• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Tampa for health, pleasure, and...
 Tampa is the healthiest city in...
 Cost of living
 Opportunities
 Growth in population
 Public schools
 Bank deposits
 Hillsborough County
 Tampa climatological condition
 A minister says our summers are...
 Comparative statistics
 Pay-roll of Tampa's industries
 Florida agricultural
 What our soil produces
 21,307 miles of cigars manufactured...
 Building material
 Tampa and the panama canal
 Tampa "growing by doing"
 Back Cover






Title: Tampa for health, pleasure, and profit
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027722/00001
 Material Information
Title: Tampa for health, pleasure, and profit
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Tampa Board of Trade
 Subjects
Subject: Tampa, Fla.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States -- Florida -- Tampa
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027722
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Tampa for health, pleasure, and profit
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Tampa is the healthiest city in the world
        Page 4
    Cost of living
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Opportunities
        Page 6
    Growth in population
        Page 6
    Public schools
        Page 6
    Bank deposits
        Page 6
    Hillsborough County
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Tampa climatological condition
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    A minister says our summers are delightful
        Page 13
    Comparative statistics
        Page 13
    Pay-roll of Tampa's industries
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Florida agricultural
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    What our soil produces
        Page 19
        Page 20
    21,307 miles of cigars manufactured of clear Havana tobacco in Tampa in a year
        Page 21
    Building material
        Page 21
    Tampa and the panama canal
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Tampa "growing by doing"
        Page 23
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text











TA M P A
Holds out to you the tempt-
ing boon of a delightfully-
beautiful natural setting in
a charming, picturesque,
sub-tropical country, laved
with the waters of the Gulf
of Mexico


TA M P A
Holds ready for you many
business opportunities,
sound, substantial, and
desirable. It extends a
hearty welcome alike to the
tourist, homeseeker, investor,
and farmer


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TAMPA, FLA.



THE TAMPA BOARD OF TRADE
F. C. BOWYER, President
W. G. BRORIEN, E. D. HOBBS,
1st Vice-President 2d Vice-President
J. A. GRIFFIN, WILLIS B. POWELL,
Treasurer Secretary
BOARD OF GOVERNORS:
M. W. Carruth D. B. McKay
W. F. Stovall Frank Bruen
Chester R. McFarland A. Nistal
Eugene Holtsinger T. Ed Bryan
V. Greco W. C. Thomas
Geo. N. Benjamin C. E. Ball
Ed. M. Hendry C. Fred Thompson
Salvador V. M. Ybor








TAMPA FOR HEALTH, PLEASURE,
AND PROFIT
No part of the world holds a monopoly on the opportunities for
health, or for wealth, or for happiness. These things depend much
on the individual. But wealth most often, and happiness always,
are dependent upon health; and that city is most contented and
prosperous where nature does not demand eternal vigilance and
unceasing toil as the price of a comfortable habitat and a sound
body. Such a city is Tampa.
This book aims to answer accurately the questions most com-
monly asked concerning this city. Its statements are facts. And
an effort has been made to present these facts in a conservative
manner.
Tampa offers much to the one whose bodily frailty makes living
in regions of extreme heat or cold, or of sudden and violent changes
in temperature, a burden to himself and to others. To the seeker
after rest or recreation, in change of environment; to the one who
would spend a vacation, at whatever season of the year may be
convenient, under conditions that are certain to be wholly delight-
ful; to the man who would build a home where the price of exist-
ence is not a ceaseless struggle against titanic forces, but where
nature works with man, and living is a joy; or who would establish
himself in a community whose material prosperity is great and
rapidly increasing,- Tampa has attractions and opportunities that
cannot be equaled.
Twenty years ago Tampa was an insignificant village of much
less than one thousand people, located at the head of navigation
on Hillsborough Bay. It was then active, had business in propor-
tion to its size, and was the metropolis of the sparsely settled country
for a hundred miles in various directions. To-day Tampa is a city
of over 50,000 people, cosmopolitan in its character and thoroughly
metropolitan. It is to-day the metropolis of all South Florida and
the city always keeps a little ahead of the growth of its "back coun-


try." Within the past fifteen years Tampa has extended its "tribu-
tary territory" from the inclusion of six counties to twelve, with
partial possession of several others. Those counties which indis-
putably belong commercially to Tampa contain one hundred and
seventy-five thousand people in the most flourishing and prosperous
condition in the country. This territory is being continually ex-
panded by the energy of the jobbing and manufacturing trade of
the city, and the time is coming when it will embrace the greater
portion of the entire State of Florida. There is ample field for the
employment of additional millions of capital and hundreds of men
in this department of commercial activity.
Tampa is picturesquely situated on an arm of the Gulf, having
the Hillsborough Bay on one side and Old Tampa Bay on the other.
The Gulf of Mexico lies sixteen miles south at the convergence to
the two bays. It is located on the best harbor in all the Southern
States. Tampa, by virtue of her superb geographical location, and
possessing a complete land-locked harbor, large enough to float the
navies of the world and the commerce of all nations, has distinct
advantages over all other seaport cities. That this is true is evi-
denced in the recent appropriation by the National Government to
deepen the channel up to the city, and the recommendation of the
United States engineers for twenty-four feet of water to the city,
and the extension of this channel through the estuary, giving Tampa
five more miles of dockage.
Tampa has the distinction of having been chosen the port of
embarkment for the army for the invasion of Cuba, it having at
that time sufficient harbor and shipping facilities to accommodate
the vast fleet of transports. During that period it was a significant
fact that forty-two transports, lying end to end, were loaded at one
time from freight cars broadside to them. This was said to be the
only port in the civilized world, at that time, where such extensive
shipping facilities could be found.
Tampa is the most convenient location to the Central, South
American, and West Indian ports, and is preparing to handle the







vast commerce coming into the Gulf from the Panama Canal. Steam-
ship and sailing lines operate regular schedules from this city to
Havana, Key West, Mobile, New Orleans, Philadelphia, New York,
South and Central Americas, and many coastwise points, while
"tramps," floating the flags of all nations, are coming and going at
all times. The imports are principally merchandise, tobacco, and
fruits, while the exports are cigars, lumber, naval stores, phosphate,
cattle, chickens, and eggs.
In 1886 began the location of factories in the manufacture of
Havana cigars. The advantages found here were an irresistible
attraction to the leading men engaged in the business, and they came
by scores, bringing with them thousands of employes and their
families. These, in turn, found a place of residence which suited
them exactly, and now they constitute a very large and important
element of the population. At the present time there are nearly
two hundred cigar factories located in Tampa and making nearly
one million of high-grade, clear Havana cigars each working day.
That this business is founded on conditions which cannot be dupli-
cated in the entire world is an indisputable fact, and at the present
writing a number of factories located in New York, Philadelphia,
and other Atlantic coast cities are making arrangements to move
their factories to this city. While the cigar industry is the principal
one of Tampa, there are others of commercial importance. Con-
spicuous among these are the large wood-working concerns, which
employ nearly one thousand men regularly in the manufacture of
everything that hard-pine wood can be turned into, while others
manufacture the finest show cases and office fixtures made from
cypress and hard wood, which abounds in the neighboring forests.
There are a number of furniture, wagon, and carriage factories, iron
foundries and machine shops, employing numbers of the most skill-
ful and highest-paid mechanics. Two shipyards employ scores of
high-paid men, while the box factories, manufacturing cigar boxes
and crates and baskets used to market the cigars and vegetables,
give employment to hundreds of men, women, and children. Other


industries incident to a manufacturing center are concrete stone
works, marble and monumental works, brickyards, ice factories,
street-car shops, macaroni factories, brewery, bottling plants, blank-
book manufactories, candy, shoe, and hat factories, proprietary
medicines, paints, mattresses, varnishes, and brooms. A significant
feature of Tampa's commerce is the immense amount of business
derived each year from its fishing industry. The total value of the
fish product reaches $1,000,000 per annum and furnishes employ-
ment for one thousand men. Linked to this is the great sponge-
fishing industry, which gives employment to over eleven hundred
men; the value of the sponge fisheries being more than $1,000,000
per annum.
Tampa is delightfully situated as a residential city. No other
American city has such a wealth of foliage, gigantic oaks, magnolia,
camphor, and palm trees, and exotics, and a luxury of glorious
shrubbery peculiar only to this clime, adorning its broad streets,
that makes the city beautiful.
Tampa is rich in historical lore. Its society is cultured and it
possesses all the influences that make the city attractive. All
classes of society are found as in other States, and the question of
nativity, antecedents, and political views create as few distinctions
as can probably be found in any community in the South. The
stranger is always accorded a welcome and the new-comer finds a
hospitable greeting.
As a place of residence, Tampa offers many advantages. It has
a fine public-school system, and our professors of law, music, and
medicine rank high; while the clergy of Tampa hold a position of
commanding influence.
A great factor in the upbuilding of Tampa is its civic pride.
However they may be divided on other questions, the people are a
unit on everything that affects the prosperity of the city.

Tampa has long been noted for its delightful winter climate, and
the city has become a great resort for tourists and health seekers.
It is hard for people from the higher latitudes to realize that Tampa




































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WHERE FIFTY-TWO PER CENT. OF THE PHOSPHATE OF THE WORLD IS EXPORTED

THE LARGEST CIGAR-BOX FACTORY IN THE WORLD

A BUSY SCENE ALONG THE RIVER

ONE OF THE 177 CIGAR FACTORIES OF TAMPA WHERE A FAVORITE BRAND OF CIGAR
IS MADE







is, in summer, cooler by far than the average American city a
fact verified by the official weather records, which we present in
this book on another page. The nights are always cool and breezy,
and very few days are uncomfortably warm.
The suburbs, so easily accessible in every direction by rapid
transit, are pictures restful and refreshing. The street-car systems
give easy access to De Soto Park, Ballast Point, Palmaceia Springs,
Sulphur Springs, Palmetto Beach, and other resorts; while hard
roads lead to Frazier's Beach, Indian Rock, Rocky Point, River
View, and other attractive places. The tourists also enjoy our
fishing, boating, and winter trips on palatial steamers to the beau-
tiful resort towns of St. Petersburg, "the Land of Manatee,"
Sarasota, Tarpon Springs, Clearwater, Green Springs, and other
places.


TAMPA IS THE HEALTHIEST CITY IN
THE WORLD
Death rate in cities where the colored population is at least ten
per cent. of the entire population, Mortality Statistics, 1907, com-
piled by Department of Commerce and Labor, Bureau of Census,
Washington, D. C.:


Raleigh, N. C., ..
Petersburg, Va., .
San Antonio, Texas,
Charleston, S. C., .
Alexandria, Va., .
Frederick, Md.,
Atlanta, Ga., .
Mobile, Ala., .
Fresno, Cal., .
Savannah, Ga.,
New Orleans, La., .
Winchester, Pa.,


31.6
29.7
28.8
27.2
25.0
24.7
24.6
24.4
24.4
24.2
24.0
23.5


Galveston, Texas, .
Washington, D. C.,.
Wilmington, Del., .
Baltimore, Md., .
Memphis, Tenn., .
Louisville, Ky., .
Kansas City, Mo., .
Atlantic City, N. J.,
Portland, Oregon,
Jeffersonville, Ind.,.
Leavenworth, Kan.,
TAMPA, FLORIDA,


COST OF LIVING
Necessaries of life are as low in Tampa as in the North. To
substantiate this statement, here follows prices on staples and
articles of known brands, which prices were taken from a current
issue of one of the Tampa newspapers:
Sirloin steak, .. 12c. per lb. Clover Bloom butter, 35c. per lb.
Round steak, 10 Seedless raisins, 12
Chuck steak, 8 Curtice Bros. Blue Label corn,
Pot roasts, .. 6 2-lb. tins, $1 per dozen.
Stew of beef,. 5 Kerosene, . 15c. per gal.
California ham, 12- Gasoline, . 12
Regular ham, 15 Firewood, . $4.50
Best flour, $1 per 24 lb. Gas, per 1,000, $1.50
Eggs, 35c. per doz. Electricity, per kw., 12c.
Water, 17c. per hundred cubic feet for first 5,000 cubic feet, grad-
uating to 9c. per hundred cubic feet.
Furniture as cheap as in North, and need less and of lighter kind.
Fewer rugs, upholstering, and curtain stuff used.
Milk is 10c. a quart; ice, $5 a ton; fruit and vegetable prices are
controlled by Northern market and range high, but any one with
a few square feet of back lot can raise vegetables and have orange
trees and the fruit therefrom.
Low cost of necessities of life made possible by superior transporta-
tion facilities by sea and rail, making Tampa a competitive point.
One can live in Tampa from 20 to 40 per cent. cheaper than in the
North and LIVE BETTER.
Rents for cottages range from $8 a month up to $40 for two-story
eight-room dwelling. It is all according to location. Rents
range lower than any other city of the same size in the North.
Furnished rooms for one and two people range from $2 a week to $6.
Rooms for light housekeeping, from $3 a week up. Board and rooms,
from $4 a week up. Good board and room can be had for $5 a week.
Restaurant meals range from 25c. up. Day board, from $3 a week
up. $4 a week is an average price for day board of three meals
daily less when lunch is taken up-town.







is, in summer, cooler by far than the average American city a
fact verified by the official weather records, which we present in
this book on another page. The nights are always cool and breezy,
and very few days are uncomfortably warm.
The suburbs, so easily accessible in every direction by rapid
transit, are pictures restful and refreshing. The street-car systems
give easy access to De Soto Park, Ballast Point, Palmaceia Springs,
Sulphur Springs, Palmetto Beach, and other resorts; while hard
roads lead to Frazier's Beach, Indian Rock, Rocky Point, River
View, and other attractive places. The tourists also enjoy our
fishing, boating, and winter trips on palatial steamers to the beau-
tiful resort towns of St. Petersburg, "the Land of Manatee,"
Sarasota, Tarpon Springs, Clearwater, Green Springs, and other
places.


TAMPA IS THE HEALTHIEST CITY IN
THE WORLD
Death rate in cities where the colored population is at least ten
per cent. of the entire population, Mortality Statistics, 1907, com-
piled by Department of Commerce and Labor, Bureau of Census,
Washington, D. C.:


Raleigh, N. C., ..
Petersburg, Va., .
San Antonio, Texas,
Charleston, S. C., .
Alexandria, Va., .
Frederick, Md.,
Atlanta, Ga., .
Mobile, Ala., .
Fresno, Cal., .
Savannah, Ga.,
New Orleans, La., .
Winchester, Pa.,


31.6
29.7
28.8
27.2
25.0
24.7
24.6
24.4
24.4
24.2
24.0
23.5


Galveston, Texas, .
Washington, D. C.,.
Wilmington, Del., .
Baltimore, Md., .
Memphis, Tenn., .
Louisville, Ky., .
Kansas City, Mo., .
Atlantic City, N. J.,
Portland, Oregon,
Jeffersonville, Ind.,.
Leavenworth, Kan.,
TAMPA, FLORIDA,


COST OF LIVING
Necessaries of life are as low in Tampa as in the North. To
substantiate this statement, here follows prices on staples and
articles of known brands, which prices were taken from a current
issue of one of the Tampa newspapers:
Sirloin steak, .. 12c. per lb. Clover Bloom butter, 35c. per lb.
Round steak, 10 Seedless raisins, 12
Chuck steak, 8 Curtice Bros. Blue Label corn,
Pot roasts, .. 6 2-lb. tins, $1 per dozen.
Stew of beef,. 5 Kerosene, . 15c. per gal.
California ham, 12- Gasoline, . 12
Regular ham, 15 Firewood, . $4.50
Best flour, $1 per 24 lb. Gas, per 1,000, $1.50
Eggs, 35c. per doz. Electricity, per kw., 12c.
Water, 17c. per hundred cubic feet for first 5,000 cubic feet, grad-
uating to 9c. per hundred cubic feet.
Furniture as cheap as in North, and need less and of lighter kind.
Fewer rugs, upholstering, and curtain stuff used.
Milk is 10c. a quart; ice, $5 a ton; fruit and vegetable prices are
controlled by Northern market and range high, but any one with
a few square feet of back lot can raise vegetables and have orange
trees and the fruit therefrom.
Low cost of necessities of life made possible by superior transporta-
tion facilities by sea and rail, making Tampa a competitive point.
One can live in Tampa from 20 to 40 per cent. cheaper than in the
North and LIVE BETTER.
Rents for cottages range from $8 a month up to $40 for two-story
eight-room dwelling. It is all according to location. Rents
range lower than any other city of the same size in the North.
Furnished rooms for one and two people range from $2 a week to $6.
Rooms for light housekeeping, from $3 a week up. Board and rooms,
from $4 a week up. Good board and room can be had for $5 a week.
Restaurant meals range from 25c. up. Day board, from $3 a week
up. $4 a week is an average price for day board of three meals
daily less when lunch is taken up-town.

























































POST-OFFICE AND CATHEDRAL ONE OF THE SPANISH RESTAURANTS
CITY PARK AND TAMPA BAY HOTEL-OWNED BY CITY OF TAMPA
STREET SCENE AND HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY COURT HOUSE THE SPANISH CLUB








OPPORTUNITIES
The future for Tampa is bright. It is destined to become a city
of 100,000 population within a few years. Tampa has never had a
boom in fact, its people guard against "booming." Its growth is
steady and solid.
The Board is requested scores of times each month to secure
employment for those who desire to escape the cold climate of the
North others come here without first asking advice and find no
positions open to them. This is a condition in all favored resort
places.
We desire to state that clerical positions are well-filled; common
labor is largely performed by negroes; mechanics and artisans are
referred to the Central Trades Labor Assembly's secretary; we do
encourage salaried people to come to Tampa.
Tampa does want, however, men of initiative, who can see and
take advantage of various rich opportunities. We need settlers on
our lands the whole North is the market place for the products
of the soil. We need men who can take the refuse from the saw-
mill and make clothespins, crate material, lath, etc.; who can distill
turpentine from the sawdust. We need men to raise tobacco,
cotton, eucalyptus, fruits, nuts. We need canneries, wood-working
establishments, furniture factories, sugar planters and their mills,
and a thousand and one other propositions for which there is an
opening. Many products have been proven eminently adapted
to conditions here and only await intelligent, vigorous, and patient
work to bring them to the position of importance they deserve.
To men who can bring these qualifications, Tampa offers a rich
reward.
GROWTH IN POPULATION
In 1885 the population of Tampa was estimated at 1,200. In
1890 it was shown by the federal census to be 5,532, with a few
hundred in" the surrounding suburbs. In 1900 the federal census
gave the city proper 15,839 population, with 5,750 people in the


adjacent suburbs a total of 21,589. The census to be taken in
1910 will show not less than 50,000 population. It is estimated
that to-day there are 54,000 people in Tampa as regular residents.
In the winter this number is augmented by thousands of tourists.
In the past two years all comparative statistics show that the city
will double its population every four years.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS
The best work in the schools cannot be reduced to statistics nor
can it be fully expressed in an article of this kind. It is the develop-
ment of the intellectual, physical, and moral powers which measure
the greatness of a people or a school system.
The growth of the schools in the past ten years is told in these
figures:
1899 Total enrollment, . . 5,182
1909 Total enrollment . . .. 9,960

BANK DEPOSITS
There is no more reliable index of the condition of a city than is
contained in the reports of its banks. The following figures prove
the remarkable growth of Tampa:
Total deposits, June, 1897, .. $1,037,451
Total deposits, December, 1904, . 3,506,872
Total deposits, November 16, 1909,.... .5,940,896
Increase in twelve years, 430 per cent.
There are at present three National and six State banks in Tampa.

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Hillsborough County, of which Tampa is the county seat, is the
first in population, first in manufactories, first in schools, and first
in commercial importance. It is also the favored tourist resort
county of the State. Assessed value of property in county, $15,781,-
061.


1_1____________1 _








OPPORTUNITIES
The future for Tampa is bright. It is destined to become a city
of 100,000 population within a few years. Tampa has never had a
boom in fact, its people guard against "booming." Its growth is
steady and solid.
The Board is requested scores of times each month to secure
employment for those who desire to escape the cold climate of the
North others come here without first asking advice and find no
positions open to them. This is a condition in all favored resort
places.
We desire to state that clerical positions are well-filled; common
labor is largely performed by negroes; mechanics and artisans are
referred to the Central Trades Labor Assembly's secretary; we do
encourage salaried people to come to Tampa.
Tampa does want, however, men of initiative, who can see and
take advantage of various rich opportunities. We need settlers on
our lands the whole North is the market place for the products
of the soil. We need men who can take the refuse from the saw-
mill and make clothespins, crate material, lath, etc.; who can distill
turpentine from the sawdust. We need men to raise tobacco,
cotton, eucalyptus, fruits, nuts. We need canneries, wood-working
establishments, furniture factories, sugar planters and their mills,
and a thousand and one other propositions for which there is an
opening. Many products have been proven eminently adapted
to conditions here and only await intelligent, vigorous, and patient
work to bring them to the position of importance they deserve.
To men who can bring these qualifications, Tampa offers a rich
reward.
GROWTH IN POPULATION
In 1885 the population of Tampa was estimated at 1,200. In
1890 it was shown by the federal census to be 5,532, with a few
hundred in" the surrounding suburbs. In 1900 the federal census
gave the city proper 15,839 population, with 5,750 people in the


adjacent suburbs a total of 21,589. The census to be taken in
1910 will show not less than 50,000 population. It is estimated
that to-day there are 54,000 people in Tampa as regular residents.
In the winter this number is augmented by thousands of tourists.
In the past two years all comparative statistics show that the city
will double its population every four years.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS
The best work in the schools cannot be reduced to statistics nor
can it be fully expressed in an article of this kind. It is the develop-
ment of the intellectual, physical, and moral powers which measure
the greatness of a people or a school system.
The growth of the schools in the past ten years is told in these
figures:
1899 Total enrollment, . . 5,182
1909 Total enrollment . . .. 9,960

BANK DEPOSITS
There is no more reliable index of the condition of a city than is
contained in the reports of its banks. The following figures prove
the remarkable growth of Tampa:
Total deposits, June, 1897, .. $1,037,451
Total deposits, December, 1904, . 3,506,872
Total deposits, November 16, 1909,.... .5,940,896
Increase in twelve years, 430 per cent.
There are at present three National and six State banks in Tampa.

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Hillsborough County, of which Tampa is the county seat, is the
first in population, first in manufactories, first in schools, and first
in commercial importance. It is also the favored tourist resort
county of the State. Assessed value of property in county, $15,781,-
061.


1_1____________1 _








OPPORTUNITIES
The future for Tampa is bright. It is destined to become a city
of 100,000 population within a few years. Tampa has never had a
boom in fact, its people guard against "booming." Its growth is
steady and solid.
The Board is requested scores of times each month to secure
employment for those who desire to escape the cold climate of the
North others come here without first asking advice and find no
positions open to them. This is a condition in all favored resort
places.
We desire to state that clerical positions are well-filled; common
labor is largely performed by negroes; mechanics and artisans are
referred to the Central Trades Labor Assembly's secretary; we do
encourage salaried people to come to Tampa.
Tampa does want, however, men of initiative, who can see and
take advantage of various rich opportunities. We need settlers on
our lands the whole North is the market place for the products
of the soil. We need men who can take the refuse from the saw-
mill and make clothespins, crate material, lath, etc.; who can distill
turpentine from the sawdust. We need men to raise tobacco,
cotton, eucalyptus, fruits, nuts. We need canneries, wood-working
establishments, furniture factories, sugar planters and their mills,
and a thousand and one other propositions for which there is an
opening. Many products have been proven eminently adapted
to conditions here and only await intelligent, vigorous, and patient
work to bring them to the position of importance they deserve.
To men who can bring these qualifications, Tampa offers a rich
reward.
GROWTH IN POPULATION
In 1885 the population of Tampa was estimated at 1,200. In
1890 it was shown by the federal census to be 5,532, with a few
hundred in" the surrounding suburbs. In 1900 the federal census
gave the city proper 15,839 population, with 5,750 people in the


adjacent suburbs a total of 21,589. The census to be taken in
1910 will show not less than 50,000 population. It is estimated
that to-day there are 54,000 people in Tampa as regular residents.
In the winter this number is augmented by thousands of tourists.
In the past two years all comparative statistics show that the city
will double its population every four years.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS
The best work in the schools cannot be reduced to statistics nor
can it be fully expressed in an article of this kind. It is the develop-
ment of the intellectual, physical, and moral powers which measure
the greatness of a people or a school system.
The growth of the schools in the past ten years is told in these
figures:
1899 Total enrollment, . . 5,182
1909 Total enrollment . . .. 9,960

BANK DEPOSITS
There is no more reliable index of the condition of a city than is
contained in the reports of its banks. The following figures prove
the remarkable growth of Tampa:
Total deposits, June, 1897, .. $1,037,451
Total deposits, December, 1904, . 3,506,872
Total deposits, November 16, 1909,.... .5,940,896
Increase in twelve years, 430 per cent.
There are at present three National and six State banks in Tampa.

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Hillsborough County, of which Tampa is the county seat, is the
first in population, first in manufactories, first in schools, and first
in commercial importance. It is also the favored tourist resort
county of the State. Assessed value of property in county, $15,781,-
061.


1_1____________1 _








OPPORTUNITIES
The future for Tampa is bright. It is destined to become a city
of 100,000 population within a few years. Tampa has never had a
boom in fact, its people guard against "booming." Its growth is
steady and solid.
The Board is requested scores of times each month to secure
employment for those who desire to escape the cold climate of the
North others come here without first asking advice and find no
positions open to them. This is a condition in all favored resort
places.
We desire to state that clerical positions are well-filled; common
labor is largely performed by negroes; mechanics and artisans are
referred to the Central Trades Labor Assembly's secretary; we do
encourage salaried people to come to Tampa.
Tampa does want, however, men of initiative, who can see and
take advantage of various rich opportunities. We need settlers on
our lands the whole North is the market place for the products
of the soil. We need men who can take the refuse from the saw-
mill and make clothespins, crate material, lath, etc.; who can distill
turpentine from the sawdust. We need men to raise tobacco,
cotton, eucalyptus, fruits, nuts. We need canneries, wood-working
establishments, furniture factories, sugar planters and their mills,
and a thousand and one other propositions for which there is an
opening. Many products have been proven eminently adapted
to conditions here and only await intelligent, vigorous, and patient
work to bring them to the position of importance they deserve.
To men who can bring these qualifications, Tampa offers a rich
reward.
GROWTH IN POPULATION
In 1885 the population of Tampa was estimated at 1,200. In
1890 it was shown by the federal census to be 5,532, with a few
hundred in" the surrounding suburbs. In 1900 the federal census
gave the city proper 15,839 population, with 5,750 people in the


adjacent suburbs a total of 21,589. The census to be taken in
1910 will show not less than 50,000 population. It is estimated
that to-day there are 54,000 people in Tampa as regular residents.
In the winter this number is augmented by thousands of tourists.
In the past two years all comparative statistics show that the city
will double its population every four years.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS
The best work in the schools cannot be reduced to statistics nor
can it be fully expressed in an article of this kind. It is the develop-
ment of the intellectual, physical, and moral powers which measure
the greatness of a people or a school system.
The growth of the schools in the past ten years is told in these
figures:
1899 Total enrollment, . . 5,182
1909 Total enrollment . . .. 9,960

BANK DEPOSITS
There is no more reliable index of the condition of a city than is
contained in the reports of its banks. The following figures prove
the remarkable growth of Tampa:
Total deposits, June, 1897, .. $1,037,451
Total deposits, December, 1904, . 3,506,872
Total deposits, November 16, 1909,.... .5,940,896
Increase in twelve years, 430 per cent.
There are at present three National and six State banks in Tampa.

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Hillsborough County, of which Tampa is the county seat, is the
first in population, first in manufactories, first in schools, and first
in commercial importance. It is also the favored tourist resort
county of the State. Assessed value of property in county, $15,781,-
061.


1_1____________1 _








OPPORTUNITIES
The future for Tampa is bright. It is destined to become a city
of 100,000 population within a few years. Tampa has never had a
boom in fact, its people guard against "booming." Its growth is
steady and solid.
The Board is requested scores of times each month to secure
employment for those who desire to escape the cold climate of the
North others come here without first asking advice and find no
positions open to them. This is a condition in all favored resort
places.
We desire to state that clerical positions are well-filled; common
labor is largely performed by negroes; mechanics and artisans are
referred to the Central Trades Labor Assembly's secretary; we do
encourage salaried people to come to Tampa.
Tampa does want, however, men of initiative, who can see and
take advantage of various rich opportunities. We need settlers on
our lands the whole North is the market place for the products
of the soil. We need men who can take the refuse from the saw-
mill and make clothespins, crate material, lath, etc.; who can distill
turpentine from the sawdust. We need men to raise tobacco,
cotton, eucalyptus, fruits, nuts. We need canneries, wood-working
establishments, furniture factories, sugar planters and their mills,
and a thousand and one other propositions for which there is an
opening. Many products have been proven eminently adapted
to conditions here and only await intelligent, vigorous, and patient
work to bring them to the position of importance they deserve.
To men who can bring these qualifications, Tampa offers a rich
reward.
GROWTH IN POPULATION
In 1885 the population of Tampa was estimated at 1,200. In
1890 it was shown by the federal census to be 5,532, with a few
hundred in" the surrounding suburbs. In 1900 the federal census
gave the city proper 15,839 population, with 5,750 people in the


adjacent suburbs a total of 21,589. The census to be taken in
1910 will show not less than 50,000 population. It is estimated
that to-day there are 54,000 people in Tampa as regular residents.
In the winter this number is augmented by thousands of tourists.
In the past two years all comparative statistics show that the city
will double its population every four years.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS
The best work in the schools cannot be reduced to statistics nor
can it be fully expressed in an article of this kind. It is the develop-
ment of the intellectual, physical, and moral powers which measure
the greatness of a people or a school system.
The growth of the schools in the past ten years is told in these
figures:
1899 Total enrollment, . . 5,182
1909 Total enrollment . . .. 9,960

BANK DEPOSITS
There is no more reliable index of the condition of a city than is
contained in the reports of its banks. The following figures prove
the remarkable growth of Tampa:
Total deposits, June, 1897, .. $1,037,451
Total deposits, December, 1904, . 3,506,872
Total deposits, November 16, 1909,.... .5,940,896
Increase in twelve years, 430 per cent.
There are at present three National and six State banks in Tampa.

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Hillsborough County, of which Tampa is the county seat, is the
first in population, first in manufactories, first in schools, and first
in commercial importance. It is also the favored tourist resort
county of the State. Assessed value of property in county, $15,781,-
061.


1_1____________1 _






























































WHERE FISHING IS GOOD BEAUTIFUL HILLSBOROUGH RIVER
THE POOL, AT SULPHUR SPRINGS, FLOWS 50,000 GALLONS
OF WATER A MINUTE
WHERE NATURE HAS LAVISHED HER ART PICNIC GROUNDS NEAR CITY


I






















































SCENERY TO DELIGHT THE EYE AT EVERY TURN
A SYLVAN RETREAT WHERE LAND AND SEA MEET
CAN YOU BLAME THEM ? SIX-MILE CREEK



























































BALLAST POINT-A POPULAR RESORT ON BAYSHORE BOULEVARD
SULPHUR SPRINGS-ANOTHER POPULAR DRIVE NEAR TAMPA
THE BEAUTIFUL HILLSBOROUGH RIVER AT SULPHUR SPRINGS










TAMPA'S CLIMATOLOGICAL CONDITION

Many delightful and enthusiastic encomiums have been written
concerning the winter climate of Tampa, none of which we would
willingly gainsay, but the summer climate is just as charming. But
once in the history of the weather bureau's existence in Tampa,
covering a period of twenty years, has the thermometer reached as
high as 96 degrees. Seldom it goes above 92. For comparison of
our summer weather with other cities where weather bureaus are
established by the government we append the maximum readings
of the stations:
WEATHER


justice, for it does not tell the story of the cooling breezes, pure and
life-giving, coming two thousand miles across the Gulf of Mexico.
The following table was compiled by Mr. George B. Wurtz, local
forecaster of the Tampa Weather Bureau, United States Department
of Agriculture, and is evidence of our equable temperature, the
sufficient rain fall, the many clear and partly cloudy days (ten per
cent. cloudy), and only eighty-four days that could be called full
cloudy yet it is very seldom that the sun does not shine some
time:

SUMMARY OF CLIMATOLOGICAL CONDITIONS AT
TAMPA, FLA.


STATIONS.
Abilene, ....
Amarillo . .
Atlanta .
Augusta .
Bismarck, .
Baltimore,
Boston, .. .
Concordia, Kan.,
Boise, Idaho,
Charlotte, .
Chicago,.....
Columbia, Mo.,
Cincinnati, .
Davenport,
Denver, ...
Dubuque, . .
Dodge City,
Des Moines,...
El Paso, . .
Evansville,...
Fort Smith,...
Fresno, Cal.,.
Fort Worth, Texas,
Havre, .. .


ax.
..
. .
. .


. .
..
. .
. .
. .

. .
. .


. .


. .
. .
. .
. .
..
. .


Temp.
110
S102
100
S105
106
104
102
106
111
104
103
111
105
106'
105
S106
108
S109
113
107
S107
114
108
108


STATIONS. Max. Temp.
Helena, . .. 106
Grand Junction, . .104
Jacksonville, . 104
Keokuk, . . 108
Los Angeles, . 107
Little Rock, .. . 106
Lincoln,. . 106
Miles City, ...... .. 111
Moorehead, Minn., . 102
New York,.. . 100
New Orleans, . 102
North Platte, . 107
Omaha, Neb., . 106
Oklahoma, . . 104
Phoenix, . . 119
Rapid City, . .. 106
St. Louis, . .. 107
St. Paul, . . 104
Shreveport, . 107
Sacramento, .. . 110
Walla Walla, . 113
Topeka, . . 106
Yuma, ......118
TAMPA, FLORIDA, 96


The above maximum readings, while proving that Tampa is the
coolest place on the map, does not do our summer weather full


January,. . .
February, . .
March . .
April. . .
May . .
June . .
July . .
August . .
September . .
October, . .
November . .
December. . .
For the Year .


58
61
66
71
76
79
80
80
78
73
65
60
70


aH



69
70
77
80
86
89
89
89
88
82
76
70
80


51
53
58
61
67
71
73
74
72
65
58
52
74


fl




<
2.71
2.85
2.35
1.80
2.67
8.47
8.18.
8.86
7.25
2.45
1.69
2.01
50. 21


a






81
80
77
74
75
80
82
83
84
80
81
82
80


11
11
14
14
13
8
7
6
8
14
13
13
118


o




13
10
12
12
14
16
19
18
15
12
11
116
163


7 NE




5 NE
4 W
4 NE
6 E
5 E
7 NW
7 NE
5 NE
4 W



6 NE


7 NE
6 NE
7 NE

84 NE


In 1895, the American Medical Society, in session at Baltimore,
decided upon this county for a site for their proposed Health City,
which is the best testimonial of our weather conditions.


_ _












































TAMPA IS THE MECCA
'A FOR MOTORISTS





... -- ..


HYDE PARK AVENUE OFF FOR A DAY'S SPIN ONE OF THE SHADE-EMBOWERED DRIVES
MR. T. ED. BRYAN, PRESIDENT OF THE TAMPA AUTO
CLUB, READY FOR A SAIL
OFF FOR A SUNDAY SCHOOL PICNIC IN MIDWINTER A CHARMING DRIVE ALONG THE BAY SHORE






























































PANORAMIC VIEW OF TAMPA'S WATER FRONT, SHOWING LOCAL COASTERS DOCKIN HILLSBCROUGH RIVER --DEEP-SEA-GOING VESSELS DOCK TO T

PANORAMIC VIEW OF TAMPA, SHOWING CITY PARK IN FOREGROUND --HILLSBOROUGH BAY AND HYDE PARK RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT TO RIGHT-BUSINESS AND WHOLESALE DISTRICT


HE RIGHT--WHOLESALE DISTRICT OF CITY

r IN CENTER--TAMPA HEIGHTS RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT SKY LINE TO LEFT


__









A MINISTER SAYS OUR SUMMERS

ARE DELIGHTFUL
"I cannot understand why any one should want to go North for
the summers. It has been warm here, but not nearly so warm as
at many points in the North. I see that in Cincinnati, Pittsburg,
and New York the thermometer several times registered over 100.
Here it has rarely gone above 90 in the daytime and 75 at night.
And the temperature keeps the same. I do not think it has varied
five degrees since the first of May.
"The heat is not sultry and stifling like it sometimes gets in the
North. There is a cool, refreshing breeze blowing nearly all the
time, either from the Gulf or bay, even when it is 90, and we never
hear of any one being overcome with the heat. Then for several
months in the summer it rains every day, keeping vegetation fresh
and green. But these rains are different from the Ohio summer
-rains. There a long hot spell is followed by a heavy rain storm,
accompanied by thunder and lightning, and then comes a long
drop in temperature and a cold, chilly drizzle, lasting for several
days, and we would say in the evening, 'If it clears off to-night
there will be a frost.' But here it is different. It rains very
hard, and then the sun comes out and the weather is just the same
as it was before. And we have no mud. The soil being sandy,
walking is better after a rain than before. A shoe shine will last a
month.
"Taking it all through, with its even temperature, its cool breezes,
its refreshing showers, besides all the other things, its opportunities
for boating, bathing, and fishing, that go to make it a delightful
winter residence, there is no place where I would rather spend the
summer than in Florida.
"Yours truly,
"REV. CHESTER SPRAGUE,
"Pastor Christian Church."


COMPARATIVE STATISTICS
As this book was issued in November, 1909, it was impossible to
give comparative figures for the entire year, yet one can appreciate
the growth of Tampa by comparing the figures of two total years
against nine months' business of 1909. The figures speak for them-
selves and will readily appeal to the intelligent mind that Tampa's
growth is remarkable.


Customs Collections, .
Internal Revenue Collections,
Post-office Receipts ..
Bank Deposits . .


1897
.... $ 638,515
S. 208,205
.. 27,282
1,037,451


Number Cigars Manufactured. . .
Phosphate Exported (tons), . ..
Commerce to City Docks (tons),......


1897
90,408,000
164,788
63,000


Nine Months
1904 1909
$1,501,189 $1,562,508
596,252 628,993
60,267 108,444
3,924,405 5,836,000
Nine months
1905 1909
196,961,500 201,865,000
439,789 787,823
274,394 540,819


PAY-ROLL OF TAMPA'S INDUSTRIES
Tampa's main industry is the clear Havana cigar business,
nearly two hundred factories engaged in making high-grade cigars.
The workmen are the highest paid of any laborers in the world.
Business conditions are always good in Tampa on account of the
$400,000 paid out in wages each Saturday night to the army of
workmen.


People Employed
Cigar Industry, . . . . 13,000
Fish Business, .. ... . .. .... 800
Mechanics,.. .. .............. 2,200
Sailors, Stevedores, etc., ............. 1,000
Railroad Employes, . . ... .. 300
Teamsters, etc .. ..... . . 550
Laborers ......... ........ 2,000
Woodworkers, Brewers, Laundrymen, Clerks, Printers,
etc., . . . . .


Annual Wage
$12,500,000
520,000
1,642,000
600,00Y'*
250,000
300,000
936,000
2,500,000
$19,248,000









A MINISTER SAYS OUR SUMMERS

ARE DELIGHTFUL
"I cannot understand why any one should want to go North for
the summers. It has been warm here, but not nearly so warm as
at many points in the North. I see that in Cincinnati, Pittsburg,
and New York the thermometer several times registered over 100.
Here it has rarely gone above 90 in the daytime and 75 at night.
And the temperature keeps the same. I do not think it has varied
five degrees since the first of May.
"The heat is not sultry and stifling like it sometimes gets in the
North. There is a cool, refreshing breeze blowing nearly all the
time, either from the Gulf or bay, even when it is 90, and we never
hear of any one being overcome with the heat. Then for several
months in the summer it rains every day, keeping vegetation fresh
and green. But these rains are different from the Ohio summer
-rains. There a long hot spell is followed by a heavy rain storm,
accompanied by thunder and lightning, and then comes a long
drop in temperature and a cold, chilly drizzle, lasting for several
days, and we would say in the evening, 'If it clears off to-night
there will be a frost.' But here it is different. It rains very
hard, and then the sun comes out and the weather is just the same
as it was before. And we have no mud. The soil being sandy,
walking is better after a rain than before. A shoe shine will last a
month.
"Taking it all through, with its even temperature, its cool breezes,
its refreshing showers, besides all the other things, its opportunities
for boating, bathing, and fishing, that go to make it a delightful
winter residence, there is no place where I would rather spend the
summer than in Florida.
"Yours truly,
"REV. CHESTER SPRAGUE,
"Pastor Christian Church."


COMPARATIVE STATISTICS
As this book was issued in November, 1909, it was impossible to
give comparative figures for the entire year, yet one can appreciate
the growth of Tampa by comparing the figures of two total years
against nine months' business of 1909. The figures speak for them-
selves and will readily appeal to the intelligent mind that Tampa's
growth is remarkable.


Customs Collections, .
Internal Revenue Collections,
Post-office Receipts ..
Bank Deposits . .


1897
.... $ 638,515
S. 208,205
.. 27,282
1,037,451


Number Cigars Manufactured. . .
Phosphate Exported (tons), . ..
Commerce to City Docks (tons),......


1897
90,408,000
164,788
63,000


Nine Months
1904 1909
$1,501,189 $1,562,508
596,252 628,993
60,267 108,444
3,924,405 5,836,000
Nine months
1905 1909
196,961,500 201,865,000
439,789 787,823
274,394 540,819


PAY-ROLL OF TAMPA'S INDUSTRIES
Tampa's main industry is the clear Havana cigar business,
nearly two hundred factories engaged in making high-grade cigars.
The workmen are the highest paid of any laborers in the world.
Business conditions are always good in Tampa on account of the
$400,000 paid out in wages each Saturday night to the army of
workmen.


People Employed
Cigar Industry, . . . . 13,000
Fish Business, .. ... . .. .... 800
Mechanics,.. .. .............. 2,200
Sailors, Stevedores, etc., ............. 1,000
Railroad Employes, . . ... .. 300
Teamsters, etc .. ..... . . 550
Laborers ......... ........ 2,000
Woodworkers, Brewers, Laundrymen, Clerks, Printers,
etc., . . . . .


Annual Wage
$12,500,000
520,000
1,642,000
600,00Y'*
250,000
300,000
936,000
2,500,000
$19,248,000









A MINISTER SAYS OUR SUMMERS

ARE DELIGHTFUL
"I cannot understand why any one should want to go North for
the summers. It has been warm here, but not nearly so warm as
at many points in the North. I see that in Cincinnati, Pittsburg,
and New York the thermometer several times registered over 100.
Here it has rarely gone above 90 in the daytime and 75 at night.
And the temperature keeps the same. I do not think it has varied
five degrees since the first of May.
"The heat is not sultry and stifling like it sometimes gets in the
North. There is a cool, refreshing breeze blowing nearly all the
time, either from the Gulf or bay, even when it is 90, and we never
hear of any one being overcome with the heat. Then for several
months in the summer it rains every day, keeping vegetation fresh
and green. But these rains are different from the Ohio summer
-rains. There a long hot spell is followed by a heavy rain storm,
accompanied by thunder and lightning, and then comes a long
drop in temperature and a cold, chilly drizzle, lasting for several
days, and we would say in the evening, 'If it clears off to-night
there will be a frost.' But here it is different. It rains very
hard, and then the sun comes out and the weather is just the same
as it was before. And we have no mud. The soil being sandy,
walking is better after a rain than before. A shoe shine will last a
month.
"Taking it all through, with its even temperature, its cool breezes,
its refreshing showers, besides all the other things, its opportunities
for boating, bathing, and fishing, that go to make it a delightful
winter residence, there is no place where I would rather spend the
summer than in Florida.
"Yours truly,
"REV. CHESTER SPRAGUE,
"Pastor Christian Church."


COMPARATIVE STATISTICS
As this book was issued in November, 1909, it was impossible to
give comparative figures for the entire year, yet one can appreciate
the growth of Tampa by comparing the figures of two total years
against nine months' business of 1909. The figures speak for them-
selves and will readily appeal to the intelligent mind that Tampa's
growth is remarkable.


Customs Collections, .
Internal Revenue Collections,
Post-office Receipts ..
Bank Deposits . .


1897
.... $ 638,515
S. 208,205
.. 27,282
1,037,451


Number Cigars Manufactured. . .
Phosphate Exported (tons), . ..
Commerce to City Docks (tons),......


1897
90,408,000
164,788
63,000


Nine Months
1904 1909
$1,501,189 $1,562,508
596,252 628,993
60,267 108,444
3,924,405 5,836,000
Nine months
1905 1909
196,961,500 201,865,000
439,789 787,823
274,394 540,819


PAY-ROLL OF TAMPA'S INDUSTRIES
Tampa's main industry is the clear Havana cigar business,
nearly two hundred factories engaged in making high-grade cigars.
The workmen are the highest paid of any laborers in the world.
Business conditions are always good in Tampa on account of the
$400,000 paid out in wages each Saturday night to the army of
workmen.


People Employed
Cigar Industry, . . . . 13,000
Fish Business, .. ... . .. .... 800
Mechanics,.. .. .............. 2,200
Sailors, Stevedores, etc., ............. 1,000
Railroad Employes, . . ... .. 300
Teamsters, etc .. ..... . . 550
Laborers ......... ........ 2,000
Woodworkers, Brewers, Laundrymen, Clerks, Printers,
etc., . . . . .


Annual Wage
$12,500,000
520,000
1,642,000
600,00Y'*
250,000
300,000
936,000
2,500,000
$19,248,000




































































































THE GERMAN CLUB


THE MALLORY LINE BOATS AT HENDRY & KNIGHT'S DOCKS

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH


ONE OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOLS


77
....... ---
...... ...
~ ~~C-~r' r~sag~k~~ILIPI~B~ s~ l ~ .............. $PC~:r~


C




ia,
''







"~*









FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL
Last year there was planted in Florida 627,000 acres in corn
which yielded on an average 10.5 bushels per acre, selling at 87
cents per bushel; 30,000 acres in oats, yielding 14.5 bushels to the
acre, selling at 72 cents per bushel; 19,000 acres in hay, yielding
1.35 tons per acre, selling at $15 a ton; Irish potatoes, 5,000 acres,
yielding 83 bushels to the acre, selling at an average price of $1.31
per bushel. To-day there are more than 25,000 acres in Irish pota-
toes, and the yield is from 150 to 250 bushels per acre, selling from
$1.25 to $2 per bushel.
We raised last year 50,000 bushels of rice, 62,089 bales of cotton.
The Sea Island cotton raised in this State is all purchased by Coats'
thread people on account of its splendid staple. Our cotton sells at
27 cents.
We raised nearly 6,000,000 pounds of tobacco. This year the
yield will be double.
OTHER FARM VALUES
Farm value of horses, $5,616,000, average $104.
Mules, $2,840,000, average $142.
Cattle, $2,464,000, average $26.
Other cattle, $691,000, average $10.
Sheep, $99,000, average $1.90.
Hogs, $447,000, average $4.
NOW FOR A COMPARISON
With vegetables bringing in from $250 to $1,500 an acre, and
citrus crops from $200 to $1,000 an acre, we have figures to prove
that every acre of cultivated land in this State is netting a higher
return than any other State in the Union. Here are a few compari-
sons:
Average value farm products in Missouri is $9.38 per acre.
Average value farm products in Iowa is $12.22 per acre.
Average value farm products in Illinois is $12.48 per acre.
Average value farm products in Ohio is $13.36 per acre.
Average value farm products in Florida is $109.76 per acre.


Farm in Hillsborough County produced $18,000 off of 48 acres
of land.
SEASON 1908-1909
Cabbage, 15 acres, 2,906 crates, .. .$2,906.00
Celery, 4 acres, 2,115 crates, .... 2,990.69
Potatoes, Irish, 20 acres, 790 barrels, 2,869.70
Cucumbers, 8 acres, 2,975 hampers, 5,137.00
Tomatoes, following celery, 1,400 crates, 1,750.00

TOTAL, .. . . . $15,653.39
(These values are net prices f. o. b. cars at
Wimauma, after freight and commission
charges have been deducted.)
There is yet to be shipped:
Onions, 1 acre, estimated, 300 bushels, .. 300.00

GRAND TOTAL, .. . $15,953.39

About 18 acres of corn, which bids fair to yield from 25 to 50
bushels per acre. It is now in full silk and tassel.
About 20 acres in hay, safe to calculate from two and a half to
four tons per acre.
About 10 acres in rice, which bids fair to yield 25 bushels per
acre.
The corn, hay, and rice are on same land on which cabbage,
potatoes, and cucumbers were grown.
A large percentage of the potatoes were grown on lands under
first year's cultivation.
(Signed) D. M. DOWDELL,
Wimauma, Hillsborough County, Fla.


Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 9th day of June, 1909.


(Signed) J. S. TARRER,


Notary Public, State of Florida.
My commission expires February 6, 1912.


_















VIEW OF FARM AND GARDENS
ALL WITHIN TWO MILES OF
TAMPA


CORNER OF JOHN H. DREW S
FARM, SHOWING HIGH-GRADE
SWINE RAISED BY HIM


PROLIFIC GROWTH OF BEANS ON WHAT WAS
A GROVE OF PALMS
A FIELD OF CELERY WHICH NETS THE OWNER
$2,000 PER ACRE


A GENERAL TRUCK FARM JUST OUTSIDE
THE CITY
ANOTHER CELERY FIELD, SHOWING SYSTEM
OF IRRIGATION


_ ___ 1_1_ L C _




















































FISHING IN FLORIDA
In a paper read at a meeting of the Fishery Congress at Tampa, Barton W. Everman, Ichthyologist of the United States Fish Commission, says: I have fished in
every State and Territory in the Union but three, and from Siberia and Behring's Sea to the Gulfs of California and Mexico, and, all things considered, regard Florida as
unequaled in the richness and variety of its attractions for all sorts of sport with rod and reel." This is high authority.
The number of fishes from Florida waters will exceed 600. The variety in the lakes and streams and on the snapper banks should please any angler, but a skirmish
with the Tiger of the Sea," the tarpon, thrills the heart and makes other fishing seem tame. He is not valued for food, but is much sought by anglers. When he has
taken the bait he leaps high in the air, not once but often, in most graceful curves. He is immense, up to seven feet in length, covered with large discs of silver scales,
hence he is the "Silver King," and weighs up to 213 pounds.


rip c~____





















































FRUITS
In temperature, Central and Southern Florida are semi-tropical, but to the eye, tropical. On the rich hammock, which grows here and there throughout the State,
anything that grows anywhere under the sun can be cultivated. Recent experiments in irrigation have worked wonders in fruit and vegetable production. All fruits of
the temperate zone grow here abundantly, but the tropical varieties with beauty of leaf and foliage, finding in its soil a congenial home, flourish and ripen under the magical
sun, and are delicious; they are even more delicious plucked ripe from tree and bush than they are when eaten in the North. The orange is extensively cultivated in
groves of many acres in Central and Lower Florida, and when the trees are in blossom, the air is redolent with a perfume, than which there is no sweeter out-of-doors in all
the world. The orange is a hardier fruit than the cocoanut, banana, and pineapple.


_ r _____








WHAT OUR SOIL PRODUCES
The following table shows some of the products that can be grown
and the net yield per acre when properly planted and cultivated:


Pecan nuts, .. .
Strawberries,......
Peaches .........
Celery, ..
Pears, . . .
Peas, .... . .
Beans (string), .... ..
Potatoes (Irish), .
Potatoes (sweet), .
Lettuce, .
Radishes, . . .
Cabbage, .
Beets, . .
Onions (Bermuda), .
Tomatoes, .
Peppers, .
Cantaloupes, ..
Upland rice, ......
Cucumbers, ... .
Oranges, .
Lemons,. ......
Grapefruit, . . .
Tangerines, Kumquats, etc.,
Avocado pears,.. ......
Guavas, .. .. .
Mangoes, ......
Loquats, . . .


Besides the fruits and vegetables enumerated above, our soil and
our climate produce pineapples of the finest varieties, bananas of
many varieties, citron, lemon, mandarin, pomelo, shaddock, lime,
grapes, scuppernong, roselle, papaia, mangosteen, custard apple,
cherimoya, macadamia nut, dates, figs, mountain apple, cayenne
cherry, Japanese persimmon, Japanese plums, tamarind, cacao,


$1,000
500
400
400
300
200
200
250
220
400
400
260
350
400
700
500
400
180
300
500
500
750
500
1,000
200
500
200


_ I I


castor bean, ginger, cinnamon, mammee apple, peaches, pears,
gooseberries, wild cranberry in fact we have from six to twenty
ripe fruits on the market any day in the year.
We raise every known vegetable, and in the line of legumes we
are producing cow peas, soy beans, jack beans, beggar weed, peas,
Para grass, etc. Cassava, the greatest forage crop in the country,
grows here without any trouble. It produces the best starch. An
acre of cassava will produce 2,500 to 5,000 pounds of starch. It is
a fine human food, also.
Bamboo and other material for reed furniture grows wild. There
is opening for the manufacture of reed furniture and other novelties
made out of grasses and the score of varieties of palm which abound
on all sides. We have all kinds of matting plants and rushes. The
beautiful Florida moss makes splendid mattresses, and there is a
demand for this exotic and palm leaves and mistletoe and holly
berries throughout the North. Nature has been kind to us in dec-
orating all of outdoors with these pretty trees and vines, for which
the people of the North pay to the florists fabulous prices.
The culture of bees is profitable. The bees thrive off the orange
bloom or the cabbage palm, making two varieties of honey. The
product is very tempting to the palate.
Sisal hemp offers a field for the farmer. There is big money in
growing the "century plant." You cannot kill the plant, and thus
from one bulb you can get hundreds of new shoots.

FLOWERS
It is useless to dwell on the beauty of our flowers. In fact, we
have so many varieties that it would be a catalogue of a nursery to
enumerate them. We have flowers in bloom every day of the year,
indoors and outdoors. There are innumerable shrubbery or arboreal
ornamentals some of the most striking being the poinciana,
golden shower, hibiscus, poinsettia. The night-blooming cereus is
common with us. Roses and geraniums and common house plants
thrive like weeds in the North.



























































TAMPA BAY HOTEL, OWNED BY THE CITY OF TAMPA
This hotel was built by the late Henry B. Plant, benefactor of Western Florida, at a cost of $3,000,000. It is now owned by the city of Tampa. The scheme and
design of architecture seen in the turrets, pinnacles, and graceful arches, carried out in detail, reveal the Moorish art in its highest conception.
A jewel so magnificent should have an appropriate setting, and so it has, in a tropical garden of rare beauty of foliage and species. The acreage surrounding the hotel
should match its noble proportions, and so it permits of orange groves, alluring walks, and enticing drives through long lines of palmetto and under live oaks trailing their
gray banners of Spanish moss.
The flashing turret greets the traveler afar, and bids him welcome. Hospitality is cultivated here as an art; it began with the beacon of welcome and it always sur-
rounds you, not insistent, but you seem to feel it in the air.
Out-of-door sports, tennis, and golf are popular here. Craft for river and gulf can be had, and the Hillsboro River, gateway to bay and gulf, is at the door.


n
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SOIL SURVEY IN THE COUNTY
Soils include three divisions: Pine land, hammock, and sand.
Average for Hillsborough County:
Coarse earth, ..... .. ... 6.0663
Insoluble residue,. ...........93.9337
Excess of soil over State average,.... 2.0539
Humus,. ..... . . .83
Excess over State average, ...... .19
Nitrogen, . . .. . .0595
Excess over State average, ...... .0182
Potash (K20), . . .. .. .0012
Deficiency over State average, ..... .0079
Phosphoric acid (P2 05), ........ .2116
Excess over State average, ...... .0481
Lime (CaO), .. ..... .... .1412
Deficiency over State average, . .0393
MUCK LANDS
While average depth of pine land and orange land soils is 6.06
inches, the depth of muck lands runs from two to fourteen feet.
The muck lands are our best vegetable lands. There lands are
very fertile. In some cases they are deficient in potash, phosphoric
acid, and lime. They are rich in nitrogen. Pure mucks, in addition
to nitrogen, contain noticeably large supplies of both phosphoric
acid and lime, and only deficient in potash.
As a whole, Hillsborough County soil cannot be excelled, and
with proper intelligence can be made to yield tremendous crops.

21,307 MILES OF CIGARS MANUFACTURED
OF CLEAR HAVANA TOBACCO IN
TAMPA IN A YEAR
Tampa turns out each year a total of 300,000,000 cigars.
The average cigar is four and one-half inches and this makes a
mere bagatelle of 1,350,000,000 inches, or, what is the same thing,
112,500,000 feet of cigars. It does not take a professor of mathe-
matics to figure it out that this means 21,307 miles of cigars.


In other words, if the entire annual output of Tampa was made
into one cigar and a man had bitten off the end in New York, the
cigar would extend across the United States, over the Pacific Ocean,
through Asia and Europe, and he would be dragging away with the
lighted end in London.
Another way to put it would be that this State, with its 58,680
square miles of territory, could be enclosed on its borders and coast line
with a tobacco wall of cigars five thicknesses deep and six inches high.
One continuous cigar would go thirty times around the border
and coast line of Florida.
That is the output of Tampa.

BUILDING MATERIAL
The Board of Trade is frequently asked the cost of building
material. The following prices are taken from the official price list and
can be used as a guide, but we do not guarantee the prices any more
than we would guarantee at long range the price of any commodity,
for all prices fluctuate. Yellow pine, unless otherwise quoted:
Rough lumber, $14 to $16 smaller sizes; 4 and 6 x 12, $19 to $23.
No. 1 5-inch cypress shingles, $4.50; No. 2 5-inch cypress shingles,
$3.50. Dressed lumber: flooring, D. & M,, $17 to $21; ceiling,
$15 to $21; boards, $17 to $23; window and door-frame stock,
$18 to $25; wainscoting, $23; window frames, complete, $1.30
to $1.75 each.

TAMPA AND THE PANAMA CANAL
Read the following resolution passed by Congress in 1906:
"WHEREAS, The city of Tampa, in the State of Florida, by reason
of its being farther to the southward and nearer to said canal than
any other city in the country having a deep and commodious harbor,
reached by ample railroad facilities, as also on account of its salu-
brious climate and the spirit of American progress among its citizens,
manifest in the rapid growth and development of the city and her
commerce *."


_ _


__








SOIL SURVEY IN THE COUNTY
Soils include three divisions: Pine land, hammock, and sand.
Average for Hillsborough County:
Coarse earth, ..... .. ... 6.0663
Insoluble residue,. ...........93.9337
Excess of soil over State average,.... 2.0539
Humus,. ..... . . .83
Excess over State average, ...... .19
Nitrogen, . . .. . .0595
Excess over State average, ...... .0182
Potash (K20), . . .. .. .0012
Deficiency over State average, ..... .0079
Phosphoric acid (P2 05), ........ .2116
Excess over State average, ...... .0481
Lime (CaO), .. ..... .... .1412
Deficiency over State average, . .0393
MUCK LANDS
While average depth of pine land and orange land soils is 6.06
inches, the depth of muck lands runs from two to fourteen feet.
The muck lands are our best vegetable lands. There lands are
very fertile. In some cases they are deficient in potash, phosphoric
acid, and lime. They are rich in nitrogen. Pure mucks, in addition
to nitrogen, contain noticeably large supplies of both phosphoric
acid and lime, and only deficient in potash.
As a whole, Hillsborough County soil cannot be excelled, and
with proper intelligence can be made to yield tremendous crops.

21,307 MILES OF CIGARS MANUFACTURED
OF CLEAR HAVANA TOBACCO IN
TAMPA IN A YEAR
Tampa turns out each year a total of 300,000,000 cigars.
The average cigar is four and one-half inches and this makes a
mere bagatelle of 1,350,000,000 inches, or, what is the same thing,
112,500,000 feet of cigars. It does not take a professor of mathe-
matics to figure it out that this means 21,307 miles of cigars.


In other words, if the entire annual output of Tampa was made
into one cigar and a man had bitten off the end in New York, the
cigar would extend across the United States, over the Pacific Ocean,
through Asia and Europe, and he would be dragging away with the
lighted end in London.
Another way to put it would be that this State, with its 58,680
square miles of territory, could be enclosed on its borders and coast line
with a tobacco wall of cigars five thicknesses deep and six inches high.
One continuous cigar would go thirty times around the border
and coast line of Florida.
That is the output of Tampa.

BUILDING MATERIAL
The Board of Trade is frequently asked the cost of building
material. The following prices are taken from the official price list and
can be used as a guide, but we do not guarantee the prices any more
than we would guarantee at long range the price of any commodity,
for all prices fluctuate. Yellow pine, unless otherwise quoted:
Rough lumber, $14 to $16 smaller sizes; 4 and 6 x 12, $19 to $23.
No. 1 5-inch cypress shingles, $4.50; No. 2 5-inch cypress shingles,
$3.50. Dressed lumber: flooring, D. & M,, $17 to $21; ceiling,
$15 to $21; boards, $17 to $23; window and door-frame stock,
$18 to $25; wainscoting, $23; window frames, complete, $1.30
to $1.75 each.

TAMPA AND THE PANAMA CANAL
Read the following resolution passed by Congress in 1906:
"WHEREAS, The city of Tampa, in the State of Florida, by reason
of its being farther to the southward and nearer to said canal than
any other city in the country having a deep and commodious harbor,
reached by ample railroad facilities, as also on account of its salu-
brious climate and the spirit of American progress among its citizens,
manifest in the rapid growth and development of the city and her
commerce *."


_ _


__








SOIL SURVEY IN THE COUNTY
Soils include three divisions: Pine land, hammock, and sand.
Average for Hillsborough County:
Coarse earth, ..... .. ... 6.0663
Insoluble residue,. ...........93.9337
Excess of soil over State average,.... 2.0539
Humus,. ..... . . .83
Excess over State average, ...... .19
Nitrogen, . . .. . .0595
Excess over State average, ...... .0182
Potash (K20), . . .. .. .0012
Deficiency over State average, ..... .0079
Phosphoric acid (P2 05), ........ .2116
Excess over State average, ...... .0481
Lime (CaO), .. ..... .... .1412
Deficiency over State average, . .0393
MUCK LANDS
While average depth of pine land and orange land soils is 6.06
inches, the depth of muck lands runs from two to fourteen feet.
The muck lands are our best vegetable lands. There lands are
very fertile. In some cases they are deficient in potash, phosphoric
acid, and lime. They are rich in nitrogen. Pure mucks, in addition
to nitrogen, contain noticeably large supplies of both phosphoric
acid and lime, and only deficient in potash.
As a whole, Hillsborough County soil cannot be excelled, and
with proper intelligence can be made to yield tremendous crops.

21,307 MILES OF CIGARS MANUFACTURED
OF CLEAR HAVANA TOBACCO IN
TAMPA IN A YEAR
Tampa turns out each year a total of 300,000,000 cigars.
The average cigar is four and one-half inches and this makes a
mere bagatelle of 1,350,000,000 inches, or, what is the same thing,
112,500,000 feet of cigars. It does not take a professor of mathe-
matics to figure it out that this means 21,307 miles of cigars.


In other words, if the entire annual output of Tampa was made
into one cigar and a man had bitten off the end in New York, the
cigar would extend across the United States, over the Pacific Ocean,
through Asia and Europe, and he would be dragging away with the
lighted end in London.
Another way to put it would be that this State, with its 58,680
square miles of territory, could be enclosed on its borders and coast line
with a tobacco wall of cigars five thicknesses deep and six inches high.
One continuous cigar would go thirty times around the border
and coast line of Florida.
That is the output of Tampa.

BUILDING MATERIAL
The Board of Trade is frequently asked the cost of building
material. The following prices are taken from the official price list and
can be used as a guide, but we do not guarantee the prices any more
than we would guarantee at long range the price of any commodity,
for all prices fluctuate. Yellow pine, unless otherwise quoted:
Rough lumber, $14 to $16 smaller sizes; 4 and 6 x 12, $19 to $23.
No. 1 5-inch cypress shingles, $4.50; No. 2 5-inch cypress shingles,
$3.50. Dressed lumber: flooring, D. & M,, $17 to $21; ceiling,
$15 to $21; boards, $17 to $23; window and door-frame stock,
$18 to $25; wainscoting, $23; window frames, complete, $1.30
to $1.75 each.

TAMPA AND THE PANAMA CANAL
Read the following resolution passed by Congress in 1906:
"WHEREAS, The city of Tampa, in the State of Florida, by reason
of its being farther to the southward and nearer to said canal than
any other city in the country having a deep and commodious harbor,
reached by ample railroad facilities, as also on account of its salu-
brious climate and the spirit of American progress among its citizens,
manifest in the rapid growth and development of the city and her
commerce *."


_ _


__









NATURE'S HERITAGE
TO TAMPA
ROCKY POINT


A FOREST TEMPLE ON THE SHELL .
ROAD TO THE BEACH-REACHED
BY MACADAM ROAD-MAG-
NIFICENT AUTO DRIVE

LAKELET INSIDE THE REEFS AT ROCKY POINT NOONDAY AT ROCKY POINT--NATURE'S SIESTA
WHEN THE TIDE IS OUT SHORE DRIVE TO THE POINT SKIRTS THE BAY
A WINDOW VIEW OF THE JANGLE SHORE IN A TROPICAL MAZE
A GRIZZLED VETERAN, SENTINEL OF THE BEACH
One day at the head of ,Tampa Bay, Nature sat in pleasant mood and mused, and as she mused, she breathed upon this spot and, smiling, left it. No one knows who
first called it by its suggestive name. No vandal-hand has touched it; no one dares improve upon it, even in name. As you gaze acquiescent upon it, and its beauty
grows, each individual spot proclaims for itself a name.


- -. .. -,:- .








TAMPA "GROWING BY DOING"


TAMPA IS
The ideal tourist winter resort.
The gateway of the Panama Canal.
The Mecca for winter automobilists.
Cuba's most natural American port.
The metropolis of Southern Florida.
One of the healthiest cities in America.
The terminus of three railway trunk lines.
The marvel of all who behold it the first time.
The American home of the clear Havana cigar.
The carnival city for summer sports in midwinter.
The largest manufacturing city in the State of Florida.
The largest, safest, and best port on the Gulf of Mexico.
The best place for profitable investments in the United States.
The market place for 80 per cent. of the citrus crop of Florida.
"The Town To Tie To," for it is growing by leaps and bounds.
In position to dominate the commerce of a wide and rich
area.
Nearer to Panama than any other Gulf port by more than 200
miles.
The phosphate market of the world. The phosphate fields lie
back of her.
In the heart of the richest agricultural country in the South, its
best market.
Tenth as a revenue producer in the United States; total in 1908,
$2,431,951.66.
Nearer the national capital than any other Gulf port, by rail,
more than 100 miles.
The naval stores market of the world- with its billion feet of
virgin timber yet to be tapped.
The yellow pine lumber market of the South has 15,000,000,-
000 feet of standing timber contiguous to the city.


TAMPA HAS
Five fire stations.
A population of over 54,000.
Fifty-seven wholesale houses.
Thirty-two passenger trains daily.
A payroll of $1,250,000 per month.
A growing season twelve months long.
Four thousand telephones in daily use.
Best sewage system in the United States.
Sixty-seven miles of vitrified brick paving.
Eighteen public schools; nine private schools.
Eight banks; capital and surplus, over $3,000,000.
Two newspapers Evening Times and Morning Tribune.
Sixty-seven miles of street railway, carrying 12,000,000 passengers.
Two hundred and fiftymiles of hard-surfaced, continuous roadway.
One hundred and eighty cigar factories, employing 13,000
hands.
The most progressive people of any city of its size in the
South.
A harbor, dock, and terminal system greater than any other port
in the South.
All the essentials of a great metropolitan city and the natural
wealth to back it.
One thousand gas lights; three hundred arc lights; sixty thou-
sand incandescents.
Forty-five miles of water mains-pumping capacity of plant,
17,000,000 gallons daily.
The backing of the richest soil and finest growing climate in the
South, both for fruit and vegetables.
The marketing and handling of hundreds of millions of dollars'
worth of phosphate, lumber, naval stores, and cattle all Florida
products.








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