leave of absence for several days.
On motion of Mr. Watson of Osceola, the House ad-
journed until 10 o'clock a. m. lomctrrow.



THURSDAY, APRIL 6, 1905.

The House met met pursuant to &ajournment.
The Speakelr in the chair. ,
The roll being called, the following members answered
to, their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Avery, Baker, Blanton of Madison,
Blanton of Taylor, Bradshaw, Bryan, Browil, Buckman,
Canmpbell, Canter, Carleton, Cobb. Cornwell, Crawford,
Dorman, DuPont, Duval, Dyal, Fillingim, Floyd. Girar-
dea:u, Hall, iHarvell, Heindon, Hill, Jewell, Johnston. Ju-
lian, Kilgore, King,, Kirkland, Knight, Knowles, Leggett,
McCallum. McElroy, Matthews, Melton, Noble, Olmstead.
Oven, Paul, Peaden. Persons, Pirrong, Rawls, Roberts,
Robison, Rosborougi, Sistrunk, Sledge, Smith of Hamil-








6



ton, Smith of Volusia, Sparkman, Sprague, Stephens, Tay-
lor of Gadsden, Taylor of Hillsborough, Tillman, .Vall,
Wartma'n, Watson, Wells, Willianms, Wilson of Hernando,
Wilson of Jackson, Wilson of Lee-67.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Chaplain.
Mr. Wilson of Lee came forward and took the oath of
office as prescribed by the Constitution of the State of
Florida before Mr. A. W. Gilchrist, Notary Public in and
for State of Florida at large.
The Speaker announced the following standing commit-
tees:

STANDING COMMITTEES.

OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

.JUDICIARY.

"Mr. Buckman of Duval, C;airImn;i
Messrs. Avery, Jewell, Sistrunk, Blanton of Taylor,
Roberts, Wells, Campbell, Stephens.

FINANCE AND TAXATION.

Mr. Wilson of Hernando, Chairman; -
Messrs. Kilgore, Kirkland, Matthews, Carlton, John-
ston, Dorman, Smith of Volusia, Persons.

COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION.

Mr. Harvell of Santa Rosa, Chairman"
Messrs. Knowles, Dyal, Cornwell, Floyd, Taylor of
Hillsborough, Fillingim, Oven, Avery.

RAILROADS AND TELEGRAPHS.

Mr. Dornan of Suwannee, Chairman.
Messrs. Roberts. King, Mattlews, Sprague, Dyal, Tay-
lor of Hillsborough, Kilgore, Robison.








7



CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS.

Mr. Avery of Escambia, Chairman;
Messrs. Pirrong, Knowles, Rawles, Blanton of Taylor,
,Campbell, Oven, Sistrunk, Paul.

PRIVILEGES AND ELECTIONS.

Mr. Leggett, of Madison, Chairman;
Messrs. Carlton, Watson, Taylor of Gadsden, Paul,
;King, Bradshaw, McCallun.

CITY AND COUNTY -ORGANIZATION.

Mr. Melton of Duval, Chairman;
Messrs. Smith of 'Volusia, Avery, Williams, Persons,
.Jewell, Olmstead, Wells, Tillman.

APPROPRIATIONS.

Mr. Rawls of Leon, Chairman;
Messrs. Canter, Tillhan, Dupon Taylor of Hillsbor-
.ough, Julian, Kirkland, Girardeau, Wall.

EDUCATION.

Mr. Johnston of Pasco, Cliairmanu
Messirs. Knight. Tillman, Cobb, Harvell, Taylor of
-Hillsborough, Bradshaw.

STATE INSTITUTIONS.

Mr. Matthews of Bradford, Chairman;
Messrs. Baker, Wilson of Jackson, Watson, Wartman,
"Kilgorey Taylor of Hillsborough, Duval, Julian.

MILITIA AND STATE TROOPS.

Mr. Stephens of Jackson, Cl:hirmiian;
t Messrs. Smith of Volusia, Noble, Buckman, Cornwell,
3Matthews, Wartman, Duval. Julian.








8



CORPORATIONS.

Mr. Smith of Volusia, Chairman;
Messrs. Carlton, Rosborough, Oven, Floyd, Jewell,
Buckman, Cornwell.

PUBLIC HEALTH.

Mr. Julian of Columbia, Chairman;
Messrs. Wells, Pirrong, Sprague, Bradshaw, McCallum,
Buckman. Knowles. Brown.

CANALS AND DRAINAGE.

Mr. Pirrong of Calhoun. Chairman;
Messrs. Dyal, Wilson of Lee, Sledge, Olmstead, King,
Leggett, Floyd, Wilson of Jackson.

LEGISLATIVE EXPENSES.

Mr. Girardeau of Jefferson, Chairman;
Messrs. Duval, Crawford. Sparkman, Sprague, Cobb,
Taylor of Hillsborough, Robison.

ENGROSSED BILLS.

Mr. Wells of Hillsborough, Chairman;
Messrs. Harvell, Baker, Girardeau, Kirkland, Stephens.

a ENROLLED BILLS.

Mr. Blanton of Taylor, Chairman;
Messrs. Canter, Doiiian, Sistrunk, Noble, Floyd.

CLAIMS.

M'r. Camrbell of Gadsden, Chairman:
Messrs. Wall, Dorman, Johnston, Robison, Wartman,.
Knight, Persons, Wilson of Hernando.

ORGANIZED LABOR.

Mr. Fillingim of Escamtbia, Chairman;
Messrs. Herndon, Sledge, Smith of Hamilton, McCal-
lum.








9



RULES.

Mr. Sistrnnk of Marion, Chairman;
SVT r>""< r. ';i' of TTHmilton. Johnston, Wilson
of Hernando, Noble, Wall, Watson, Rawls.

PUBLIC ROADS AND HIGHWAYS.

Mr. Wall of Putnam, Chairman;
Messrs. Wartman. Peaden, Sparkman, McElroy, Wil-
liams. Dupont, Knight, Hall.

PUBLIC PRINTING.

Mr. Duval of Waunllla, Chairman;
Messrs: Carleton, Rawls, Hall, Harvell, Taylor of Gads-
den, Roberts.
PUBLIC LANDS.

Mr. Brown of LaFayette, Chairman;
Messrs. Leggett, Pirrong, Blanton of Taylor, Rosb.,r-
ouigh, Melton, Blanton of Madison, Wilson of Lee.

PUBLIC BUILDINGS.

Mr. Baker of Clay, Chairiman;
Messrs. Pirrong, Blanton of Madison, Bradshawv.
Bryan, Crawford, Wilson of Lee.

MINING AND PHOSPHATES.

Mr. Cantor of Polk. Chairman;
M.:ss's. McElroy. Hall, Rosborough, Kilgore, Leggett.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS.

M3. MIcFlroy of Levy. Chairman;
Msers Blanton of Madison, Brown, Herndon, Hill;
Hall.
CENSUS AND APPORTIONMENTS

Mr. Paul of Holmes Chairman;
Messrs. Herndon, Wilson of Jackson, Campbell.
Sprague, Carlton.








10



AGRICULTURE.

Mlr Kirkland of Lake, Chairman;
Messrs. Peaden, Herndon, Baker, Bradshaw, ball,
'Crawford, S I)irkmain, Fillingim.

FISHERIES.

Mr. Taylor of Hillsborough, Chairman;
Messrs. Wilson of Lee, Oven, Cornwell, I:cElroy, Spark-
man, OImstead, Williams, Brown.

INDIAN AFFAIRS.

Mv. King of Dade, Chairman;
IMessrs. Olmstead. Hill, Sparklman, Cobb, Knowles.

STATE PENSIONS.

Mr. Blanion of Madison, Chairman.
Messrs. Stedge Sprague, Hill, McCallum, Bryan, Robi-
son, i.den, ;iliams.

TEMPERANCE.

Mr. Bryan of Washington, Chairman;
fssrs. Canter, Olmstead, Fillingim. MeltonI, Sedge,
tiake;i, Knigit
JOURNAL.

Mr. Smith of Hfamilton, Chairman;
MAssrs. Ta2:. of Gadsden, Peadei, Tilim n, (;)bb,
HilL.
FORESTRY.

Mr. Wat,(.)o ,.' Osceolat, Ch'airman;
Messrs. Persons, Dyal, Crawford, Noble, Leggett Du-
pont.
MISCELLANEOUS LEGI \ TON.

Mr. Jewell of'Orange, Chairman;
Messrs. Roborough, D)npont, Smith of TH-riilLon, Wil-
o0.i .c.f Jackson, Aver y, Wilson of H'riaai ,.








11



MEMOR [AL".

!Hon. Albert W. Gilchrist,
Speaker of the Hoiuse of Representattives:
SIR-In view of the fact that all legislation should be
free from t-le suspiclun otf having been influenced by per-
sonal or local or pecuniary interests of individuals, and in
'view of the fact that important pension legislation has
been recommended and will probably be introduced at
tins session or tie Legislature, and having been myself a
soldier of the Confederacy, I have decided that it is im-
proper for me to be chairman of the Committee on Pen-
sions, and I therefore respectfully decline to act in that
capacity. Very Respectfully,
BLANTON OF MADISON.
Which was read and ordered spread upon the Journal.

INTRODUCTION OF RESOLUTIONS.

House Resolution No. 5:
By Mr. Wall of Putnam:
Whereas, The Ruler of all things has seen fit to remove
"from the scenes of earth our venerable fellow citizen, Wm.
Forsyth Bynum, who for so many sessions of this House
was the Chief Clerk.
Therefore be it resolved, That a committee of three be
-appinlted by the Speaker to (raft suitable resolutions of
respect to his memory and that the same be reportedto
"-this body and spread upon its Journal.
Mr. Wall of Putnam moved that the resolution be
:adopted.
Which was agreed to.
House Resolution No. 6:
By Mr. Wells of Hillsborongh :
Be it resolved by the House of Representatives, That all
"bills introduced of a general nature, where the subject
matter of such bills contains more than three sections,
unless otherwise ordered by the House, shall be printed,
and each member of the House shall be furnished one copy
of such printed bills.
The said bills to be printed after the same shall have
been reported by the committee to whom referred.
Mr. Wells moved the adoption of the resolution.
Mr. Wall of Putnam moved to lay the motion upon the
table.








IIj



Which was agreed to.
By Mr. Wall of Putnam:
House Resolution No. 7:
Resolved, That a special committee of nine members of
the house of representatives shall be appointed by the
Speaker to whom shall be referred all bills, resolutions,
reports of committees, or other papers pertaining to the
various State institutions and no member of said special
committee shall be a resident of the county where any of
said State institutions are situated, and be it further re-
soiveo. I'na nfu membtler o.f a comitnittee appointed to visit
such State institutions shall be" a representative of the
county wherein such institutions are located.
Mr. Wall moved the adoption of the resolution.
Mr. Wells of Hillsborough moved to lay the motion on
the table.
Which was not agreed to.
The question recurred upon'the motion to adopt the-
resolution.
Which was agreed to.
By Mr. Buckman of Duval:
House Resolution No. 8:
Be it resolved, That the Judiciary Committe e e and it
is hereby authorized to employ a clerk.
Mr. Buckman moved the adoption of the resolution.
Which was agreed to.
By Mr. Knight of Citrus:
House Resolution No. 9:
Be it resolved by tle House of Reresentatives, That a
special committee of five be appointed to whom all bills
with reference to v''rncvy shall be referred. Such com-
mittee shall make its final report by May 1st.
Mr. Knight moved the adoption of the resolution.
Mr. Wall of Putnam moved to lay the motion on the
table.
Which was agreed to.
By Mr. Watson of Oscoola:
oJP PC Resolution No. 10:
Resolved, That the Sergeant-at-Arms be Insteucted to
get waste baskets and place one at the desk ')f each mem-
ber.
Mr. Watson moved the adoption of the resolution.
Which was agreed to.



4
"e








13



By Mr. Roshorough of Alachua :
House ConcurlreInt Resolution No. 12:
Resolved, That a joint commiftee of three from lhe
House and two from the Senate be appointed to visit ihe
I. V 10Pr -e, .iii tt at ia.i s^ ile, _'la., and repol' t zit
their earliest convenience on the management andI neces-
sities of the institution.
Which was read the first time and went over under the
rules.
I-v NMr. Stephens of Jackson:
House Concurrent Resolution No. 33:
I-( it I.esoJved. T''hat : c.onlmi ottee of three, two from ;!e
HoIseo of ReCrosentCStves and one from the Senate be :ip-
pointed to visit the State Normal School at DeFun iak
l pigs and report on thle (ondition.-ertc., to thi; body(
within tw.ilty days.
Which was read the first time and went overunder the

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS.

By Mr. Rosborough of Alachua:
House Bill No. 4:
A bill to be entitled an act regulating and' defining the
duties, liabilities and rights of master and servant; provid-
ing for the procedure and rules tllieieof in personali injury
cases and actions.
VWhich was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Hill of Bradford:
House Bill No. 5:
A bill to be entitled an act to abolish the present mu-
nicipal government of the town cf Lake Butler. in the coun-
ty of Bra ford and State of Florida, ard to establish, or-
ganize and constitute a municipality ,to be known and
desin,,J Pted as the clitv of :,,eko il0-,.' an-d to pfie, its
territorial bounldaries, and to provide for its jurisdiction,
powers and privileges.
Which was read 1- ifirs( tiw-e by its title and referred
to the Committe on City and County Organization.
By Mr. Julian of Columbia:
House Bill No. 6:
A bill to be entitled an act to legalize and validate all
warrants heretofore issued by Boards of County Commis-
sioners for work and materials in constructing court
houses and jails f6r cotitity piurbses.








14



VWhj(i was i'(11d the first time by its tii0e and referreda
to the Committee on Miscellaneous Legislation.
By Mr. Buckman of Duval:.
House Bill No. 7:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 1394 of
the Revised 7tat;1tes of the State of Florida, relating to
compensatialn ocf clerks of circuit courts as clerk and re-
corder.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee cin Judicia( l y.
By Mr. Melton of Duval:
House Bill No. 8:
A bill to be entitled an act requiring paynient in ad-
vance of clerk's costs in civil cases, at law and equity,
and the clerk's duties and responsibilities in regard there-
to.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Commnittee on Jluniiciary.
By Mr. IBuckman of Duval:
House Bill No. 9:
A bill to be entitled an act to protect sureties.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Juldiciat-'V.i
By Mr. Buckman of Duval:
House Bill No. 10:
A bill to be entitled an act requiring notaries public
to record their collllissions as such notaries public, and
prescribing a fee therefore, and requiring the county
commissioners to furnish a book for that purpose.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Miscellaneous Legislation.
By Mr. Avery of Escanmbia:
House Bill No. 11:
A bill to be entitled an act to require street car com-
panies and others in this State, to furnish separate cars
or compartments for white and colored passengers; to
require said companies and others to furnish comfortable
seats well ventilated, heated and lighted cars and keep
white and colored passengers in their respective cars or
compartments; to give conductors and employes of said<
companies police powers, and to provide penalties for the
violation, of this act.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred.
to the Committee on Railroads and Telegraph..








15



By Mr. Avery of Escambia:
House Bill No. 12:
A bill to be entitled an act to regulate the business of
money lending on household or kitchen furniture or
household goods, sewing machines, tools of trade, musi-
cal i'nrliuIelts, typewriters, wearing apparel or like ar-
ticles of personal property and the sale or pledging of
wages or salaries; to fix the fees and charges which may
be made on such transactions; to prescribe requirements
and conditions under which such business shall be con-
ducted; to provide for licensing such business, and declar-
ing such licenses void; to prescribe conditions under
which criminal warrants shall issue upon affidavits of
money lenders under this act, their agents or employes,
against borrowers or vendees; to fix a penalty for exceed-
ing certain rates of interest, and to provide penalties for
violations of this act.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Taylor of CadsTen:
House Bill No. 13:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Sections 801 and
805, Chapter 4, Revised Statutes of the State of Florida.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Health.
By Mr. Wilson of Hernando:
House Bill No. 14:
A bill to be entitled an act relating to vagrancy, defin-
ing vagrants, prohibiting loitering, wandering or stroll-
ing about, idling, gamblling, frequenting places for the-
purpose of unlawful behavior or conduct, refusing to
perform labor or accept employment incident to earning
a livelihood, and prescribing the manner of arrest, trial,
punishment and procedure.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Judiciary.
Pv Mr.. Vells of Hillsborough:
House Bill No. 15:
A bill to be entitled an act to establish the Florida In-
dustrial School at Saint Petersburg, Hillsborough county,
Florida, and to provide for the erection of certain build-
ings therefore, and for other purposes.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Special Committee on State Institutions.







16



By Mr. Wells of Hillsborough:
House Bill No. 16:
A bill to be entitled an act to naess a tax on licenses
to provide for the collection thereof and to prescribe pen-
alties for doing business without paying the license tax'
assessed thereon or other failure to comply with the pro-
visions thereof.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Finance and Taxation.
By Mr. Wells of Hillsborougli:
House Bill No. 17:
A bill to be entitled an act to prescribe the compensa-
tion to be paid members of the Board of County Commis-
sioners of the several counties of the State of lorida.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on City and County Organization.
By Mr. Wells of Hillsborough:
House Bill No. 18:
A bill to bbeentitle( r an at to n+,mr r!-tion 1032 of
the Revised Statutes of the State of Florida, relating to
entry upon rule day.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Wells of Hillsborough:
House Bill No. 19:
A bill to be entitled an act to provide for the disposi-
tion by the several counties of the State of Florida, of
the funds arising from and apportioned to the said several
counties from the hire of State convicts.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Finance and Taxation.
By MA.. Wells of Hillsborough:
House Bill No. 20:
A bill to be entitled an act to provide for the registrn-
tion of all county warrants by the county treasurer, when
not paid at presentation and for payment of all such war-
rants in consecutive order, and for the payment of in-
terest thereon.
Which was reid the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Wells of Hillsborough:






17



'House Bill No. 21:
A bill to be entitled an act to regulate the sales of
stocks of merchandise in bulk, or parts of stock and pre-
scribinga a penalty for certain violations thereof.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
-to the Committee on Miscellaneous Legislation.
By Mr. Wells of Hillsborough:
House Bill No. 22:
A bill to be entitled an act to punish keeping and main-
taining gaming devices and parties permitting the opera-
tion of such devices.
Which was read Ihe first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Stephens of Jackson:
House Bill No. 23:
A bill to be entitled an act to a iend Section 2, Chapter
50i4, Laws of Florida, entitled an :cL to regulate the
holding of political primary x k .)> i-. the State of
Florida, for nominating candidates for any office under
the laws of the State, and for nominating delegates to
political conventions.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Privileges and Elections.
By Mr. Stephens of Jackson:
House Bill No. 24:
A bill to be entitled an act to define who are vagrants
in the State of Florida, and to provide for their punish-
ment.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Wilson of Jackson:
House Bill No. 25:
A bill to be entitled an act declaring vagrancy a mis-
demeanor in this State, defining and designating what
class of persons shall be deemed and considered vagrants,
providing for arrest and apprehension of suspect va-
grants, providing and adopting a rule of evidence for
the trial of persons suspected and charged with being va-
grants under the provision of this act, and providing .
penalty for those convicted of vagrancy, or of being. a
vagrant under the provisions of this act.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the (Comnmittee on Judiciary.
6 HB







18



By Mr. Noblc of Lake:
House Bill No. 20:
A bill to be entitled an act to punish vagrancy in tiis-
State, declaring what manner of persons shall be consid-
ered vagrants, making vagrancy a misdemeanor, provid-
ing for their irrel and penalty for same.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Noble of Lake:
House Bill No. 27:
A bill to be entitled an act to provide for the building
of a governor's mansion.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Finanee and Taxation.
By Mr. Noble of Lake:
House Bill No. 28:
A bill to be entitled an act to create a State Booard of
Accountancy and to p escrilbe its powerv, and duties, to
provide fcr the examination of qualified accountants and
to provide a nen alty for the violation of this act.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred'
to the Committee on Finance and Taxation.
By Mr. Robison of Leon:
House Bill .No. 29:
A bill to be entitled an act for the protection of the
food fishes in the waters of the State of lorida.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
lo the Committee on Fisheries.
By Mr. Wartman of Marion:
lHouse Bill No. 30:
A bill to be entitled an act to regulate the running of
,nulo.mobiles or motor vehicles on the public roads and
highways.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to t+h Coiwmittee- op Public Roads and Highways.
SBy Mr. Sistrunk of Marion:
House Bill No. 31:
A bill to be entitled an act to define apd prescribe what
shall be deemed vagrancy in this State, to designate what
persons shall be deemed and declared vagrants, and to.
provide a penalty therefore.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to' the Committee on Judiciary.









"19



By Mr. Johnston of Pasco:
House Bill No. 32:
A bill to be entitled an act to create a State- School
Book Commission and a County School Book Commission
and to procure for use in the public schools of the State
of Florida a uniform series of text books, and to define the
duties and power's of said commiz-sion; to make preplaa-
tions for carrying this act into effect and providing penu
alties for the violation of the same.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Education.
By Mr. Johnston of Pasco:
House Bill No. 33:
A bill to be entitled an act to provide for the payment
by the State of Florida of the actual traveling expenses
l;(idilhn, s.*ie-"s o f ofl!mit in their respective circuits.
Holding session of court in their respective circuits.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Canter of Polk:
House Bill No. 34:
A bill to be entitled an act making an appropriation
for the construction of an academic building and to
equip the same for the South Florida College.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred:
to the Special Committee on State Institutions.
By Mr. Harvell of Santa Rosa:
House Bill No. 35:
A bill to be entitled an act to provide State aid to cer-
tain public schools in this State, to prescribe conditions
and make appropriations therefore.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred:
to the Committee on Education.
By Mr. Wall of Putnam:
House Bill No. 36:
A bill to be entitled an act to define vagrancy and to,
provide punishment for the same.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Conmmittee on Judiciary.
By Mr. DuPont of St. Johns:
House Bill No. 37:
A bill to be entitled an act to provide for a speedy trial
in cases of rape, prescribing the duty of sheriffs and
judges of the circuit courts, the manner of drawing jurors







20



validity of indictments and penalty for non perform-
ance of duty by sheriffs and circuit judges in such cases.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Commuluittee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Floyd of St. Johns:
House Bill No. 38:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 3024 of the
Revised Statutes of Florida relating to fees.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Miscellaneous Legislation.
By Mr. Floyd of St. Johns:
House Bill No. 39:
A bill to be entitled an act allowing fees in cases be-
fore committing magistrates.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Miscellaneous Legislation.
By Mr. Dorman of Suwannee:
House Bill No. 40:
A bill to be entitled an act to amend Section 33 Chap-
ter 4328 of the Laws of Florida, the same being an act
entitled an act to provide for the registration of all le-
gally qualified voters in the several counties of the State,
and to provide for general and special elections and for
the returns of elections.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Privileges and Elections.
By Mr. Dorman of Suwannee:
House Bill No. 41:
A bill to be entitled an act to regulate the sale of all
syrups and the adulterations thereof within this State,
and for other purposes.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Agriculture.
By Mr. Dorman of Suwannee:
House Bill No. 42:
A bill to be entitled an act to define and punish va-
grancy.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Cobb of Baker:
House Bill No. 43:
A bill to be entitled an act in relation to obtaining
money or any other personal property under false prom-
ises or for violations of contracts and providing penalties
therefore.









21



Which was read the first time by its title and reftred
to the Committee on Miscellaneous Legislation.
By Mr. Cobb of Baker:
House Bill No. 44:
A bill to be entitled an act to regulate the final hearing
and determination of all cases in the courts of the State-
4,f Florida.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred;
to the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Floyd of St. Johns
House Bill No. 45:
A bill to be entitled an act to extend the time for com-
pleting the canal of the Florida Coast Line Canal and
Transportation Company and to preserve and continue
the grant of land, to aid in its construction.
Which was read the first time by its title and referred
to the Committee on Canals and Drainage.
Mr. Sistrunk, (Ch'irman; of the Committee on Rules, sub-
mitted the following report:
House of Representatives,
Tallahassee, Fla., Apri'l 6, 1905.
Hon. Albert W. Gilchrist,
Spc(ikcr of the House of Represcntatives:
SIR-Your Committee on Rules have the honor to make
this the following our report:
We recommend that the rules of the House of Represen-
tatives of the State of Florida, for the year 1903, be adopt-
ed, with the following amendment: Amend rules number
"12," so as to read as follows:
"He shall put the previous question in the following
form: Shall the main question now be put? And all de-
bate upon the main question and pending amendments
shall be suspended, except that the introducer of a bill,
resolution or motion shall, if he so desire, be allowed five
minutes to discuss the same before the previous question,
is ordered. After the adoption of the previous question,
the sense of the House of Representatives shall forthwith
'be taken on pending amendments in their regular order,
and then upon the main questions "
Also that "Rule 32" be amended so as to read as follows:
"No rule or order of the House of Repres?tatives shall
be dislpenised with or repealed unless two-thirds of the
members present shall consent thereto, and no bill shall be
taken up for consideration from the calendar out of its








22



regular order, except by unanimous consent, unless the
bill shall be one of public importance and its consideration
asked for by a committee."
Also that "-ule 56" entitled "Order of Busiiess" be
amended so as to read as follows:
1. IM adding of the Journal.
2. Correction of the Journal.
3. Introduction of iemorials,, petitions or other papers
-addressed to the House of Rleplresentatives or to the Speak-
er thereof.
4. Introduction and cosidieatin of all resolutions
,other th u joint or coficurrent resolutions.
5. I' da :,in or t,,i;h.ii,tion of joi. t or concur-
rent resolutions.
6. Introduction of bills by call of counties.
7. Report of sanding' committees.
8. Report of select commniittees.
Your committee also suggests that two hundred copies
of said rules be printed for disiriiutioni.
Very Reslec i'Iul!y,
^ CARLOu L. 1ST. iNK,
("hairma n.
.Mr. J ;hnsto of Pas-tci-,o\-ved the aiption of the report.
"Which was agIred to.
The following -i-'om the Si-retar:v of St:.1' was received:
Office of the ;S'ceta;ry of State,
Ta lllah-see, PFi., April 6th, 1905.
lHon. AJl:e t W. Gilchrist,
/,','ofA r olf the 1 house of .jsi !
BDEAR IRK-In conformity with the requirements of
the C 0itiitIion of the (Iate (f lri a, I Leewili tran.-
mit to you, for the consiration of the iose of .eps:-n-
Sativ-s, the following veled act with the (Goveri air'ss ob-
jection written thereon, viz:
"A'An A 't to regulate the talkif.; of food fish in the salt
and fresh waters of Breva d County."
Very Respectfully,
-1. CLAY CRAWFORD,
Secretary State.
Which wes read.
Mr. Johnston of Pasco moved that the bill contained in
the above I bnesa e be considered instant.
Which was agreed to.
Thereupon the I'1l was read in full and upon the ques-










23



-tion shall the bill pass, the veto of the Governo'r notwith-
standing, the vote was:
I



Mr. Speaker Girardeau
Avery Hall
iiaker Hill
B3lanton of Madi-Jewvell
son Johnston
Blanton of Taylor Julian
B. radshaw Kilgore
Bryan King
114 r v a n d
Brown Kirkland
Buckman Knight
7am o-ell Knowles
Canter Le_ .:ett
Carleton MCallum
Cobb v\'Elvrov
Cornwell Ma ttlews
Crawford .elton
Dorman Olmstead
DuPont n-iil
Duval P[,a P .
Dval Pirrong.
Fili"'^im Enwi.
Floyd olbe f.r



Robison
Sistrunk
Sledge
Smith of Hamilton
Smith of-Volusia
Spark man
Sprague
Ptephens
Taylor of Ga- ldcn
Taylor of Hills-

Tillman
Wall
W a rtman
Watson
Well
Williams
Wilson of Hernan-
do
NWilson of Jn a;.-Io;1
Wilson of Lee



^ens-Noae.
NY v.s--2.
So the bill did not pass.

CONSIDERATION OF CONCURRENT RESOLUTIONS

House Concurrent Pflioen No. 1:
Be it resolved byN the IHou1e of Representatives, the Sen-
ate concurring- That the daily journals of the Senate and
House for the session of 1f05 be bound together in pam-
phlet form. the piro edings of the House to appear first,
"the pro. edings of the Seate to follow. The said journal
to lhe-1n ged numerically,. bhinni',g at page 1, and follow
numeriaelly until end of session.
That there shall be published daily for the use of the
House and Senate and executive department 1,200 copies
-of said journal, ten copies to be furnished each member
-of the Legislature, the remainder to be distributed to the
,executive department.









24



That at the end of the session, thesaid journal to be-
bound in two volumes, designated as volumes one and two,
journal of the Legislature of Florida, 1905.
That each member of the Legislature for 1905 be furn-
ished with substantially bound volumes of the said
journal.
That in addition 300 bound volumes shall be furnished
the various departments of the State government.
Was taken up and read a second time.
Mr. Watson of Osceola offered the following amend-
ment:
Strike out 1,200 and insert 800.
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Wells of Hillsboroiugh offered the following ameinl-
ment:
"St;lke out 10 and insert 6."
Mr. W\ellis moved the adoption of the amendinet.
Mr. Wall moved to lay the motion on the table.
Which was not agreed to.
The onestion then recurred upon the adoption of the
amendment.
Which was agreed to.
The question then recurred upon the adoption of the
resolution as amended.
Which vwas agreed to.
House Concurrent Resolution No. 2.
A resolution in reference to a committee of five to visit
and investigate, and report on the affairs of the Florida
East Coast Line and Transportation Company, and to,
find what benefit has accrued to the citizens of Florida in
the way of transportation since their charter wa
granted.
Was taken up and read a second time.
Mr. Watson of Osceola moved the adoption of the resolu-
tion.
Mr. Wall, of Putnam offered the following amendment:
";Strike out five and insert three, one on the part of the
Senate and two on the part of the House.
Mr. Wall moved the adoption of the amendment.
Which was agreed to.
The question then recurred upon the adoption of the res-
olutin as lmelNFed.l
Which was agreed to.
House Concurrent Resolution iNo. 3.
A resolution in refere-ice to a committee of five-two











from the Senate and three from the House-to visit, in-
vestigate and report on the condition of the Florida Coast
Line Canal and Transportation Comnlpany, extending from
the Halifax River to the Biscayne Bay, and to ascertain
what extension of time should be granted said company
to complete said cania;l.
Was taken up and read a second time.
And by permission was withdrawn.
House Concurrent Resolution No. 4.
A resolution relative to the appointment of committee
to visit South Florida Military Institute, at Bartow, and'
St. Petersburg Industrial and Normal Institute, at St..
Petersbulrg, Fla.
Was taken up and read a second time.
Mr. Kirkland moved the adoption of the resolution.
Which was agreed to.
House Resolution No. 5.
A resolution in-reference to a committee of three-two (
on the part of the House and one on the part of the Sen-
ate-to visit the Hospital for the Insane, at Chatta-
hoochee.
Was taken up and read a second time.
Mr. Knight offered the following amendment:
Strike out the words "two on the part of the House and
one on part of the Senate," and write "three on part of
House, two on the part of the Senate.."
Mr. Knight moved the adoption of the amendment.
Which was agreed to.
The question then recurred upon the adoption of the
resolution as amended.
Which was agreed to.
House Concurrent Resolution No. 6:
A resolution in reference to a committee of three, two
from. the House and one from the Senate, to investigate
and report on the condition of the University of Florida
at Lake City.
Was taken up and read a second time.
Mr. Wells of Iillsborough offered the following amend-
ment:
Strike out the words South Florida Militry Educational
Institution at Bartow and the Normal and Industrial
School at St. Petersburg.
Mr. Wells moved the adoption of.the amendment.
Which was agreed to.








26



The motion then iiecurred upon the adoption of the res-
,olution as amended.
Which was agreed to.
House Concurrent Resolution No. 7:
A resolution relative to visiting the convict camps and
providing for lecinmenidaions of legislation on the con-
vict system of the State.
Was taken up and read a second time.
Mr. Floyd of St. Johns moved the adoption of the reso-
l u tli"o). ,
Which was agreed to.
House CoMncerent Resolutibn No. 8:
Relative to the appointment of a committee to visit,
investi ate and report upon the condition of the Florida
Instit ut for the Deaf and Blind located at St. Augus-
tine.
Was taken up and read a secowl time.
Mr. Paker move!d the adoption of the resolution.
Which was agreed to.
Ho11-e Concurrent Resolution No. 9:
A resolution rTlaiive: to the appointment t of a commit-
.tee to visit the Florida School for the Blind, Deaf and
Dumb at t. AugustinPe, Fla.
Was taken up ad by pesI:sion was withdrawn.
I!u::-: Coicurrent rsE'-':litn No. 10:
A resolion relative to a committee to visit the Mil-
itary Col1l at Bartow and the St. Petersbur"g Io:rmall
and Tml-s-timm !l .,orl at 1t. rirsiurg, Fla., and report
upon lthfi coi itiri and neecs.
Was- t,:ken u, and read a second time.
a' -A by priisimn was witldr',wn.
or.s: C ac.'u i" t soln tion No. 11.
A resolution rel' tive to the an niit It of a committee
to visit and report upon the condition of the State Rformi.
School at Marianna.
Was taken up and read a second time'.
Mr. Bryan of Washington moved the adoption of the
'reeltotion.
Which-was agreed to.
By permission Mr. Jolh(nston of Pasco offered the follow-
ing resolution :
Resolved, That until otherwise ordered the House shall
,convene at 10 o'clock a. m. and adjourn at 1 o'clock p. m.
Mr. Johnston moved the adoption of th, resolution.
Which was agreed to.









27



At the request of Mr. Wells of IHillsborough the courte-
:sies of the House were extended to Mr. H. A. Raymond,
-Capt. S. E. Hope and Judge 1). H. Yancy.
At the request of Mr. Johnston of Pasco the courtesies
of the H-ouse were extended to Mr. John E. Donalson of
Pasco and to Hon. Frank Clark of Lake City, at the re-
quest of 1Mr. Persons of Colu lbia. 0.
At the request of Mr. Kilgore the courtesies of the House
were extended to -.on. J. C. B. Kasnce, ex-'e-ibcr of the
House of Poi:pre-s':tmi from Snumer county.
Mr. 1Welils gave notice that on tomorrow he would move
to rei( (-'i.r the vote by which House Resolution No. 7
was adoltedl.
On motion of Mr. rDyal Mr. Carleton of Nassau was ex-
cu'e;'d until Tuesday next.
On motion of Mr. Johnston of Pasco the House adjourn-
ed until 10 o'clock a. m. tomorrow.


FRIDAY, AP RI L 7, 3- .

The House met pursuant to adjournment.
The Speaker in the chair.
The roll _;ei:; called, the following jn:c'.elrs answered
to their name.:
Mr. Speaker, MeseI Ave-y, Baker, 7lan-on of Madi-
son, Bl:;ai-.n of Taylor, Bradshlaw, Bryan, Bro\vn, Buck-
man- Cpnb,-ll C anti, C'1., Co:rnwell, C.avfod.', Dor-
-man, DuPont, D, D a D l, FillingimI, Floyd, Girardeau,
Hall,' ITvell, Ierndon, Hill, Jewell, .JJ,is:ton, Julian,
Kilgore, King, Kirklad, Knight. KIowles, Logett. Mc-
Callum, MIE roy, Matthews, .:d!e lton Olmstead, Paul,
Peaden, Personss, Pirrong, Rawls, Prberts, Robison, Ros-
borough, ;Itr:nki, :le2!, Smith of Hamilton, Smith of
Volusia, Sparkt.n, Sprague, Steplens, Taylor of Gads-
,den, Taylor of Hilisborough, Tillman, Wall, Wartman,
Watson, Wells, Williams, Wilson of Hernando, Wilson of
Jackson, Wilson of Lee
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Chaplain.
Mr. Wells of Hillsborough moved that the reading of
the Journal be dispensed with for the entire session un-
less called for.
Which was agreed to.








28



INTRODUCTION OF RESOLUTIONS.

By Mr. Wilson of Hernando:
House Resolution No. 13:
Be it resolved by the House of Representatives, That
the Secretary of State be, and he is hereby instructed to
furnish the Finance and Taxation Comimittee a room on
this floor of the capitol building for their use during the
present session, 'and that a committee of three be appoint-
ed by the Speaker to investigate the condition of said
rooms and designate the room that may be vacated by the
clerks of State officitis with the least injury to the admin-
istration of State affairs.
Mr. Wilson of Hernando moved, the adoption of the
resolution.
Which was ag-reed to.
Thereupon the Sppaker appointed as such committee,
Mess;s. Wilson of- Iernando, Johnston, and Blanton of
Taylor.
By Mr. Campbell of Gadsden:
House Resolution No. 1.4:
Resolved by the House of Represeltntaves, That the
Committee on Claims be authorized to employ a clerk.
Mr. Campbell moved the adoption of the resolution..
WhAich was agreed to.
By Mr. Dorman of Suwannee:
House Resolution No. 15:
Resolved, That the Speaker of the House of Represen-
tatives appoint a committee on game.
Mr. Dorman moved the adoption of the resolution.
Which was agreed to.
Thereupon the Speaker appointed as a Committee on'
Game, Messrs. Rosborough, Blanton of Madison, Kilgore,.
Crawford, Fillingim, DuPont, Knight, Taylor of Hills-
borough and Sparkman.
By Mir. Melton of Duval:
House Resolution No. 16:
He it resolved by the House of Representatives, That
the Committees on City and County Organization, Public
Roads and Highways and Public Buildings be authorized
to employ one clerk, who shall serve upon each of them
and perform such clerical duties as may be encessary.
Mr. Melton moved the adoption of the resolution.
Which was ags-e.-d to.










By Mr. Smith of Volusia:
House Resolution No. 17:
Be it resolved by the House of Representatives, That
the Committees on Corporations, Journals and Forestry,
be authorized to employ a clerk who shall serve said com-
mittees jointly and perorm such clerical duties as may be
necessary.
Mr. Smith moved the adoption of the resolution.
Which was agreed to.
By Mr. Jewell of Orange:
House Resolution No. 18:
Resolved by the House of Representatives, That the
Sergeant-at-Amrs be and he is hereby directed to procure
suitable hooks and to be placed underneath on the inside
of each members desk for the purpose of'hanging their
hats theeron; and that suitable racks with hooks be
placed by him at either side of the Speaker's rostrum for
the hats of the clerks of the House.
Mr. Jewell moved the adoption of the resolution.
Which was agreed to.
By Mr. Johnston of Pasco:
House Resolution No. 19:
Resolved, That the Committees on Education, Organ-
ized Labor, Indian Affairs, Legislative Expenses and Nav-
igation, be authorized to employ a clerk at such times as
the exigencies of the legislative work may demand.
Mr. Johnston moved the adoption of the resolution.
Which was agreed to.
By Mr. Stephens of Jackson:
House Resolution No. 20:
Be it resolved by the House of Representatives, That
the Committees on Census and Apportionments, Constitu-
tional Amendments, Militia and State Troops, Fisheries
and Canals and ,Drainage be authorized to employ one
clerk, who shall serve upon each of them and perform
such clerical duties as may be necessary.
Mr. Stephens moved the adoption of the resolution.
Which was agreed to.
By Mr. Dorman of Suwannee:
House Resolution No. 21:
Resolved by the House of Representatives. That the
Committee on Railroads and Telegraph and Game be au-
thorized to employ one clerk for the two committees.
Mr. Dorman moved the adoption of the resolution.