• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Title Page
 Advertising
 Foreword
 Tampa, Florida
 What to see in Tampa
 Terse information
 Tampa's wealth and industries
 Public utilities
 Our neighboring towns
 Through storyland to sunset...
 Florida in an automobile
 A directory of public buildings...
 Street car schedules
 Business directory
 Index
 Back Cover






Title: Rinaldi's guide book to the city of Tampa
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027721/00001
 Material Information
Title: Rinaldi's guide book to the city of Tampa
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Rinaldi Printing Company
 Subjects
Subject: Tampa, Fla.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States -- Florida -- Tampa
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027721
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Advertising
        Advertising
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Advertising
        Page 3
    Foreword
        Page 4
    Tampa, Florida
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    What to see in Tampa
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Terse information
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Tampa's wealth and industries
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Public utilities
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Our neighboring towns
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Through storyland to sunset seas
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Florida in an automobile
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
    A directory of public buildings and grounds in Tampa
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Street car schedules
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
    Business directory
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Index
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text


lRIIIIIIIIIII IIIIII IIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIll lllll ll ulllilll 111111111111ii

-- 1915-EDITION-1916


RINALDI'S


SGuide Book
TO THE

City of Tampa
50 CONTAINING
Map of the City, Street Car Schedules, Railroad
and Steamship Timetables, Points of Interest
and Commercial, Historical, Statistical
Sand General Information


= PRICE 10 CENTS

Printed and Published by
-I RIN.ALDI PRINTING COMPANY
Tampa, Florida

S iiIIIIIilliiiill IIIIIIIIiMii i ii IIIII lIIUIIIIii i IIIIIII lIiiii











SDairy Kitchen
V WHERE EVERYTHING IS
+ PLEASING
STampa's Famous Restaurant
JACK & CAREERS, Props.
EVERYTHING NEW OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
S Corner Tampa and Lafayette Streets
Merchants' Lunch Served from 11:30 to 2:00 P. M.
I 35c
A la Carte Service at all Hours
,- TAMPA, FLORIDA

.. .,.. ...... ...


THE NEW

I Marlboro Hotel
Tampa's Leading Popular Priced Hotel
Location central to all lines of business, depots, theatres,
etc. European plan, $1.00 up, detached bath; $1.50, private
Sbath. First class service and modern equipment.
For the mother, wife or daughter travelling alone THE
NEW MARLBORO is unrivaled. All rooms are newly
-decorated, all of good size, light, airy, with running water, .
Electric lights, etc.
Union Depot Car Direct to the Hotel
707 TAMPA ST., CORNER OF ZACK ST.
y GEO. W. WILSON, Prop. Phone 3493
3 a .. .. ........ .. .*









RINALDI'S


Guide Book
to the

City of Tampa


Containing Map of the City, Street Car Schehules, Railroad and
Steamship Timetables, Points of Interest, and Commercial,
Historical, Statistical and General Information
PRICE, 10 CENTS
Printed and Published by
RINALDI PRINTING COMPANY
Tampa, Florida
I'


I




















































COPYRIGHT APPLIED FOR
RINALDI PRINTING COMPANY
TAMPA. FLA.

4e





RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


REAL PROGRESSIVE
MERCHANDISING

W HILE this furniture store always carries great
stocks it may sometimes fail in providing
exactly what you want and in that case we'll get
the furniture for you without delav-rest assured of that.
It is not what we want to sell but what you want to buy
that guides us aright-we never have and never will try
to change the individual's preferences, because we want
to sell you


The Furniture You Want

-But for Less!
SOUTH FLORIDA'S GREATEST
HOUSEF[RNISHER


1011-13 Franklin Street-TAMPA


=URNE~ kNH:14S-







4 RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


Foreword

HIS compendium of information is dedicated
especially to the visitors to our city. With so
many places of interest within our gates, ;.s
well as almost unlimited attractions in this
immediate section of Florida, it is impossible
for the stranger among us to find all that is
worth seeing without some sort of guide. It
was to supply this long-felt want that
RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK TO THE CITY OF TAMPA was
first published four years ago.
The popular favor with which it has been received is very
gratifying, and this year we have striven to make it more com-
plete and attractive than ever before.
To prevent its falling into disinterested hands we make for it
a nominal charge, which, it is needless to say, does not represent
more than a mere fraction of its actual cost. Hence, the adver-
tisers herein represented are the actual donors of this useful vol-
ume. We trust that the reader will bear this in mind and show
substantial appreciation of their liberality in thus making possi-
ble its distribution.
The statistical and other data has been carefully compiled
and revised, and, in the main, it will be found very accurate.
We have attempted to give information regarding out-of-
town attractions as well as those in the city without any coloring
of prejudice or favor.
We join our advertisers in wishing you a pleasant visit in
our midst, and urge you to see as much as possible of our glor-
ious country before you return to your home.
THE PUBLISHERS.

PLEASE MENTION RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK WHEN
CALLING UPON OUR ADVERTISERS







IINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK 5


Tampa, Florida


S ITS LOCATION, HARBOR, IMPORTANCE AS A MANU-
FACTURING CITY, AND ADVANTAGES AS A
HOME CITY.
AMPA, FLORIDA, located at the head of Hills-
borough Bay, on the west coast of the state.
occupies an enviable position in the front rank
of the greatest cities of the South. Destined to
become the largest and most important com-
mercial city in Florida, it has a I. .1 ,iK: .. at
this time of more than 70,000 ir.h,l., ni-,, the
figures taking into consideration Tampa
proper, Ybor City, West Tampa and close-in
suburbs. The white American population is
estimated at 40%, foreign white population, :0%; negro popula-
tion, 30%.
HEALTH
Health is one of the prime factors of any city; without a
healthy climate no city can prosper. Tampa is universally con-
ceded to be one of the most healthful cities in the United States.
The death rate of the United States is .015, while of Tampa it is
.0139. The Tampa rate is the lowest of any large city in the
South. Taking into consideration the fact that there are a great
many persons coming into the city at all times during the year.
and ti .' ,11 during the winter months, who are in ill health
and die trom causes not attributed to Tampa conditions, the
above figures show the health of Tampa exceptionally good.
TAMPA BOARD OF TRADE
The Talnpa Board of Trade is an organization of business
and professional interests to protect and promote the trade of
the "Cigar City," and to improve municipal conditions in gen-
S eral. The organization at this time embraces over two hundred
firms and individuals, and is representative, in the highest de-
gree, of every phase of commercial, industrial and professional
life in Tampa. It conducts its work through many standing and
special committees and by a salaried office staff at its head-
quarters in the new city hall.






fUNA\LI)1 S GUll E BOO)K


MRS. JULIA MARTIN
"'ITHE CHIROPODIST"
OFFICE HOURS
9 to 6
PHONE 4218 /
ALL FOOT TROUBLES
TREATED
Manicuring, Scalp and Facial
vs. MASSAGE
f Robert's Bldg., Suite 8
SZACK ST. &- FLORID AlYVE.
4Opposite Y. X1. C. I.





S THOSE. C. HAMMOND & CO.
Room 4, Giddens Building


+ Real Estate
? .and --
|:+ Mortgages


MEMBERS
TAMPA REAL ESTATE BOARD
. ,
+-^^-+ + +++ +++++H6+-++- + '-+-f 4








RINALDL'S GUIDE BOOK


The organization undertakes large and general things, look-
ing toward the future development of the greatness of Tampa.
It facilitates the visit to this city annually of thousands of tour-
Sits, homeseekers and investors, doing this through an extensive
advertising campaign.
B. L. Hamner, secretary, and L. P. Dickie, assistant secre-
tary of tie Board of Trade, are in their offices at all times, to
which visitors and enquirers are cordially invited and where they
will receive nuch competent and disinterested advice as may
make a trip to Tampa a profitable experience and a pleasant
memory.
FIRE DEPARTMENT
The efficiency of the Tampa Fire Department is borne out
by the low insurance rates in effect in the city. The apparatus is
composed of self-propelled vehicles of the most modern con-
struction, and the number and kind are entirely adequate for the
present need. The department is being enlarged regularly to
keep pace with the rapid growth of the city.
FACTORIES
Tampa is pre-eminently a manufacturing city. Backed by
tributary country immensely rich in agricultural and horticul-
tural products, with stock-raising and phosphate mining the
most extensive in the state, and hence, by no means dependent
upon her manufacturing industries for subsistence, Tampa is,
nevertheless. the leading manufacturing center of Florida.
In point of importance, the cigar industry ranks first, Tampa
being recognized as the leading clear Havana cigar market of
the world. The cigar factories, located in Tampa and West
Tampa, number over two hundred, many of which employ over
500 workers. The estimated output of cigars during 1915 is
placed at nearly 1,000,000 per day, employment being given to
over 10,000 Spanish and Cuban workmen. The weekly payroll of
these employees averages $250,000. In addition to the above,
three cigar box factories, two of which are the largest in the
United States, give employment to several hundred men and
women.
Other manufacturing industries of Tampa, are, briefly
stated: Iron foundries and machine works, building dredges,
cranes, derricks, etc., of immense power, ship yards, furniture
factories, heater and ventilator fortory, mattress factories, brush
factories, brewery, tent and awning factory, automobile and car-
riage top factory, engraving, printing and book-binding plants,








RIN.\LD)J'S GULIDE BOOK


EVERY TOURIST TAKES A TRIP TO



Mitchell's Beach



Y'ur visit to St. Petersburg is not complete without
a sight of the Gulf of Mexico.

Mitchell's Beach on John's Pass is the nearest point
and the easiest reached.

A short ride out Grand Central on a Jungle car, a
shorter ferry, and you are there in forty minutes!

In addition to a sight of the rolling waters of the
Gulf. Mitchell's Beach offers shore dinners, surf bathing,
boating and the best gulfand bay fishing in Florida.


Mitchell't Beach Hocel is open the Budding sites at thr reit offro the
jear round. Its guests have h n oken most cairful .invtcestor wondr:til opportttnitii
of the Florida fishing records. oar big profti.


NOEL A. MITCHELL, Owner
(Mitctell, the Sandmnu )
I


i .


St. Petersburg, Florida


Mitchell's Block







RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


candy factories, boiler works, harness factories, broom factories,
cider and vinegar works, crate factory and cooperage works, fer-
tilizer factories, patent medicine factories, manufacturing jew-
elers, automobile tire works, marble and granite works, coffee
and spice mills, and many others of importance, but too numer-
ous to mention in this work.
HARBOR
The harbor of Tampa is one of the best in the world. From
the Gulf of Mexico to the head of Hillsborough Bay, a distance
of thirty-six miles, it is land-locked, affording protected water
great enough in extent and depth to anchor the navy of the
United States. The rise and fall of the tide is about eighteen
inches. The Government has appropriated $1,750,000 for harbor
improvements in Tampa. The dredging of the channel to 24
feet has been completed and a survey has been made with a view
of increasing this depth to 30 feet. The estuary improvement,
now going on, will provide five additional miles of dockage at
the command of shipping interests, a greater percentage of the
docks to be controlled by the city, making the harbor of Tampa
an open port. Being only 1,216 nautical miles from the Panama
Canal it is evident that Tampa will be selected as the connecting
link between \ashington and the Canal Zone, thus justifying
the claim of supremacy over any other Gulf or South Atlantic
port.
HOME ADVANTAGES
Tampa's advantages as a home city are many. It practically
combines the enjoyable features of the year-round seaside resort
with those of the up-to-date modern city. Well-paved and well-
lighted streets, creditable business buildings, handsome resi-
dences, excellent transportation facilities, well-appointed hotels,
large and complete wholesale and retail stocks, good water,
sanitary sewerage system, efficient city government, excellent
schools, good newspapers (morning and evening), good theatres,
superb climate, and delightful social conditions are all to be
found here. Boating, fishing, and bathing are convenient to all
S portions of the city. (See elsewhere, in this guide, a list of at-
tractive resorts, drives, and excursions).
r THE HEART OF TAMPA
. That section of Tampa lying between Tampa street on the
west and Florida avenue on the east, Lafayette street to the
south, and Zack street to the north, comprising six city squares,





EINTALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


Country Trips Our
Specialty
RATES BY HOUR OR DAY

Eagle Auto Service

...Cadillac Cars...
PHONE 2330
If above 'phone is busy
CALL 2776
Day or Night

806 1-2 Twiggs Street
TAMPA, FLORIDA






































LA FAYE ]'TTE~ STR EHJT BRUIDGE


0 .


li~l~~~~


I,
if






12 RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK



Dairy Kitchen
4i' WHERE EVERYTHING IS
PLEASING
STampa's Famous Restaurant
*. JACK & CAREERS, Props.
EVERYTHING NEV OPEN DAY AND NIGHT '
S Corner Tampa and Lafayette Streets
S Merchants' Lunch Served from 11:30 to 2:00 P. IM.
35c
,C l a Carte Service at all Hours
TAM PI,. FLORIDA



THE $15.00 STORE



BAILEY'S
LAFAYETTE STREET (Around the Corner)
OUR ORIGINAL METHODS PRO- 1
DUCE WONDERFUL VALUES IN
SUITS AND OVERCOATS AT








RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


is known as the heart of the retail business of the city. Nearly
every street car operated by the Tampa Electric Co. circles a
loop in this section, the outward limits of which are the streets
named. Within this radius can be found the greater majority of
the best retail establishments of the city, although the business
section is growing so rapidly that many stores of more than or-
dinary importance are to be found outside of these boundaries.
The majority of the important wholesale establishments are lo-
cated within a few blocks of this center, the river front, Water
and Tampa streets probably having the greater number.
EARLY HISTORICAL FACTS
Tampa Bay entered and named Espiritu Santo (Holy Spirit)
May 25, 1539, by Hernando DeSoto. Supposed to have landed at
Green Springs, on Old Tampa Bay. Green Springs is also called
the "Fountain of Eternal Youth," made famous by Ponce de
Leon.
Territory of Florida under Spanish flag until July, 1821, when
it was formally transferred by Spain to the United States, cere-
monies taking place at St. Augustine and Pensacola, and known
as "The Exchange of Flags."
Fort Brooke established on the present townsite of Tampa
in February, 1824. Named after General George Marshall
- Brooke. The military reservation as originally set aside con-
tained sixteen square miles.
First townsite of Tampa comprises 160 acres, given to the
City of Tampa by the United States Government in 1847.
Military reservation relinquished January 4, 1883, transferred
to the Interior Department and land shortly after restored to
public domain and opened to homestead entry.
The "Carew Homestead," one of the first to be filed, em-
braced the ground upon which is located the "Officer's Quarters."
This building is still intact and may be seen near the intersection
of Franklin and Krause streets. It stands well back in a grove
of magnificent moss-hung live oaks.


What to See in Tampa

COURT SQUARE-On Franklin St., between Lafayette
and Madison Sts., and extending east to Florida Ave., is located
this delightful little park. Here are found the Hillsborough
County courthouse, a building unique in its style of architecture,







14 RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


MANUEL GARCIA'S


Famous panishRestaurant

North Franklin Street
Corner Constant
SERVES THE ONLY
GENUINE SPANISH DINNERS
IN THE TRULY SPANISH STYLE



Adolph Werly, Mgr. Adolph Werly, Jr., Ass't Mgr.
PHONE 71-313
Good Clean Rooms German Cooking Reasonable Rates
Automobile Service


Colonial Hotel
SULPHUR SPRINGS TAMPA, FLORIDA
Finest Bathing, Fishing, Hunting and Boating
in the South
FINEST MINERAL AND CHALYBEATE WATER
IN AMERICA
An ideal place to rest and recuperate. Bowling alleys open
every day. Especially for boating clubs. Dinner
parties also requested at all times.




















i~- ` 2 iE


HOME OF TAMPA LODGE, NO. 708, B. P. O. ELKS






16 RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK

. ..-


Tampa's Havana

Best 5c

Product Cigar

SBISTRICTLY HAND MADE
, A SURE GUIDE TO SATISFACTION
Made by
| MARSICANO CIGAR COMPANY
TAMPA, FLORIDA




A Place of Interest

In the City of Tampa is our yard equipped with all
modern machinery for handling and preparing coal. Few
people realize the amount and class of equipment neces-
sary to the proper and economic handling of coal on a
large scale.
Vessels loaded and unloaded, cars handled with quick
dispatch, and retail orders given prompt attention, re-
quires high grade machinery and efficient management.
We Sell the Best Coal on Earth
Tampa Coal Company
Hendry & Knight Terminals Phones 4645-4646
I.







RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK 17


the Confederate monument, erected in 1911 by Tampa Chapter
United Daughters of Confederacy, a cement and iron fountain,
containing an interesting collection of alligators native to Florida
waters, a municipal bandstand, lawns, shrubs, trees, and num-
bers of shady seats. One of the most delightful features of daily
life in Tampa is the band concerts held here every Saturday
night throughout the year. These concerts are given by the
Municipal band, an excellent musical organization, and are at-
tended by throngs of people. Owing to the large Latin-Ameri-
can population of Tampa, "La Paloma" vies in popularity with
"America," and to this whole-hearted intermingling of the races
is due much of the general spirit of neighborliness and good
fellowship which makes the newcomer feel welcome, and the old
resident realize that no other place can ever be home to him.
During the Gasparilla celebration each year Court Square is
made a veritable "Garden of Eden," and a wonderful collection
of tropical and semi-tropical plants, shrubs, trees, etc., are here
displayed.
LAFAYETTE STREET BRIDGE-One of the finest
cement and steel bridge's in the South, erected by the City of
Tampa at a cost of approximately $300,000. This bridge was
opened to the public in the early spring of 1914, and spans the
Hillsborough river at Lafayette street, connecting the business
section of the city with the residence sections of Hyde Park,
North Hyde Park and Moody Heights. Hyde Park, Union Sta-
tion, Ballast Point and Port Tampa cars pass over the bridge.
HILLSBOROUGH RIVER-Dividing the business section
of the city from the residence sections of Hyde Park, North
Hyde Park and Moody Heights. One of the most beautiful
rivers in Southern Florida, the scenery along which rivals the
far-famed St. Johns. Docks accommodating shipping south
from Lafayette street bridge to bay. Twenty-four feet of water
to docks, 12-foot channel to Tampa Steam Ways. Estimated
seven feet to Sulphur Springs, nine miles up the river, and nav-
igable for small craft to the power dam of the Tampa Electric
Co., some six miles further. A motor-boat trip up the Hills-
borough river is a succession of delightful vistas. The tropical
scenery is magnificent and no discomfort from insects is en-
countered. Among other interesting sights may be seen, on the
right bank a short distance above the Garcia Avenue bridge, the
fast-decaying hull of the "Magdalene," said to have been an
American cup defender in the American-English yacht races.
Stops may be made at Avon Springs, Purity Springs, and Sul-
phur Springs, where docks are available.
I






RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


IT'S

BUTTER-NUT

Sold on its own merits.
,1 Its rich, nutty flavor is
made possible only by our
new and exclusive pro-
cess.

TRY OUR FAMOUS 10c PACKAGE CAKE-SOLD ON
ITS OWN GOODNESS!
Orders Solicited from Anybody, Anywhere, at Anytime,
when QUALITY IS REQUIRED


CONSTANTLY ON HAND:
A Full Line of Cakes, Cookies, etc.
Home Baked Ham
A Large Variety of High-grade
Salads


Tampa Steam Bakery
1002 FRANKLIN STREET Phone 2307
I.








RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


PLANT PARK--West side Lafayette St. Bridge, fronting
Hillsborough river and extending along Lafayette street to
f Crescent Place, south to A Avenue and east to the river. Con-
tains about seventy-five acres of rich tropical and natural foliage
and lawns. Shady walks, seats, etc. One of the most beautiful
municipally owned parks in the South. Location of Tampa Bay
Hotel, Tampa Bay Casino (theatre), and Woman's Club Build-
ing. Hyde Park, Union Station, Ballast Point and Port Tampa
cars pass the gates at Hyde Park Avenue.
DESOTO'S OAK-Located in Plant Park, north from the
gates at Hyde Park Ave., said to have been the first camping
place of Hernando DeSoto upon arriving on the shores of Flor-
ida.
TAMPA BAY HOTEL-The finest municipally owned
hotel in the South, located in Plant Park north from the gates at
Hyde Park Avenue. This hotel is famous for its Moorish style
of architecture, its furnishings, service and cuisine. Opened to
the public in 1889. Built by the late Henry B. Plant at a cost of
t about $2,000,000. Hotel, furnishings and grounds are estimated
to be worth over $3,000,000. At a cost of $125.000 the City of
Tampa received a deed to the entire property from the heirs of
H. B. Plant on June 23, 1905. Hyde Park, Union Station, Ballast
Point and Port Tampa cars pass the gates.
YBOR CITY (pronounced E-bor)-Within the corporate
limits of the City of Tampa and under the same general govern-
ment. The principal street is Seventh Avenue, on which are
located all the more important business houses. Many of the
great cigar factories are located in this section of the city, in-
cluding the,Sanchez & Haya factory, built in 1886, the first fac-
tory to engage in the manufacture of cigars in Tampa. Some
of the best Spanish restaurants and cafes are located throughout
the section. East of Nebraska Avenue is located that section of
Tampa known as "The Scrub," housing a large percentage of the
negro and low-caste foreign population. More particularly in
Ybor City than in any other section of Tampa the visitor comes
into touch with the Spanish, Italian and Cuban population. The
customs of this section of the city are distinctly un-American
and it is seldom that an English word is heard spoken by the
crowds which throng the streets, stores, theatres and clubs. The
"White Way" of Ybor City, a recent innovation, adds much to
the attractiveness of the section after darkness. A visit to
Tampa that does not include Ybor City is incomplete. Seventh
Avenue, Tampa Heights, Michigan Avenue, Ross Avenue and
West Tampa cars reach the section at different points.








20 RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


PHONE 3060
THE NEW HOTEL
Mrs. Sanchez, Proprietress
ROOMS AND BOARD $7.00 PER WEEK
1017% FRANKLIN STREET TAMPA, FLA.
Corner Harrison St.










YOU AUTO HAVE A NEW
TOP
Let us give you prices on Tops, Covers, or anything in
that line.
Rebuilt Ford Tops supplied while you wait. Ask about
it.
WHITTENBURG & BOYD
T AMPA'S BIG
OP FACTORY 1101 FLORIDA AVENUE




S THE LIBERTY HOUSE
*. 207%., FORTUNE STREET
Rooms for Two $3.50 and up
Rooms for One 2.50 and lip
S 1.1 l I :% \ El.l. l l: I I :FD %'%l) 114 ll-I.iLE 1
*:t MRS. ANNIE PHILLIPS. Proprietress -
+ I lI.....: 73: 1 4...'.
--'-I------ -- --- + -. .-" -' -'-- -- --- :" "" "' "









RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


DESOTO PARK-A popular picnic park, located on Spark-
man Bay, an arm of Hillsborough Bay. Location of one of the
government wireless stations. Natural foliage, good beach,
fishing from docks. Boats can be rented. Take Seventh Avenue
car.
GARY-Adjoining Ybor City to the east is the newly incor-
porated town of Gary, which holds a special interest to the win-
ter visitor, especially those coming to Tampa with the end in
view of locating in this section or State and engaging in the cul-
tivation of winter vegetables for the ever-increasing market in
the North. Here can be seen any number of the finest truck
gardens under the most intensive cultivation. During the entire
winter season green fields of every imaginable vegetable are
grown and marketed, almost invariably bringing the highest
prices. This section is a recent development close upon the out-
skirts of Ybor City, and is best reached by automobile or driv-
ing, although the Seventh Avenue car reaches within easy walk-
ing distance. An excellent brick road leads through Gary to Six
Mile Creek and Plant City. South Tampa, another famous truck-
growing community, is within a short distance of Gary.
WEST TAMPA-A separate municipality joining ''ampa to
the west. Similar to Ybor City its population is largely foreign
and its commercial interest centers to a great extent in the man-
ufacture of cldar Havana cigars, a great number of the finest
cigar factories in the world being located in various parts of the
city. West Tampa has its own city hall, bank, theatres, clubs,
Spanish restaurants and cafes, library, city government, etc.
The city is building rapidly and Horace Greeley's advice, "Go
West, young man, go West," is heard often in regard to the pos-
sibilities of lucrative real estate investment in West Tampa.
Take Union Station, West Tampa or Ross Avenue cars.
TAMPA AUTOMOBILE AND GOLF CLUB-About 7
miles from the city, near the shore-line of Old Tampa Bay, on
Grand Central Drive. Club building and grounds are valued at
$50,000.00. Golf course among best in tle State. A very popu-
lar social club. Reached only by automobile or driving.
ROCKY POINT-A popular picnic place. Fronts directly
on Old Tampa Bay. Magnificent moss-hung oaks and tropical
foliage of every description. No accommodations. Oyster beds
and fishing short distance off shore. Near Tampa Automobile
and Golf Club property, and reached only by automobile or driv-
ing. Frazier's Beach. where bathing and fishing are to be en-
joyed. is located about two mile- seuth of Rocky Point.







22 RINALII'S GUIDE BOOK



TAMPA

A CITY ELECTRICAL
q The joys and comforts of living in Tampa are con-
tributed to, to no little extent, by electricity. Our
Great White Way, brilliantly illuminated stores and
show windows are a source of pride to all Tampans.
q In Tampa homes evidences of electricity are
plainly seen. Not only are the homes electrically
lighted but electric irons, electric percolators, sewing
machine motors, vacuum cleaners, etc., are exten-
sively used.
( TAMPA'S STREET RAILWAY, consisting of
51 miles of track, completely cover the city and sub-
urban territory. Included in this system are inter-
urban lines to the separate municipalities of West
Tampa and Port Tampa City.
j To our visitors we would say that the very best
way to see Tampa is by trolley.

TAMPA ELECTRIC CO.
% -J







RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


SULPHUR SPRINGS-About six miles north of the city,
fronting the Hiilsborough river, is located Sulphur Springs park,
of especial interest to visitors to this section. Here is found the
famous "Stomawa" mineral well, the name being of Seminole
Indian origin and meaning Stomach Water. It is claimed the
effect of the water is identical with that of the Kissingen Springs
of Kissingen. Germany, the analyses showing but slight differ-
ences. In the days of the Seminole supremacy, the spring was
visited yearly by thousands of Indians who came from the coun-
try both north and south of Tampa to drink the water and re-
gain their health. Today the spring is visited by thousands of
Americans each year. The water is slightly alkaline and has a
saltine taste. The enormous Sulphur Spring, from which the
park takes its name, is another feature of intense interest. This
spring is confined in a large concrete basin, 125x135 feet in di-
mensions, in which bathing is permitted. The spring has an
eight and one-half foot fall, a flow of 30,000 gallons per minute,
or 43,200,000 gallons every 24 hours. The grounds surrounding
the springs are interesting for their natural tropical growth.
The amusements provided consist of a zoological garden, in-
cluding a collection of Florida alligators, dancing pavilion, cafe.
and several minor attractions. There is also a good hotel on
the grounds giving excellent accommodations either by the week
or for a single meal. The car ride to Sulphur Springs takes the
visitor through some of the most rapidly growing suburbs of the
city and directly through the center of two large orange groves,
where during the season the golden fruit may be seen hanging
from the branches of the trees. Take Sulphur Springs car.
PALMA CEIA SPRINGS-About three miles from the city,
on Hillsborough Bay, is located the mineral springs of Palma
Ceia, which has many prominent sponsors for the beneficial ef-
fects to be derived from the use of the water. The springs are
contained in a cement basin in which bathing can be enjoyed.
Take Ballast Point or Port Tampa cars.
SPANISH SANATORIUM-Located on'the "Little Penin-
sula," about three and a half miles from the city. An immense
brick structure, surrounded by beautiful grounds, and established
and supported by the Latin-American population of Tampa for
the scientific care of the sick. The apparatus is all of the latest
and most modern manufacture, and the institution ranks among
the best in South Florida.
BALLAST POINT PARK-On the west shore of Hills-
borough Bay, about 4i miles southwest of the city, is located







RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


When the Stranger Asks the Question
V WHICH IS THE MOST RELIABLE JEWELRY
STORE IN THIS LOCALITY?
THE ANSWER IS
OWEN-COTTER JEWELRY CO.
SWe enjoy the reputation of dealing honestly and giving our
trade the best money can buy. Our sales being very large,
Swe are satisfied with a small profit.
Our stock embraces all lines belonging to the jewelry in-
Sdustry, from an inexpensive souvenir to the most gorgeous iF
+ diamond La Valliere.
Our jewelry manufacturing department is ranked among
* the highest class of manufacturing jewelers, and our work is -
executed at manufacturer's prices.
SOWEN-COTTER JEWELRY CO.
HEADQUARTERS FOR FLORIDA SOUVENIRS
SPhone 4324 013 Franklin Street, Tampa






LUMBER
\e are extensive dealers in Pine and Cypress Lumber of
all kinds and sizes, Brick. Lime. Cement, Shingles, Laths,
and Vulcanite Roofing. No order too small or too large
for us to handle. Our motto i- "SERVICE" and we have
built up a big business by giving our customers what they
want when they want it.
('all and inspect our stock and get our prices before
bulling anything in our line

Alexander Lumber Co.
Phone 208S
Opposite Union Station DREW AVE. & TW.IGGS ST.
I'




4 .


I AM PA -
\IA(NI1I( F \ T I i ALi


(* 4 --t(






26 RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK






Ball Bearing-Long Wearing
The

"SILENT SMITH"
New Model 8
ONE of the greatest retail mer-
chants of the country built his
business upon the maxim-"The
customer is always right." This
principle has been followed in the
manufacture of the
L. C. Smith & Bros.
Typewriter

L. C. Smith & Bros. Typewiter Company
309 Zack St., Tampa, Fla.


Branches in all principal cities Factory and Home Office: Syracuse. N. Y.


I -


L







RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


The wants of the user have dictated its con-
struction. The user has decided in favor of
certain improvements, now incorporated in
the New Model 8. Here are some of them:

Silence of Operation-The most silent running efficient
typewriter ever placed on the market. Absolute silence has
been very nearly attained.

Decimal Tabulator-A help in billing and tabulating
There is no extra charge for this convenience.

Variable Line Spacer-Enables the operator to start on a
given line and space from point of starting; also to write on
ruled lines whose spacing varies from typewriter spacing.
A great help in card work.

Faster Ribbon Feed-Insures new place of impact for each
type face.

Choice of Carriage Return-Upon special order the new
left hand carriage return will be furnished in place of the
right hand.

All the important features of previous models have been retain-
ed-ball bearing carriage, typebars and capital shift; back spacer,
key controlled ribbon, removable platen, protected type, flexible
paper feed and automatic ribbon reverse.

Write for new catalog of Model 8. .... It will explain why the
L. C. Smith & Bros. typewriter is a synonym for superior service

L. C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter Company
309 Zack St.. Tampa, Fla.
Branches in all principal cities Factory and Home Office: Syracuse. N. Y.





I:INALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


From the Factory to Your Head
ELIMINATES JOBBER'S PROFITS


STampa's Why

$2.00 Pay
HAT STORE -Si S More?
rs More?
STAM P A,
FLORIDA




Hillsboro Hotel
CORNER FLORIDA AVENUE AND TWIGG STREET
r ENTIRELY NEW STRUCTURE
NEW FURNIS-IINGS THROUGHOUT
MODERN IN APPOINTMENTS
,, LOCATED IN THE BUSINESS CENTER
Opposite the Postoffiee
RAILROAD, PULLMAN CAR AND STEAMSHIP OFFICES T
LOCATED IN HOTEL BUILDING






RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


this popular picnic and amusement park. The grounds contain
some sixteen acres of rich tropical foliage, lawns, etc., in a high
state of cultivation. Salt water bathing is one of the main at-
tractions, the beach being equipped with a large bathing house,
where suits may be rented. Boats and fishing tackle may be
rented at the dock for fishing trips off the point. Shore dinners
are served in the cafe. The open-air dancing pavilion and
theatre is one of the best in the State, and dancing is a regular
attraction throughout the year. Take Ballast Point or Port
Tampa cars.
TAMPA YACHT AND COUNTRY CLUB-This property
adjoins Ballast Point Park to the south, and is valued at about
$50,000. Club building, recently remodeled, cost $20,000 to build.
Private dock. Grounds are extensive and well cared for. One
of the most popular social clubs of the city. Ballast Point and
Port Tampa cars.


Terse Information


Legal rate of interest, 8 per cent.
Banks pay 4 per cent. on saving accounts.
The churches of the city number 28.
The park system contains 125 acres.
Altitude of Tampa is 79 feet above sea level.
European plan hotels, $1.00 to $10.00 per day.
Total area State of Florida, 59,368 square miles.
Total area of State covered by water, 5,028 miles.
Rooms in private homes, $5.00 to $10.00 per week.
Furnished cottages, $200.00 to $600.00 the season.
Total land surface of the State, 54,240 square miles.
Death rate of city and county is 8.5 per 1,000.
Tampa has accommodations for 10,000 visitors.
Light housekeeping rooms, $5.00 to $10.00 per week.
The first street pavement in Tampa was laid in 1898.
School teachers employed in the city schools number 178.
Tampa ranks second in population of the cities of the State.
Tampa has the largest white population of any city in the
State.
City water is taken from wells 130 feet and more below the
surface.
There are over 1,200 automobiles owned in Tampa.
There are 291 square miles in the harbor of Tampa.





RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


See Manatee County

FIRST

Let us show you our lands that are situated on
and near the Manatee River, in Manatee County,
Florida, which include water fronts and high grade
citrus fruit, truck and combination soils. Close to
both water and rail transportation, in the flowing
well area, and in a developed section.
This property adjoins a town-site, where desir-
able lots can be had for building purposes. A de-
lightful location for Northern people to build and
spend the Winter.
You are invited to stay at our Club House while
investigating. Right on salt water, where you can
enjoy boating, bathing and fishing, and have running
water in yofr house. Sold on easy terms. Soil
survey report on file in our office.


Manatee River Land Co.
Suite 23-25 101 1-2 Franklin Street
TAMPA. FLORIDA








RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


There are eight miles of boulevards within the city.
Tamna and West Tampa have about 150 miles of brick pav-
ing.
Florida has 30,000,000 acres of land, one-tenth of which is
under cultivation.
Tampa ranks eighth as a revenue producer for the United
States government.
Tampa is destined to become a city of 100,000 population
within the next few years.
The city water works pump a daily average of more than
four and one-half million gallons of water.
Tampa's Bayshore Drive, over a mile in extent, lighted to
daylight brightness by ornamental gas lights, is perhaps the most
beautiful drive in the South.
The longest street in Tampa is Michigan Avenue, approxi-
mately three miles in length.
Ybor City (pronounced E-bor) named for V. Martinez Ybor,
"Father of the Cigar Industry in Tampa."
The value of the citrus fruit and vegetable crop of the State
of Florida approximates $30,000,000 annually.
The State of Florida is rich in deposits of glass-sand, which
is an industry practically untouched at this time.
Tampa's "Great White Way" is the largest and brightest of
any city in the South, containing over three miles of superbly
lighted thoroughfare.
The population tributary to Tampa, which includes only
close-in suburbs and West Tampa, is estimated at 72,000.
The length of the City of Tampa is 32 miles, its greatest
width is 312 miles, and its total area is 8 6/10 square miles.
There are over 300 miles of brick and hard-surfaced roads in
Hillsborough County, the majority of which lead into Tampa.
The effect of the cigarmaker's strike, called July, 1910, and
lasting until January 25, 1911, made Tampa an open-shop city.
The first channel in the harbor of Tampa was opened to a
depth of six feet. There is now twenty-four feet to the city
docks.
Tampa operated, during the winter of 1913-'14, the first com-
mercial hydro-aeroplane line in the world, carrying passengers,
express and freight from this city over the bay to St. Petersburg,
a distance of 20 miles, making the trip on an'average running
time of 20 minutes.
The increase in population of the City of Tampa from 1900
to 1910 (taking into consideration only those living within the
city limits) was 143.2 per cent. Only one other city in the







32 RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


A FIRST CLASS SERVICE AT REASONABLE PRICES ,
CALL ON1
Si- "EMILIE"
i (Mrs. Emilie A. Staley)
VILLA DE PARIS
BEAUTY SHOP
-- 1 Suite 24, Bank of Commerce Bldg, *;
MANICURING SHAMPOOING !
HAIR DRESSING
------- Phone 2075 914 Franklin Street
EMILIE TAMP'A, FLORIDA




Auto Owner
CALL OR WIRE US, WE WILL COME TO YOU
ANYWHERE

Firestone and Tampa Made Tires
For Sale
RE-TREADING OUR SPECIALTY

Tampa Rubber Tire Works
Phone 3673 206 ZACK STREET
' "


















































LIVE OAK\K TN TAMII'. RAY GVROTTNDS






34 HINALDIS GUIDE BOOK

a3-^~aa^?e^^$K!$i^a-(^KODAK!^


Send Your KODAK
FINISHING

PHOTO

North

A highly appreciated remembrance at any time
is a GOOD PHOTOGRAPH.


Over C


4.i
-I
+
1*


prices, see


central Pharmacy .


TAMPICO HOTEL
101% SOUTH FRANKLIN STREET
- -...Phone 73-278...
S\ Holel for Methanli $5.00 a Week and up -
SOPPOSITE SEABOARD FREIGHT DEPOT



G. Greco G. Lodato D. Ginex
YBOR CITY MACARONI FACTORY
rn G. GRECO & CO., Proprietors
...Manufacturers of...
ALL KINDS OF MACARONI--Wholesale and Retail
1725 SEVENTH AVENUE YBOR CITY


+
+
+
+
+
.1.


+ 816Y,


For first class work at reasonable p


J. R. LYTLE


SFranklin St.


~~` '~~""'~~"'~~"`~`'~~~"~"~"~~"~"`


.








RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK 35


Tampa class in the United States shows as large or larger in-
crease in population for the same period.
During the three summer months the merchants of Tampa
provide free baseball for the public, the schedule containing two
games a week. Plant Field, municipally owned, contains the
baseball diamond, and is also the spring training ground of the
Chicago National Baseball club.
The first railroad train to enter Tampa arrived in 1884.
This was a narrow-guage road operating from Tampa to San-
ford, thence via St. Johns river boats to Jacksonville. It was
first known as the South Florida Railroad Co., afterwards the
Plant System, and now known as the Atlantic Coast Line. The
Florida Central & Peninsula Railroad, now the Seaboard Air
Line, entered Tampa in 1889.
One of the most important events in aiding the growth of
the City of Tampa was the building of the Tampa Bay Hotel.
known as the Moorish Palace of the South, in 1889. This was
the direct cause of some of the wealthy people coming from the
North to spend the winters in Florida, who later invested in
property here, forming the nucleus from which both the City of
Tampa and the great tourist trade of the present day has been
built.
The public schools number 26, the system consisting of
primary, grammar and high. High school equipped with chem-
ical, physical, botanical and zoological laboratories. Depart-
ments of history, ancient and modern languages, mathematics,
and English. Courses offered: Classical, Latin-scientific, tech-
nical, general, commercial, agricultural. Music, drawing, phy-
sical training, manual training, sewing, basketry, domestic
science, athletics.
The Sanchez & Haya cigar factory was the first factory to
engage in the manufacture of cigars in Tampa, closely followed
by the factory of Ybor & Manrara. These factories were built in
1886.
The first survey of the City of Tampa was made in 1847, by
Captain Jackson, who used a ship's compass for the purpose.
The original survey is now the business section of the city.
The spring of 1898 saw 50,000 soldiers encamped in Tampa,
awaiting transportation to Cuba. The selection of Tampa as an
embarkation port brought the city into great prominence.
Tampa's new city hall, facing three streets, Lafayette, Flor-
ida and Washington, cost $235,000.00.
During the past year Tampa has purchased and improved
three new parks and playgrounds, located in various parts of the






36 IINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


IDEAL FOR

Semi-Tropical Florida
Gas is the ideal fuel. It eliminates
all excess heat, dirt and labor. It is
more economical in time and money.
We invite your inquiries as to cost.

The Tampa Gas Co.




CAROLINA HOUSE t

In the Heart of the Down-Town Section
S. Clean, Modern Rooms at
Reasonable Rates
S Every effort to provide agreeable and home-like quar-
Sters. Special rates by week or month.
SEE OUR ROOMS BEFORE LOCATING
i.: b08'2 FLORIDA AVENUE PHONE ;2507
..,.







ItNALDI'S GUIDE BOOK 37


city, providing breathing places for children and others in the
more congested districts.
In 1866 the first boat line was operated between Tampa and
Cedar Key. This line continued in business for nearly twenty
years, during which time the sailing vessels first used were re-
placed by steamers.
Tampa-an Indian name, signifying "Split Wood for Quick
Fires." Presumably suggested to the Indians by reason of the
large number of lightwood knots found throughout the sur-
rounding country.
There is said to be one hundred and seventy-five kinds of
wood in the forests of Florida. The Tampa Board of Trade has
an exhibit of one hundred and forty varieties of this wood, said
to be the finest wood exhibit in the South.


Tampa's Wealth and Industries


Tampa has over 300 factories.
Building permits, 1915, $1,500,000.
The annual wholesale business amounts to $30,000,000.
Postoffice receipts, annually, a quarter million dollars.
Value of public buildings in Tampa is approximately three
million dollars.
Customs receipts, year ending June 30, 1915, $1,741,534.32.
Cigars manufactured during 1915, approximately 300,000,000.
Internal revenue receipts, year ending June 30, 1915, a mil-
lion dollars.
Weekly clearings of the banks of Tampa, more than $1,-
000,000.
Valuation of property owned by the City of Tampa is ap-
proximately $5,000,000.
Some cigars made in Tampa sell for $950.00 per 1,000-95
cents apiece.
Tampa has a larger wage roll per employee than any other
city in the world.
The banks of Tampa have combined deposits of over $9,-
500,000.
The number of vessels entering and clearing the port of
Tampa during 1915 is placed at 1,800.
The cost of pavements in the City of Tampa, up to and in-
cluding May 31, 1915, is $1,255,752.







38 GUIDE BOOK


SEMINOLE TAILORING CO.
E. C. A. NORWOOD, Proprietor
+ RELINING A SPECIALTY MISSING BUTTONS St I'II.IED
CLEANING AND PRESSING
PHONE 2552 815 FLORIDA \V1 3.1 E





I Alligator Farm ana

SZoological Gardens |


4-'7



*V FARM AT SULPHUR SPRINGS PARK
The I.arge.t Collection of Florida Animals and Hirds on i
Exhibition and For Sale in the State
ALL KINDS OF PETS BOUGHT, SOLD AND EXCHANGED
ALLIGATORS OF ALL SIZES FROM THE EGG TO
HUGH MONSTERS FOR SALE
S COME AND BRING THE CHILDREN
J- C. M. STOKES, Tampa, Fla.
Correspondence Solicited +
^^^^." ,^^-^^^a^^^^








ItINALDI'S GUIIE BOOK


Vessels drawing 272 feet have cleared from Tampa's port by
taking advantage of favorable tides.
Tampa has a phosphate elevator with a loading capacity of
1,200 tons per hour, owned by the Seaboard Air Line.
There are over 10,000 workmen employed in the cigar fac-
tories of Tampa, with a weekly payroll of over $250,000.
Tampa and surrounding territory holds the world's record
on phosphate, sponges, winter vegetables, citrus fruits and
Havana cigars.
The building operations in Tampa during 1915 are estimated
at $1,500,000, with $200,000 additional being spent in close-in
suburbs.
Tamoa is the largest phosphate port in the world and has
the largest elevator for -lI! .- it, shipping more than a million
tons yearly.
The payroll of Tampa (employees engaged in other indus-
tries than the cigar business) amounts to approximately $6,300.-
000 annually.
Three and one-half billion cigars, with an average price of
$63.00 per 1,000, have been manufactured in Tampa during the
past ten years.
The number of varieties, of fish from Florida waters exceed
600. Fishing, both salt and fresh water, is unequalled by any
otler section of the United States.
Tampa steamers taking cargoes from Tampa to the Orient,
by passing through the Panama Canal, save 6.000 miles, or $13,-
000) per trip on charters to the Orient.
Out of eight hundred million cigars consumed annually,
Tampa produces three hundred million, which is not only more
;ian is produced by the City of Havana but by the Island of
Cuba.
Draw a circle 75 miles around Tampa and you will find more
tl-an $50,000,000 invested in the phosphate industry. In that
same radius is half of the standing yellow pine of the State, 75
per cent. of all the citrus fruits and vegetables, and nearly 100
per cent. of the cattle.
The annual output of cigars in Tampa if placed end to end
\would encircle the earth at its greatest circumference. If laid
a- paving they would more than cover the streets of Tampa with
a paving of cigars ten feet wide.













r;



. .-- ,


GOVERNMENT BUILDING


,/ -. ,







RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


C. H. DAVIS, President C. C. STEBBINS, Vice-President
J. S. TARRER, Secretary-Treasurer



Davis-Manatee Co.
INCORPORATED

REAL ESTATE AND
INVESTMENTS ..
OWNERS OF
CHOICE PROPERTY OF EVER I)ESCRIPTION, FOR SALE
OR FOR RENT, IN MIANATEE AND VICINITY
River Front Property and other City Lots

Grove and Trucking Land
Furnished Houses and Rooming Houses for the Season

ALL MODERN
-Ve operate a demonstration farm at Manatee which
affords invaluable instruction in Florida farming, and vis-
itors are cordially invited to inspect it at any time.
This company also controls the Wimauma Fruit &
Vegetable Company (see following page) as well as 160
acres of unsurpassed land at Terra Ceia, within 4 mile of
the railroad station.
All inquiries, either by mail, by telephone, or in per-
son, cheerfully answered. It will be a pleasure to show
you our property, whether you buy or not.
TELEPHONE M
266 Manatee, Florida
2 ^







ix.N.\I.tI'S G([II}I BOOK


I-^
C. H. DAVIS, C. C. STEBBINS, J. S. TARRER,
President Vice-Pres. Sec'y and Treas.


WIMAUMA

FRUIT & VEGETABLE CO.



We own 15,000 acres of the finest citrus
fruit and vegetable land in the state. Lying
around a beautiful lake of pure, fresh water
(see next page) advantages are enjoyed
which can be found nowhere else in Florida.
Over 400 acres now in cultivation. Excel-
lent shipping facilities. Midway between
Manatee and Tampa, on the accepted route
of the Tamiami Trail-twenty miles of the
twenty-five to Tampa is already bricked.
Also reached by the Seaboard railway.
Very desirable farms are offered upon
reasonable terms. Write for free booklet,
or, better, call in person.


IWE A ,SO CO'I'ROL THE DAVIS-JIANATEE COMPANY
(See preceding page)
HOME OFFICE
MANATEE, FLORIDA
FARMS: .VIMAUMA, FLORIDA
D. M. Dowdell, Manager
S. A. Dowdell, Ass't. See'y
S---















~. w '..


w qi


)~~si


L-


CITY PARK-SKIRTS THE HILLSBOROUGH RIVER


m






RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


Tampa


Business


College
(Incorporated)
College Building, Cor. Grand Central & College (Edison) Aves.
L. M. HATTON, President
"A School for the Rich and Poor Alike"


BOOKKEEPING
BANKING
BUSINESS ARITH-
METIC
PENMANSHIP
SPELLING
COMMERCIAL LAW
Open All the Year


Phone 4476


SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITING
REPORTING
CORRESPONDENCE
PUNCTUATION
OFFICE PRACTICE
ENGLISH
Positions A/ways Secured


NIGHT SCHOOL TUESDAY.
WEDNESDAYS. THURSDAYS
Catalog Free


Take "U" Car Across New Bridge






RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK 45

Tonnage handled by the railroads entering Tampa during
1915 is estimated at about 2,000,000 tons; cleared and entered
through the Customs District, 2,300,000; handled in the port of
Tampa, 2,800,000 tons.
The annual cost of the city government (exclusive of county
government), including cost of administration and permanent
improvements, for the year ending May 31, 1915, was $1,000,000.
Fuller's Earth, a mineral used to bleach and clarify fats,
greases and oils, is extensively mined in Florida, approximately
60 per cent. of the total output of the United States being fur-
nished by this State.
Tampa can unload coal at the rate of 75 tons per hour. The
cut (below) of the yards and docks of the Tampa Coal Co. will
give some idea of the vastness of Tampa's industries. This com-
pany operates its own vessels and a visit to its docks is rich in
interest.


ii'



I: \%
a 4'






46 RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


THE MOTOR MART
South Florida's Leading Automobile Clearing House
SEE US BEFORE BUYING OR SELLING
Tampa Theater Bldg., Tampa St. Tampa, Florida

*...K ^..^I'^^I^ y.^ a .. ^ ..^ .T.;;.^ t^!^


To See Tampa Properly

DRIVE A STUDEBAKER
There are more Studebakers in Detroit, "the Home of -
Automobiles," than any other car priced over $500.00
A Great Car---Made by a Great Company
4 cylinder, 40 horsepower, 7 passenger, $. 960, Tampa
6 cylinder, 50 horsepower, 7 passenger, $1 150, Tampa
Sold and Guaranteed by
LUCAS MOTOR SALES CO.
Phone 2456 409 Cass Street


*I

.1
+

+


Rinaldi Printing Company
RULING, BINDING
Booklets, Catalog and Commercial Printing
107 LAFAYETTE ST. TAMPA. FLA.








RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK 47


Public Utilities

PENINSULAR TELEPHONE CO.
The above company, one of the most progressive of the pub-
lic service corporations within the City of Tampa, was organized
in 1901, at which time the telephone business of the city con-
-isted of 385 telephones. Today Tampa alone has 4,700 tele-
phones and the connections outside the city total 3,350 addi-
tional. Toll stations to the number of more than 100 are lo-
cated throughout South Florida, making connections possible to
all points within the State and in some instances to points out-
,ide Florida. Throughout the business section of Tampa the
wires are underground and during the past two years 100,000
feet of underground cable has been laid in the Tampa Heights,
Ybor City, Nebraska Ave. and Hyde Park sections of the city.
The company occupies its new three-story building, corner Zack
and Morgan streets, and its equipment is the finest in the state,
being the latest improved automatic type.
TAMPA ELECTRIC CO.
The company operates an equipment of 47.13 miles of main
track, 4.44 miles of turnouts and car barn track, or a total of 51.57
miles of single track. There are 67 passenger cars operated, 63
of which are open, and 4 closed, 2 express and freight cars, 16
flat and 5 work cars. A $145,000 brick car barn, a two-story re-
inforced concrete and brick office building, 155 miles of primary
and secondary power lines, two power stations, with a combined
capacity of 8,425 k. w., two amusement parks, DeSoto park, 5/4
acres, and Jules Verne park (locally known as Ballast Point), 16
acres, a two-story casino (Ballast Point), an additional car barn
of 30 cars capacity, waiting station, 61x90, theatre building,
60x120 (Sulphur Springs park); steel single-track bridge, across
the Hillsborough river at Sulphur Springs, is included among
other property owned by the company in Tampa and vicinity.
TAMPA GAS CO.
The City of Tampa is fortunate in the matter of a sufficient
gas supply. At the manufacturing plant of the Tampa Gas Co.
there are gas holders with a capacity of 625,000 cubic feet daily,
a supply great enough for a city of 100,000 population. Twenty-
tive miles of mains convey this gas to all portions of the city, to







RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


C. H. DAVIS, President
K. W. WIGGINS, Vice-Pres.


PERRY R. CURRY, Cashier
SJ. S. TARRER, Ass't Cashier


COURTEOUS ATTENTION TO ALL
ACCOUNTS


Manatee Banking Co.
ESTABLISHED 1903


CAPITAIL, $35,000.00


SURPLUS, $13,000.00


NO ACCOUNTS TOO SMALL, NONE
TOO LARGE, FOR US TO HANDLE


MANATEE, FLORIDA



.... !+.g ..2 ..\! .;: ,. .+ .\ .. \, /..+ .. ,/.. .. i. i.. .


Hotel Juplinor
A COUNTRY HOTEL WITH CITY APPOINTMENTS


is a well appointed hotel, having large, cool and airy rooms
with plenty of baths, large lobbies and piazza. The Man-
agement takes pleasure in catering to the entire comfort
of guests and visitors.
CUISINE A SPECIALTY
Rates
American Plan, $3.00 up European Plan, $1.50 up
Special rates for families and large parties
AUTO SERVICE IN CONNECTION
Bradentown, Florida


9
4.
,+

:
-i-




:i;


a-

t


+



+


I


~...~...~........... ....~.......


--








RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK 49


sections in West Tampa, and in one or two instances to out-
lying suburbs. During the past three years the output of gas
has been increased from 52,000,000 to 125,000,000 cubic feet an-
nually. Gas is used in Tampa very extensively for heating and
cooking purposes. The rate up to 2,000,000 cubic feet per month
is placed at $1.50 net. The more modern office buildings, flats
and private homes are being equipped with gas heating plants
in preference to any other method as this fuel has proven to be
not only the cheapest but through the wonderful advance of gas
appliances, also the most desirable and convenient. The city
office and salesroom of the Tampa Gas Co. is located at the cor-
ner of Madison and Tampa streets, where the company owns its
own building.

TAMPA WATERWORKS CO.
From 1890 to 1915, a little matter of twenty-five years, the
Tampa Waterworks Co. has grown from a plant pumping 90,-
000,000 gallons of water yearly to its present magnitude of an
annual average of 1,650,000,000 gallons. The system of mains,
in Tampa, West Tampa, and suburbs, total 80 miles. The water
supply is drawn from twenty-two artesian wells sunk to a depth
of 130 feet below the surface, conducted to an underground re-
ceiving reservoir and from there forced through the mains sup-
plying the city. By this method the water is not exposed for an
instant in its long journey from the wells to the consumer, and
because of these conditions there can be no contamination of the
city water of Tampa. Repeated chemical analyses have shown
the water to be especially pure, healthful and free of bacteria, or
other injurious substances. Based on the rate Tampa now uses
water,-4,500,000 gallons daily,-the maximum capacity of the
present pumping plant and equipment of the Tampa Waterworks
Co., estimated at 6,000,000,000 gallons yearly, will supply a city
of 200,000 population. The volume of water and pressure main-
tained in the fire mains of the city has had much to do with
lowering fire insurance rates in Tampa and is one of the direct
causes of the wonderful efficiency of the city fire department.






t I


II I SBOROtUGHA ('()t'NTY COURT IHOUSE


I 1







RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


Our Neighboring Towns


FORT MEADE
South of Bartow a few miles in the phosphate country is
located Fort Meade, a town that has increased in population
wonderfully during the past few years. Of the agricultural
country surrounding this town it has been said to be the best for
general farming in the State of Florida. The population is esti-
mated at 3,000. It is reached from Tampa by Atlantic Coast
Line via Lakeland, while a continuous chain of good roads via
Plant City, Lakeland and Bartow make the trip through this
section one of delight to the motorist. Other towns within this
general neighborhood which can be visited with profit and en-
joyment are Lake Alfred, Haines City, Dundee, Lake Wales,
Avon Park, Loughman and Davenport.
WINTER HAVEN
Citrus fruit is the basis of wealth for the Winter Haven sec-
tion. Within a radius of live miles of the town there are ap-
proximately 9,000 acres of orange and grapefruit groves, and
within the same radius there are ninety-seven clear, sparkling,
fresh water lakes. Here the greatest nursery acreage in Florida
has been established, the nurseries coming from many sections
of the State to settle among the lakes. The Glen St. Mary Nur-
series, one of the largest establishments of its kind in the world,
las established a 500-acre plant at Winter Haven and is planting
another 80(0 acres at Dundee. The W\inter Haven Nurseries have
hundreds of acres of tender plants almost within the limits of the
town, and the luckeye Nurseries have established here the larg-
est exclusive citrus fruit nursery in the world. Including Flor-
ence Villa and Eagle Lake, Winter Haven has perhaps 850 in-
habitants. It can be reached by A. C. L. Ry. or by automobile
from Tampa. Lucerne Park, a short distance from Winter
Haven, will soon be one of the show places of Florida. Here the
Lucerne Park Fruit Association, of Tampa, has 1,000 acres of
grove set. some of the rows of trees being as much as two miles
in length. This work has been under way for the past four years
and has reached a point in its development at this time that
promises much for the future.





52 RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


Heiglehurst Hotel
Siesta Island (Sarasota) Florida

BOATING, BATHING AND FISHING
RIGHT AT THE DOOR

PRIVATE BOAT DOCKS FREE TO GUESTS
Passenger Launch Service to Sarasota,
Six Trips Daily


ON THE GULF
"The Prettiest View in the Semi-Tropics"
RATES
American, $2.50 up European, $1.00 up

W. A. PHILLIPS, Proprietor
P. O. Siesta Island, Fla.







RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


ORLANDO
On the main line of the Atlantic Coast Line between Tampa
Sand Jacksonville, and served by a branch line of the Seaboard
Air Line from Wildwood. A splendid town for tourists to visit
or to remain in throughout the winter. Known as one of the
most delightful towns in South Florida and the religious center
Sof the State. An excellent grove and agricultural country sur-
rounds the city, and many pretty drives can be made throughout
the adjacent territory. The town offers all in the way of first-
class accommodations, commercial and scoial life to be obtained
in cities of much larger population.

LEESBURG
Located near the geographical center of peninsular Florida,
south of Lake Griffin and north of Lake Harris, on the proposed
Ocklawaha canal project. From the earliest days of the settle-
ment of Florida Leesburg has been an important business center.
It is located in an extensive grove and agricultural section, ship-
ping in the neighborhood of 150,000 boxes of oranges and grape-
fruit and hundreds of carloads of vegetables yearly. Its popula-
tion is estimated at 1,500. As a tourist town its popularity is
greatly enhanced by its location among the lakes and every win-
ter sees hundreds of tourists stopping here and at Eustis, Tav-
ares and Mt. Dora. Good accommodations are to be found at
each of these places. Leesburg is reached by either the Atlantic
Coast Line or Seaboard Air Line railways.

PLANT CITY
Located in the center of a wonderfully productive agricul-
tural center, 22 miles northeast of Tampa and reached from this
city by automobile over a brick and hard-surfaced road, or by
railroad over either the Atlantic Coast Line or Seaboard Air
Line. The population is estimated at 5,300. Plant City has sev-
eral miles of paved streets and hard-surfaced roads radiating in
all directions, three banks with combined deposits of nearly
$800,000.00, two newspapers, excellent schools, churches, retail
business houses, etc. It is a progressive, substantial town in all
respects, and judging from its growth of the past six years-the
1910 census giving the population at 2,481-it is destined to be-
come one of the really important cities of the State. All of the
more important phosphate mines, producing an average of 2,000,
000 tons of phosphate rock annually, and giving employment to
thousands of workmen the year round, are located within a






54 RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


Rates $2.00 Per Day Up Weekly Rates on Application

Mango Avenue Hotel
Thomas Davidson, Manager

SARASOTA'S NEW FIRE-PROOF HOTEL

Newly Furnished, Fine Table, Two Blocks from Railway
Station or Dock. Rooms Single or en Suite, with or
without Bath. Running Hot and Cold Water
in Rooms.
SARASOTA, FLORIDA






Hotel Florida
Bradentown's Newest Hotel
Mrs. B. F. Tenkins, Prop.
All modern conveniences. Hot and cold water in every
room.
RATES $2.00 AND $2.50 A DAY
Terms by the Week
Everything New and Up-to-date
Telephone 365
MAIN STREET, NEAR RAILROAD STATION
Bradentown, Florida








RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


radius of 50 miles of Plant City. One hundred and fifty thous-
and dollars was spent by Plant City last year for additional pav-
ing and sewerage system within the city.
DADE CITY
Northeast of Tampa about 40 miles is located Dade City, the
county seat of Pasco County and the metropolis of the Pasco
Highlands. A town old in settlement but young in advance-
ment, and destined for a glorious future. Four years ago Dade
City slept among its picturesque lake> and hills. Today it is a
bustling little city with paved streets, electric lights, ice plant,
good hotels, substantial business houses, excellent homes, graded
and high schools employing 12 teachers, churches of six different
denominations, newspapers, and the seat of the South Florida
Normal Institute. which last year completed a commodious brick
building. The "Highlands of Pasco County," known also as the
"Backbone of Florida," is peculiarly adapted to general farming
carried on almost as it is in the Central and Middle Western
,tate>. Immediately attention was directed to this favored sec-
tion. where corn and oranges may be grown in adjoining fields,
a large acreage was brought under development. Dade City
gathered impetus from this development and is building rapidly
and -ubstantially, as is also Zephyrhills and Elfers. St. Leo
monastery, with its academy and college. conducted under the
direction of the Jesuit Fathers, is within a few miles of Dade
City. Ioth the Seaboard Air Line and Atlantic Coast Line
trains serve Dade City, and the trip may be made by automobile
via Plant City over an excellent hard-surfaced road, excepting a
few miles between Plant City and Zephyrhills which is now be-
ing hard-surfaced.
LAKELAND
This little city never fails to impress all who visit it. It is
important for its railroad connections, for its wonderful straw-
berry acreage, its beautiful homes, its progressive commercial
life, and its idealistic location among the lakes. The tourist
stopping at Lakeland remains to admire and leaves only with
reluctance and the determination to return. On the main line of
the Atlantic Coast Line.
WIMAUMA
The little village of Wimauma affords no end of pleasure
and profit to the visitor contemplating an investment. Here is
located the farms of the Wimauma Fruit & Vegetable Co., and








56 RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK



THE FLORIDA BREWING COMPANY
OF TAMPA
are Manufacturers and Bottlers of
... FINE BEERS...
Their leading brands, ROBY and EXPORT Lager Beers
are unexcelled. Roby, $1.50 per dozen; Export, $1.00 per
dozen, delivered anywhere at any time.
FLORIDA BREWING COMPANY
; 4+-* + '- +


ONE OF THE EXCURSION STEAMERS PLYING OUT OF TAMPA


A-Mir








RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


upon their lands, as well as on many smaller farms, may always
be seen the best examples of intensive farming. A visit to their
farms alone abundantly repays one for the trip from Tampa.
Here is situated beautiful Wimauma Lake, 350 acres in area, 85
feet above sea level, 50 feet deep, fed by never-failing subter-
annean streams, having no surface outlet, and with water as clear
as crystal. To the south and west the land slopes sharply away
from the banks of the lake, giving, in some places, a fall of 12
feet in one-half mile, and making available the inexhaustable
supply of lake water for irrigation purposes. Strange as it
seems, excellent drainage is afforded on all these lands, for they
are still from 50 to 65 feet above sea level. As far as in known
this is the only lake in the State whose waters are available for
irrigation by gravity. Excellent boating and bathing are afford-
ed at all seasons, while the waters teem with fish. Wimauma is
set in the heart of a virgin pine forest of more than 100,000 acres.
and to the east for miles the sound of the axe has never been
heard. The richest farming land of the State surrounds Lake
Wimauma.

BARTOW
About 44 miles southwest of Tampa, located on both the A.
C. L. and S. A. L. railroads, and connected with Tampa by hard-
surfaced road via Plant City and Lakeland. A splendid little
city of about 4,500 population, drawing its revenue from an ex-
tensive agricultural section and located upon the edge of the
phosphate zone of Polk County, estimated to produce almost
half of the raw phosphate rock mined in the world. The water-
works and light plants are municipally owned; the city has a
$50,000 sewerage system, several paved streets, newspapers.
banks, excellent stores, schools, churches, and is the county seat
of Polk County. The court house, one of the most beautiful in
the State, cost approximately $100,000 to complete. Bartow has
experienced less of the influx of Northern people seeking per
manent homes in Florida than many of the other cities of the
State and therefore more truly conforms to the quiet life of the
Old South.
CLEARWATER
This city, the county seat of Pinellas County, and located on
a bluff thirty-five feet high overlooking the Gulf of Mexico, is
one of the most progressive towns in the State of Florida as well
as a resort visited yearly by thousands of tourists. The view
across the gently undulating waves of Clearwater Harbor to








RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


where the white-caps ride upon the majestic bosom of the Gulf
of Mexico, is one of the scenic beauties of South Florida. The
Belleview Hotel, in some respects the greatest tourist hotel in
Florida, surrounded by its many acres of beautiful grounds, golf
course, etc., is located at Belleair, only a short distance away.
Harbor Oaks, a subdivision of Clearwater, is possibly the most
ideal conception of landscape gardening for residential purposes
to be found in South Florida. Dunedin, a few miles north of
Clearwater, is famous for the boating and fishing to be enjoyed,
having one of the largest yacht clubs in the State. Sutherland.
lying between Tarpon Springs and Clearwater, is the seat of
Southern College and the center of a splendid grove section.
Wall Springs and Crystal Springs, the former chiefly notable for
the mineral springs located there, and the latter a beach resort.
are situated between Sutherland and Tarpon Springs. Clear-
water may be reached from Tampa by automobile over an ex-
cellent hard-surfaced road or by either the Atlantic Coast Line
or Gulf Coast railways.

FORT MYERS
Located as a military reservation by the United States gov-
ernment in 1841. Situated on the Caloosahatchee river about 22
miles inland from the Gulf of Mexico, and named in honor of
Col. A. C. Myers, a distinguished veteran of the Mexican war.
To one who visits Fort Myers for the first time it is a city of
surprises. Its business section, paved streets, broad cement
walks, beautiful private homes and grounds, concrete sea wall.
harbor, etc., contrast so vividly with what one naturally expect-
to find that the feeling of isolation, usually associated wiith
places far removed from other cities, is lost in the knowledge
gained of a city sufficient unto itself. Fort Myers is the county
-eat and largest city of Lee County. It can be reached direct bh
Atlantic Coast Line Ry., by Charlotte Harbor & Northern Ry. to
Charlotte Harbor or Boca Grande and Towles Line to destina-
tion, or by Towles Line direct from Tampa.
VALRICO
To the east of Tampa. thirteen miles distant, surrounded by
high rolling hills and fertile valleys. Valrico, meaning "rich val
ley," is rightly named, as the wonderful vegetable and citrus
fruit crops harvested in the section amply testify. Almost fif-
teen hundred acres of citrus fruit trees were set out in groves
here in two seasons. Valrico claims herself a suburb of Tampa
and Tampa is proud of the affiliation. A good paved road leads








RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


from this city to Valrico and it is one of the most enjoyable of
the many automobile rides to be taken. This section, if for no
other reason, justifies the time spent in visiting it by the agri-
cultural development it presents to prospective settlers in Flor-
ida who wish to see at first hand the methods employed in bring-
ing the wild land of Florida under cultivation. The town may
also be reached by Seaboard Air Line railway.

THONOTOSASSA
Fifteen miles to the northeast of Tampa lies Thonotosassa
Lake, and the thriving town of Thonotosassa. The importance
of this district lies solely in its citrus groves. Fort King Ave.,
the principal street, traverses a mile of as fine groves as are to be
found in Florida. Here oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, and all
the citrus fruits that have made South Florida famous, are to be
found in the greatest profusion. About half a mile east of the
business district lies the lake, a magnificent body of water five
miles in length, the shores of which abound in delightful camp-
ing sites. Quite a few homes and groves surround the lake.
The Atlantic Coast Line operates an afternoon train to Thono-
tosassa. and a morning train to Tampa, over a branch line, which
brings all the citrus shipments through this city. An excellent
automobile road, five miles of which was built last year, connects
Tampa and Thonotosassa by way of Harney, while another de-
sirable route is to follow the Plant City road to Seffner, twelve
miles, then turn due north for four miles, making sixteen miles
in all. The Harney road, from 22nd street, is the better of the
two.

PORT TAMPA
About nine miles southwest of the city, on Old Tampa Bay,
is located Port Tampa, a town of about 1,900 population, the
terminus of the Atlantic Coast Line and site of extensive rail-
road yards, oil storage tanks, phosphate elevators, etc. The
shipping facilities consist of 11,000 feet of docks, upon which are
warehouses of immense capacity, steamship and railroad offices,
etc. Ships from every port in the world call at Port Tampa,
some of the largest steamers, barges and schooners making this
port and taking on or discharging cargoes. The flags of many
nations may at times be seen floating at mast head, bow or stern
of these mighty leviathan burden bearers of all the seas.








60 RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


GREEN SPRINGS
Situated near the northern end of Pinellas Peninsula, almost
directly west of Tampa and northwest of Port Tampa. It is
claimed the original "Fountain of Eternal Youth," made famous
in history by Ponce de Leon, is located at this point; also Her-
nando DeSoto is supposed to have anchored his fleet just off
Green Springs and to have first put foot on Florida soil here.
Many benefits are claimed for the waters of these springs.
Hotels, bathing, fishing, etc. Reached by boat from Port Tampa,
by automobile, or by Tampa & Gulf Coast railroad.
ST. PETERSBURG
Known as the "Sunshine City," located near the southern
extremity of Pinellas Peninsula, on the shore of Tampa Bay, 20
miles by water from Tampa. The city is connected with Boca
Ceiga Bay and the Gulf of Mexico by a boulevard seven miles
long, straight as an arrow, and destined to become one of the
famous show streets of America. A tourist city of the highest
class, having an estimated population of 11,655, well-paved
streets, handsome residences, good transportation facilities, pub-
lic utilities (municipally owned), high-grade stores, first-class
hotels, restaurants, boarding and lodging houses, commission
form of government, splendid educational facilities, through
daily train service (A. C. L. and T. & G. C.) connecting with all
eastern and western railroads, and steamship service of the Fa-
vorite Line, from Tampa and Manatee River points.
PASS-A-GRILLE
Known as the "Island Kingdom," fronting the Gulf of Mex-
ico on one side and Tampa Bay on the other. Famous for its
surf-bathing, tarpon fishing, shore dinners, hotels, etc. Furnish-
ed cottages can be rented. Many wealthy South Floridians have
summer cottages at this point. Enjoys the largest excursion
trade from Tampa to Gulf resorts. Regular excursion steamers
are conducted by the Favorite Line to Pass-a-Grille, the excur-
sion rate being usually 75 cents for the round-trip. Can also be
reached from St. Petersburg via electric car to Gulfport, Gypsy
Line to Pass-a-Grille.
ANNA MARIA BEACH
Another of the popular Florida Keys, reached by special ex-
cursion steamers of the Favorite Line. Surf bathing, fishing.
etc. Good accommodations may be obtained. Cottages for rent.







RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


The beach is possibly the best on the west Gulf coast, being
something over three miles in extent, and destined one day to
rival the now famous Daytona.
TARPON SPRINGS
This little city, the center of the sponge industry of the
state, is located about twenty-five miles northwest of Tampa, on
the Anclote river, four miles from the Gulf of Mexico. During
the winter months the sponge industry is at its heighth, and the
gaily decorated boats of the Greek divers are continually arriv-
ing and unloading their cargoes of sponges. "Tarpon Inn," one
of the best tourist hotels in the State, is located here. The town
is modern, progressive, and up-to-date and well repays a visit.
Can be reached from Tampa via automobile, over good roads,
Atlantic Coast Line, Seaboard Air Line, or Tampa & Gulf Coast
railroads.


Through Storyland to Sunset Seas

SVISIT to Tampa that does not include the de-
lightful water trip offered by the Favorite Line
S to Bay and Manatee River points is incomplete.
Under the highest conditions of comfort and
convenience it is possible to leave Tampa at
7:30 o'clock in the morning of any day (except
Sunday) on one of the commodious steamers
of this line, touching at St. Petersburg, Palma
Sola, Palmetto, Bradentown, Manatee, Mana-
vista, and Ellenton (the six points last named
being located along the famous Manatee River), and arrive back
in Tampa at 7:00 o'clock in the evening of the same day. Leav-
ing Tampa one is afforded a splendid view of the harbor, the
docks of the Mallory, Southern, and Gulf & Southern Steamship
companies, the terminal of the Seaboard Air Line, and the won-
derful lift-bridge, the largest single-span lift-bridge in the world.
The ride down Hillsborough Bay, passing around Gadsden's
Point into Tampa Bay, stopping at St. Petersburg, and thence
on down to the Manatee River, is filled with interest from the
moment the boat leaves the dock at Tampa. Water porpoise
frequently play about the bow of the vessel, jumping clear of
the waves, while great flocks of sea-gulls, pelicans, and other
water fowl are to be seen on every side.








62 RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


Bird Key, just off Point Pinellas, and passed shortly after
leaving the dock at St. Petersburg, can be seen across the water
and commands the admiration of everyone who views it. This
key has been set aside for many years by the government to
furnish the water-fowl an unmolested breeding ground and no
boats, except those of the government, are allowed to land there.
The tropical growth of the key is wonderful for its density and
verdure and its deep green setting against the blue waters is
beautiful to behold. Myriads of birds continually hover over
the island and at times their number is so great as to blot out
for an instant the sky above them.
The famous resort of Pass-a-Grille, on Long Key, lies di-
rectly west of Bird Key. while Fort DeSoto, the United States
Quarantine Station, located on Mullet Key, is passed shortly af-
ter, as is Fort Dade, on Egmont Key, one of the strongest for-
tified defenses maintained by the United States government.
Shortly before entering the Manatee River Terra Ceia Island
and Snead's Island are passed to the northeast, while Palm Key,
the location of the popular resort of Anna Maria Beach, is pass-
ed to the southwest. Palma Sola, Palmetto, Bradentown, Man-
atee, Manavista, and Ellenton, named in the order of which they
are reached, each hold more than the usual interest for the vis-
itor, for here, if anywhere in Florida, can be seen the agricul-
tural development of the State in its highest perfection. The
rich tropical beauty of the surrounding landscape, immense
trucking farms spreading out like green mats, virgin forests of
magnificent palms and hoary oaks, groves of citrus fruits, and
prairies dotted with innumerable herds of sheep and cattle, go
far to justify the claim of the Manatee River section as being the
most beautiful in the State.

THE BAY TRIP TO SARASOTA
Another of the delightful water trips which the Favorite
Line offers the tourist or winter visitor in search of recreation
and scenic beauty is that to Sarasota. Comfortable steamers
ply upon this route, a distance of 42 miles, touching at St. Peters-
burg, Anna Maria Beach, Ilexhurst, Cortez, Longboat, and Sara-
sota, returning the following day. Hillsborough and Tampa
bays are traversed for their entire length, the Gulf of Mexico
being reached at Anna Maria Beach. Ilexhurst, Cortez, and
Longboat, reached in the order named, are located on Longboat
Key, lying off the mainland from one-half to three miles, and are
among the most noted salt water fishing points along the West
Florida coast, there scarcely being a time throughout the year





























































CONFEDERATE MONUMENT
Erected in 1911 by Tampa Chapter U. D. of C.





1INALDI'S GULDE BOOK


We Either Have It, Will Get It,
or It Isn't Made



Auto Marine Supply
Company


AUTOMOBILE, MOTOR BOAT
and GAS ENGINE SUPPLIES
and ACCESSORIES


Fishing Tackle and
Sporting Goods


201 Franklin St.


Phone 3183


TAMPA. FLA.


I







RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK 65


when some variety of salt water game fish cannot be caught in
large numbers in the waters off this key. Longboat Key forms
the outer shelf of land that makes of Sarasota Bay one of the
best protected harbors of the Gulf of Mexico. (See also page ).
MANATEE
Situated upon the south bank of the Manatee river, Manatee
is without dov'lt one of the prettiest little cities in the South.
With a population of only 1,800, its progressiveness is bringing it
rapidly into the public eye as a town with a future. Manatee
boasts a $23,000.00, three-story brick school building, where three
hundred pupils have the advantages of a most competent faculty
and modern equipment. About three miles of brick streets are
now building, and a sewer system aggregating five miles has
just been installed. Manatee is rich in fine residences, substan-
tial business blocks, stable financial institutions, and a tributary
country second to none in the entire South. It is the heart of
Manatee County. In the disastrous freeze of '85 Manatee
County was hurt less than any other county on the West Coast.
In fact, for several years after-,he freeze, Manatee County sup-
Splied more than one-third of the entire citrus crop of the State.
Trim, well-kept groves, with their rich green foliage and golden
fruit, vie with riotous, tropical jungles in affording never-ending
pleasure to the winter-weary visitor from the frigid North, and
venerable live-oaks, hoary with their festoonings of Spanish
moss, lend enchantment to a scene already soul-satisfying in its
placidity. A trip to Florida that does not include Manatee is by
no means complete.
SARASOTA
Sarasota is yearly the mecca for hundreds of tourists who
take up their winter residence here, enjoying all the delights of
fishing, boating, hunting, automobiling, golfing, bathing, etc.,
while their Northern homes are wrapped in snow and ice. Dur-
ing he past few years it has enjoyed a remarkable growth, due to
its excellent location, character of the soil found in this section
and to the many natural resources of the contiguous territory.
The city boasts of five miles of brick streets and hard-surfaced
roads, modern hotels and stores, the best of public schools, sew-
erage system, banks, newspaper, churches, clubs, golf course,
electric lights; in fact, all the advantages that are found in cities
of much larger population. New. hard-surfaced streets are con-
stantly building, and at present an elaborate park system is well
on its way toward completion. Manatee County has voted a






RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


Rinal Priting Co.
Rinaldi Printing Co.


Printers, Rulers
Book Binders


Fine Commercial Stationery
Catalogues and Booklets


Office and Sales Room
107 Lafayette Street


Tampa, Fla.


I








RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


bond issue for a bridge connecting Sarasota with Little Sarasota
Key, otherwise known as "Siesta Isle," upon which is located the
far-famed Bay Island Hotel, where one finds all the comforts of
the most modern hotel (including all conveniences and high-
class French chef), combined with the pleasures of boating,
bathing, and unsurpassed fishing at the very doors. Very few
days are too cool here to enjoy these sports, and with "Heigle-
hurst," another modern well-equipped hotel only a stone's throw
distant, a large colony of winter visitors make "Siesta Isle" a
busy little city within itself. Another hotel, "The Roberts," one-
half mile south, completes the accommodations for transients,
while cozy, well-furnished bungalows can be secured for the sea-
son. Many wealthy visitors regularly spend the winter in their
own bungalows here. There is a regular boat service from the
hotels to Sarasota. No resort in the entire State affords better
fishing. Small fish can be caught anywhere in such quantities
as to satiate, while grouper, king-fish, jewfish, tarpon and sharks
afford abundant sport of a more exciting character. Within a
few miles east may be found excellent hunting, the forests
abounding in deer, turkey, smaller game, and an occasional bear.






RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


A GUIDE TO

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TERMS BY WEEK OR MONTH
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1207 Florida Ave. TAMPA, FLA. Phone 3613 +
'+








RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK 69


Florida in an Automobile


To the automobilist, the drives around Tampa are a never-
ending succession of delightful surprises. No State in the entire
South has kept pace with Florida, in the past few years, in build-
ing good roads; and Hillsborough County has been especially
progressive along this line. It is possible for the motor enthu-
siast to spend weeks around Tampa alone in visiting points of in-
terest without ever leaving a hard-surfaced road.
On the following pages will be found valuable suggestions
as to motor trips, using Tampa as a base. Distances are given
in round numbers as very few of the routes have been logged.

Tampa to Lakeland and Bartow
This is. doubtless, one of the most attractive drives in the
South. Out Seventh Avenue, the rich farms of Gary are the
lirst to attract one's attention to the many possibilities of mak-
ing a home in Florida. The substantial bridge and the semi-
tropical scenery at Six Mile Creek speak eloquently, in unison,
of the permanency of our improvements and the wealth of our
natural attractions. What, but a few years ago, was a wilder-
ness of tangled palmetto, sighing pines, festooned oaks, hoary,
as from long waiting for companions who came not, and peopled
only by the soft-eyed deer and the lazy alligator, has, by the
magic wand of industry and science, been transformed into a
veritable fairy-land in which you, gentle reader, may play the
part of Prince or Princess and forget, for the period of your
actiono, that there ever was such things as sordid work and
biting cold and cruel sleet.
But pass on. Leaving Six-Mile Creek. take the left-hand
i, and you pass through the little villages of Mango and
-ni,. -all too quickly!-and find yourself in the very heart of
the Land of Enchantment-Plant City! Here, despite the placid
beauty of the streets and groves and homes, are some of the
largest phosphate mines in the world. But it is not within the
province of this little book to say more. See Plant City! It is
22 miles distant and brick all the way. Lakeland is just 10 miles
farther east, and the road is good, excepting about a mile in the
outskirts of Lakeland. Here you will find a hustling city, given
to varied industries, and an important railroad center. Beyond








RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


Lakeland, to the south, is Bartow, an important city and richly
rewarding a visit. The entire trip is 44 miles (from Tampa)
and good road.
To Wimauma and Manatee
Taking the right-hand highway at Six-Mile Creek (see pre-
ceding), a smooth brick road leads southward through fertile
prairie to Riverview and five miles beyond, a total distance of
19 miles. Here five miles of sand-some of it quite heavy-is
encountered, but the trip is easily made, bringing up sharply at
the hard-surfaced thoroughfare of Wimauma. At the junction
are the young groves and beautiful farms of the Wimauma Fruit
& Vegetable Co. Here four hundred acres are under cultivation
by this one company alone, and the fields of growing celery,
tomatoes, peas and other vegetables in mid-winter are a revela-
tion. Turning toward the town (east) Lake Wimauma is seen
on the right. In many respects this is the most marvelous body
of water in the South. Covering an area of 350 acres, it is 65
feet deep, fed by never-failing subterranean streams and has no
surface outlet. It lies 85 feet above sea level, and to the west
and south the land slopes so sharply away from its shores that a
fall of 12 feet below the lake's surface is had in less than one-
half mile. This phenomena is well worth investigating.
Passing through Wimauma light sand is encountered
through forest and hammock a distance of ten miles to the rail-
road, when there is three miles of bad sand to Parrish. From
Parrish road is hard-surfaced but generally rough to Ellen-
ton, on the Manatee river, a distance of 9 miles. The drive
down the river to Palmetto or across (by bridge) to Manatee is
a delight, making as naught some of the trials of sand encount-
ered en-route.
Manatee is the heart of the world-famous Manatee river
farming section, and must be seen to complete one's Florida trip.
The streets here are, at present, torn up for paving and the sand
is bad. West. one mile, is Bradentown. South, 13 miles, excel-
lent road. is Sarasota, the "Pearl of the West Coast." Distances
-Tampa to Manatee, 50 miles; to Sarasota, 63 miles.
Tampa to Tarpon Springs
A good road. out Grand Central Avenue, leads to this busy
West-coast resort. The foreign sponge-fishers, mingling with
the busy natives and curious tourists who annually throng its
streets, lend an air of romance to this thriving little city which
well pays one for the visit. The distance is 28 miles.







t. ",


K


I


CIGARMAKERS AT WORK IN ONE OF THE LARGE FACTORIES








72 RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


Tampa to Clearwater and St. Petersburg
Following the Tarpon Springs road for 20 miles, Clearwater,
the county seat of Pinellas County, is reached over a good road
which leads through some of the prettiest country in the State.
The distance is 32 miles. Between Clearwater and St. Peters-
burg, a distance of 24 miles, there is approximately 6 miles of
sand. This road is to be paved in the near future.
Tampa to Port Tampa
A nine-mile brick boulevard leads along the bay to Ballast
Point and thence straight across the peninsula to Port Tampa.
Tampa to Zephyrhills and Dade City
Through Plant City, to the north, the brick highway is ex-
tended toward Zephyrhills for a distance of five miles. After
another five miles of sand-heavy in places-a good road is
again encountered which leads through Zephyrhills to Dade
City. Between the two latter places is seen hills and valleys re-
minding one of the Cumberlands. It is so different from the
pine prairie and cypress swamp that one wonders, on viewing
it, if some magic has not transplanted here a portion of Ten-
nessee. Tampa to Zephyrhills, 39 miles; to Dade City, 48 miles.


HOTEL WEIDA
Running Water in Every Room
Modern-Centrally Located
Cuisine the Best
RATES $2.00 AND UP SARASOTA, FLA.
I'* -


















































Y. M. C, RI[It)ING, TAMPA









ItlNALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


A Directory of Public Buildings and Grounds

in Tampa


IS%-LI11S AND HOSPITALS-Centro Asturiano Sanatorium-
Cor. Jackson St. and Ola Ave.; Centro Espanol Sanatorium-Bay-
shore Blvd.; Children's Home-3302 Florida Ave.; Clara Frye Hos-
pital-(colored)-1613 Lamar Ave.; Gordon Keller Memorial Hos-
rit(l-- n? N Boulevard; Halcyon Sanatorium-Plant Park, North
i.,, ...I Place; Latin-American Home for Boys-610 LaSalle;
Old People's Home-404 Hampton Ave.; Women's Home and Hospi-
tal-105 W. Ross Ave.
B.%NKS-American National Bank-616 Franklin St.; Bank of
Ybor City-Cor. 7th Ave. and 16th St.; Bank of West Tampa-Cor.
Main St. and Howard Ave.; Citizens Bank & Trust Co.-Cor. Frank-
lin and Zack Sts.: Bank of Commerce-Cor. Franklin and Tyler
Sts.: E-hin-c- Nntional Bank-601 Franklin St.; First National
Bank- ... i ,' ,I ,I' and Madison Sts.
CLUBS AND SOCIETIES-Associated Charities-315 Curry
Bldg.; Centro Asturiano-Cor. Nebraska and 9th Aves.; Centro
Espanol-1536 7th Ave.; Centro Espanol de West Tampa-Cor.
Cherry St. and Howard Ave., West Tampa; Circulo Cubano-10th
Ave. and 14th St.; Cuban Athletic Club-1331 7th Ave.; Deutsche
Amerikanischer Verein-Cor. Nebraska Ave. and 11th St.; General
Contractors Association-Court Arcade; German-American Club-
Cor. Nebraska Ave. and llth St. G. A. R., A. H. Terry Post No. 20
--i-," Florida Ave.; Havana Cigar Manufacturers Association-
32 i',. r National Bank Bldg.; Italian Society L'Unione-1724 7th
Ave.; Joe Wheeler Camp No. 2, United Spanish War Veterans-
F,,, Tlorida Ave.; Marine Engineers Benefit Association-1110%
! ',I !... St.; Mechanics Social Club-1312 Tampa St.; Palmetto
Beach Marine Club-Palmetto Beach; Real Estate Exchange of
Tampa-Rooms 7 and 8 Giddens Bldg.; Tampa Automobile and Golf
Club-504 Citizens Bank Bldg.; Tampa Chess Club-410%' Franklin
St.; Tampa Merchants Association-410% Franklin St.; Tampa
Yacht & Country Club-Ballast Point; Loring Camp No. 1126, Uni-
ted Confederate Veterans-City Hall; United Daughters of the
Confederacy-no regular meeting place; Woman's Relief Corps No.
5-no regular meeting place; Commercial and Industrial Associa-
tion-1423 7th Ave.: Rotary Club of Tampa-L. P. Dickie, Ass't
Secretary, Board of Trade Rooms, City Hall.
CEMETERIES-Catholic Cemetery-Cor. Morgan and Constant
Sts.; Catholic Cemetery-Florida Ave., between Emily and Buffalo
Ave..; Oaklawn Cemetery-606 Harrison St.; Spanish Cemetery--
Cor. Wall and 25th Sts.; Woodlawn Cemetery (City)-Cor. Wood-
lawn and Ola Aves.; Zion Cemetery (Colored)-Florida, near Buff-
alo Ave.
CHURCHES-(White)-Adventist-First Seventh Day Church
-Cor. Florida and Palmetto Aves.; Second Adventist-311 E. Fran-
cis Ave.; Baptist-Baptist Italian Mission-Cor. Oak St. and Ar-
mina Ave.; Clark Memorial Church-1909 15th St.; Concord Church









RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


Palmetto Beach; First Church-Cor. Lafayette St. and Plant
Ave.; Palm Ave. Church-1809 Florida Ave.; Sixth Ave. Church-
3001 6th Ave.; First Baptist Mission-Jefferson St., near Bell St.:
West Side Mission-Cor. Cypress and 12th Ave., West Tampa:
Christian-First Christian Church-Cor. Marion and Twiggs Sts.;
Christian Science-First Church of Christ, Scientist-Cor. Hender-
son and Florida Ax ,.mrfe..iniriui.nl-i',..r Church-2201 Flor-
ida Ave.; Cuban 1 .*. .r,..,.,I '* I.... i.-;- Green St., W est
Tampa; Union Congregational Church-484 Green St., West Tampa:
* Episcopal-St. John's-By-The-Sea-906 South Orleans Ave.; St. An-
drew's-505 Marion St.; House of Prayer-2405 Taliaferro St.;
Jewish-Congregation Schaarai Zedek-1209 Florida Ave.; Rodolph
Shalem Congregation (Orthodox)-311 E. Palm Ave.;Lutheran-
Deutsche 1: ... i,. .1 Lutheran Church-502 Tyler St.; Methodist
-Cuban ( I..-. I.--.. 16th St. and 12th Aves.: First Church-1001
Florida Ave.; Highland Ave. Church-Cor. Gladys St. and Highland
Ave.; Hyde Park Church-522 Platt St.; Italian M. E. Church-1615
9th Ave.; Nebraska Ave. Church-Nebraska Ave., near Florabraska
Ave.: Selma Ave. M. E. Church-Cor. Nebraska and Selma Aves.;
South Church-3102 8th Ave.; Tampa Heights M. E. Church-Cor.
Ross and Central Aves.; Presbyterian-Associated Presbyterian-
Cor. Livingston and Osborn Aves.; Associate Reformed Presbyter-
ian-2305 Tampa St.; Cuban Mission-1008 8th Ave.; 1st Church-
412 Zack St.; Hyde Park Presbyterian-Cor. Oregon and Inman Sts.:
Tampa Heights Presbyterian-Cor. Lamar and Palm Aves.; United
Brethren-United Brethren Church-Cor. Nebraska and Danbridge
Aves.; Roman Catholic-The Church of Our Lady of Mercy-Cor.
17th St. and 10th Ave.; Sacred Heart Church-Cor. Florida Ave. and
T St. Joseph Church-Cor. Walnut and Francis Ave..


CHL.RC1HES-(Colored)-Baptist-Bethel Church-Cor. Jeffer-
son and Short Emory Sts.; Beulah Church-709 Harrison St.; Ebe-
nezer Church-1215 Jefferson St.: Mt. Moriah Primitive-1228 Ne-
braska Ave.; New Salem Primitive-Cor. 2nd Ave. and Blanch St.;
St. John's-905 Governor St.: St. Stephens-1219 Long Emory St.;
Tabernacle-1010 Highland Ave.; Trinity-215 N. Oregon Ave.;
Episcopal-St. James Church-1307 Lamar Ave.; Methodist-Allen's
Temple-1120 Scott St.: Bowman Church-608 Constant St.; Mt.
Olive A. M. E. Church-Cor. LaSalle St. and 20th Ave., West Tampa;
Colored 'M. E. Church-Cor. Nebraska and Second Aves.; Macedonia
M. E. Church-1309 N. "A" St.; Mt. Sinai Church-Cor. Har-
rison St. and Nebraska Ave.: MIt. Zion A. M. E. Church-Cor. 14th
Ave. and 26th St.; Mt. Zion A. M. E. Church-113 S. Dakota Ave.:
Pleasant Church-620 Bell St.; St. Paul's Church-1101 Marion St.;
Salem A. M. E. Church-2602 12th Ave.

FOREIGN CONSULS-Cuban Consulate-314 Curry Bldg.:
- French Consulate-20 1st National Bank Bldg.; Honduran Consu-
late-20 1st Nat'l Bank Bldg.; Italian Consulate-Knight Bldg.:
Norwegian Consulate-15 1st Nat'l Bank Bldg.; Spanish Consulate
S 1420%S 7th Ave.

GOVERNMENT BUILDING-Florida Ave.. between Twiggs and
Zack Sts.: contains Postoffice. Customs House, U. S. Bureau of In-
ternal Revenue, U. S. District Attorney's office, U. S. Commission-
er's office, U. S. Customs Special Agent's office. U. S. Engineer's






















bI

'4 ~


ONE OF THE SPANISH CLUBS









RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


office, U. S. Postoftice Inspector's office, U. S. District Court, U. S.
Weather Bureau.

I'OS'TOFFI(CE-Florida Ave., between Twiggs and Zack Sts.:
free delivery. special delivery, money order dept., registry dept..
stamp window, parcels ....i dept.. postal savings bank; Ybor City
Station-1603 7th Ave.: 1lec- Tampa Station-Main St., near How-
ard Ave.: Station No. 1-2707 Florida Ave.; Station No. 2-Ross
Ave.. cor. Jefferson St.; Station No. 3-2424 18th Ave.; Station No.
4--Vest Lafayette St. and Magnolia Ave.; Station No. 5-1718
S Nebraska Ave.: Rural Routes-No. 1-North of Tampa to Lake
Magdalene: No. 2-Northeast of Tampa to Tampa Electric Co. dam;
No. 3-East of Tampa to DeSoto park, to Six-Mile Creek.

HOTELS-(*) Spanish; (black type) largest hotels of the city:
*Alhambra-HaL,:na Ave., cor Alvaro St., West Tampa; Allen-212
Tyler St.: Almeria-2011/ Franklin St.; Arlington-1219i % Franklin
St.: Aurora-131512 Franklin St.; Bay View-Jackson St., near
Franklin St.; Bay View-Palmetto Beach; Bristol-700 Zack St.:
*Buena Vista-Arch St., west of Fortune St. Bridge; DeSoto-701
Marion St.: *El P,. i. --Cor. 9th Ave. and 14th St.; *El Pongueta-
1415 Armina Ave., 'A -- Tampa; *El Sidelo-Cor. Howard Ave. and
Orange St., West Tampa; Florida-1307% Franklin St.; Hiawatha-
206 Polk St.; Hillsboro-Cor. Twiggs St. and Florida Ave.; Olive-
117 Franklin St.;. Orange-813-15 Tampa St.; Royal-314 Madison
St.: *Vegeteriano-1406 10th Ave.: *La Casa Blanca-1331%
7th Ave.: Lafay-ir-- I,,'- Lafayette St.; LeRoy-914 Frank-
lin St.: Lewis i i.... --.1/2 Franklin St.; Marlborough-707
Tampa St.: Miller's Hotel-918 Twiggs St.; Milton-306% Franklin
St.: Commercial-51412 Franklin St.; Northern-307'2 Tyler St.;
Union Depot Hotel-8521/ Zack St.; Oglethorpe-10151/2 Franklin
St.; Olympia-804 Franklin St.: Shamrock-1107 Tampa St.; Tampa
Bay Hotel-West Lafayette St. and Hyde Park Ave. (Plant Park):
Traveler's-706%1 Franklin St.; Tremont-15051% Franklin St.; Vir-
ginia-515 Tampa St.
RESTAURANTS AND CAFkS-(*) Spanish; *Alhambra Cafe-
208 Madison St.: Bell Cafe-701 Franklin St.; Bostain's Cafe-609
Franklin St.: American Pie Counter-1226 Franklin St.; *El Paseje
Cafe-Cor. 9th Ave. and 14th St.: Falsone's Restaurant-1001 New-
comb Ave.; *Garcia Bros.' Cafe-2117 7th Ave.; *Garcia's Restaur-
ant-1324 Franklin St.: *Grand Orient Cafe-114 Lafayette St.:
*Ideal Cafe-1223 Franklin St.; Dairy Kitchen-201 Lafayette St.:
New York Restaurant-306 Franklin St.; Union Passenger Sta-
tion Cafe-Union Station, foot of Zack St.; Gus Mexis Restaur-
ant-850 Zack St.: Saratoga Cafe-202 Franklin St.; *Pineiro &
Lamos Restaurant-1434 Franklin St.; Tampa Quick Lunch-603/2
Franklin St.: *Spoto's Cafe-1826 7th Ave.; Court Arcade Restaur-
ant-408 Franklin St.
BUILDINGS AND HALLS-Allen Bldg.-508 Franklin St.;
American Nat'l Bank Bldg.-614 Franklin St.; Arnold Bldg.-306
Franklin St.; A. C. L. Bldg.-Cor. Lafayette and Ashley Sts.; Bank
of Commerce Bldg.-914 Franklin St.; Bank of West Tampa Bldg.
-Cor. Main St. and Howard Ave.: Brown Bldg.-1302-04 Franklin
St.; Bruen & Webb Bldg.-404% Zack St.; Campbell Bldg.-316%
Franklin St.; Centro Espanol Bldg.-1536 7th Ave.; Citizens Bank
Bldg.-706 Franklin St.: City Hall-Lafayette St., Florida Ave. and









RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


Jackson St.; Clark Bldg.-Franklin St., between Fortune and Con-
stant Sts.; Court Arcade-408 Franklin St..: Curry Bldg.-Cor. Cass
and Franklin Sts.: Dawson & Thornton Bldg.-501 Franklin St.
Drew Bldg.-7161/2 Main St., West Tampa; Eagles Hall-207%
Twiggs St.; Easley Blk -5081/2 Franklin St.; Elk's Home-413 Florr
ida Ave.; Exchange Bank Bldg.--601 Franklin St.; Federal Bldg.-
Florida Ave., between Twiggs and Zack Sts.: First Nat'l Bank
Bldg.-414-416 Franklin St.; Franklin Square Bldg.-l01/2 Frank-
lin St.: Friebele Bldg.-807-09 Franklin St.; Giddens Bldg.-Cor.
Franklin and Lafayette Sts.; Gould Bldg.-5041/2 Franklin St.:
Haden Bldg.-10161/ Franklin St.; Hampton Bldg.-713'/2 Franklin
St.; Hancock Bldg.-410-412 Franklin St.; Hillsborough County
Court House-Franklin St., between Lafayette and Madison Sts.:
1. 0. O. F. Hall--09)1/ Franklin St.; I. 0. O. F. Hall (colored) 902
E. Scott St.: Jackson Bldg.-7101 Franklin St.; Julvy Bldg.-Hendry
& Knight Terminals: Knight Bldg.-315' F. .nk!in St.; K. of P.
Hall-601 Lafayette St.; Krause Bldg.--, -..... Franklin St.; Ma-
sonic Temple-508 Lafayette St.; Mugee Bldg.-Jackson St., near
Franklin St.; Petteway Bldg.-312%2 i -: St.; Pythian Castle
Hall-601 Lafayette St.; Rev Bldg.--Main nL., near Howard Ave.,
West Tampa: Salvation Army Hall--1l01/ Franklin St.: Spark-
man Bldg.-5111/ Franklin St.; Ulmer Bldg.-106 S. Franklin St.:
Warner Bldg.-1001, Lafayette St.; West Tampa City Hall-701
Main St T .... Zephus Hall-821 Constant St.; Zion Hall-
1236 E. ii ,

PUBLIC SCHOOLS-(White)-Buffalo Avenue-Cor. Buffalo
and Nebraska Aves.: East Tampa High School-Palmetto Beach:
Gary School-10th Ave., cor. 36th St.; Hillsboro Co. High School-
Highland and Euclid Aves.; Hyde Park Grammar School-Cor.
Boulevard and DeLeon St.; Madison Street School-Madison, cor.
Pierce St.; Michigan Ave. Grammar School-Michigan Ave., cor.
Morgan St.; North Hyde Park School-13th Ave., cor. Cypress St.:
Tampa Heights Grammar School-1616 Jefferson St.; Tampa
Heights Primary School-1610 Jefferson St.; West Tampa School-
378 Green St.; .'. I -:chool-Cor. 14th St. and 15th Ave.; Sem-
inole Heights -. I. '---* Central and Hanna Aves.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS-(Colored)-Caesar Street Grammar School
-Caesar, cor. Finley St.: Harlem Academy-5,10 E. Harrison St.:
Robles Pond School-Florida Ave. and Virginia St.; West Hyde
Park School-317 S. Dakota Ave.; West Tampa School-278 LaSalle
St.

RELIGIOUS AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS-Circulo Cubano School
-1319 10th Ave.: Convent of the Holy Names-Cor. Twiggs and
Morgan Sts.: Convent of the Holy Names-Cor. Francis Ave. and
Spruce St.; El Salvador Mission School-(colored)-West Tampa-
637 Main St.: English Classical School-705 Swann Ave.; Florida
Open-Air School-107 Bay St., Hyde Park; Home Training School-
841 Laurel St., West Tampa; Hoover School-925 12th Ave.; Italian
Methodist School-1615 9th Ave.; Italian School-1906 10th Ave.;
Rodriquez Aguida School-1211 llth Ave.; Sacred Heart College-
Cor. Florida Ave. and Twiggs St.; St. Benedict's School-(colored)-
Cor. Michigan Ave. and 20th St.; St. James Parochial School-(col-
ored)-1034 Constant St.; St. Joseph's School-1518 17th Ave.; St.
Peter Claver's School-83 Governor St.: Tampa Business College-
Cor. W. Lafayette St. and Edison Ave.; Tampa Conservatory of









RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


Music-803 E. Michigan Ave.; Tampa Heights Kindergarten-1614
Jefferson St.: Wolff Mission School-Cor. 16th St. and 13th Ave.

PARKS AND THEATRES-(PARKS)-Ballast Point Park-41/
S miles southwest of city, on Hillsborough Bay; Sulphur Springs
Park-514 miles north of city; DeS I i ,, miles east of city,
on Sparkman Bay: Plant Park-L -rI- -I between Hillsboro
river and Crescent Place; Plant Field-between Crescent Place and
North Boulevard: Macfarlane Park-between Roosevelt and Lin-
coln Aves., West Tampa; Highland Park-between Park and Fran-
cis Aves., o.. T-.i t (THEATRES)-Tampa Bay Casino-
Plant Park; I .I..i I'... I e-309 Tampa St.; Ballast Point Casino
-Ballast Point Park. (PICTURE THEA TRES)-Alcazar-606
Franklin St.: Bonita-710 Franklin St.; Gasparilla-1215 Franklin
St.; Grand-512. Franklin St.: Montgomery-Cor. Cass St. and Flor-
ida Ave.; Prince-904 Franklin St.; Sans Souci-1313 7th Ave.:
Strand-Cor. Tampa and Twiggs St.; Venus-1424 7th Ave.; Grande
Teatro Espanol-1536 7th Ave.; Grande Teatro de West Tampa-
Cor. Main St. and Howard Ave., West Tampa.

SECRET SOCIETIES-B. P. O. E.-Lodge No. 708, Elk's Home,
413 Florida A-o Druid 4--nr.no- Grn-e No. 1,1110%i Franklin St.;
Knights of (..Iulmli.ui- '..,' .... ... No. 667, Woodmen's Hall,
cor. Franklin and Lafayette Sts.; K. of G. E.-Cervantes Castle No.
4, W. O. W. Hall, West Tampa; Cristoval Colon Castle, 7th Ave. and
16th St.; K. O. T. M. M.-Tampa Bay Tent No. 1400, 3152 Franklin
St.; K. of P.-Bay Lodge No. 12, Castle Hall, 601 Lafayette St.; Red
Cross Lodge No. 43, Castle Hall, 713% Franklin St.; Pythagoras
Lodge No. 69. Castle Hall, 7131/2 Franklin St.; Uniform Rank, Castle
Hall, 713% Franklin St.: Pythian Sisters, DeLeon Temple No. 6,
Castle Hall, 713% Franklin St.; Masonic-Hillsborough Lodge No.
25, F. & A. M., Masonic Hall, 508 Lafayette St.; John Darling Lodge
S No. 154, F. & A. M., Odd Fellows Hall, 909% Florida Ave.; Universal
Lodge No. 178, F. & A. M. (Spanish), Masonic Hall; Tampa Chapter
No. 3, R. A. M., Masonic Hall; Tampa Council No. 8, R. & S. M., Ma-
sonic Hall; Ivanhoe Commandery No. 8, K. T., Masonic Hall; Tau
Lodge of Perfection No. 7, A. A. S. R., Masonic Hall; McLean Chap-
ter Rose Croix No. 1, A. A. S. R., Masonic Hall; Bruce Council No. 1,
Knights Kadosh, A. A. S. R., Masonic Hall; Tampa Consistory No.
1, A. A. S. R., Masonic Hall; Order Eastern Star-Tampa Chapter
No. 11, O. E. S., Masonic Hall: Joint Relief Committee, Masonic
Hall; L. O. O. M.-Loyal Order of Moose, Tampa Lodge No. 798,
315%2 Franklin St.: Odd Fellows-Unity Encampment No. 12, Odd
Fellows Hall, 909%/ Florida Ave.; Prospect Lodge No. 38, Odd Fel-
lows Hall; Poinsettia Rebekah Lodge No. 20, Odd Fellows Hall;
-of 0.-Order of Owls, Odd Fellows Hall; P. 0. S. of A.-Wash-
ington Camp No. 7, 1110% Franklin St.; Red Men-Okeechobee
Tribe No. 22, Improved O. R. M., 315% Franklin St.; W. O. W.-
Hillsboro Camp No. 37, 3151 Franklin St.; Palmetto Camp No. 161,
S 16th St. and 7th Ave.: Woodmen's Circle-Gate City Grove No. 2,
315% Franklin St.








au RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK



Street Car Schedules



PORT TAMPA DIVISION-
Transfers are not issued. Fare: Port Tampa, 10c; Ballast
Point, 5c. Round trip, 1 hour, 30 minutes.
ROUTE-North on Florida Ave., west on Zack St., south on
Tampa St., west on Lafayette St., south on Hyde Park Ave., west on
Azeele St., south on Magnolia Ave., west on DeLeon St., south on
Boulevard, west on Swann Ave., southwest on Snow St., south on
Rome Ave., along Bayshore Boulevard to Ballast Point, thence in a
southwesterly direction to Port Tampa City, returning via the same
route to Lafayette St., then east to Florida Ave., and north to the
postoffice.
SCHEDILE-Leave from the postoffice, corner Twiggs St. and
Florida Ave., at 5:00 A. M. and every 30 minutes thereafter until
9:30 P. M., then every 45 minutes until 11:45 P. M. Leave Port
Tampa at 5:45 A. M. and every 30 minutes thereafter until 10:15 P.
M., then every 45 minutes until 12:30 A. M. (On Sunday morning
the first car is 30 minutes later.)
BALLAST POINT CARS operate over the same division with
the terminus at Ballast Point, the two divisions being consolidated.
Round trip, 1 hour. On week days a Ballast Point car leaves
Franklin and Lafayette Sts. at 5:15 P. M. and makes one round trip.
On Sunday Ballast Point extras leave this corner at 1:45 P. M. and
every 30 minutes, giving (in connection with the Port Tampa cars)
15 minute service to Ballast Point until 6:00 P. M. and as much
later as traffic demands.

HYDE PARK DIVISION-
Transfers are issued. Fare, 5c. Round trip, 30 minutes.
ROUTE-The Hyde Park cars operate over the same route as
the Ballast Point-Port Tampa Division, with the terminus at Bay-
shore Boulevard.
SCHEDULE-Leave the corner of Franklin and Lafayette Sts.
at 5:00 A. M. and 5:30 A. M., then every 10 minutes thereafter until
8:10 P. M., then at 8:30 and every 15 minutes until 12:30 A. M.
Leave terminus at Bayshore Boulevard at 5:15 and 5:45 A. M., then
every 10 minutes thereafter until 8:25 P. M., then at 8:45 and every
15 minutes until 12:45 A. M. (On Sunday morning the first car is
30 minutes later, and cars run every 10 minutes from Franklin and
Lafayette Sts. until 1:30 P. M., then every 15 minutes until 12:30
A. M.)

SEVENTH AVENUE DIVISION-
Transfers are issued. Fare, 5c. Round trip, 1 hour.
ROUTE-North on Franklin St., east on Cass St., north on Cen-
tral Ave., east on Kay St., north on Nebraska Ave., east on 6th Ave.,










RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


north on 14th St., east on 7th Ave., south on 22nd St., east on Lee
St., south on "B" St. to DeSoto Park. Returning: West on Park
St., north on 22nd St., west on 7th Ave., south on Nebraska Ave. to
Kay St., thence over the same route as out-going.
SCHEDULE-Leave Mallory Line Dock at 5:15 A. M. and every
15 minutes thereafter until 12:30 A. M. Leave DeSoto Park at 5:15
A. M. and every 15 minutes thereafter until 1:00 A. M. (On Sunday
morning the first car is 1 hour later.) (Seventh Ave. cars pass cor-
ner of Franklin and Lafayette Sts. two and one-half minutes after
leaving the Mallory Docks.)
NEBRASKA AVENUE DIVISION-
Transfers are issued. Fare, 5c. Round trip, 45 minutes.
ROUTE-North on Franklin St., east on Cass St., north on
Marion St., east on Harrison St., north on Jefferson St., west on
Michigan Ave., north on Morgan St., east on Florabraska Ave.,
north on Nebraska Ave. to Osborn Ave. Returning: Over the
same route to Franklin and Zack Sts., thence west on Zack St.,
south on Tampa St., east on Lafayette St. to Franklin St.
SCHEDULE-Leave corner of Franklin and Lafayette Sts. at
5:00 A. M. and every 221% minutes thereafter (which falls on the
even hour at 8:00 and 11:00 A. M.; 2:00, 5:00. 8:00 and 11:00 P. M.)
until 11:22 1'. M., then 12:07 A. M.
Leave Nebraska and Osborn Aves. at the time stated above un-
til 10:37 P. 1., then 11:22 P. M. car goes to car barn, 11:45 P. M. car
makes round trip and leaves Osborn Ave. at 12:30 to go to car barn
(via Nebraska Ave,, Florabraska Ave., Morgan St., west on Michi-
gan Ave., Highland Ave., and 7th Ave.) (On Sunday the first car
leaves each end at 6:07 A. M.)
ROSS AVENUE DIVISION-
Transfers are issued. Fare, 5c. Round trip, 1 hour, 30 min-
S utes.
ROUTE-From Osborn Ave. and 30th St. southwest to Tampa
Northern R. R. crossing, south on Campobello Ave., west on Michi-
gan Ave., south on 22nd St., west on 7th Ave., north on 14th St.,
west on llth Ave. to Nebraska Ave., west on Ross Ave., south on
Garcia Ave., west on Laurel St., north on Francis Ave., west on
Chestnut St., north on Howard Ave., west on St. Louis St., north on
Armenia Ave., west on Ivy St., north on Dewey St. to terminus.
Returning: Over the same route to Howard Ave. and Main St..
thence east on Main St., south on Boulevard, east on Green St.,
north on Garcia Ave. to Ross Ave., thence over the same route as
out-going.
SCHEDULE-Leave Osborn Ave. and 30th St. at 5:15 A. M. and
every 30 minutes thereafter until 10:45 P. M., then at 11:45 to the
car barn (via Ross Ave., Highland Ave., and 7th Ave). Also leave
22nd St. and 7th Ave. going west at 5:00 A. M., 11:30 P. M., and
12:00 M.
Leave Dewey St., West Tampa, at 5:00 A. M. and every 30 min-
utes thereafter until 10:30 P. M., the 11:00 and 11:30 P. M. cars going
only as far as 22nd St. and 7th Ave., Ybor City. (Ross Ave. cars
pass the corner of Ross and Highland Aves., going west, at 10 and
40 minutes past the hour; going east, at 20 and 50 minutes past the
hour.) (On Sunday the first three cars are one hour later.)
WOODLAWN AVENUE DIVISION-
Transfers are issued. Fare, 5c. Round trip, 30 minutes.
ROUTE-North on Franklin St., west on 7th Ave., north on
4 Tampa St. to Virginia Ave. Returning: South on Tampa St., east










RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


on Fortune St., south on Franklin St., west on Zack St., south on
Tampa St., east on Lafayette St. to Franklin St.
SCHEDULE-Leave the corner of Franklin and Lafayette Sts.
at 5:30 A. M. and every 30 minutes thereafter until 12:00 midnight.
Returning: Leave Virginia Ave. at 5:15 A. M. and every 30 min-
utes thereafter until 12:15 A. M. (On Sunday morning the first car
is 1 hour later.)
SULPHUR SPRINGS DIVISION-
Transfers are not issued. Fare, 5c. Round trip, 1 hour.
ROUTE-North on Franklin St., west on 7th Ave., north on
Tampa St., east on Buffalo Ave., north on Central Ave., thence to
Sulphur Springs. Returning over the same route to Tampa and
Fortune Sts., thence to Franklin St., south on Franklin St., west on
Zack St.. south on Tampa St., east on Lafayette St. to Franklin St.
SCHEDULE-Leave the corner of Franklin and Lafayette Sts.
at 5:15 A. M. and every 30 minutes thereafter until 2:40 P. M., then
every 20 minutes until 7:20 P. M., then 7:45 P. M. and every 30 min-
utes until 11:45 P. M.
Leave Sulphur Springs at 5:15 A. M. and every 30 minutes
thereafter until 2:45 P. M., then at 3:10 P. M. and every 20 minutes
until 7:30 P. M., then at 7:45 P. M. and every 30 minutes until 12:15
A. M.
On Sunday morning the first car is 1 hour later, and cars run
every 30 minutes until 12:45 P. -M., then 1:00 P. M. and every 20
minutes as long as traffic demands, then every 30 minutes at 15 and
45 minutes past the hour.
MICHIGAN AVENUE DIVISION-
Transfers are issued. Fare, 5c. Round trip. 1 hour.
ROUTE-North on Franklin St., west on 7th Ave., north on
Highland Ave., east on Michigan Ave., south on 22nd St. to 7th
Ave., returning via the same route.
SCHEDULE-Leave Mallory Line Docks at 5:07 A. M. and every
15 minutes thereafter until 11:07 P. M., then every 30 minutes until
12:37 A. M.
Leave 22nd St. and 7th Ave. at 5:07 A. M. and every 15 min-
utes thereafter until 10:37 P. M., then every 30 minutes until 1:07
A. M. (Michigan Ave. cars pass the corner of Franklin and
Lafayette Sts. two and one-half minutes after leaving the Mallory
Docks.) (On Sunday the first car starts one hour later.)
TAMPA HEIGHTS DIVISION-
Transfers are issued. Fare, 5c. Round trip, 45 minutes.
ROUTE-North on Franklin St., east on Oak Ave., north on
13th St., east on 9th Ave.,.north on 15th St., east on 12th Ave., south
on 22nd St. to 7th Ave. Returning: Over the same route to
Franklin and Zack Sts., thence west on Zack St., south on Tampa
St., east on Lafayette St. to Franklin St.
SCHEDULE-Leave the corner of Franklin and Lafayette Sts.
at 5:07 A. M. and every 15 minutes thereafter until 9:07 P. M., then
at 9:25 P. M. and every 20 minutes thereafter until 11:45 P. M., then
every 40 minutes until 12:25 A. M.
Leave 22nd St. and 7th Ave. at 5:15 A. M. and every 15 minutes
thereafter until 9:45 P. M., then at 10:05 P. M. and every 20 minutes
thereafter until 11:25 P. M., then 12:05 A. M. (On Sunday the first
car starts 1 hour later.)
WEST TAMPA-YBOR CITY DIVISION-
Transfers are issued. Fare, 5c. Round trip, 1 hour.
ROUTE-West on 7th Ave., south on Nebraska Ave., west on









RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


Henderson Ave., south on Franklin St., west on Fortune St., north
on Boulevard, west on Laurel St., north on Francis Ave., west on
I'once de Leon St., south on Armenia Ave., east on Main St., south
on Boulevard, east on Green St., south on Garcia Ave. to Arch St.,
S thence returning to Ybor City over the same route to Nebraska and
Henderson Aves., thence east to 14th St., north on 14th St. to 7th
Ave., thence to 36th St.
SCHEDULE-First car leaves 22nd St. and 7th Ave., Ybor City,
at 4:50 A. M. Cars then leave 36th St. and 7th Ave. at 5:00 A. M.
and every 15 minutes thereafter until 12:30 A. M. Cars at 12:45 A.
IM. and 1:00 A. M. go to car barn, following regular route to Frank-
lin St., thence north to 7th Ave. and west to barn.
Leave Armenia Ave. and Ponce de Leon St., West Tampa, at
5:00 A. M. and every 15 minutes thereafter until 12:30 A. M. Cars
at 12:45 and 1:00 A. M. follow regular route to Franklin St., then
go to car barn.
(West Tampa cars pass each other at Franklin St. and Hender-
son Ave. on the even hour and every 15 minutes.) (On Sunday the
first cars are one hour later.)
UNION STATION DIVISION-
(Note: Do not take Union Station cars going west at Franklin
and Zack Sts. for Union Passenger Station. Take cars going east
on Grand Central Ave., east on Lafayette St., north on Florida Ave.
south of Twigg St., or east on Twigg St.)
Transfers are issued. Fare, 5c. Round trip, 1 hour, 15 min-
utes.
ROUTE-East on Chestnut St., south on Howard Ave., east on
Lemon'St., south on Albany St., east on Grand Central Ave., east on
Lafayette St.. north on Florida Ave., east on Twigg St., north on
Nebraska Ave., east on 6th Ave., north on 14th St., east on 7th Ave.
to 22nd St. Returning: West on 7th Ave., south on Nebraska Ave.,
west on T ; St., north on Florida Ave., west on Zack St., south
S on Tamp;: -r r.. Lafayette St., thence to West Tampa over the same
route as in-coming.
SCHEDLLE-Leave 22nd St. and 7th Ave., Ybor City, at 5:00 A.
M. and every 15 minutes thereafter until 11:45 P. M.
Leave Macfarlane's Park, West Tampa, at 5:07 A. M. and every
15 minutes thereafter until 11:52 P. M., then every 30 minutes until
12:52 A. M.
Going to Union Station and Ybor City Union Station cars pass
corner of Franklin and Lafayette Sts. at 4:45 A. M. and every 15
minutes thereafter until 12:15 A. M., then 12:45 A. M. Going to
West Tampa cars pass the postoffice, corner of Twiggs St. and
Florida Ave., at 4:45 A. M. and every 15 minutes thereafter until
11:30 P. M., then at 12:00 Midnight. (On Sunday the first car starts
one hour later.)
RIVER DIVISION-
Transfers are not issued. Fare, 5c. Round trip, 30 minutes.
ROUTE-North from Osborn Ave. and 30th St. to Power Station
0on the Hillsborough river, and return over the same route.
WEEKDAY SCHEDULE-Going to Power Station car leaves
Osborn Ave. at 5:45 A. M., 7:15 A. M., 11:45 A. M., 3:15 P. M., 5:15 P.
Y M ., 6:45 P. M., 7:15 P. M., and 11:15 P. M. Leave Power Station 15
minutes after the above times.
SSLNDAY SCHEDULE-Leave Osborn Ave. at 5:45 A. M. and
every hour until 1:45 P. M., then every 30 minutes until 7:45 P. M..
then at 11:15 P. M. Leave Power Station 15 minutes after the
above times.












































A sTHIKT' S'ICENE TN T.\NMi I\




S.' 4 '1 \











U. S. Department of Agriculture, Weather Bureau

Data, Tampa, Florida, 1915


Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.

Av. T'emp .. ..... .59).0 (0.3 t.7.S 41S.6 7S.7 81.(. 82.4 82.6i 81.7 76.8 66.2 61.2
Highest Temp... 7. 79. 7(1. S(. *!2. *3. *. *94. 03. *91. 82. 80.
Lowest TenI.. ... 41. 41. 40. 43. 1.5. 69. 72. 70. 70. 55. 32. 37.
Total Rain ....... 4..! 4.71 1.35 1.1S 6.87 :3.93 5.OS 8.91 2.08 1.37 0.82 1.26
No. Rainy Days
.01 or more ... 9 9 5 8 8 14 17 12 14 7 12
No. Rainy Days 0
0.25 or more... 4 7 2 1 5 4 7 6 3 2 3 O
Percent. Sunshine 43. 3N. :55. 0O. 71. 74. 65. 74. 72. 64. 57. 34.


The figures given for November and Lecembler are taken from the 1914 report.
*The summer of 191.)5 as the hottest on record.





u\









ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILWAY
-BETWEEN-
TAM I'A-JACKSONVILLE-NEW YORK
Connections for
Ft. Myers, Ocala, Gainesville, Savannah, Charleston, Washington, Chicago,
(Subject to change without notice)


St. Louis, etc.


Iv.-Tampa .......
Ar.-Jacksonville.
" -New York...


84 80 92
6:10 A. M. 10:30 A. M. 12:45 P. M.
4:30 P. M. 6:30 P. M. 7:30 P.M.
7:13 A.M.


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54 2 o." So


CLYDE LINE
JAICKSONVILLE TO NEWY YORK

(Subject to change without notice)

Leave Jacksonville-2::00 I'. 31.-Every Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
Leave New York-1 :0(0 1. I.--Every Tuesday, WTednesday, Friday and Saturday.


82
9:00 P. M.
6:45 A. M.
2:57 P. M.




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SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY
-BETWEEN-
TAM PA--JAC(KSON VI I, -WVASHINGTON-NEW YORI
Tampa and Bnrtow Tampa and Sarasota
(Subject to change without notice)

No. 4 No. 10 No. 2
Lv. Tampa ............................ 9:00A.M. 1:00 P. M. 9:00 P. M.
Ar. Jacksonville ...................... 5:25 P.M. 7:15 P. M. 6:45 A. M.
Ar. W ashington ....................... 9:10P. M. 9:10P. M. 9:10A. M.
Ar. New York ........................ *6:00 A.M. *6:00 A.M. 1:40 P.M.

*Passengers may remain in sleeper until 7:30 A. M.

4:05 P. M ........................... Lv.-Tampa-Ar. .......................... 9:10 A.M.
6:05 P. M ........................... Ar.- Bartow- Lv. ...........................7:10A.M.

Lv. Tampa .............................................. 7:50 A.M. 4:25 P. M.
Ar. Sarasota ............................................ 10:54 A.M 8:02 P.M.



MALLORY LINE
BETWEEN TAMPA, KEY WEST, MOBILE AND NEW YORK
SOUTHBOIUNIl-Leave New York-1:00 p. m.-(every Saturday) for Key West, Tampa
and Mobile; Leave Key WVest-(every Wednesday) for Tampa and Mobile; Leave Tampa-
9:00 p. m.-(every Friday) for Mobile.
NORTHBOUND-Leave Mobile-at Day light-(every Tuesday) for Tampa, Key West and
New York; Leave Tampa-4:00 p. m.-(every Thursday) for Key West and New York;
Leave Key West-(every Friday) for New York.
______________________ o








PENINSULAR & OCCIDENTAL STEAMSHIP CO.
PORT TAMPA-KEY WEST-HAVANA
(Subject to change without notice)
Sailings beginning January 1, 1916
Leave Port Tampa, Fla.-3:00 p. m.-Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday; Arrive Key West-
7:30 a. m.-Monday, Wednesday and Friday; Leave Key West-8:30 a. m.--Monday, Wednes-
day and Friday; Arrive Havana, Cuba-.N-:(10 p. m.-Monday, Wednesday and-Friday.
Leave Havana, Cubla-9:30. a. m.-Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday; Arrive Key West,
Fla.-6:00 p. m.-Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday; Leave Key West-9:00 p. m.-Tuesday,
Thursday and Saturday; Arrive Port Tamnpa-11:30 a. m.-Wednesday, Friday and Sunday.



0







GULF & SOUTHERN STEAMSHIP CO.
BETWEEN TAMPA AND NEW ORLEANS
(Subject to change without notice)
Proposed sailings of Steamer "BRUNSWICK," carrying passengers and freight: Leave
Tampa on the 9th, 19th, and 29th of each month, at 11:00 a. m.; returning leave New Or-
leans on the 5th, 15th, and 25th.






* l -<* ",













T^


_-- ---







CHILDREN'S PLAYGROUND, YBOR CITY, TAMPA







RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


Business Directory

A DIRECTORY OF REPRESENTATIVE FIRMS IN
TAMPA AND VICINITY

Conveniently Arranged Under an Alphabetical Classification,
with Cross References

A Number Following a Name Refers to the Page in this Book
upon which the Firm's Avdertisement will be Found

ARCHITECTS
CRACKER BOY COFFEE, "The Rich Man's Coffee at the Poor
Alan's Price."
A. H. Johnson, Phone 2450, 711 Citizens' Bank Bldg.
AUTOMOBILES
TRIUMPH COFFEE MILLS, Importers and Roasters, "Quality
First."
Lucas Motor Sales Co., (46), Phone 2456, 409 Cass St.
Motor Mart, (46), Phone 73-161, 307 Tampa St.
AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES
TAMPA BAY HOTEL COFFEE, "An Economical Luxury."
Auto Marine Supply Co., (64), Phone 3183, 201 Franklin St.
American Supply Co., (68), Phone 2655, Zack and Tampa.
AUTOMOBILES FOR HIRE
TAMPA BAY HOTEL COFFEE, "The Best at Any Price."
Eage Auto Service, (10), Phone 2330, 306/2 Twiggs.
AUTOMOBILE RADIATOR WORKS
TRIUM'PH COFFEE MILLS, "A Blend to Suit Any Taste at a Price
to Suit Any Purse."
Tampa Auto Radiator Works, 307 Harrison St.
Repairers and Rebuilders of Auto Radiators, Fenders,
Lamps, and Bodies. All Work Promptly Executed
and Guaranteed.
"Auto Radiator Specialists"








RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK 91


AUTOMOBILE TOPS AND TRIMMINGS
TRIUMPH MILLS TAMPA MADE COFFEES.
F. A. Snyder, Phone 3344, 413 Cass.
Whittenburg & Boyd, (20), Phone 4220, 1101 Florida Ave.

AUTOMOBILE TIRES
TAMPA BAY TEA-Try this Tea Today.
Tampa Rubber Tire Works, (32), Phone 3673, 206 Zack.

BAKERIES
TAMPA BAY COFFEE. Made in Tampa-Always Fresh.
Tampa Steam Bakery, (18), Phone 2307, 1002 Franklin.
Campbell's Bakery, 1441 Franklin.

BANKS
ROYAL PALM COFFEE-CRACKER BOY COFFEE-TAMPA BAY
COFFEE-"All Pure-Alright-Always."
Bank of Manatee, (48), Manatee, Fla.
BICYCLES
USE TAMPA BAY TEA in the Summer when its HOT,
El Moderno, C. Rodriquez, Prop., 1033 7th Ave.
BREWERY
USE TAMPA BAY COFFEE in the Winter when its NOT.
Florida Brewing Co., (56), Phone 4157, 5th Ave. and 13th St.
BUSINESS COLLEGE
TRIUMPH COFFEE MILLS-"Quality First."
Tampa Business College, (44), Phone 4476, Edison and Grand
Central Ave.
BOOKBINDING AND BLANK BOOKS
CRACKER BOY COFFEE, 1, 2 and 3-lb. Sealed Tins ONLY.
Rinaldi Printing Co., (66), Phone 3355, 107 Lafayette St.
BEAUTY PARLORS
TAMPA BAY COFFEE-Never Sold in Bulk.
Ville de Paris Beauty Parlors, (32), 914 Franklin St.







RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


CIGAR FACTORIES
ROYAL PALM COFFEE Suits the Most Exacting.
Marsicano Cigar Co., (16), Phone 2416, Scott and Ashley.

COFFEE MILLS
DO YOU DRINK TAMPA MADE COFFE? If not, WHY not?
Triumph Mills, Phone 4277, 203 Washington.

CLOTHING AND GENTS' FURNISHINGS
TAMPA BAY HOTEL Coffee and Tea. "THE BEST."
Bailey of Tampa, (12), Phone 2838, 209 Lafayette.
(See also Hatters.)
COAL
Everybody drinks CRACKER BOY COFFEE. Cup Quality Tells.
Tampa Coal Company, (16), Phone 4645.

CONFECTIONERY
ROYAL PALM COFFEE-The Flavor Never Varies.
J. R. Jones, (also auto for hire), Phone 73-657, 2217 7th Ave.

CHIROPODY PARLOR
(See Manicure)
USE TAMPA BAY COFFEE Today-Tomorrow-All the Time.
DRY GOODS & GENTS' FURNISHINGS
TAMPA BAY-The Best Coffee and Tea.
Adolph N. Goldstein, 1224 Franklin.
(See also Clothing.)
ELECTRIC COMPANY
Get the Taste of TAMPA BAY COFFEE.
Tampa Electric Co., (22), Office, Tampa & Cass, Phone 2661.

FURNITURE
Get the Taste of CRACKER BOY COFFEE.
Rhodes-Pearce-Mahoney Furniture Co., (3), Phone 3742, 1011
Franklin St.
Filocco & Co., Phone 2935, 1708-10 7th Ave.
C. L. Shipp, (Restaurant in Connection), 2225 7th Ave.








RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


GAS COMPANY
Start the Day with a Cup of TAMPA BAY Coffee, MADE IN TAMPA
Tampa Gas Co., (36), Phone 2648, 201 Madison.
GENTS' FURNISHINGS
Every Grocer Listed Below Sells TRIUMPH COFFEE MILL'S
Products.
Orient Pressing Club, Tailoring, 2116 7th Ave.
(See also I( ..ii .. )
GARAGES
(See -\utomobiles.)
CRACKER BOY TEA-"The Rich Man's Tea at the Poor Man's
IPrice.
GROCERIES AND MEATS
TAMIPA BAY TEA is "A Nice Tea for an Ice Tea."
International Meat Market & Grocery, Phone 72-664, 2004 7th
Ave.
R. C. Monroe, Phone 2386, 701-03 7th Ave.
HOTELS
ROYATI PAL\M COFFEE Pleases the Hard-to-Please.
Arlington, Index, Phone 2264, 1219/2 Franklin.
Bay Island, (see colored insert), Sarasota, Fla.



Bay View Hotel
MODERN FIREPROOF FIRST CLASS
150 Rooms with Bath. Rates Reasonable. -+
.IGU[ST B. MI GGE, Manager
CENTRALLY LOCATED TAMPA. FLA.
:-.'--'- -:----,- --!o -: -: -'- -- --:-..---- .'- .-:- --:-.'---:'- .'-.-:...'--:-.- --:- -- : -,- -: -'"

Colonial Hotel, (14), Phone 71-313, Sulphur Springs.
Cottage Hotel, (68), Phone 3613, 1207 Florida.
Florida, (54), Bradentown, Fla.
Heiglehurst, (52), Sarasota (Siesta Island P. O.), Fla.
Hillsboro, (28), Twiggs St., Phone 2674.
Juplinor, (48), Bradentown, Fla.
Mango Avenue, (54), Sarasota, Fla.








RINALLI S GUIDE BOOK


Marlboro, Page B, Phone 3493, Tampa & Zack.
New Hotel, (20), 1017% Franklin.
...: -.:- ..- ..- ..-.-.......-.-...-:-.:.-,: :--:...-.... :-.. .:.*-* :--:-* --:- ..:. ..- .{,
New Hotel with All Modern Conveniences -
HOTEL ORANGE e
C. H. HAWES, Prop.
"THE BEST FOR THE MONEY"
Rates 7-
S 75c TO $1 PER DAY $1 TO $1.25 PER DAY
+ A With Use of Public Bath With Private Bath
815 TAMPA STREET TAMPA, FLA.




HOTEL OLIVE
S. J. CARNES, Prop.
117-110 FRANKLIN STREET
S A New Hotel Equipped with All Modern Conveniences
Strictly European Plan Centrally Located
i- Rooms with Bath, $1.00 and $1.50
TAMPA, FLORIDA


Tampico, (36), Phone 73-278, 101/% S. Franklin.
Weida, (72), Sarasota, Fla.

HABERDASHER
SEMINOLE COFFEE-Made in Tampa-Ask Your Grocer.
Broda Hat Co., (28), 311 Franklin St.
HATTERS
Ask Your Grocer for TRIUMPH MILL'S COFFEE.
A. Colado, Phone 4552, 1421 7th Ave.
Ramon Sierra & Sons, Phone 3782, 1508 7th Ave.
(See also Haberdasher.)
HARDWARE
Start the Day with TAMPA BAY COFFEE.
Altman & Knight, 2207-2209 7th Ave.

ICE CREAM PARLOR
CRACKER BOY COFFEE.
Sam's Place, Phone 3574, 1622-24 Franklin.








RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


ICE
No Meal is Complete without CRACKER BOY COFFEE.
S Mutual Ice Delivery Co., Phones 4460-4461-4320.
JEWELERS
TAMPA BAY COFFEE-"An Economical Luxury."
SOwen-Cotter Jewelry Co., (24), Phone 4324, 613 Franklin.
Jose Goyanes, The 14K Shop, 1615 7th Ave.
LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR GARMENTS
TAMPA BAY Coffee and Tea are Used in Florida's Finest and Best
Hotels and Restaurants.
"The Grand Egel," Rubin Egel, Proprietor, 906 7th Ave.
LAUNDRY
TRIUMPH MILLS-Tampa's Coffee Roasters.
Manuel Rosende, 1223 7th Ave.
LUMBER
TAMPA BAY COFFEE Made Tampa Famous. Served in all First-
Class Restaurants, Hotels and Fountains.
Alexander Lumber Co., (24), Phone 2088, Drew & Twiggs.
MANICURE & CHIROPODY PARLOR
TAMPA BAY Coffee and Tea-Oh, how Good! Ask your Grocer.
Mrs. Julia Martin6, (6), Phone 4218, Zack & Florida.
MACARONI FACTORY
TRIUMPH MILLS, TAMPA, FLA.
Ybor City Macaroni Factory, (34), 1725 7th Ave.
PRINTERS & BINDERS
CRACKER BOY COFFEE is Served in More Florida Homes than
any other Five Brands of Coffee Combined.
Rinaldi Printing Co., (66), Phone 3355, 107 Lafayette St.
PHOTOGRAPHERS
TAMPA BAY COFFEE-The Best Coffee for the Best People.
SJ. R. Lytle, (34), Over Central Pharmacy, 816% Franklin.
ROOMS FOR LIGHT HOUSEKEEPING
Ask Your Grocer for TRIUMPH MILLS COFFEE.
Mrs. J. Garcia, 1310 Tampa.









96 RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


ROOMING HOUSES
CRACKER BOY COFFEE-Made ,in Tampa-Made RIGHT in
Tampa.
Carolina House, (36), Phone 72-507, 1008/2 Franklin.
Mrs.. A. C. Lunsford, Phone 72-898, 1002I2 Franklin.
Liberty House, (20), Phone 73-894, 207% Fortune St.
Marie Maya, (over Ybor City P. O.), 1601% 7th Ave.
RESTAURANTS AND CAFES
TAMPI' BAY Coffee-Your Grocer Does Not Keep It-He Sells It.
American Pie Counter, Index, Phone 3937, 1118 Franklin.
Dairy Kitchen, (12), Phone 3065, Tampa & Lafayette.
Noah Adams, 2214 7th Ave.
Magnolia Restaurant, 15c, 911 Florida Ave.
Manuel Garcia's, (14), Cor. Franklin & Constant Sts.
REAL ESTATE
TAMPA BAY COFFEE. Try It and You will Buy It.
Davis-Manatee Co., (41), Manatee, Fla.
Gulf Bay Land Co., (see colored insert), Sarasota, Fla.
Thos. C. Hammond & Co., (6), Phone 3140, Giddens Bldg.
Manatee River Land Co., (30), Phone 2405, Franklin Sq. Bldg.
Mitchell's Beach, (8), Phone 2806, American Nat'l Bank Bldg.
Virginia Park, (see map), Phone 3463, Strand Bldg.
Wimauma Fruit & Vegetable Co., (42), Wimauma, Fla.

RENTAL AGENTS
TAMPA BAY COFFEE-The Best-and Costs No More than the
Rest.
C. V. Dickins, Phone 3659, Room 2, Giddens Bldg.
(See also Real Estate.)
SEEDSMEN
TAMPA BAY COFFEE-Once Used It is Never Refused.
Reliable Seed Co., 2207 7th Ave. t
Buckeye Incubators, Seeds, Poultry Supplies, etc.
SHOE REPAIRERS
Do More than ASK for CRACKER BOY COFFEE-See that You
GET IT.
W. T. Lindsay, "The Shoo Fixer," 1226 Franklin.








RINALDI'S GUIDE BOOK


TAILORS
SEMINOLE COFFEE-Try It-You Will Like Tt.
W. M. McCaskill, Phone 3293, 414 Tampa.
A. Fernandez, 1818 15th St.
Seminole Tailoring Co., (38), Phone 2552, 815 Florida Ave.
TELEPHONES
TAMPA BAY COFFEE-Made in Tampa-Always Best.
Peninsular Telephone Co., Zack & Morgan.
TINNERS & TANK BUILDERS
SEMINOLE COFFEE-Buy It Because It's Best.
Ybor City T. & T. Bldrs., W. K. Flinn, Mgr., 2026 7th Ave.
TRIMMING STORE
DRINK TRIUMPH MILL'S CRACKER BOY COFFEE.
WOLFSON'S TRIMMING STORE
E. Wolfson, Prop.

Complete Line of Tailors' Trimmings. Full Assortment of
Dressmakers' Supplies. Buttons Made to Order. We Dye
All Colors in Trimmings to Match Material.

1730 7th Avenue Ybor City
TYPEWRITERS
CRACKER BOY TEA-"The Rich Man's Tea at the Poor Man's
Price."
L. C. Smith & Bros., (26-27), Phone 2440, 309 Zack.
TIRE REPAIRING
CRACKER BOY COFFEE-"The Rich Man's Coffee at the Poor
Man's Price."
Puncture Proof Tire Co., Phone 2051, 202 Polk St.
(See also Automobile Tires.)
UMBRELLA REPAIRING
Manuel Blanco, 1228 7th Ave.
WALL PAPER & PAINTS
S Gulf City Painting & Decorating Co., Phone 3912, 112 Fortune
St.
WATER
Purity Springs Water Co., Phone 2430, Morgan & Carew Sts.
ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS
Sulphur Springs Zoological Gardens, (38), Sulphur Springs,
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