• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Foreword
 Introduction
 Tampa, Florida
 Back Cover






Title: Tampa today and tomorrow.
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027763/00001
 Material Information
Title: Tampa today and tomorrow.
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Clyde Glenn Co.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027763
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
    Foreword
        Page 2
    Introduction
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Tampa, Florida
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Phosphate
            Page 12
            Page 13
        Trucking
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
        Citrus fruits
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20-22
        Stock raising
            Page 23
            Page 24
        Poultry
            Page 25
            Page 26
        Sea food
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
        Waste product
            Page 31
            Page 32
        Lands
            Page 33
        Good roads
            Page 34
        Tampa
            Page 35
            Page 36
        Schools
            Page 37
        Homes
            Page 37
            Page 38
        Social life
            Page 39
            Page 40
        The body politic
            Page 41
        Care of the sick
            Page 42
            Page 43-44
        Climate conditions
            Page 45
        Banking
            Page 46
            Page 47
        Hotels
            Page 48
        Mercantile interests
            Page 48
            Page 49
        Wholesale interests
            Page 50
            Page 51
        Manufacturing
            Page 52
        The press
            Page 52
            Page 53
        Transportation
            Page 54
        Commerce
            Page 54
        Commercial instituion
            Page 55-56
            Page 57-58
            Page 59-60
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text













~ '1
.e
-- 'ii
r
I
~L '+1
'. r.rC*-c. *


I

C,
,I
1 .?
1.
IrSii
.I ;


TODAY

AND




*cniif 0 illl


!e lcnn LO. lamp
ajlnllll .l t

























































Compliments of
The Tampa Board of Trade
of
Tampa, Florida












f-orewor6

With the theme of TAMPA in the preparation of this
little brochure, the process of elimination has been resort-
ed to on account of the many things of interest and value
to be mentioned.
You may rest assured that nothing has been mention-
ed which should be excluded from the volume, yet it is
also true that many things of interest that should have
been mentioned have been eliminated due largely to lack
of space.
A much more pretentious volume and a more free
hand would be required to do full justice to such a subject
as Tampa. The author bespeaks consideration on the
part of the gentle reader for errors and omissions.


Page Two













Snttrouction

S AMPA'S history dates back several hun-
dred years but in real development the
time is much shorter. Between 1890 and
1910 Tampa's growth was the greatest of
any city in its class in the United States.
The percent increase in population was
596. From 1900 to 1910 only one city in
the Union made a greater gain in population than Tampa
with its increase of 143.2 percent. Since being a city the
growth has been nothing short of marvelous. The last
United States census gave us 49,156 people, and with
West Tampa added, the total population of Greater
Tampa is 59,928, but with the immediate retail trade ter-
ritory which takes in all of the suburbs and nearby settle-
ments, our population does not fall far short of 70,000 peo-
ple.
Tampa first was heralded to the land as important in
1898 when the American armies sailed forth from this port
to plant the "Stars and Stripes" in a foreign land. Since
that time merchant vessels of all nations have been calling
at Tampa, and truly it can be said that our city is just six-
teen-"Sweet Sixteen." It is just sixteen years ago that
the first street was paved and now we have seventy-five
miles of various kinds of pavements in the city.
Tampa is the metropolis of South Florida, the fairest
section of the land of health, sunshine and untold possibil-

Page Three










ities. It is the commercial and financial center of this fer-
tile region of resources of immense values. Along this
portion of the State are located thousands of small islands
forming the greatest fishing ground on this continent,
where can be found seafood of every description. It is
the heart of a section that stands unrivaled in the produc-
tion of vegetables marketed at a time of year when the
rest of the country is in the grip of winter. In this sec-
tion is produced 52%o of the world's phosphate supply.
It includes the greatest sponge market in the world. It
has the finest climate in the world and produces the gold-
en fruit that has not a rival. This is the playground of
the nation. In this city is one of the most scientific and
up-to-date sewerage systems ever devised. The channels
in the harbor of Tampa have a depth of 24 feet with a sur-
vey completed with a view to giving greater depth.
There are five miles of docking room controlled by the
municipality and part of this is owned by the city. The
finest municipally owned hotel in the world is located here
and is surrounded by a magnificent park. There are more
than two hundred cigar factories and the output is about
one million a day, which is more than the total output of
the whole island of Cuba. More than one million tons of
phosphate is shipped from Tampa annually, and the total
value of the port's two and a quarter million tons of water
commerce yearly is almost $40,000,000. Only ten
other cities in the Union pay more custom duties to the
Federal Government than Tampa, its total revenue to the
Federal Government in eleven years having reached
thirty millions of dollars. Tampa is the nearest available

Page Four











port of any importance in the United Statels to the Pan-
ama Canal. Beautiful public buildings owned by the
city, the county and the nation are an asset of which the
people are proud, and with the parks and playgrounds
there is recreation for all. This territory holds the
world's record on phosphate, phosphate facilities,
sponges, citrus fruit, winter vegetables and Havana















Lafayette Street Bridge

cigars. The people of Tampa believe in the beautiful
things of life as is shown by the many handsome homes,
fine churches, club houses, school buildings, the fine Bay-
shore Boulevard and the dazzling great White Way.
This denotes the culture and refinement of the people.
Tampa is the County Seat of Hillsborough County,
the first county of the United States to vote $1,000,000 for
the construction of brick roads entirely in the country dis-

Page Five










tricts. Valuation of property in the city is over $60,000,-
000. It has an exceedingly low death rate and has spent
more than $2,000,000 in city improvements in the past two
years. Building permits during the past year totaled $1,-
625,000 and the bank clearances were $54,000,000. It is
the city beautiful with some of the finest people in the
world, and is the ideal location for a wonderful city. It
made the first "Made in Bond" cigar in the United States,
has the largest public school enrollment and has more
white population than any other city in the State, with a
payroll of $1,000,000 monthly and more ornamental
"White Way" than any other city in the South.
We all realize that the march of the settler to
the westward has stopped and the eyes of the nation are
all turned southward. This southward vision takes them
to the Peninsular of Florida which points still further
south through the waters of the southern seas and shows
the wonderful opportunities of this section, by command-
ing the attention of the continent farther southward in-
cluding all those fast growing and fast developing prov-
inces. We present to you here this wonderful city and
section and ask you to compare it with any other section
and bear in mind that Tampa, the metropolis, is "Sweet
Sixteen".


Page Six




















IriI


1-Public Library


2-City Hall


3-Union Station







An. --


Sampa, flort6a

,AMPA should command your attention if
you are looking for a place to invest all or
part of your capital, or if you are looking
for your future home. To be fair with
yourself you should at least make the
wonderful South Florida section, the
Tampa territory, a visit and we believe
that such a trip here will prove to you that you are offered
more inducements and given a greater opportunity for
health, wealth and happiness than it is possible to find in
any other section of the country. The present is prosper-
ous and the future is more than assured.
Tampa stands as the hub of a great and strong wheel
which has a radius of 100 miles. Its territory embraces
all the territory south of Ocala, Fla., with the possible ex-
ception of the extreme eastern coast of the State. Ac-
cording to the U. S. census, 219,557 people were located
in 1910 in this territory, which includes the counties of
Marion, Citrus, Sumter, Lake, Orange, Hernando, Pasco,
Hillsborough, Polk, Osceola, Manatee, DeSoto and Lee,
and it is now estimated that the population is 350,000.
The wholesale grocery business of the city of Tampa
alone is proof enough that this wonderful producing sec-
tion is growing steadily year by year. It was only a few
short years ago when the total business in that line did
not exceed $25,000 per month, but now $1,000,000 per

Page Eight


- .- f7.. J-- =RU ALTlu0


































I


1-Bank of Commerce
2-First Savings and Trust Co.
3-Citizens Bank and Trust Co.


4-Exchange National Bank
5-American National Bank
6-First National Bank


-9~~- --

Cr-a 1~21 C-~.i~
i'.

I: r:I I:
~~:~e~i~-~1 ~ ~~~r.


1
~~
.~.











month is not exaggerating. The city and towns in this
great producing section keep growing continuously, some
of them have doubled and trebled in population in the last
few years, while in other instances little villages have
sprung up, and in less than five years have become towns
of from 500 to 1,500 population. All realize, of course,
that a city cannot grow and prosper without a back coun-
try, so this is proof enough that the whole section is
growing. Hillsborough County leads the list, for its gain
in population from 1900 to 1910 was greater than the to-
tal population of any county in the State, with one excep-
tion.
First of all we will remind you that a few years ago
this great territory afforded practically nothing except
timber. The timber lands are being cut over and is being
shipped by steam and sail, by rail and water to all sec-
tions of this country and to many foreign ports.
In this territory we have the greatest naval stores
production in the United States, but this of course is be-
ing diminished year by year and it will not be a great
while until the factors in this line of business will be turn-
ing their backs on the South Florida section. To gain one
end we must lose the other, so it will be to gain the home-
seeker we will lose the naval stores operators. Probably
you will ask this question: What are you going to do for
timber when all the virgin uncut lands have been put into
development? This can be answered: By inviting in-
vestors with a little capital, which will prove to be the
biggest investment for interest they have ever made. The
solution to this is Eucalyptus and Pecans. It has been

Page Ten









































































A Group of Tampa's Public Schools


rc' ~m' ~~~~C1~C

19ifl i
IB~fF:
r
Is a 49'8'~;











proven that this territory will grow pecan trees fast and
that these same trees will produce profusely. It is an in-
dustry that is fast taking hold in this section and one
which will make those who are behind it a fortune.
The story of the Eucalyptus tree is too long to be
told here, and those interested can get complete and reli-
able information from the Department of Agriculture,
Bureau of Forestry, Washington, D. C., by requesting
"Eucalyptus in Florida." Our Government has estab-
lished experimental farms in the State and colonization
companies as well as individuals have met with great suc-
cess in planting these trees. They can be planted very
close together, need little care, grow on almost any ordi-
nary soil here, providing roots can easily reach water, and
will bring great returns to the owner which you will real-
ize is true when it is known that a Eucalyptus tree will
be large enough to use as a telephone or telegraph pole in
as short a time as five years. It is a high class wood and
used in many kinds of fine work. For Florida it is espec-
ially useful not only as telephone and telegraph poles, but
for piling in salt water, as it does not deteriorate and is
immune from the attacks of marine insects.

Tpl0osp$)ate

Tampa ships more phosphate than any other port in
the world. The average is more than 1,000,000 tons
yearly. The Tampa territory produces 52% of the
world's output of phosphate rock and the grade of rock
produced is as rich as can be found in any other section of

Page Twelve





































































1-Hillsboro County Court House 3-State Laboratory
2-Fire Department Headquarters 4-Y. M. C. A. Building
5-Federal Building


. K










the world. It is shipped to almost every foreign country
and the business of handling this product has been the
means of making fortunes for many, of making indepen-
dent thousands of men, and of giving employment to
many thousands of persons as well as totaling up invest-
ments that will range far into the millions. Is not this a
wonderful industry? But again you may ask: What
will you do when the phosphate supply is exhausted?
This question is one that should not and is not causing
worry to even the slightest extent. It is estimated that
with the phosphate property already discovered, there is
enough of this deposit to supply the world at an increased
rate every year for hundreds of years to come. In fact it
seems as though the supply is inexhaustible. We might
say that the earth has only been scratched, for the surface
layer is that which is now being mined and below that
there is known to be two other stratas that are as large or
larger.


ZSruckinq

Tampa territory is the finest vegetable producing
section in the United States, and even a greater advan-
tage than being the finest trucking section is the fact that
tender and delightful garden products are produced and
marketed at a time when the greatest section of the U. S.
is in the grip of winter, and our only competitor is the
most southernly section of California, which is, as you
know, four days from the center of population in the Uni-
ted States, while our territory is but a day and a night's

Page Fourteen




















































































































1-Tampa Bay Hotel
2-Hillsboro Hotel


3-Bay View Hotel
4-DeSoto Hotel


''
; ~;r I


'6
...


0 1 1111111 1 1 11, M I IIIIIIIIIIIINIMMI


.....,. '"
: ';-. B~~i-~n~_r"P-''(:
Ir.' ''''
.~ '7*:-












ride from the greatest consuming section of our country.
In the extreme southern portion of the State the average
length of the crop growing season is from 340 to 365 days
in the year, while that part of the peninsula which is in
the northern part of Tampa territory, has an average of
from 290 to 330 crop growing days. These figures are
taken from reports of the U. S. Weather Bureau. A few
figures will not go amiss here. According to statements
prepared by the U. S. Department of Agriculture the an-
nual average value of farm products in the states known
as farming states are: Ohio, $13.36; Illinois, $12.48;
Iowa, $12.22, and Missouri, $9.29, while the average value
of farm products in the State of Florida is $109.76 per
acre. This proves that a farmer who farms in a scientific
way, which really means intensified farming, can make as
much profit on ten acres of good Florida soil as the aver-
age farmer can make in the so-called farming states of the
North on from fifty to seventy-five or even one hundred
acres. But, let us add here, we are not advocating having
all settlers come here to take up property of five, ten and
twenty acres, but believe that if possible one should se-
cure a tract of something around fifty acres and on this
there could be enough diversified interests to keep a fam-
ily as busy as they cared to be and it would provide some-
thing that, if taken care of properly, would mean to the
average settler a living of ease after a few short years of
work applied in a business way. Farming here is like a
retail or a wholesale business, you must open up shop in
the morning, keep it open all day and leave nothing un-

Page Sixteen

























































mm' -A
Oft~a~~t


1-Seventh Avenue 3-Franklin Street at Night
2-Lafayette Street 4-Bayshore Boulevard
5-Franklin Street


..''
,.....~ '
.:
~. : i
r. : '..::
r-~
-*
i ''~~;
-~:., ...? Im~J~dr(~:


&1








L3~. ~--------~~


done when business hours are closed when the rays of
sunlight are lost in the West.
An objection may be offered to trucking, in that some
may think it will be overdone, but this is impossible.
You realize that there will be no more land and that there
will be no more territory available with our wonderful
climatic conditions until our Master changes seasons and
we all realize that is not likely. On the other hand the
population of our country is increasing steadily every
year and this is the one section that is depended upon to
keep the public supplied with delightful garden vege-
tables at a time when they are compelled to be indoors
and when it is impossible for them to get such products in
their immediate section. You probably have heard your'
grandparents tell of the time when they thought there
would be an over-production of wheat and corn. At this
time we cannot supply the demand.


ittrusf ruitb


Florida oranges and grapefruit are considered to be
the finest fruit of the citrus variety on the market, and it,
too, is such a subject that no one volume can cover the
possibilities to be offered the settler in that line. The
matter of citrus fruit culture being overdone is answered
in the same way as that of the trucking industry. You
have probably heard a great deal concerning citrus fruits,
their profits, adaptabilities to Florida, the cost of produc-
ing a grove or a box of oranges, the selling price and

Page Eighteen


,. .. . ." j ,J.T







































-:^^5 ^i
^ *- -*"As- |


lqu~


A Group of Houses of Worship


I'brrPr ~'I
11
II
r

I r


~a~P- d


r i
,,
~
1' '`*

,....,
~~?i


Q,al,



















~1 _


Bird's-Eye-View of City of Tampa, Showing Business District and Lafayette Street Bridge


Copyright, 1914, by W. A. Fishbaugh


many other phases of the industry, and what is true of one
section of Florida's citrus territory with respect to the
above, is true of another, with the exception of a few of
the minor details. It cannot be doubted that the culture
of citrus fruits in Tampa territory is profitable because
there is proof on every hand.
In dealing with Hillsborough County the following is
true and with minor changes, is adaptable to other sec-
tions in South Florida:
Hillsborough County, situated and bordering on the
arms of the Gulf of Mexico, is tempered by her tropical
mildness and renders reasonable immunity from frosts.
Bear in mind that a frost, however, is not injurious to cit-
rus fruit, but is an agent which hastens the maturity of
the fruit. However, a freeze or drop in temperature to
below 28 degrees Farenheit might be damaging, depend-
ing upon the condition of the tree. So being situated as
we are and practically immune from low temperatures

Page Twenty


*1


renders the location of Hillsborough County ideal with
reference to location for a citrus grove.
The fact that the Florida Citrus Exchange, the grow-
er's organization for the marketing of citrus fruits, has
chosen Tampa for the main office of its organization is
sufficient evidence that this county is centrally located
and offers an attraction to the grove owner. The county
is well supplied with transportation facilities for handling
the fruit which is another added attraction. And all indi-
cations point to this county as ideal for the location of a
grove.
In the neighborhood of Tampa may be found many
profitable bearing groves which offer proof that the citrus
industry is profitable and that here is an ideal location
from which to choose a site for a grove. I have in mind
one grove in particular, situated within a thirty minute,
drive from Tampa, in an automobile, which has produced,
for the past three years over eight hundred dollars per

Page Twenty-one


acre per year net, to the grove owner. For other concrete
examples of grove production there are many groves
within the boundaries of Hillsborough which might be
pointed to with pride. I point to this one as an example
for those who contemplate emigration from our Northern,
states to Florida for the purpose of engaging in one of the
most fascinating and remunerative occupations which
Florida in all her possibilities offers. The expression
"Hillsborough County offers you an opportunity for the
culture of citrus fruits which can not be surpassed by any
county in the State" is one to be commended.
Hillsborough County has many hundreds of acres
which are highly adaptable to the culture of citrus fruits
and which may be purchased for a reasonable sum.
Within the past three years this county has made many
remarkable advances in new development and the oppor-
tunities are still open for development which will repay
the investor many times the original investment. Some-


Page Twenty-two


wm'"
-Of 0

Wei,


top











thing in the neighborhood of six thousand acres have been
set to citrus grove in this county within the past two
years. The future promises to be even brighter for the
next two years than those which have passed, so let him,
who desires to investigate, visit such sections within our
boundaries as Valrico, Brandon, Limona, Seffner, River-
view, Keystone, Thonotosassa, and here you will find the
grapefruit, the orange, and the other members of the cit-
rus family, in a state of luxuriance and so it may be said,
come to Hillsborough County for your grove plantings
for its inducements are many and the field is unlimited.
We will not take up space here in giving figures for
they can be had from every nursery dealer or from every
land company that is selling citrus property.


Stock )Raistin

Like so many other questions that are brought out
concerning this State, stock raising would even require a
much larger volume than either of the foregoing. This is
a matter for every settler and investor to take up, for the
settler in a small way will want to have one or more
cows, some hogs or other kinds of stock, while the larger
property holder and heavier investor would want a wide
range and instead of having one or two heads of cattle he
would want hundreds or even thousands of them. Flor-
ida is destined to be, and has the possibilities and oppor-
tunities of making one of the greatest stock raising
states in the Union.
We have been raising stock here for years and dur-

Page Twenty-three


- -C rC, 2,7 .'r nT


1'-' .. .. I






























































































1-Telephone Exchange 2-Electric Co. Offices
3-Gas Co. Offices 4-Tampa Water Works Co. Pumping Station


~9~8~e~%~e~s~88a~:~~p~""~""~
~~:~~-i~i
;:5











ing the War between the States Florida provided almost
all the meat for the Southern armies. Since then the stock
from this State has been shipped to Cuba by steamer and
to the Northern packing plants by rail, and each year
finds more stock in the State and more people interesting
themselves in the industry. One of the greatest advan-
tages offered in this line is the fact that there is forage
practically the entire year, and there is never more than
two months of a year when you are required to feed the
stock and now with the silo which has proven its value be-
yond a doubt these two months of feeding, if it should&
happen to come every year, would not be a hardship upon
the cattle or the owner as much as it is in our Western
states where the cattle have to be fed as much as six or
seven months. Forage is an easy matter to get here for
the cattle and there are various kinds of plants and grass-
es that grow in abundance. For the investor with a rea-
sonable amount of capital and some knowledge of the
stock raising business this opportunity is one of the great-
est to be offered.


P oultry

This state is an ideal place for poultry raising, and al-
though it may sound like a small business to you, this
statement may startle you. "As much money is sent out
of the State of Florida for poultry and eggs as the total
profits from the citrus industry in all its branches." That
means that several millions of dollars are sent out of the

Page Twenty-five






























~~-. ~Lr~qr..
k ~--:'r.. "
;-, _...~-','""
P.
P C~7)~Dr

~~gTi;* ~i"' '"~
~~ 21


r 1I a ~-


B*'


a-.
r

18~ .~...._

~~1Prs~..


A Group of Clear Havana Cigar Factories


:~Cg~-r-~.
~'
I.
-1...
arrcp~-; ~-











State of Florida every year to supply the demands of our
own people.'
There are some immense chicken farms now in the
State and you will find many large flocks located in or
around almost every city, but even then we cannot begin
to supply the trade which is demanding more and more all
the time, and the poultry business does not need to be a
strict and separate farm for it has been proven and suc-
cessfully demonstrated that the poultry farm is an asset
with a citrus grove. With trucking, of course, you realize
that is a different matter, for probably you have been
bothered with chickens in your garden when your Spring
vegetables were just beginning to peep above the ground.
No expensive houses are needed in winter for shelter, and
all varieties of poultry do well in this climate. The laying
is during the winter months when the price of eggs is
highest. No extensive capital and not a great acreage is
needed. At the edge of Tampa are some ideal locations
for poultry raising. The demand in this city alone ex-
ceeds the supply of eggs to be had locally. One million,
five hundred thousand dollars is sent from Tampa annu-
ally to various states for this product. Five carloads of
eggs per week leave Tampa for Cuba.

SeaJood

At a meeting of the Fishery Congress some time ago
one of the United States Fish Commissioners made the
statement that he had fished in every state and territory
in the Union but three, and from Siberia and Behring's to

Page Twenty-seven

































































1-Centro Espanol Club, West Tampa 3-Circulo Cubano
2-Centro Asturiano Club 4-German-American Club
5-Centro Espanol Club, Ybor City











the gulfs of California and Mexico, and everything con-
sidered, he claimed Florida as being unequalled in the
richness, variety and attractions for all sorts of sports
with rod and reel. There are more than 600 varieties of
the finny tribe in Florida waters, but we are not dealing
with the sport of fishing for almost anyone knows that
with the bass, the trout, the kingfish and the tarpon, there
is no other fishing as fine, but from a business standpoint
there is an opportunity in the State of Florida for a busi-
ness that might be said is in its infancy. We need plants
of various kinds to take care of the enormous quantities
of sea food that are caught in the lakes, the rivers, the sea
and the gulf. Without these industries the fish must be
shipped while fresh and there are times when the catches
are considerably more than the demand, consequently, the
catch that must be thrown away is an entire loss. There
is an opening here for the many factories that use fish ma-
terial. Fish scraps can be had in abundance and it has
been said that from the oily varieties of fish those caught
in these waters have a greater percent of oil than those
caught in any other section. There is the opportunity
here to smoke the fish and to can the fish, and, in short, it
might be said that the opportunity for those interested in
the fish industry is unlimited. There are thousands of
tons of these fish brought to the port of Tampa in the
course of a year and there are many other towns and cit-
ies along the Gulf coast where the fishing is carried on
even more extensively. You might be surprised to know
that even the fertilizer plants operating in this state go

Page Twenty-nine


r


- --- -my U.' A







I


I


1-Masonic Temple 2-Yacht and Country Club
3-Auto and Golf Club 4-Elks' Home
5-Knights of Pythias











elsewhere to buy their fish scraps for the sole reason that
none is obtainable here.
While on this subject it might not go amiss to tell
our readers that the oysters which are caught in abund-
ance in Tampa Bay, are as fine as the finest to be had, for
they are not only sweet in taste but are large and plump
in size. The waters here for the culture of oysters is
ideal and there are thousands of acres that can be planted
with these bivalves and in this industry the opportunity
for oyster canneries is wide open. There is not one in this
section and you all know how the whole country clamors
for fine oysters during the months of the year which
contain the letter R. There is a chance in these two
branches to make immense fortunes for any man who will
be the pioneer and put his money into the development
of such industries. Tampa is the ideal location for such
businesses.

Waste-pro6uct

Millions of dollars are lost in the State of Florida
each year for the sole reason that there is waste. By this
we mean that an opportunity is being lost by men who
have a little capital and some nerve, along with good,
sound business sense, on account of them not already
knowing the situation. We need plants in the citrus
growing section of the state that can utilize the culls of
citrus fruits. The cull is the orange or grapefruit that has
fallen from the tree and been bruised, or the fruit that has
been sorted and is not of perfect shape or of perfect color

Page Thirty-one






















Showing Part of Hyde Park Residential District

and can not be shipped to other markets. One can pass
through the orange groves throughout any section and
find crate after crate of this luscious fruit lying on the
ground, and this will happen year after year and will be
left there to rot unless some men with capital will come
here and utilize this waste product. You have heard the
expression, "There are millions in it," and it may be ap-
plied with truth to this branch. Another product that is
not really a waste product needs attention; there is the
business opening in this wonderful vegetable producing
section for capital to be invested in canning and refining
plants.
In the canning plants one can hardly realize the
many things that can be used. First comes the tomato,
which can be grown in abundance, and they are some-
thing that we all know is canned throughout many sec-
tions of the country and not always sold in case lots but
in quantities of as high as 500,000 cases to one firm. Then
there is the strawberry, which has a prolific growth here
and bears abundantly. Then there are the guavas and
figs, the pineapple and the asparagus, with the wonderful
opportunity of shredded cocoanuts. There is the rhubarb,

Page Thirty-two











the pumpkin and horseradish, and the great production of
cucumbers to make into the pickles that are sold in every
section of our land, and the refining plant with the can-
ning plant to take care of the fast growing and rich in har-
vest sugar-cane which grows abundantly and which
makes the Florida cane syrup, which is known to be the
finest on the market. These items enumerated here are
but a few of the great number of crops that grow better in
Florida than in any other section.
You would be surprised if you just took a look at
some of the truck patches here, and an idea of the magni-
tude of this industry will be given you when I say there
is one celery patch of a hundred acres within just a few
miles of Tampa.


Let us advise our readers that when they buy land in
Florida they be sure and buy good soil. Find out what
the land IS first, then find out the price. Cheap land is
high priced land. This organization does not take the re-
sponsibility of picking out lands; we will not place a value
on land, and we have no land to sell, but if you are in the
market for Florida soil and will advise us of your wants
we will take pleasure in giving your information to such
responsible firms and individuals whom we think can fill
your wants. In the so-called farming states of Illinois
and Iowa, to farm properly you need at least 160 acres of
good land, which will cost you from $110.00 to $150.00 per
acre, but here in Florida it is different. We do not want
to advise you to only buy five or ten acres and try to make
you believe you will get rich in a couple of years from that
holding, but buy as much land as you can afford, say 40,
50 or 75 acres, and if handled in a businesslike way you
will not be one to want. With the same energy and the
same money on one-tenth of the land here your returns

Page Thirty-three


I IV .- w rf -66- I- ; ; -- -- __ m-wT


M . -M . l






















A Residential Suburb Near the City of Tampa

will be ten times greater. You can make a comfortable
living and a small bank account on five acres, and in
trucking five or ten acres is all one man can care for.
If you buy cheap land you will spend as much for
clearing, drainage, transportation, fertilizer and incon-
venience as it would have cost you to have bought land
which was good land at the start. Our advice to every
prospective land buyer in the State of Florida is to see the
land first, if possible, before making a purchase. If this
cannot be done then have some friend whom you can
trust act as your agent and find out what the land which
has been offered you really is.

0oo6 )0oabs

For the number of years that this State has been
really developing it exceeds every State in the Union in
good roads. Throughout this wonderful section you will
find that every county and most of the towns and the cit-
ies have provided good roads for their settlers. These
roads have been built along lines and through places and
sections where the greatest benefit will be had by the

Page Thirty-four











greatest number of inhabitants. Few of the towns and
cities are there that have not paved streets. All these,
roads wind, intermingle and join together to make the
spokes of this wonderful wheel that has been outlined on
the proceeding pages. These spokes in this wheel of op-
portunity extend throughout the whole territory and join
at the hub, which is Hillsborough County, with its more
than one million dollars' worth of good roads, and then
all form a fine net work meeting in the center, which is
Tampa, the heart of the most wonderful producing section
with the greatest opportunities to be found any place in
our great United States. Hillsborough County, of which
Tampa is the county seat, was the first county in the Uni-
ted States to vote a $1,000,000 bond issue at one time for
the purpose of building brick roads in the country dis-
tricts. We have more than twenty-five miles of these
roads now and will have seventy-five miles completed be-
fore 1915 has passed.

z5ampa
A little descriptive matter no doubt will entertain you
and it really is necessary to give you an idea of what the
heart of this great section is. Certainly you want to know
something of Tampa which is the metropolis of this terri-
tory, for Tampa is a place of business, a place of beauty,
and its hand stretches out to call you and to let you
know that opportunity is at your door. You will almost
think we have a fairyland after perusing this booklet and
seeing the photographs contained herein, which can but
give you a faint idea of what it really is, for, as has been
said in the foreword of this brochure, it would take
a much more pretentious volume and a more free hand to
do full justice to Tampa.
The area of the city is a trifle over eight miles. We
have 175 miles of streets and 75 of these are paved with

Page Thirty-five











I


A Group of Handsome Residences


-?:r. : I*>**~s







i,. .-c i ~ C-- .--- = .' Lc* *


brick or other high class paving material, then there are
several miles of rock streets which give excellent service
where traffic is not so heavy.
The assessed valuation of city property is approxi-
mately $30,000,000, which is about 50% of actual value,
giving Tampa a valuation of more than $60,000,000.

Schools

Of course you are interested in schools, and Tampa
and Hillsborough County have the finest in the State.
Six thousand pupils were enrolled on the first day of the
school year of 1914. We have had the largest graduating
class of any High school in the State as well as the largest
enrollment. All the branches which should be taught are
handled with great care here and every opportunity is
given the young men and young women to become as well
educated as any young people could be.

3fomes

The home spirit enters every phase of Tampa life.
There are institutions which make living here delightful
and satisfying. The civic awakening of the last few years
is the cry that has been taken up by the whole population.
The idea of city beautiful has been taken up more with
home life than in any other endeavor. You can find the
stately mansion or the humble cottage in our city, and
about both of them you will find an air that lets you know
it is a home. The building of bungalows has been pre-
dominant for some time past, and we do not believe there
is another city in the country which has more homes
owned by the person living therein than there is in
Tampa. It is that civic pride which is in all of us seek-
ing to own a home of our own. The home life or the so-

Page Thirty-seven


I~C~-~-~-~------







i,. .-c i ~ C-- .--- = .' Lc* *


brick or other high class paving material, then there are
several miles of rock streets which give excellent service
where traffic is not so heavy.
The assessed valuation of city property is approxi-
mately $30,000,000, which is about 50% of actual value,
giving Tampa a valuation of more than $60,000,000.

Schools

Of course you are interested in schools, and Tampa
and Hillsborough County have the finest in the State.
Six thousand pupils were enrolled on the first day of the
school year of 1914. We have had the largest graduating
class of any High school in the State as well as the largest
enrollment. All the branches which should be taught are
handled with great care here and every opportunity is
given the young men and young women to become as well
educated as any young people could be.

3fomes

The home spirit enters every phase of Tampa life.
There are institutions which make living here delightful
and satisfying. The civic awakening of the last few years
is the cry that has been taken up by the whole population.
The idea of city beautiful has been taken up more with
home life than in any other endeavor. You can find the
stately mansion or the humble cottage in our city, and
about both of them you will find an air that lets you know
it is a home. The building of bungalows has been pre-
dominant for some time past, and we do not believe there
is another city in the country which has more homes
owned by the person living therein than there is in
Tampa. It is that civic pride which is in all of us seek-
ing to own a home of our own. The home life or the so-

Page Thirty-seven


I~C~-~-~-~------











-


.. 1


A Group of Pretty Bungalows











cial life is ideal, and to either of the two, Tampa bids you
welcome.
The abodes have every convenience of the first cities
of the country and few of the inconveniences, and the at-
titude of the city departments for the sanitary good of the
people, and the attitude of the public utilities for the con-
venience of the people, makes life worth living in Tampa.

Sociat-life
The people of our city have a delightful social life,
and riches do not make the position that our men and(
women hold; it is the individual that counts, they must
make good, and the glad hand is extended to all who can
show that they are worthy.
By having a cosmopolitan city many classes of peo-
ple will be found here, but there is a feeling which pre-
vails throughout the city that makes everyone feel at
home.
Almost every denomination in religious life is repre-
sented. Tampa affords some handsome places of wor-
ship. The people are fair minded and open in their dis-
cussions.
The Y. M. C. A. has a large and handsome building
and it is operated by a competent leadership and gives a
place for the young men to get acquainted and where'
they can be entertained, and they can also advance their
education by attending classes that are taught through-
out the year.
The Y. W. C. A. has the support of the people of
Tampa and it is hoped and expected that they will have a
building of their own within a short time. Then there
are the lodges, clubs and the societies which are other
means of making the social life of Tampa more pleasant.
All of the larger national lodges have a home in Tampa,
some of them owning their own buildings, which are

Page Thirty-nine













comfortable and expensive. There are quite a number of
lodges, clubs and societies for the foreign population,
such as the German Club, Italian Club, Centro Asturiano,
Centro Espanol, Circulo Cubano, and others. Then, too,
is the club house and fine golf links, covering more than
100 acres of the Tampa Automobile and Golf Club, and
the Tampa Yacht and Country Club, which has a pretty
home on the Bay and in which are given many of the so-
ciety functions of the year. And added to all of this are
several very pretty parks, of which Plant Park is the most
beautiful, for this is known as one of the prettiest, if not
the prettiest, park in the South. It borders on the Hills-
borough river and is filled with tropical vegetation which
makes the park a place of beauty throughout the year.
There are the playgrounds which are located in different
sections, which have proved to be one of the greatest in-
vestments the city has ever made, for it provides a place
where the children can enjoy themselves without being
on the public thoroughfare. Last, but far from being
least, is the public library which is in course of construc-
tion and will be completed in April, 1915. This is a hand-
some building and will not only be a convenience to our
M O E 11111I -


F-?


Country Road Scenes Near the City


II ...


r __ -. ...


.... I '''i.
~r c
-4'. a
I "r
: ..c
s~ .;
;~ -3
h 'I(~l~ai
c 9'lk 'f, J
.. !.ia"d~4
k ;
-










whole population but will be an added attraction for the
city.

Z1be nobpy oltfic
The administration of affairs of Tampa will compare
favorably with that of any other city. They have been
most efficient and successful from a business standpoint.
The attitude of the Mayor, the Council, the Committees,
the heads of the various departments, the Commissioners
and Boards are progressive and at the same time conser-
vative. Much good has been accomplished by the various
bodies and the welfare of the city has been their foremost
thought. Some of the things that are of interest to our
people and to the newcomer which has been carried on by
this body during the past two years, are mentioned here.
A large site in connection with the site already owned by
the city was purchased and on it is being erected a munic-
ipal building to cost almost a quarter of a million dollars,
and which will be as fine a city hall as can be found in any
city near our size. The site for the library was purchas-
ed, as were the sites for several parks and playgrounds.
The handsome Lafayette Street Bridge was erected and
is an asset that would do justice to cities a great deal lar-
ger than Tampa. The city hospital was added to with an
addition and its capacity has been increased considerably.
The Tampa Bay Hotel, valued at $5,000,000, with its
beautiful grounds, is owned by the city, and it has been
repaired and kept in first class condition from year toi
year. There is a city athletic park which has a half-mile;
dirt track, a baseball diamond, a football gridiron, an arm-
ory, and a large grandstand and bleachers, and it is in this
park where national leaders of the national game do their
spring practicing. A new sewerage system has been in-
stalled at a cost of about $700,000, this is of the Imhoff
plan and considered to be the finest system in use. Many

Page Forty-one










of the streets have been paved, sidewalks have been laid
and water-front property has been purchased. A seawall
has been constructed at places fronting the Bay and the
Bayshore Drive of a mile in length is one of the prettiest
drives in the country. This street is illuminated with or-
namental gas lights making it a bright drive by day or
night, and at the back of this drive are many handsome
homes with beautiful surroundings.
The police protection of the city is good and the
Gamewell signal system is used and has been a great help
to the law enforcers in keeping the city free of criminals.
The fire department is efficient and is not only commend-
ed by the people of Tampa but by the fire insurance un-
derwriters of the State, and the South.

Care of tt) Sick
Tampa is a health city and we boast of having hospi-
tals and sanatoriums of the best. The Gordon Keller
Memorial Hospital is maintained by the city and all mod-
ern appliances and conveniences with a delightful sur-


Residential Street Scenes in Tampa























Tampa Bay Hotel and Plant Park-Both Owned by the City


rounding is something of which we boast. The county
has a hospital and there is an old folks' home and a chil-
dren's home. There are other sanatoriums maintained by
various clubs and societies which are beautiful buildings
in delightful grounds and are fitted with modern appli-
ances and comforts. Other than these there are various
private sanatoriums where treatment is excellent.
Mineral springs are numerous throughout the out-
lying districts and this water is used by a great number
of people. There is Sulphur Springs, which flows at the
rate of 30,000 gallons per minute and is the largest of the
mineral springs in Tampa's vicinity, but there are many
others of lesser size that are as important or even com-
mand more importance by some of the people. The sani-
tary department is responsible in a way for the good
health prevailing in the city; garbage is gathered at reg--
ular intervals and all is burned in a crematory. It is also:
this department that sprinkles and keeps the streets-
clean. The restaurants, bakeries, dairies and food pro-
duct houses are inspected at regular intervals and the re-


Page Forty-three


ports published. This has caused the owner to look after
the sanitary conditions more closely than in many other
cities.
What few flies that may be found are swatted, but
then almost every visitor to the City of Tampa makes the
remark that we have so few flies in this section. We have'
some mosquitoes, but there are not more of them here
than in the middle states and this statement is borne out
by the fact that on almost any summer evening you can
ride along and see families sitting on the veranda, which
is unscreened. Tampa's air, its surface and its under-
ground, has nothing to denote sickness and many are the
persons who come here in the last stages of different ail-
ments, find relief and often is the case where permanent
health is restored.
Whether sick or well Tampa is good to come to. To
get an idea as to Tampa's healthfulness we might add
here that Tampa's death rate for the year of 1914 was 16.6.
Compare that with other cities and you will see that
Tampa is a healthy place to live in.


Page Forty-four






















1-In Ballast Point Park 2-At the Golf Links


Florida is known the world over for being a winter
resort, and figures that can be had from the Government
Weather Bureau is proof enough that Tampa's climate is
as near ideal as it is possible to get. Our summer climate
is delightful for it is then we have our so-called rainy sea-
son, which cools the atmosphere and makes the climatic
conditions delightful. The maximum temperature rarely
reaches 95 degrees and then it is only for a duration of an
hour or so. Every night is delightful for we have the
breezes from the water which makes one comfortable
when other sections of the United States are sweltering
with the heat. The reverse is true during the winter
months, for it is then that our Northern neighbors must
endure the snow, the slush and the cold, while in this sec-
tion we are comfortable without fires for any length of
time and with clothing that is comfortable during the
Spring and Fall of the year in other sections. The re-
port herewith is no doubt interesting, and covers a period
of twenty-five years.

Page Forty-five


~g~pMATWXa, MUM s11


Totimatir. Tonbittons










Mean Max. Mean Min. Average Rainfall Rainfall
Ta Fla. Temp. Temp. Rainfall for for
ampa,a. for for 25 Years 1913 1914
25 Years 25 Years [Inches] [Inches] [Inches]
January 69.0 51.2 2.69 1.09 4.27
February 70.4 52.6 2.76 4.02 3.43
March 76.5 57.9 2.37 3.09 1.22
April 80.2 61.4 1.73 1.39 2.50
May 85.7 67.2 2.59 1.49 1.03
June 88.6 71.5 7.92 6.75 4.73
July 89.1 73.2 7.98 7.01 6.21
August 89.2 73.5 8.08 11.08 5.64
September 88.0 71.8 7.22 2.44 6.30
October 82.0 65.6 2.70 1.54 4.45
November 75.8 57.9 1.72 0.27 2.05
December 70.1 52.2 2.01 4.20 4.93
Year 80.4 63.0 49.77 44.37 46.76
Book compiled during January, 1915, using
average for 25 years.

nNan kin
No barometer can be used that shows more conclu-


1-Centro Espanol Sanitorium 2-Gordon Keller Hospital
3-Centro Asturiano Sanitorium


















i I


I


1-Eggplant Patch 3-Watermelon Patch
2-Cabbage Patch 4-Orange Groves
5-A Four-year-old Grapefruit Tree










sively the growth of a community than the banking insti-
tutions and clearing houses. The total clearances of our
banks in the past year were over $53,500,000, and it has
been a gain from year to year, and the industry is carried
on by men of affairs of Tampa and who are among the
ablest business men of the city. They have the busi-
ness interest of the community always in mind. The
bank's industrial influence and advice from their officers
has done much to keep the business interests on a level
and conservative plan. Our citizens feel secure and ab-
solute safety in their dealings with the local institutions.
Handsome homes are owned by these institutions and
they are forever pushing forward.

hotelss
We all realize that the best hotels of a city must have
capable managements and render good service as well as
look after the needs and comforts of the public. Tampa
has some large hotels and it is more trouble to find more
room for the public who desire hotels that it is to find
people to fill the hotels already established. One new
ten-story hotel was opened this year and that will help to
take care of the fast increasing number of people coming
to Tampa at all times. The rates are reasonable and the
service is excellent. There are about twenty hotels of
various sizes within the city, and accommodations to suit
the traveler can be had at almost any daily rate, accord-
ing to his needs and desire.

S2ercantile interests
Tampa enjoys an enviable reputation as a trading
center and the retail merchants of the city form a most
prominent feature in the general activity of business.
This is the shopping center of a large territory and in the

Page Forty-eight










sively the growth of a community than the banking insti-
tutions and clearing houses. The total clearances of our
banks in the past year were over $53,500,000, and it has
been a gain from year to year, and the industry is carried
on by men of affairs of Tampa and who are among the
ablest business men of the city. They have the busi-
ness interest of the community always in mind. The
bank's industrial influence and advice from their officers
has done much to keep the business interests on a level
and conservative plan. Our citizens feel secure and ab-
solute safety in their dealings with the local institutions.
Handsome homes are owned by these institutions and
they are forever pushing forward.

hotelss
We all realize that the best hotels of a city must have
capable managements and render good service as well as
look after the needs and comforts of the public. Tampa
has some large hotels and it is more trouble to find more
room for the public who desire hotels that it is to find
people to fill the hotels already established. One new
ten-story hotel was opened this year and that will help to
take care of the fast increasing number of people coming
to Tampa at all times. The rates are reasonable and the
service is excellent. There are about twenty hotels of
various sizes within the city, and accommodations to suit
the traveler can be had at almost any daily rate, accord-
ing to his needs and desire.

S2ercantile interests
Tampa enjoys an enviable reputation as a trading
center and the retail merchants of the city form a most
prominent feature in the general activity of business.
This is the shopping center of a large territory and in the

Page Forty-eight




































































1-Cauliflower Patch
3-Marketing Lettuce
5-Strawberry Patch


2-Tomato Patch
4-Cabbage Patch
6-Celery Patch











establishments of Tampa retail merchants can be supplied
almost any want that can be had in cities several times as
large.
Every class and kind of business is well represented
on our busy streets, the establishments are modern and
their proprietors are men of successful affairs who carry
for their customers the very best merchandise which the
world has to offer at a price which is in keeping with any
other section of the country. The stores are well lighted
and the windows are tastefully trimmed and decorated.
The interior decorations and fixtures are of the latest de-
sign and people for many miles around are attracted to
Tampa by the reputation of its retail stores and for their
metropolitan method of conducting business.

Wholesale interests
One statement should be conclusive that the whole-
sale and jobbing business of Tampa is termed excellent.
"Tampa's wholesale business twenty years ago was prac-
tically covered by one wholesale grocery establishment
and the volume of business amounted to about $25,000 per
month, but now the wholesale grocery business alone
amounts to $1,000,000 per month and the manufacturing,
jobbing and wholesale business of Tampa i's more than
$30,000,000 annually." The heads of Tampa establish-
ments are all good business men who believe in helping
their customers, and it is in this way that the magnitude
of their business has grown wonderfully. Nothing but
fair treatment on the part of wholesale dealers could
bring about such a wonderful business growth as has
been the case among the Tampa firms in the past
few years. The usual wholesale houses in a city of 100,-
000 population are located in Tampa and there is an air of
prosperity about all of these places that shows all persons
that the situation is entirely satisfactory.

Page Fifty



































A.


Scenes During the Gasparilla Carnival in February







I- -_ ..RV v


IA AM pJxr FLUNRIDN.,


manufacturing
First of all Tampa leads the world in the manufacture
of clear Havana cigars with more than two hundred fac-
tories whose output is about one million cigars daily,
which is more than the total of the whole island of Cuba
and any other one city in the United States. Other than
this line of manufacturing activity we have plants in the
following branches and of many of them there are more
than one establishment: Wood working, wagon plant,
auto tops, ornamental stone, phosphate shipping, fertili-
zer plant, broom factory, foundries, marine ways, trunk
factory, automobile tire works, awning and tents, bottling
works, cement blocks, coffee mills, confectioners, bakers,
ice plant, ice cream factories, printing, cigar box factories,
manufacturing jewelers, laundries, macaroni factories,
brewery, art metal works, upholsterers, potato chip fac-
tory, automobile branch, barrels, blacksmith, cider and
vinegar, oil refineries, engraving plant, disinfectant fac-
tory, furniture makers, gasoline lamp factory, paint fac-
tory, harness maker, safe and lock works, mattress fac-
tory, slaughter house, novelty factory, packing house,
planing mills, sand and shell, storage company, tile man-
ufacturer.


There are two high class daily papers in Tampa
which have full leased wire service of the Associated
Press. The Times is published in the evening, six days
a week, and the Tribune is published seven days a week
in the morning. They also publish weekly papers, and
then there are many other publications in the city, week-
ly, semi-weekly and monthly. The Tampa press is lib-
eral and fair minded and the public is more than satisfied
with the amount of good that is being done by these pub-

Page Fifty-two


rL - . ....--







I- -_ ..RV v


IA AM pJxr FLUNRIDN.,


manufacturing
First of all Tampa leads the world in the manufacture
of clear Havana cigars with more than two hundred fac-
tories whose output is about one million cigars daily,
which is more than the total of the whole island of Cuba
and any other one city in the United States. Other than
this line of manufacturing activity we have plants in the
following branches and of many of them there are more
than one establishment: Wood working, wagon plant,
auto tops, ornamental stone, phosphate shipping, fertili-
zer plant, broom factory, foundries, marine ways, trunk
factory, automobile tire works, awning and tents, bottling
works, cement blocks, coffee mills, confectioners, bakers,
ice plant, ice cream factories, printing, cigar box factories,
manufacturing jewelers, laundries, macaroni factories,
brewery, art metal works, upholsterers, potato chip fac-
tory, automobile branch, barrels, blacksmith, cider and
vinegar, oil refineries, engraving plant, disinfectant fac-
tory, furniture makers, gasoline lamp factory, paint fac-
tory, harness maker, safe and lock works, mattress fac-
tory, slaughter house, novelty factory, packing house,
planing mills, sand and shell, storage company, tile man-
ufacturer.


There are two high class daily papers in Tampa
which have full leased wire service of the Associated
Press. The Times is published in the evening, six days
a week, and the Tribune is published seven days a week
in the morning. They also publish weekly papers, and
then there are many other publications in the city, week-
ly, semi-weekly and monthly. The Tampa press is lib-
eral and fair minded and the public is more than satisfied
with the amount of good that is being done by these pub-

Page Fifty-two


rL - . ....--





























































Surf Bathing-Spring Water Pool-Fishing from the Docks and
Motion Picture Theatres


I ,ows.ImAM
NNUM~


..I ~

f
s~.~'*~
.' ~s~ ~.
9. .~~~.~.: ..,


........




10 1
: :-91 1










locations from day to day. Sample copies of the daily pa-
pers will be mailed to all those who request and we feel
safe in saying that no city in the Union of double the pop-
ulation of Tampa has a better paper than either one of
those published in this city. It can truly be said they are
metropolitan newspapers.

Transportation
This is a line of achievement of which Tampa can
justly be proud, for we are served well with both water
and rail facilities. The railroads represented are the Sea-
board Air Line, the Atlantic Coast Line, the Tampa Nor-
thern and the Tampa and Gulf Coast, which are complet-
ed lines and are serving the whole country advantageous-
ly, and there are two proposed lines, with Tampa as a ter-
minus, crossing the State from east to west about one-half
way between the center and the southern extremities of
the peninsula.

commerce
Every one of the above named transportation lines
handle a large volume of business and for water transpor-
tation we have a depth of twenty-four feet in the channels
and implements of commerce such as loading elevators,
discharging elevators and warehouses that would be a
credit to some of the larger ports along the northern At-
lantic. Our commerce is steadily increasing as you will
no doubt know when you are told that the Federal Gov-
ernment has deepened our channel from eight feet to
twenty-four feet in fifteen years, and a survey has just
been completed with a view to giving us a depth of thirty
feet. The deep sea commerce handled through the Port
of Tampa last year totaled about two and a quarter mil-
lion tons, valued at more than $37,000,000.

Page Fifty-four










locations from day to day. Sample copies of the daily pa-
pers will be mailed to all those who request and we feel
safe in saying that no city in the Union of double the pop-
ulation of Tampa has a better paper than either one of
those published in this city. It can truly be said they are
metropolitan newspapers.

Transportation
This is a line of achievement of which Tampa can
justly be proud, for we are served well with both water
and rail facilities. The railroads represented are the Sea-
board Air Line, the Atlantic Coast Line, the Tampa Nor-
thern and the Tampa and Gulf Coast, which are complet-
ed lines and are serving the whole country advantageous-
ly, and there are two proposed lines, with Tampa as a ter-
minus, crossing the State from east to west about one-half
way between the center and the southern extremities of
the peninsula.

commerce
Every one of the above named transportation lines
handle a large volume of business and for water transpor-
tation we have a depth of twenty-four feet in the channels
and implements of commerce such as loading elevators,
discharging elevators and warehouses that would be a
credit to some of the larger ports along the northern At-
lantic. Our commerce is steadily increasing as you will
no doubt know when you are told that the Federal Gov-
ernment has deepened our channel from eight feet to
twenty-four feet in fifteen years, and a survey has just
been completed with a view to giving us a depth of thirty
feet. The deep sea commerce handled through the Port
of Tampa last year totaled about two and a quarter mil-
lion tons, valued at more than $37,000,000.

Page Fifty-four






















Along the Waterfront


Commercial Tnstitution
The Tampa Board of Trade, under whose auspices
this booklet is published, endeavors to carry on work
which covers a broad and far-reaching area. Its duties
are many more than can possibly be mentioned here, but
among the foremost is the gathering and disseminating
of statistics that are reliable and accurate; to give to those
interested in this section a general idea in truth of what
they might expect should they make a visit to this sec-
tion; to stand for such activities and developments that
will be of most value to most people; to deal in civic mat-
ters that tend to build up the community; to interest cap-
ital to invest in various properties in need of develop-'
ment; to work for better conditions and facilities pertain-:
ing to our port; to be of benefit to the public in the way
of having a power with transportation companies to af-
ford better service. In fact, the duties of the organization
are to work for the betterment of conditions for our peo-
ple, to take up matters of national, state and local import-



Page Fifty-five


ance that will be of benefit to the community; to protest
and work against matters that we feel would be a detri-
ment to the community. We herald information through-
out the world to all interested parties telling of the won-
derful opportunities and possibilities that await them in
Tampa and its territory. We stand for Tampa first, for
Hillsborough County next, and for our wonderful pro-
ducing section of South Florida and everything that will
be of interest to it that can be handled by the organiza-
tion.
The Tampa Board of Trade is composed of the fore-
most business men in our community who are looking to-
wards the welfare and up-building of the entire section.
To Tampa, the metropolis of South Florida and the
fastest growing city in America, we bid you welcome. A
thousand times the amount of literature we could send
you could not make as favorable an impression of this
wonderful country as would a personal investigation.
Your correspondence solicited, but come and look,-
you will cast your lot among us and you will be satisfied.



Page Fifty-six






























































Shipping Scenes and Government Vessels, Showing Water Commerce Activity



































,.,
. /ox.2 ~ iL





..r 4: .....


























Scenes of 'Tampa's Harbor, Showing Ma~rine Activity and Cargo-I-Iandling Fiacilities
I'























































































mall


... di
., -tt '~







IrI








LAJU




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs