• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Abstract
 Table of Contents
 List of Tables
 Summary
 Introduction
 Economic role of basic industr...
 Input-output analysis
 Multipliers
 Construction of the Broward County...
 The port services sector in the...
 Impact analysis
 Bibliography
 Appendix














Group Title: Economics report - University of Florida Food and Resource Economics Dept. ; 90
Title: Input-output analysis of the Broward County economy with emphasis on the impact and role of the port sector
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 Material Information
Title: Input-output analysis of the Broward County economy with emphasis on the impact and role of the port sector
Series Title: Economics report - University of Florida Food and Resource Economics Dept. ; 90
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Gordon, John R.
Mulkey, David
Goggins, James
Publisher: University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Publication Date: 1980
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Bibliographic ID: UF00027705
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 6946341

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Abstract
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
    List of Tables
        Page iii
    Summary
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Introduction
        Page 6
    Economic role of basic industries
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Input-output analysis
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Multipliers
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Construction of the Broward County input-output model
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    The port services sector in the Broward County economy: results of the input-output model
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Impact analysis
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Bibliography
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Appendix
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
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        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
Full Text
WAay 1980


Economics Report 9


An Input-Output Analysis
of the Broward County Economy


with


Emphasis on the
Role of the Port


Impact and
Sector


ood and Resource Economics Department
agriculturall Experiment Stations
institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
universityy of Florida, Gainesville 32611


John Gordo
David Mulke
James Goggi


I









ABSTRACT


This report presents an input-output analysis for Broward County,
Florida. Particular emphasis is given to analyzing the interrelationships
and role of the Broward County port sector in the county's economy. The
county input-output model is constructed from a national model with port
services as an explicit sector and conventional methods of estimating
county coefficients. Sales, income and employment multipliers are esti-
mated for 34 sectors. The information is discussed in the context of
impact analysis.
Key Words: Input-output analysis, port services sector, Broward
County, regional economics, economic impact analysis.






TABLE OF CONTENTS



ABSTRACT. ... . .. ......

LIST OF TABLES. . . . .

SUMMARY . . . . .

INTRODUCTION. . . . . .

ECONOMIC ROLE OF BASIC INDUSTRIES .. ...

INPUT-OUTPUT ANALYSIS . . . .

Transactions Table .. . .......

Technical Coefficients . . .

Total Requirements . . . .

MULTIPLIERS . . . . .

Output Multipliers . . . .

Income Multipliers . . . .

Employment Multipliers . . .

LIMITING ASSUMPTIONS OF INPUT-OUTPUT ANALYSIS .

CONSTRUCTION OF THE BROWARD COUNTY INPUT-OUTPUT

Sector Delineation . . . .

Sector Employment and Output Totals .. .

Estimation of the Broward County Transaction


Page

. . . i

. . iii






. . . 1

. . 13

. . 14

. . . 1

. . . 1

. . . 1

. . . 1
. . . 15

. . 15

. . . 16

. . . 17

. . . 18

MODEL . .. 20

. . 20

. . 22

Matrix. . 25


THE PORT SERVICES SECTOR IN THE BROWARD COUNTY ECONOMY:
OF THE INPUT-OUTPUT MODEL . . . .

Gross Sales: Direct, Indirect, and Induced Impacts.

Employment and Income: Direct, Indirect and Induced
Impacts . . . .... .

IMPACT ANALYSIS .. . . ..........

BIBLIOGRAPHY .. . . ............

APPENDIX . . . . . .


RESULTS
* .


.29

S29










LIST OF TABLES


Table Page

1. Simplified input-output transactions matrix. . 11

2. Correspondence of sectors with 1970 U.S. port industry model 21

3. Estimates of employment and gross output by sector in Broward
County, 1976. . . .... ... .. 23

4. Broward County location quotients by sector. . . 27

5. Sales of the Broward County port sector to other county
industries, 1976. .... . . .. 31

6. Purchases of the Broward County port sector from other county
industries, 1976. . . . .... 33

7. Total local requirements per dollar of export sales of the
Broward County port sector, 1976. ........... .34

8. Export sales multipliers from the Broward County input-output
model, 1976 . . . . . 36

9. Outputattributable by sector in Broward County, 1976 .. 37

10. Employment multipliers by sector in Broward County, 1976 39

11. Employment attributable by sector in Broward County, 1976. 41

12. Income multipliers by sector in Broward County, 1976 12

13. Value of output per workers and percentage of output sold
to final demand . . . . .. .... 45







AN INPUT-OUTPUT ANALYSIS OF THE BROWARD COUNTY
ECONOMY WITH EMPHASIS ON THE IMPACT
AND ROLE OF THE PORT SECTOR*

John Gordon, David Mulkey and James Goggin

SUMMARY


The purpose of this report is to provide information on the economic

interrelationships of the Broward County economy with particular emphasis

on the role and impact of the port services sector. This objective is

accomplished with the use of a Broward County input-output model and by

examples of model interpretation and impact analyses.

Input-output analysis offers a comprehensive overview of the economic

relationships between sectors of an economy. The model quantifies in

terms of dollars, the sales and purchase relationships between industries

and final consumers and can be used to measure the impact of any one in-

dustry on the entire economy. Multipliers for impact analyses in the

local economy can be measured in terms of value of output, income and

employment.

The national input-output study,completed by the Port Authority of

New York and New Jersey under contract to the Federal Maritime Adminis-

tration of the U.S. Department of Commerce,was used as a basis for this

Broward County Study. The particular national study was utilized as it

contains detailed information on economic transactions of the port sector.



*This study was prepared at the request of and partially funded by
the Broward County Board of County Commissioners, Division of Planning
and Administrative System.

The authors are Associate Professor, Assistant Professor and Graduate
Research Assistant, respectively, Food and Resource Economics Department,
IFAS, Universicy of Florida Gainesville.







Ordinarily, port sector information in an input-output study is not dis-

aggregated from the broad transportation category.

Information in Broward County was developed for 34 sectors. Trans-

actions were updated to 1976 from secondary data sources. As in the U.S.

Department of Commerce study, the port sector was defined as any economic

activity directly needed in the movement of waterborne cargo;

The total direct purchases of supplies and services (inputs) by the

port industry in 1976 came to $112.2 million. Of this amount, $82.7

million in goods and services were purchased from local businesses and

households. Such purchases range from real estate and business services

to maintenance, repair, utilities, meals, fuels, and many other goods

and services. Capital investment in plant and equipment by the port

industry is not included in these figures. Purchases from households

(primarily labor) and from the dummy (miscellaneous)sector were the

largest input purchases by the port sector (Table 6 and Al). Business

services such as promotion, advertising, consulting, legal and accounting

services and dozens of other peripheral business services accounted for

another large expenditure by the port industry. Payments to the financial,

insurance and real estate sector were also substantial.

The port industry's impact upon the rest of the economy affects

a broad front of producers of goods and services. The purchasing

power of the port industry, with its ripple effects extending to many

other industries, is of great importance to many sectors. These ripple

effects are measured with multipliers determined in the input-output

analysis. For each sector, the output or sales multiplier measures the

total gross sales generated locally per dollar of export sales by the






industry in question~ For example, the gross sales multiplier for the

port sector is 2.552 (Table 8). This peans that for each dollar of pro-

duct sold outside the region a total of $2.55 in gross sales is generated

within the region. This figure includes the $1.00 in export sales plus

an additional $1.55 in sales by the support industries (indirect) and

sales generated by the expenditures of employee income earned in the

direct and indirect activities (induced).

The analysis also reveals that the port services sector has the

second highest sales multiplier of any local industry. This indicates

that changes in the level of port services to final users has a larger

impact on local economic activity than would similar changes in most

other industries. The electric and electronic equipment sector has a

slightly higher sales multiplier, 2.60 versus 2.55 for the port services

sector.

I In terms of its total contribution to gross sales in the Broward

County economy, the port services industry in 1976 exported products

valued at more than 53.7 million dollars. /Considering the multiplier

value of 2.55, these exports generated in excess of 135 million dollars

in gross sales in the county.

The port services sector accounts for full-time equivalent employment

of more than 2,000 workers (Table 11). This figure is exceeded by house-

hold, trade, and service sectors which account for the majority of local

employment. However,the port services sector compares favorably to

manufacturing, construction, resource based and other transportation

sectors in the provision of employment.

Another measure of impact of a sector is income. Just as activity

in a given economic sector generates sales or employment in other sectors,







the creation of income in a given sector can be related to income earned

in other sectors. Income multipliers measure this relationship. These

multipliers relate direct earnings within a sector to total earnings

caused by an expansion of that sector,

The port services sector income multiplier is 1.63 (Table 12) which

means an increase in the output of the port services sector large enough

to generate a $1.00 increase in direct income to its employees will gen-

erate an additional $0.63 in local income. The additional income would

include earnings in other businesses which provided goods and services

to the port services industry or its employees.

Economic impact analyses can be conducted by applying the concepts

and multiplier information from the input-output model to specific changes

in the local economy]. Impact analyses address the question of what hap-

pens in the local economy given some initial change.! The initial change

must be described and measured in terms of change on some economic variable

such as value of export (final demand) sales, employment or income

The most straightforward example is an increase in export sales from

the local economy. Remember that export, as used here, means any sale

outside of the local economy. 'The total effect of the increased sale can

be estimated by the use of the multipliers and impacts on individuals

sectors determined by considering the column of interdependence coeffi-

cents for the sector experiencing the initial change in export sales.

Income and employment changes can then be determined by applying the

respective multipliers.

For example, suppose the final (export) sales of the port industry

are expected to expand by $1 million for some reason. Using the gross






output multiplier of 2.55 (Table 8) and the employment multiplier of

.000039613 (Table 10), the total sales and employment impacts can be

estimated as $2,550,000 (1,000,000 x 2.55) and 40 (1,000,000 x .000039613),

respectively. Further, if the direct income earned in the port industry

as a result of the $1 million expansion is known, the income multiplier

(Table 12) can be used to estimate the total impact on local income.

Assuming, for example, that the expansion results in a direct earnings

increase of $400,000 in the port sector, the total increase in regional

income is $652,800 (400,000 x 1.632).

Population growth can be estimated by linking population change to

employment change. In addition, local government fiscal impacts are

often of interest in impact analyses. A first approximation of the fiscal

impact can be estimated by multiplying per capital expenditures for various

local government services by the number of new residents or new population

estimated above. Local government revenues can be estimated in a similar

manner. Of course, it is much more appealing to conduct a study of the

likely effects on the major sources of local government income, e.g. esti-

mate changes in assessed valuation and the resulting effects on real pro-

perty tax revenues.

Impact analysis can branch into measurement of other dimensions of

economic change. But, in general, all economic impact studies are

strengthened if a local input-output analysis is available. Such an

analysis for Broward County is described in this report. It provides a

framework and foundation from which impact analyses of specific economic

changes in the community can proceed.






INTRODUCTION


The purpose of this report is to provide information on the economic

interrelationships of the Broward County economy with particular emphasis

on the role and impact of the port services sector. A Broward County

input-output model was prepared and the results of the model along with

an interpretation of the information in impact analyses are presented.

The economic impact model developed in this study utilizes the New

York and New Jersey Port Authority national study as a starting point and

makes appropriate adjustments to estimate a Broward County input-output

table.1 Initial sections of this report are devoted to a discussion of

the economic role of local industries and a general description of input-

output analysis. Final sections of the report present the input-output

results for Broward County and discuss their usefulness in impact

analysis.


ECONOMIC ROLE OF BASIC INDUSTRIES


All firms and businesses produce for a market. Broadly classified,

product markets may be identified as export and local. The distinction

between these markets is based on geography. Sales of goods and services

which flow out of the study area or local sales to outsiders such as

tourists comprise the export market. Goods and services produced and


1/ In January 1979, Arthur D. Little, Inc. prepared an "Assessment of
Alternative Economic Impact Methodologies" for the Economic Committee of
the Pacific Coast Association of Port Authorities. In this assessment
input-output analysis utilizing the national study completed by the Port
Authority of New York and New Jersey, under contract to the Federal
Maritime Administration, is suggested as a good starting point for ana-
lyzing the economic impact of a port. This particular study is suggested
as an appropriate base because it recognizes the port industry as a
specific sector.






INTRODUCTION


The purpose of this report is to provide information on the economic

interrelationships of the Broward County economy with particular emphasis

on the role and impact of the port services sector. A Broward County

input-output model was prepared and the results of the model along with

an interpretation of the information in impact analyses are presented.

The economic impact model developed in this study utilizes the New

York and New Jersey Port Authority national study as a starting point and

makes appropriate adjustments to estimate a Broward County input-output

table.1 Initial sections of this report are devoted to a discussion of

the economic role of local industries and a general description of input-

output analysis. Final sections of the report present the input-output

results for Broward County and discuss their usefulness in impact

analysis.


ECONOMIC ROLE OF BASIC INDUSTRIES


All firms and businesses produce for a market. Broadly classified,

product markets may be identified as export and local. The distinction

between these markets is based on geography. Sales of goods and services

which flow out of the study area or local sales to outsiders such as

tourists comprise the export market. Goods and services produced and


1/ In January 1979, Arthur D. Little, Inc. prepared an "Assessment of
Alternative Economic Impact Methodologies" for the Economic Committee of
the Pacific Coast Association of Port Authorities. In this assessment
input-output analysis utilizing the national study completed by the Port
Authority of New York and New Jersey, under contract to the Federal
Maritime Administration, is suggested as a good starting point for ana-
lyzing the economic impact of a port. This particular study is suggested
as an appropriate base because it recognizes the port industry as a
specific sector.




-7-
sold within the study area either to be consumed in a final use or used

further in the production process,constitute the local market.

Central to economic base theory is the proposition that the rate and

direction of growth of a region is determined by its function as an ex-

porter to the rest of the world. For example,agriculture is a basic or

export sector in many regional economies. The term "basic" in this sense

is used to indicate a key sector that produces a product which is sold

outside the region. These sales channel outside dollars into the region

and trigger chain reactions of additional economic activity in the region.

First, an "export" or "basic" industry influences economic activity in a

region directly when its product is sold outside the region. Included

in the direct impact are the jobs provided and the income generated in

the industry. For agriculture this would include jobs and wage payments

in all operations from the planting, tilling and harvesting of agricultural

products to the processing., storage and transporting functions.

The direct impacts then produce additional, indirect economic impacts.

These impacts come in the form of goods and services provided to the basic

industry by other businesses in the region. The sale of fertilizers and

chemicals to growers, the sale of machinery and repair services to growers

and processors, and the provision of office supplies and packing materials

are all examples of indirect economic activity which can be attributed to

the basic sales of agricultural products. These additional sales are in-

dicative of additional jobs and income for residents of the region gen-

erated indirectly by the basic industry.

The direct and indirect impacts associated with the production of

an export commodity then result in an additional impact on the regional




-8-

economy. This is labeled "induced" activity and is associated with spend-

ing activities of employees who earn income in jobs provided in either

direct or indirect businesses. The spending of this income translates

into sales in local retail establishments, savings and checking accounts

in local banks, and sales of the myriad of other goods and services

purchased by the modern consumer. Obviously, these additional sales to

employees of the direct and indirect businesses add up to additional jobs

and income in local retail and service industries.

)The total impact of an export industry may be visualized by thinking

of the direct, indirect, and induced impacts |simultaneously. This is best

done by tracing the chain of events which occur subsequent to additional

sales by a local export industry. Suppose that for some reason, the ex-

ternal sales of agricultural products increase and, as a result, production

expands. First, the increase in sales represents new economic activity

and an increase in jobs and income. The dollars generated in new sale

are then spent again to employ additional labor, to purchase the other

inputs (goods and services) necessary to produce the additional output,

and part accrues as income to owners of capital in the region.

A chain reaction of spending is triggered. The additional dollar

of export sales, when respent, generates addiLionalsales in the various

service industries. However, the process does not end here. The service

industries, in order to supply the additional demands by the export in-

dustry, also increase their output. The increase in service industry out-

put entails additional local purchases and output increases as suppliers

to the service industries expand to meet the new conditions. At the same

time, each dollar in additional employee income earned in the direct and





-9-

indirect activities, when spent jocaljy, triggers an additional chain of

spending of its own.

The responding process is not infinite in nature. At each round of

the process some dollars leak out of the local economy in the form of

saving, taxes to the federal government, corporate profits which accrue

to stockholders outside the region, and perhaps most importantly, as pay-

ment for goods and services which are imported from outside the region.

The total responding associated with an additional dollar in export

sales is usually designated the "multiplier" effect. The multiplier for

a particular export industry then is a measure of the total economic ac-

tivity associated with the initial increase in export sales. Obviously,

the size of the multiplier varies with the industry and region in question.

The more complex the industry in terms of its linkages to other industries,

the larger the multiplier. The multiplier effect also works in reverse.

That is, an initial decrease in export sales will trigger a chain of de-

creases in economic activity.

Estimation of the multiplier effect is complicated by the sheer size

and number of transactions involved in the economy of even small regions,

and by the fact that the distinction between export industries and service

industries is seldom clear from casual observation. For example, the port

sector which provides the focus for this study encompasses a variety of

economic activities which enable and facilitate trade. This is a critical

function, but it does not fit neatly into the basic-nonbasic dichotomy.

The measurement task is further complicated by the fact that the goods

and services exchanged between local industries may range from commodities

which are easily measured in physical terms to services which are






impossible to quantify in physical terms. Accordingly, the measurement

tools required for the task are relatively sophisticated. The technique

employed as a basis for this study is known as input-output analysis. A

general discussion of input-output techniques is presented in the following,

section.


INPUT-OUTPUT ANALYSIS2


Input-output analysis offers a comprehensive overview of the economic

relationships between sectors of an economy. Since the objective of this

project includes a need to analyze the interrelationships of the port

sector with the rest of the Broward County economy, input-output (I/O)

analysis was selected.

An input-output model quantifies in terms of dollars the sale and

purchase relationships between industries and final consumers. The I/O

model thus shows the economic interrelationships among industries and

can be used to measure the impact of any one industry on the entire

economy. It also can be used, under certain simulated conditions, to

forecast the effects of major changes that may be made in the interrelated

industries making up the model.

The model consists basically of three phases. Each phase is con-

cerned with the construction of a table from which the multipliers used to

measure the chain reactions of a given sector's operations can be obtained.

First, a transactions table showing the purchases and sales among the

various sectors over a given period of time is constructed. From the



2/ The illustration in this section draws heavily on material in the
U.S. Department of Commerce national port study.




-11-


Table l.--Simplified input-output pransqctions matrix.

(values in million of dollars)



Output Final Total
ut A B C D Demand Sales
Input _________

A 4 9 15 13 11 52


S 8 16 14 12 5 55


C 7 15 6 2 12 42


D 13 5 4 8 25' 55


Value 20 10 3 20
Added

Total
Purchases 52 55 42 55




-12-

transactions table, the table of technical or direct coefficients is

derived. Finally, by making certain assumptions and by mathematically

manipulating the technical coefficients table, a matrix of interdependence

coefficients is determined. This table contains information necessary

for multiplier or impact analysis.


Transactions Table


The first phase of input-output analysis, the transactions table,

shows in dollars the flow of goods and services within an economy over a

one-year period, Table 1 is a simplified illustration of an input-output

transactions matrix. Each industry or sector (A through D) is listed

in the table twice, once on the left as a seller of goods and services

and again at the top as a purchaser of goods and services.

The dollar figure in each cell of the transactions table represents

the total output sold during the year by the industry named on the left

to the industry named on the top. When sales are to final consumers, the

amount is listed under final demand. For example, the horizontal row for

industry A in Table 1 shows that of a total output of $52 million, in-

dustry A sold $4 million to itself (e.g., auto makers must purchase auto

parts for their own use), $9 million to industry B, $15 million to C,

$13 million to D, and finally, industry A sold $11 million in goods and

services to final consumers.

Since sales by one industry amount to purchases by other industries,

each column in a transactions matrix shows the total inputs purchased by

each industry listed at the top from all the sellers named on the left.

The primary input or value added row(s) represents the dollar value of




-13-

wages, salaries, profits, interest, depreciation and taxes contributed

by the industries at the top of the table. Again, using industry A as

an example, column 1 shows that in order to accomplish its production,

industry A purchased inputs of $4 million from itself, $8 million from

industry B, $7 million from C, $13 million from D and $20 million in

wages, salaries, interest, depreciation, taxes and profit.

All the rows and columns in the transactions matrix then represent

the total transactions of the economy in a specific year. The port in-

dustry developed within this frameworkwill have one row and one column.

Thus, the transactions matrix for Broward County will provide a picture

of the port industry as both a purchaser and seller of goods and services

within the county's economy.


Technical Coefficients


The second phase of I/O analysis is the derivation of technical

coefficients for each cell in the transactions table. Technical coef-

ficients are derived by dividing the input of each industry by the total

output for that industry. For example, the technical coefficients for

industry C would be: .36; .33; .14; .09. They were obtained by dividing

each of the values in the C column 15, 14, 6, etc. by the total output

of 42 of Row C.

Each technical coefficient has a significant meaning. It shows the

proportions of each input which must be purchased by the industry named

at the top of the table from each industry named on the left to produce

each dollar of output. For example, each dollar of output by industry

C required about 36 cents of purchases from industry A; 33 cents from




-14-


B; 14 cents from itself; and 9 cents from D. In effect, the complete

table of technical coefficients reflects the technical composition of

production in the economy in terms of inputs required in the production

and trade processes.


Total Requirements


The third phase in constructing an I/O model is the derivation of

a table of total requirements. This table provides the basis for obtain-

ing multipliers for computing the total impact of any industry on the

economy. The table of technical coefficients provides the starting point

for this process. Each column in this table is a linear equation reflect-

ing the production function for the industry represented by that column.

That is, it shows the input requirements for expanding that sector's output

by one unit. The full set of equations may be solved mathematically to

obtain the output level necessary for each row industry (seller) to meet

its final demand sales plus its intermediate sales to other sectors.

The solution above results in the total requriements table. Each

element represents the output required from the industry on the left in

order for the industry at the top of the table to deliver one unit of

sales to final demand. Again, the measurements are in dollars and capture

not only initial changes in output in response to a change in demand, but

also total effect of the chain reaction throughout the economy.

The elements in the total requirements table then capture the direct,

indirect, and induced impacts discussed earlier. Further, the sum of all

the elements in a particular column shows the total impact on the local

economy when the industry listed at the top of that column increases sales




-15-


to final demand by one unit. These sums are the sectoral multipliers

discussed below.


MULTIPLIERS


The I/O model's ability to generate multipliers is one of its most

important properties. Multipliers are used to measure the direct, in-

direct and induced effects of particular economic changes. For example,

the multipliers can be used to measure the ripple effect of a change in

final demand of the port industry on the entire economy or on individual

industries which are related to the port industry. Obviously, the

sectoral multipliers differ substantially from one industry to another

depending on the complexity of the chain relationships initiated in the

production process of each industry. The larger the multiplier for a

given industry, the larger the percentage of the required inputs which

come from local sources.

Once the matrix of interdependence coefficients and the matrix of

direct technical coefficients are completed, the data necessary for the

calculation of output, income, and employment multipliers are available.

All three multipliers measure repercussions in the local economy due to

changes in output, but as they differ conceptually they shall be discussed

separately below.


Output Multipliers


The output multiplier for a sector measures the sum of the direct

and indirect requirements from all sectors due to a dollar change in the

given sector's final demand. As the total requirements table shows the




-16-

output required from all other sectors when final demand changes by a

dollar in a given sector, the sum of the coefficients in that sector's

column equals the sector's output multiplier. For example, if the output

multiplier for a sector is 2.41, then for every dollar change in final

demand, an additional $1.41 worth of economic activity is generated in

the region. The $2.41 includes the $1.00 of new final demand as well as

the $1.41 of additional economic activity generated.


Income Multipliers


Input-output models allow the calculation of income multipliers.3

A sector's income multiplier measures the total change in household income

resulting from a dollar change in direct income. Each dollar the sector

pays households produces not only a direct change in income but indirect

and induced changes as well. This means that due to the direct change in

income, the level of expenditures of the households will change. This

change in expenditures leads to indirect income changes as the producing

sectors make output adjustments to fulfill the direct and indirect re-

quirements of a change in deliveries to final demand. Induced changes

in household income result from changes in household purchases of locally

produced goods and services.


3/ Income multipliers can be calculated with the household sector ex-
cluded from the transactions matrix (Type I multipliers) or with the
household sector included in the transactions matrix (Type II multipliers).
The income multipliers in this study are Type II as they are calculated
from an input-output table which includes households as a sector in the
transaction matrix. Households are simply treated like any other sector.
They purchase inputs (consumption) and sell outputs (labor services).
Treating households in this manner allows the I/O model to capture economic(
impacts (induced effects) associated with the spending activity of con-
sumers.




-17-

Income multipliers are calculated by dividing each element in the

household row of the total requirements matrix by the corresponding ele-

ment in the household row of the matrix of direct technical coefficients.

This means a sector's income multiplier is calculated by dividing the

direct, indirect, and induced changes in income per dollar change in

sector output by only the direct effects on income due to a dollar change

in output.

Income multipliers should be interpreted with caution for, though

they are tied to changes in output, they really reflect the impact of

changes in income. For example, suppose a dollar change in output of a

sector generates 95 cents worth of direct, indirect, and induced payments

to household, but of that 95 cents, 90 cents is a direct payment. In

this case, the income multiplier will be relatively low because 95 divided

by 90 equals only 1.06. In comparison, if there is a sector whose dollar

change in output generates 23 cents in total payments to households, but

of that 23 cents, only 4 cents are direct payments, te income multiplier

for the second sector (5.75) will be higher than that for the first.

LThis indicates the second sector has strong structural ties with the

other local sectors, so a change in its output affects the income of em-

ployees in many parts of the local economy.


Employment Multipliers i


/The employment multiplier for a sector estimates the effect on re-

gional employment of a change in final demand for that sector's outputs

hen the final demand for that sector's output changes there are direct,

indirect and induced employment changes. Direct changes result as the




-18-

sector makes production adjustments to satisfy final demand. Indirect

employment changes result as all sectors make output adjustments to

support the change in deliveries to final demand. Induced employment

changes ensue from the inter-industry response to the change in local

household spending.

Employment multipliers may be calculated using an input-output

table with the first step being division of a sector's employment by

the total gross output of that sector. The resulting value is a direct

employment ratio which indicates the employment directly required per

dollar change of final demand. A direct employment ratio of 0.000056

means 0.000056 of a worker is directly required per dollar change in

final demand, or 56 workers are directly required for a change in final

demand of a million dollars.

The total effect on employment of a change in final demand is the

sum of the direct,:indirect, and induced employment effects. To estimate

the total effect,.each row in the table of interdependence coefficients

is multiplied by the direct employment ratio for the respective sector.

The sum of the values in the resulting corresponding column equals the

sector's employment multiplier. [As an example, a value of 0.000077 for

the employment multiplier indicates that when final demand changes by a

million dollars, the sector generates employment for 77 people in the

regional economy,


LIMITING ASSUMPTIONS OF INPUT-OUTPUT ANALYSIS


The input-output framework and the calculation of sectoral multi-

pliers have been discussed. Input-output analysis clearly provides a





-19-

wealth of information concerning the transactions and relationships

between an economy's sectors. However, as it is important to bear in

mind the technique's limitations, a brief review of the major assumptions

of input-output analysis follows.

In substance, the input-output production function has two basic

characteristics. The first is that it has constant returns to scale,

which means a proportional change in all inputs leads to the same pro-

portional change in output. Applied to the study region, this says a

sector may increase or decrease in size but to change output by some

proportion it must change all its inputs by the same proportion. In

effect, this rules out economies and diseconomies of scale.

The second basic characteristic of the input-output production

function is that inputs are combined in fixed proportions and substi-

tution of one input for another is not allowed. The proportions or

combinations are given by the direct technical coefficients described

earlier and are assumed to remain constant despite changes in relative

prices and output levels. In effect, this fixed input ratio freezes

the state of technology for the period of analysis.

A final major assumption of I/O which bears repeating is that a

commodity is considered to be supplied by only one sector and that it

is the only product of that sector. This, of course, does not correspond

closely with reality but the purpose of the assumption is to allow clear

delineation of sectors and their transactions. Thus, when sectors are

aggregated for manageability they should at least have similar input

structures.

On the positive side, input-output models are empirically




-20-


implementable and indicate the interrelationships among sectors. They

are especially helpful for analyzing general equilibrium systems for they

show the effect of changes in the final demand of one sector on the output

of another. However, the results must be interpreted with full knowledge

of the set of assumptions underlying the analysis.


CONSTRUCTION OF THE BROWARD COUNTY
INPUT-OUTPUT MODEL


The purpose of this section is to present a description of the

specific assumptions and procedures utilized to formulate an input-output

model of Broward County based on the national input-output study completed

by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey under contract to the

Federal Maritime Administration of the U.S. Department of Commerce.


Sector Delineation


The first step in the process of developing an input-output study

is the division of the local economy into components or sectors. For

example, port services constitute one sector, ship and boat building an-

other, etc., until each economic activity in the region is included as

part of a particular sector. The object of the process is to group to-

gether those firms which produce similar products.

The national matrix used as a basis for this study contained 86

separate economic sectors and was estimated for 1970. For the Broward

County study the magnitude of the transactions were first updated using

estimates of national output and employment gathered from secondary

sources for 1976. As illustrated in Table 2, the updated national matrix

was then aggregated to form a 34 sector national matrix. This matrix





-21-


Table 2.--Correspondence of sectors with 1970 U.S. port industry model.




Broward Corresponding
County Sector Name 1970 U.S.
Sector Name
Sector Port Study
Number Sector Number


Livestock and livestock products
Other agricultural products
Forestry and fishery products
Ag., forestry and fishery services
Mining
Construction
Ordinance and accessories
Food and kindred products
Textiles and apparel
Lumber and wood products
Furniture and fixtures
Paper products
Printing and publishing
Chemical products
Rubber and plastic products
Glass, stone and clay products
Primary metal industries
Fabricated metal products
Nonelectric machinery
Electric and electronic equipment
Aircraft and motor vehicles
Ship and boat building
Instruments and related products
Other manufacturing
Port services
Other transportation services
Communication
Electric, gas and sanitary services
Wholesale and retail trade
Finance, insurance and real estate
Services
Government enterprises
Dummy
Households


1
2
3
4
5-10
11,12
13
14
16-19
20-21
22-23
24-25
26
27-30
32
35-36
37-38
39-42
43-52
53-58
59,60,61C
61A,61B
62,63
15,31,33,34,64
65A
65B
66,67
68
69
70,71
72-77
78,79
80A,O8B,81-83
Personal Consumption


;" '




-22-

was then used as a basis for the Broward County study. Households were

included as a sector in the national matrix, and as in the U.S. Department

of Commerce study, the port sector was defined as any economic activity

directly needed in the movement of waterborne cargo.


Sector Employment and Output Totals


Once the sector delineation was accomplished, data were collected

on Broward County employment and output totals for each of the thirty-

four sectors in the input-output table. These estimates for Broward

County are reported in Table 3.

For all sectors, except 1 and 2, the employment per county sector

in 1976 was gathered from the 1976 County Business Patterns. For the

agricultural sectors (sectors 1 and 2) comparable employment data are

not readily available and must be estimated. It is important to note

that the employment estimates for these two sectors are estimates of

full-time equivalent employment rather than the actual numbers of people

employed. Such estimates are made necessary by the seasonal and part-

time nature of agricultural employment and by the fact that much owner-

operator labor must be counted as employment.

The output estimates are generally more straightforward. For most

sectors, these data measure the value of sales expressed in dollars at

producers' prices. Exceptions are the trade and transportation sectors,

including the port sector, where output is a measure of gross margins as

opposed to total sales. Another exception is the household (consumer)

sector where gross output is a measure of total personal income.

Output estimates for the national sectors in the I/O model were




-23-


Table 3.--Estimates of employment and
county, 1976.


gross output by sector in Broward


Sector Employment* Gross Output
(dollars)


Livestock and Livestock Products
Other Agricultural Products
Forestry and Fishery Products
Ag, Forestry, Fishery Serv.
Mining
Construction
Ordinance and accessories
Food & Kindred Products
Textiles & Apparel
Lumber & Wood Products
Furniture & Fixtures
Paper Products
Printing & Publishing
Chemical Products
Rubber & Plastic Products
Glass, Stone & Clay Products
Primary Metal Industries
Fabricated Metal Products
Nonelectric Machinery
Electric & Electronic Equipment
Aircraft and Motor Vehicles
Ship and Boat Building
Instruments & Related Products
Other Mfg.
Port Services
Other Transportation Services
Communication
Electric, Gas & Sanitary Serv.
Wholesale & Retail Trade
Finance & Insurance
Services
Government Enterprises
Dummy
Households


Totals


335
975
3
1,170
209
1,111
0
632
1,368
565
605
38
3,538
441
721
925
186
2,200
5,274
6,628
978
1,099
1,069
719
2,346
2,645
6,473
1,295
54,920
22,009
87,155
2,313
100***
100***


210,045


10,965,628
23,593,850
40,457
39,748,936
18,231,619
71,961,054
0
66,440,146
47,872,925
27,462,017
20,048,386
2,259,898
127,938,157
36,937,719
30,188,307
43,520,007
12,941,392
98,909,998
221,738,985
276,507,733
75,715,538
85,083,756
41,264,561
.61,588.,59961
L121187,3_88
126,489,014
303,821,052
143,981,176
1,287,716,320
1,744,668,561
2,156,812,869
125,968,673
836,897,280
5,987,000,000**

13,429,604,713


*Data for the agricultural sectors represent full-time equivalent
employment estimated using national data on manpower requirements and
output for the agricultural sectors. Non-agricultural sector employment
estimates are from the 1976 Countv Business Patterns.
&**Output for the household sector reflects total personal income
from all sources."
***Employment is an artificial value designed to yield a location
quotient greater than unity.




-24-

taken from secondary sources. It was assumed that the productivity per

worker for each sector was the same at the county level as it was at the

national level, and the following was used to estimate county output for

a given sector:

(a) 1976 County Output = 1976 National Output
1976 County Employment 1976 National Employment

(b) 1976 National
1976 County Output Output X 1976 County Employment
1976 National
Employment

In sectors 1 and 2, output values were available from secondary

sources and the preceding ratios were used to calculate sectoral employ-

ment. For the consumer sector, the value of total personal income was

available from published sources at the county level.

The estimates of output and employment, by sector, for Broward

County are presented in Table 3. These estimates provide a view of the

relative importance of each sector within the local economy. Trade,

services, and financial sectors provide over 78 percent of the county's

employment and 43 percent of the value of output.

iThe port services sector employs approximately 2,346 workers and is

estimated to produce output valued in excess of 112 million dollars

However, data in Table 3 represent only a measure of total direct impact;

and as indicated earlier, this is only the beginning of the impact which

the port sector has on the local economy. Following sections discuss

and present the results of several measures of the additional impact of

the port sector on the local economy.




-25-


Estimation of the Broward County
Transactions Matrix


The Broward County transactions matrix or table provides a picture

of the interactions between various local sectors. Since local purchases

by a given sector must amount to sales by some other local sector, the

completed table shows what each local sector purchased from every other

local sector; or alternatively, what each local sector sold to every

other local sector. This information allows the flow of dollars to be

traced through the local economy. The total importance of a given

sector can be assessed along with the multiplier effect of any expansion

or contraction in its level of activity. Construction of the transactions

table is critical to the analysis.

Data from the U.S. Department of Commerce national port study plus

the value of output and employment data by sector were utilized in a

computer model which simulates a regional (county) transactions matrix

based on national I/O coefficients. The computer model uses the Schaffer-

Chu location-quotient approach for adjusting national technical coeffi-

cients to regional or subregional economies.

Required for the location-quotient approach are a national trans-

actions matrix, output and employment totals by sector in the national

matrix, and output and employment totals for each sector of the region

of study. As noted, the national transactions matrix chosen was the port

industry model developed and published in August 1978 by the Maritime

Administration of the U.S. Department of Commerce. This matrix (87 x 87)

is the first analysis of the nation's port industry. The base year of

this study is 1970.




-26-

The first step in estimating the county transactions matrix is the

calculation of location quotients. A location quotient (LQ) indicates

how county employment in a particular sector compares to national em-

ployment in the same sector. If a county has a larger percentage of

its labor force employed in a sector than does the nation, it is con-

sidered more specialized in that sector than in the nation. The formula

for calculation for Sector i is:

County Employment Total County
(c) Location-quotient in Sector i Employment
for Sector i National Employment Total National
in Sector i Employment


The location-quotient approach assumes that a LQ of less than one

for a sector implies the sector does not produce enough output to satisfy

the county's needs. Conversely, if the LQ is greater than or equal to

one, it is implied that the county's economy is self-sufficient in the

inputs provided by that sector. These assumptions allow the adjustment

of the national coefficients to account for differences in output and

employment patterns between the county and the nation.

When the location-quotient for a county's sector was greater than

one it was set equal to one in the computer simulation model. A LQ

which was less than one was left unchanged, and this was seen as the

proportion of the county's requirements for the sector's inputs that

was actually available in the region. Thus, for each of the 34 sectors

there was a LQ value which fell within the range of zero to one (Table 4).

The LQ values were used in association with the national matrix to con-

struct a transactions matrix for Broward County.

To create an initial county matrix representing imports plus local




-27-


Table 4.--Broward county location quotients by sector.



Sector Location Quotients

1 Livestock and Livestock Products 0.06436
2. Other Agricultural Products 0.11260
3 Forestry and Fishery Products 0.00447
4 Ag., Forestry, Fishery Serv. 1.00000
5 Mining 0.08850
6 Construction 0.10684
7 Ordnance & Accessories 0.00000
8 Food and Kindred Products 0.12939
9 Textiles & Apparel 0.18766
10 Lumber & Wood Products 0.28893
11 Furniture & Fixtures 0.42102
12 Paper Products 0.01871
13 Printing & Publishing 0.99036
14 Chemical Products 0.15596
15 Rubber & Plastic Products 0.33671
16 Glass, Stone & Clay Products 0.48265
17 Primary Metal Industries 0.04932
18 Fabricated Metal Products 0.50079
19 Nonelectric Machinery 0.80245
20 Electric & Electronic Equipment 1.00000
21 Aircraft and Motor Vehicles 0.19309
22 Ship and Boat Building 1.00000
23 Instruments & Related Products 0.70559
24 Other Mfg. 0.24352
25 Port Services 1.00000
26 Other Transportation Services 0.53521
27 Communication 1.00000
28 Electric, Gas & Sanitary Serv. 0.61990
29 Wholesale & Retail Trade 1.00000
30 Finance & Insurance 1.00000
31 Services 1.00000
32 Government Enterprises 1.00000
33 Dummy 1.00000
34 Households 1.00000





-28-

transactions, the column entries for each endogenous sector in the ag-

gregated and updated national transactions matrix were first divided by the

corresponding national sector outputs to derive the national technical

coefficients. These coefficients are then multiplied by the corresponding

county sector output totals to create the total requirements matrix for

the county. The total requirements were then scaled downward using the

V location quotients and the assumptions above concerning regional special-

ization.

The result of the location-quotient procedure is a 34 x 34 trans-

actions matrix for Broward County. Obviously, there are some problems

with this approach. Using national coefficients makes a very strict

assumption with regards to the homogeneity of production input. Specifi-

cally, using national coefficients implies the marginal product of factor

inputs is equal across all regions, which means a unit of labor in New

York is exactly as productive as a unit of labor in West Virginia.

However, in actuality, factor inputs are not homogeneous across the nation,

In addition, the procedure assumes that the mix of inputs required to

produce a given sector's output is the same in the region as in the nation

Similarly, when households and their demands are placed inside the

transactions matrix and national coefficients are used in calculation,

the assumption is made that demand for goods and services is the same

across all regions. Also, the procedure fails to account for the cross-

hauling of products between regions. This means that if a given product

is produced in the region and required in the region, the LQ approach

assumes that the product is purchased in the region within the assumption

that the magnitude of the LQ, when less than unity, dictates the percentage





-29-

of the inputs required from a sector which are purchased locally.

Estimates of transactions prepared using the LQ approach then are

subject to limitations imposed by a very strict set of assumptions. Hence,

they must be viewed as approximations and interpreted with some caution.

Recognizing these limitations, however, the use of LQ analysis is war-

ranted by its simplicity, its availability, and the insights it offers

into the workings of the local economy.


THE PORT SERVICES SECTOR
IN THE BROWARD COUNTY ECONOMY:
RESULTS OF THE INPUT-OUTPUT MODEL


Gross Sales: Direct, Indirect, and Induced Impacts


[The port industry's economic interactions with the rest of the local

economy are demonstrated by the sales of port services (output) to all

other industries and by purchases of products and services (input) neces-

sary to provide port services.

As noted in Table 3, the port industry in Broward County grossed an

estimated $112 million in revenues from the sales of its services in

1976. In the input-output model, sales of the port services industry

are read across row 25 of Table Al.

Since the port services sector is a transportation sector and since

transportation sectors are margin sectors in national input-output studies,

the figures in row 25 of Table Al do not indicate actual transactions be-

tween the port sector and other sectors receiving port services. Rather,

the figures indicate the costs associated with moving the product of the

various sectors through the port; thus they represent only the port ser-

vice cost not the total value of the product.





-30-

Sales of port services were delineated into two major categories--

intermediate and final sales. Intermediate sales are port services pur-

chased by other industries in the county for the movement of goods de-

stined for further processing by the buyer. They represented about 53

percent of the port industry's direct output in 1976. Final sales of

port services--those purchased for movement of cargo to final markets

such as exports--represented 47 percent of the sector's direct output.

The intermediate sales of the county's port industry in 1976 amounted

to $59.5 million. This was the revenue from sales to a large number of

varied users (Tables 5 and Al). Practically all sectors have some de-

pendence upon the services of the port. The household sector, as defined

in this study, was a major user of port services. Other sectors utilizing

port services relatively more than other industries included industries

such as the iron and steel, lumber, rubber and chemical, as well as the

oil refining and food processing industries.

Another major consumer of port services was the port industry itself

(businesses within the port sector utilizing the services of the businesses

within the port sector). A total of $7.3 million was paid during 1976 for

such services. Other sectors utilizing port services relatively more thar

other industries included electric and electronic equipment, services,

mining, nonelectric machinery, and government enterprises. Sales to final

demand users totaled $52.7 million.

The total direct purchases of supplies and services (inputs) by the

port industry in 1976 came to $112.2 million. Of this amount, $82.7 mil-

lion in goods and services were purchased from local businesses and house-

holds. Such purchases range from real estate and business services to




-31-


Table 5.--Sales of the Broward county port sector to other county
industries, 1976.



Broward
County
Sector Sector Name Sales
Number (dollars)


Livestock and livestock products
Other agricultural products
Forestry and fishery products
Ag., forestry and fishery services
Mining
Construction
Ordnance and accessories
Food and kindred products
Textiles and apparel
Lumber and wood products
Furniture and fixtures
Paper products
Printing and publishing
Chemical products
Rubber and plastic products
Glass, stone and clay products
Primary metal industries
Fabricated metal products
Nonelectric machinery
Electric and electronic equipment
Aircraft and motor vehicles
Ship and boat building
Instruments and related products
Other manufacturing
Port services
Other transportation services
Communication
Electric, gas and sanitary services
Wholesale and retail trade
Finance, insurance and real estate
Services
Government enterprises
Dummy
Households


24,105
.133,133
788
15,014
653,555
144,507
0
473,757
334,564
443,556
50,821
17,083
119,545
242,811
414,780
358,521
251,726
392,149
861,831
1,432,971
174,505
27,855
159,424
939,145
7,347,807
154,057
66,764
253,262
681,487
638,053
1,193,220
743,814
3,882,920
36,823,293




-32-

maintenance, repair, utilities, meals, fuels, and many other goods and

services. Capital investment in plant and equipment by the port industry)

is not included in these figures. Purchases from households (primarily

labor) and from the dummy (miscellaneous) sector were the largest input

purchases by the port sector (Table 6 and Al). Business services such as

promotion, advertising, consulting, legal and accounting services and

dozens of other peripheral business services accounted for another large

expenditure by the port industry. Payments to the financial, insurance

and real estate sector were also substantial.

Table A2 reports local purchase coefficients for each of the thirty-

four sectors in the study. For any sector, these coefficients are inter-

preted as the value of local purchases required to produce one dollar of

that sector's output. The direct coefficients were then used to estimate

the total (direct, indirect, and induced) output necessary from each loca:

sector to support a dollar's worth of export sales by a given sector. Thi

total requirements coefficients are reported in Tables 7 and A3.

The total requirements coefficients show the total value of output

required from the various sectors if the sector at the top of the column

increases its output to a final user by $1.00. The ranking suppliers of

the port industry, in terms of total requirements, closely parallel the

port industry's leading direct suppliers which were discussed earlier.

The port industry's impact upon the rest of the economy affects a

broad front of producers of goods and services. The purchasing power

of the port industry, with its ripple effects extending to many other

industries, is of great importance to many sectors.

The total requirements coefficients were used to estimate multiplier




-33-


Table 6.--Purchases of the Broward
industries, 1976.


county port sector from other county


Broward
County
Sector Sector Name Purchases
Number (dollars)


Livestock and livestock products
Other agricultural products
Forestry and fishery products
Ag., forestry and fishery products
Mining
Construction
Ordnance and accessories
Food and kindred products
Textiles and apparel
Lumber and wood products
Furniture and fixtures
Paper products
Printing and publishing
Chemical products
Rubber and plastic products
Glass, stone and clay products
Primary metal industries
Fabricated metal products
Nonelectric machinery
Electric and electronic equipment
Aircraft and motor vehicles
Ship and boat building
Instruments and related products
Other manufacturing
Port services
Other transportation services
Communication
Electric, gas and sanitary services
Wholesale and retail trade
Finance, insurance and real estate
Services
Government enterprises
Dummy
Households


0
2,977
0
74,933
0
161,451
0
46,678
95,194
33,096
13,853
8,985
103,760
90,702
140,929
112,699
44,328
564,822
615,152
374,663
62,950
1,582,401
279,778
349,370
7,347,807
853,913
253,785
267,420
705,248
5,381,927
5,677,250
2,362,582
14,796,993
40,335,800




-34-


Table 7.--Total local requirements per dollar of export sales of the
Broward county port sector, 1976.



Broward
County
Sector Sector Name Total
Number Requirements

1 Livestock and livestock products 0.0004
2 Other agricultural products 0.0010
3 Forestry and fishery products 0.0000
4 Ag., forestry and fishery services 0.0013
5 Mining 0.0000
6 Construction 0.0036
7 Ordnance and accessories 0.0000
8 Food and kindred products 0.0085
9 Textiles and apparel 0.0057
10 Lumber and wood products 0.0008
11 Furniture and fixtures 0,0021
12 Paper products 0.0004
13 Printing and publishing 0.0198
14 Chemical products 0.0037
15 Rubber and plastic products 0.0037
16 Glass, stone and clay products 0.0025
17 Primary metal industries 0.0011
18 Fabricated metal products 0,0116
19 Nonelectric machinery 0.0152
20 Electric and electronic equipment 0.0242
21 Aircraft and motor vehicles 0.0049
22 Ship and boat building 0.0160
23 Instruments and related products 0.0079
24 Other manufacturing 0.0102
25 Port services 1.0761
26 Other transportation services 0.0302
27 Communication 0.0321
28 Electric, gas and sanitary services 0.0171
29 Wholesale and retail trade 0.0233
30 Finance, insurance and real estate 0.2157
31 Services 0.2048
32 Government enterprises 0.0345
33 Dummy 0.1866
34 Households 0.5868
Total 2.5517





-35-

for each local industry. Table 8 presents the output or sales multipliers

for each of the thirty-four sectors included in this study. For each

sector, the multiplier measures the total gross sales generated locally

per dollar of export sales by the industry in question. For example, the

gross sales multiplier for the port sector is 2.552. This means that for

each dollar of product sold outside the region,a total of $2.55 in gross

sales is generated within the region. This figure includes the $1.00 in

export sales plus an additional $1.55 in sales by the support industries

(indirect) and sales generated by the expenditures of employee income

earned in the direct and indirect activities (induced).

The port services sector has the second highest sales multiplier of

any local industry (Table 8). This indicates that changes in the level

of port services to final users has a larger impact on local economic

activity than would similar changes in most other industries The elec-

tric and electronic equipment sector has a slightly higher sales multiplier,

2.60 versus 2.55 for the port services sector.

Sales multipliers (Table 8) may also be used to assess the total

impact on local sales of any change in export activity (increase or

decrease). Also, these values may be used in conjunction with estimates

of sector exports to provide insight into the workings of the local

economy. In essence, the multiplier is used to assign all local output

to the appropriate export sector (export in this sense means only sales

outside the region). Column 1, table 9, gives the estimate of gross sales

attributable to each export sector (total gross sales are the same as

total gross output) and column 2 indicates the percentage of gross output

which is attributable to each sector.




-36-


Table 8.--Export sales multipliers from the Broward county input-output
model, 1976.



Broward
County Export Sales
Sector Sector Name Multiplier
Number

1 Livestock and livestock products 1.421406
2 Other agricultural products 1.789560
3 Forestry and fishery products 1.924261
4 Ag., forestry, fishery services 1.757533
5 Mining 2.321102
6 Construction 2.466364
7 Ordnance and accessories 1.000000
8 Food and kindred products 1.735637
9 Textiles and apparel 1.930560
10 Lumber and wood products 2.065290
11 Furniture and fixtures 2.193535
12 Paper products 1.974915
13 Printing and publishing 2.284639
14 Chemical products 1.972887
15 Rubber and plastic products 2.083088
16 Glass, stone and clay products 2.195469
17 Primary metal industries 2.052803
18 Fabricated metal products 2.052183
19 Nonelectric machinery 2.495315
20 Electric and electronic equipment 2.606376
21 Aircraft and motor vehicles 2.263923
22 Ship and boat building 2.496116
23 Instruments and related products 2.354238
24 Other manufacturing 1.763951
25 Port services 2.5516681
26 Other transportation services 2.305373
27 Communication 2.080973
28 Electric, gas and sanitary services 1.911961
29 ,Wholesale and retail trade 2.337906
30 Finance, insurance and real estate 1.765435
31 Services 2.332487
32 Government enterprises 2.421640
33 Dummy 1.867277
34 Households 2.071960





-37-


Table 9.--Output attributable by sector in Broward county, 1976.



Broward
County Sector Name Output Percent of
Sector Attributable Total
Number


Livestock and livestock products 10,363,779
Other agricultural products 25,929,583
Forestry and fishery products 0
Ag., forestry, fishery services 58,170,112
Mining 41,594,784
Construction 138,092,012
Ordnance and accessories 0
Food and kindred products 0
Textiles and apparel 0
Lumber and wood products 42,511,043
Furniture and fixtures 0
Paper products 588,111
Printing and publishing 0
Chemical products 18,270,102
Rubber and plastic products 12,809,718
Glass, stone and clay products 58,323,857
Primary metal industries 14,336,155
Fabricated metal products 86,933,782
Nonelectric machinery 325,290,428
Electric and electronic equipment 185,597,972
Aircraft and motor vehicles 72,327,677
Ship and boat building 189,702,471
Instruments and related products 2,098,555
Other manufacturing 0
Port services 134,566,167
Other transportation services 0
Communication 0
Electric, gas and sanitary serve 0
Wholesale and retail trade 2,599,796,773
Finance, insurance& real estate 111,482,381
Services 1,628,712,619
Government enterprises 8,536,471
Dummy 819,956,503
Households 7,680,509,681


Gross Output (Total)


0.0726
0.1818
0.0000
0.4077
0.2916
0.9679
0.0
0.0000
0.0
0.2980
0.0000
0.0041
0.0000
0.1281
0.0898
0.4088
0.1005
0.6094
2.2801
1.3009
0.5070
1.3297
0.0147
0.0000
0.9432
0.0000
0.0000
0.0000
18.2231
0.7814
11.4163
0.0598
5.7474
53.8360

100.0000


14,266,500,737




-38-

An assessment of the relative importance of the port sector in terms

of its total contribution to gross sales in the Broward County economy

can be determined from Table 9. In this respect, the port services in-

dustry in 19761exported products valued at more than 52.7 million dollars

Considering the multiplier value of 2.55 reported earlier, these exports

generate in excess of 135 million dollars in gross sales in the county.

The contribution of the port services sector is exceeded by several

sectors. Recall that the port services, transportation and trade sectors

are margin sectors. Thus,output values are not strictly comparable be-

tween sectors. Household exports consist of income not earned from a

local business. As such, they consist primarily of transfer payments to

retirees and earnings by federal, state, and local government employees

in the area. Other relatively large local sectors include the services,

trade, and dummy (miscellaneous) sectors. The relatively large service

and trade sectors reflect the importance of the tourist industry.


Employment and Income: Direct, Indirect and
Induced Impacts


The previous section used gross sales as a measure of the total

impact of the port services industry on the economy of Broward County.

This section reports results of a similar nature using the alternative

measures of economic activity of employment and income. The initial

estimates of employment and output were used in conjunction with the

total requirements table to calculate employment multipliers for each

sector in the local economy (Table 10). These multipliers relate

changes in total employment to changes in the level of exports for a

given sector. The multipliers were also used to assign regional




-39-


Table 10,--Employment multipliers by sector in Broward county, 1976.



Broward
County Sector Name Employment
Number Multiplier
Number


Livestock and livestock products
Other agricultural products
Forestry and fishery products
Ag., forestry, fishery services
Mining
Construction
Ordnance and accessories
Food and kindred products
Textiles and apparel
Lumber and wood products
Furniture and fixtures
Paper products
Printing and publishing
Chemical products
Rubber and plastic products
Glass, stone and clay products
Primary metal industries
Fabricated metal industries
Nonelectric machinery
Electric and electronic equipment
Aircraft and motor vehicles
Ship and boat building
Instruments and related products
Other manufacturing
Port services
Other transportation services
Communication
Electric, gas and sanitary services
Wholesale and retail trade
Finance, insurance and real estate
Services
Government enterprises
Dummy
Households


0.000038720
0.000055059
0.000084849
0.000038175
0.000026641
0.000036700
0.000019591
0.000020770
0.000041290
0.000034518
0.000046199
0.000029258
0.000044575
0.000026350
0.000037844
0.000036448
0.000027424
0.000035744
0.000044987
0.000046756
0.000030299
0.000032902
0.000045071
0.000022195
0.000039613
0.000037170
0.000035582
0.000020361
0.000059289
0.000023494
0.000058306
0.000034310
0.000015637
0.000019233




-40-


employment to each of the export sectors in a process similar to the one

reported earlier for gross sales. The results of these calculations are

reported in Table 11 as employment attributable.

As noted in Table 11, the port services sector accounts for fulltime

equivalent employment of 2,089. This figure is exceeded by household,

trade, and service sectors which account for the majority of local em-

ployment.\ However,,the port services sector compares favorably to man-

ufacturing, construction, resource based and other transportation sectors

in the provision of employment.

Another measure of the indirect and induced impact of a sector is

income. Just as activity in a given economic sector generates sales or

employment in other sectors, the creation of income in a given sector

can be related to income earned in other sectors. Income multipliers

which measure this relationship for local sectors are reported in Table

12. These multipliers related direct earnings within a sector to total

earnings caused by an expansion of that sector This relationship leads

to a different interpretation than the one used for the multipliers re-

ported earlier where total changes were related directly to changes in

export activity.

The port services sector multiplier may be used as an example for

interpretation of the income multiplier. This multiplier is 1.63 which

means an increase in the output of the port services sector large enough

to generate a $1.00 increase in direct income to its employees will gen-

erate and additional $0.63 in local income. The additional income would

include earnings in other businesses which provide goods and services to

the port services industry or its employees. In interpreting the income




-41-


Table ll.--Employment attributable by sector in Broward county, 1976.



Broward
County Sector Name Employment Percent of
Sector
Sector Attributable Total
Number


Livestock and livestock products
Other agricultural products
Forestry and fishery products
Ag., forestry, fishery services
Mining
Construction
Ordnance and accessories
Food and kindred products
Textiles and apparel
Lumber and wood products
Furniture and fixtures
Paper products
Printing and publishing
Chemical products
Rubber and plastic products
Glass, stone and clay products
Primary metal industries
Fabricated metal products
Nonelectric machinery
Electric and electronic equipment
Aircraft and motor vehicles
Ship and boat building
Instruments and related products
Other manufacturing
Port services
Other transportation services
Communication
Electric, gas and sanitary services
Wholesale and retail trade
Finance, insurance and real estate
Services
Government enterprises
Dummy
Households


Total Employment


282.3
797.8
0.0
1263.5
477.4
2054.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
710.5
0.0
8.7
0.0
244.0
232.7
968.3
191.5
1514.2
5364.6
3329.4
968.0
2500.5
40.2
0.0
2089.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
65,931.1
1483.6
40,713.3
120.9
6866.5
71,292.8

209,945.7


0.1345
0.3800
0.0000
0.6018
0.2274
0.9788
0.0
0.0000
0.0
0.3384
0.0000
0.0042
0.0000
0.1162
0.1108
0.4612
0.0912
0.7212
2.7934
1.5859
0.4611
1.1910
0.0191
0.0000
0.9950
0.0000
0.0000
0.0000
31.4039
0.7067
19.3923
0.0576
3.2706
33.9577

100.0000








Table 12.--Income multipliers by sector in Broward county, 1976.



Broward
County Sector Name Type II
Sector Income Multiplier
Number

1 Livestock and livestock products 2.715
2 Other agricultural products 2.963
3 Forestry and fishery products 3.100
4 Ag., forestry, fishery services 1.316
5 Mining 1.724
6 Construction 1.634
7 Ordnance and accessories 0.000
8 Food and kindred products 1.815
9 Textiles and apparel 1.548
10 Lumber and wood products 1.650
11 Furniture and fixtures 1.540
12 Paper products 1.601
13 Printing and publishing 1.517
14 Chemical products 1.893
15 Rubber and plastic products 1.569
16 Glass, stone and clay products 1.538
17 Primary metal industries 1.654
18 Fabricated metal products 1.534
19 Nonelectric machinery 1.819
20 Electric and electronic equipment 1.839
21 Aircraft and motor vehicles 1.775
22 Shipand boat building 1.577
23 Instruments and related products 1.742
24 Other manufacturing 1.825
25 Port services 1.632
26 Other transportation services 1.484
27 Communication 1.474
28 Electric, gas and sanitary services 2.412
29 Wholesale and retail trade 1.430
30 Finance, insurance and real estate 1.868
31 Services 1.543
32 Government enterprises 1.372




-43-
multipliers it is important to note that they do not relate income changes

directly to export activity as do the sales and employment multipliers

reported earlier. Thus, the income multiplier cannot be used to assign

income to export categories in the same manner in which employment and

sales multipliers were used earlier.


IMPACT ANALYSIS


Economic impact analyses can be conducted by applying the concepts

and multiplier information from the input-output model to specific changes

in the local economy. Impact analyses address the question of what hap-

pens in the local economy given some initial change. The initial change

must be described and measured in terms of changes on some economic

variable such as value of export (final demand) sales, employment or income.

The most straight forward change is an increase in export sales by

some sector within the local economy. Remember that export, as used here,

means any sale outside of the local economy. The total effect of the in-

creased sale can be estimated by the use of the multipliers and impact on

individual sectors determined by considering the column of interdepen-

dence coefficients for the sector experiencing the initial change in ex-

port sales. Income and employment changes can then be determined by

applying the respective multipliers as discussed in the preceding section

of this report.

For example, suppose the final (export) sales of the port industry

is expected to expand by $1 million for some reason. Using the gross

output and employment multipliers, the total sales and employment impacts

can be estimated. The multiplier for gross sales (Table 8) is 2.55 while




-44-

the employment multiplier is 0.000039613. Thus, the gross sales and

employment impacts are, respectively,$2,550,000 (1.000,000 x 2.55) and

40(1,000,000 x .000039613). Further, if the direct income earned in the

port industry as a result of the $1 million expansion is known, the income

multiplier (Table 12) can be used to estimate the total impact on local

incomes. Assuming, for example, that the expansion results in a direct

earnings increase of $400,000 in the port sector, the total increase in

regional income is $652,800(400,000 x 1.632).

If the initial change is given as change in employment, then in this

impact framework, the first step is to convert the employment change to

the implied change in final demand. Table 13 shows value of total output

per worker and percentage of total output going to final demand by sector

Given a change in employment by some sector, the first step is to convert

the employment change to value of output by multiplying the change in

employment by the value of output per worker. Then multiply the value of

output by the percentage going to final demand. The average figure in

Table 13 can be utilized if no other value is known. This makes some

rather strict assumptions about the new workers and the associated value

of output, but the impact analysis can then proceed as prescribed in the

example above.

If the initial change is given as a change in income, then it must

be determined if the change is in income associated with earnings from

one of the business sectors or if the change is from transfer payments

or other nonlocal business sectors. When the income is from earnings in

a business sector, then the income multipliers in Table 12 can be

utilized.





-45-


Table 13.--Value of output per worker and percentage of output sold to
final demand.



Broward Output Percentage of
County Sector Name per output to
Sector Worker final demand
Number

1 Livestock and livestock products 32733 66.5
2 Other Agricultural products 24199 61.4
3 Forestry and fishery products 13486 0.0
4 Ag., forestry, fishery services 33973 83.3
5 Mining 87233 98.2
6 Construction 64771 77.8
7 Ordnance and accessories 51043 0.0
8 Food and kindred products 105127 0.0
9 Textiles and apparel 34995 0.0
10 Lumber and wood products 48605 75.0
11 Furniture and fixtures 33138 0.0
12 Paper products 59471 13.2
13 Printing and publishing 36161 0.0
14 Chemical products 83759 25.1
15 Rubber and plastic products 41870 20.4
16 Glass, stone and clay products 74049 6.1
17 Primary metal industries 69577 54.0
18 Fabricated metal products 44959 42.8
19 Nonelectric machinery 42044 58.8
20 Electric and electronic equipment 41718 25.8
21 Aircraft and motor vehicles 77419 42.2
22 Ship and boat building 77419 89.3
23 Instruments and related products 38601 2.2
24 Other manufacturing 85659 0.0
25 Port services 47821 47.0
26 Other transportation services 47822 0.0
27 Communication 46937 0.0
28 Electric, gas and sanitary serv. 111182 0.0
29 Wholesale and retail trade 23447 86.4
30 Finance, insurance.and real estate 79271 3.6
31 Services 24747 32.4
32 Government enterprises 54461 2.8




-46-

In those cases where the income change is from transfer payments or

sources other than the local business sectors the analyst can, if appro-

priate, rely on the household column to provide an indication of how the

income is likely to be spent within the local economy. For example, if

social security payments to households in the county increase, the house-

hold column can be used as a guide to show how the new income will be

spent among local business sectors. However, the household sector is an

aggregate of all household spending in the county. If spending patterns

of retirees are known, this information could be utilized to more ac-

curately predict local consequences of the additional social security

income.

In all of the cases discussed above, once the employment changes are

known then population change can be estimated by making two additional

assumptions. First, it is necessary to make an assumption about the

percentage of workers that will be new residents in the community. Then

an assumption must be made about the number of people per new worker.

A figure from the most recent census can be utilized if more accurate

data are not available. The estimated population change then equals the

total employment change times the percentage of workers that are new to

the community times the average number of people per new worker.

Local government fiscal impacts are often of interest in impact

analysis. A first approximation of the fiscal impacts can be estimated

by multiplying per capital expenditures for various local government ser-

vices by the number of new residents or new population determined above.

Local government revenues can be estimated in a similar manner. Of course

it is much more appealing to conduct a study of the likely effects on the





-47-
major sources of local government income, e.g. estimate changes in as-

sessed valuation and the resulting effects on real property tax revenues.

Impact analysis can branch into measurement of other dimensions of

economic change. But, in general, all economic impact studies are

strengthened if a local input-output analysis is available. Such an

analysis for Broward County has been described in this report. It pro-

vides a framework and foundation from which impact analyses of specific

economic changes in the community can proceed.






BIBLIOGRAPHY


Gordon, John and Kenneth Clayton. "As Your Community Grows--Some
Economic Considerations." Extension Circular, Cooperative Ex-
tension Service, IFAS, University of Florida Circular No. #457,
11 pages, July 1979.

Gordon, John and David Mulkey. "Income Multipliers for Community
Impact Analyses: What Size is Reasonable?" Journal of Community
Development Society of America, Vol. 9, No. 1 (Fall 1978),
pp. 85-93.

Hite, James C., David Mulkey, and William J. Yarborough. An
Economic Analysis of Petroleum Usage in South Carolina. Depart-
ment of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology. Clemson,
South Carolina: Clemson University, November 1974.

Little, Arthur D., Inc. "Assessment of Alternative Economic
Impact Methodologies." Mid-term briefing report to the Pacific
Coast Association of Port Authorities Economics Committee,
Arthur D. Little, Inc., San Francisco, January 19, 1979.

Miernyk, William H. The Elements of Input-Output Analysis. New
York, New York: Random House, 1965.

Mulkey, David and John Gordon. "The Economic Importance of the
Sugar Industry in South Florida." Food and Resource Economics
Department, IFAS, University of Florida, Staff Paper #117, 33
pages, February 1979.

Schaffer, William A. and Kong Chu. "Non-Survey Techniques for
Constructing Regional interindustry Models." The Regional
Science Association Papers, November 1968, pp. 83-101.

Tiebout, Charles M. The Community Economic Base Study. New York.
New York: Committee for Economic Development, December 1962.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service. State
Farm Income Statistics. Supplement to Statistical Bulletin
No. 576. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office,
September 1977.

U.S. Bureau of the Census. County Business Patterns 1976, Florida
Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1978.

U.S. Department of Commrerce, Mlaricime Administration. "Economic
Impact of the U.S. Port Industry: An Input-Output Analysis of
Waterborne Transportation." Prepared by the Port Authority of
New York and New Jersey for the U.S. Department of Commerce,
Washington D.C., Volume I, August 1978.


-48-





-49-


U.S. Department of Commerce, Maritime Administration. "Economic
Impact of the U.S. Port Industry: An Input-Output Analysis of
Waterborne Transportation." Prepared by the Port Authority of
New York and New Jersey for the.U.S. Department of Commerce,
Washington D.C., Volume II, August 1978.






























APPENDIX







Sector Name


LIVESTOCK AND LIVESTOCK PFCD.
.CT-ER AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS
*FCFRESTRY AND FISHERY PRODUCTS
.AG, FORESTRY, FIS C-:Y SERV.
DININGG
*CONSTRUCTICN
.CRCNANCE &. ACCESSORIES
.FGOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS
.TEXTILES & APPAREL
*LUJV3E & WCCD PRODUCTS
#FURNITURE & FIXTURES
*PAPER PRODUCTS
*PRINTING & PUBLISHING
.CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
*RUEBER & PLASTIC PRODUCTS
.GLASSs STONE & CLAY P'rCUCTS
*PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES
.FAERICATED METAL PRODUCTS
.NCNELECTRIC MACHINERY
.ELECTRIC & ELECTRONIC EQUIP.
.AlrCrACT AND MOTCR VEHICLES
.SHIP AtVr) SCAT BUILDING
* ISTRU.E-lFTS & RELATED PRODUCTS
*CTHER MFG.
.PORT SERVICES
*CTHER TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
COMMUNICATE I O
.ELECTRIC, GAS & SANITARY SERV.
*HCLESALE & RETAIL TRADE
*FINANCE & INSURANCE
*SEPV ICES
GOVERNMENTT EF.TE1RPRISES
*CUMMY
*HCLSFHOLDS


Sector Number

4


139001.
311564.
0.
17849 4
0.
7276.
00
87764.
615.
403&
0.
104.
1325.
6677.
4425.
1249.
20.
12365.
3515.
4980.
500.
0.
0.
981 5
24105.
62201.
5797.
16719.
472332.
279893.
135066.
1594.
75501.
472332.


79460.
82216.
0.
1047982.
0*
29848.
0.
0.
11701
19023.
0.
65*
5529.
276976.
49498.
9920.
52.
22853.
216639.
35246.
2152.
0.
0.
121580.
133133.
90054.
13836.
97617
1278357.
2212032.
1220852.
3834.
370124.
1738050.


51.
247.
2.
940.
0.
0.
0.
36.
216.
0.
0.
0.
0.
15.
37.
7.
0.
519.
44.
41.
56.
0.
0.
128.
788.
58.
0.
7.
913.
636.
111.
14.
12015.
2337.


162751.
862634.
0.
0*
0.
0.
0.
39471.
119890.
32519.
0O
30042.
0O
35108.
0.
0.
0.
93940.
42147.
0.
1449.
0.
0O
12370.
15014.
99066.
0
15131
397865,
1141046.
7507.
7507 .
795729.
10982567.


0.
0,
0.
G.
199965.
28022.
0,
0O
1740.
23731.
0.
72.
701.
63026.
47199,
10703.
22645.
34277.
506840.
18352.
7242.
0.
1932.
9298.
653555.
25592.
620CC.
235979.
197491.
1115481,
446751.
15065.
3604963.
4511066.


6

0.
5210.
0.
114415.

2260.
0O
0.
31687.
926994.
1543.37
3265.
846.
1457 8.
203329.
22067009
148567.
3583554.
1105731.
1698368.
511.
O0
141328.
248206.
144507.
438482.
48045.
24075.
5693301.
969551.
3532644.
47948.
530740.
2 69863 87.






Table Al.--Broward county transactions matrix (continued),


Sector Name


Sector Number


1
2
3
4
5

7
8
9;
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34


.LIVESTOCK AND LIVESTOCK PRCD.
.CTHER AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS
.FORESTRY AND FISHERY PRODUCTS
.AG, FORESTRY, FI ZHLrY SE'V.
*MINING
*CONSTRUCTION
.CRCNANCE & ACCESSORIES
.FCCD AND KIND _rD PRODUCTS
*TEXTILES & APPAREL
*LUMBER & WGCD PRODUCTS
.FURNITURE & FIXTURES
.PaF'F PRODUCTS
.PRINTING & PUBLISHING
.CHEMICAL PFGrUCTS
.FUERER & PLASTIC PRODUCTS
.CLASS, STCri- & CLAY PRODUCTS
.PRT:iAFY 'ETAL Ir:u3STRIES
FABRICATEDD METAL PRCDUCS
NONELECTRICC IACH I'-FPY
*ELECTRIC & -LECTRONIC EQUIP.
.AIRCRAFT AND ..1 TC R V\-ICLLS
ISH10 Ai.C 31-CAT BUILDING
.INSTFRU '-TS & RELATED Fp.LDUCTS
. THE-R MFG.
*FCFT -SEFVICES
.CTFh-R T ANSPCRTATION SERVICES
C 3 'MUNICAT ION
.ELECTRIC, GAS & SANITARY SERVE.
.iHCLESALE & RETAIL TRADE
.FINANCE & INSURANCE
*SERVICES
.GCVE2FN'.IE'NT ENTER tP-IiSE.S
*CUMMY
h-.CUSEHCLDS


0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
O.
0.
0.*
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
O.
0.
0.
0.
O.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0


954347.
538482.
938.
O.
0.
23775.
0.
806195.
18897.
19195S
0.
33895.
187312.
84280.
168609.
405707.
C32.
987049.
134264.
4005.
541.
C.
6214.
27255.
473757.
472047.
49195.
236891.
2466932.
866219.
2- 5,2320.
67279.
2288692.
9608101.


13228.
1023 09.
207.
0.
12157.
0.
3712.
3593574.
5200.
5477.
8015.
11390.
536748.
87772.
45113.
86.
4 09=; 5.
12351 3.
18587.
785.
581.
35 ,39
-35185.
334554.
144412.
244 9.
183539.
1363330.
313178.
802722.
83641.
1277850.
11818955.


0O
28,685.
6513.
0.
0.
15853.
0.
66.
13633.
2076643.
31 '"-7
35 95
274 '.
73886.
4303 .
103969.
4849.
255147.
109741.
27722.
4487
0.
7568.
41114.
443 5 5:.
148933.
15C 5'.
127951.
947028.
427459.
542820.

1823409.
C : 93582.


0.
0.
0.
0.
O.
8628.
0.
869.
216394.
6 C4760.
216043.
5215.
3334.
4 ; 70.
27191 !
105612.
47666.
614444.
121241.
53428.
7796.
0-.
58618 3
17179.
50821.
99397.
21669.
""61930.
824870.
426118.
521245,
26062.
349234.
6626327.


0.
0.
O.
0.
0.
1343.
0.
952.
4256.
3637:3
91.
10137.
8523.
15762.
11284.
1620.
283.
13768.
12865.
1448.
0.
O.
2328.
2729.
17087
20144.
1733.
20757.
74643.
43-52.
58834.
2490.
168453.
529622.




va- -a-* -L w-au. v cy ---- -W l.clPctL. .LUlSb Utla .LA % IIdnuea *


Sector Name


Sector Number


.LIVESTOCK AND LIVESTOCK PFCr,
CTthER AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS
*FORESTRY AND FISHERY PRODUCTS
*AG. FORESTRY. FISHERY SERV.
* I I NING
*CCNSTRUCTI ON
*CRONANCE & ACCESSORIES
*FOCD AND KINDr:-[ PRODUCTS
,TEXTILES & APPAREL
LUMBERR & WGCD P rCDUCTS
*FURNITURE & FIXTtRES
.PACE: PRODUCTS
-PRINTING & PUBLISHING
*CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
.RUEBER & PLASTIC PRODUCTS
.CLASS. STONE & CLAY PRODUCTS
.FFIMRY METAL I'IDUSTRIES
.FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS
NONELECTRICC MACHINERY
*ELECTRIC & ELECTRONIC EQUIF.
AIRCRAFT AND MOTCO VEHICLES
.SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING
*INSTRUMENTS & RELATED PRODUCTS
*CTHEfi MFG.
*PORT SERVICES
CTHIER TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
. CC' rJ L NICATIOr.
ELECTRICC, GAS & SANITARY SERV.
t.HOLESALE & RETAIL TRADE
*FINANCE & INSURANCE
*SERVICES
*GOVERNMENT ENTERPRISES
* ECUMM Y
*HOLSEHCLDS


0O
0.
O0
0.
0.
55320.
0.
0.
109035.
8852.
9634.
367893.
6853285.
398523.
175376.
0.
13902.
74721 7.
1450C55.
7050 1.
1183.
0O
665837.
76272.
119545.
406133.
321754.
353341.
3445361.
6596457.
6127471.
1655245.
2007751.
47435023.


683.
6900.
48*
0.
9565
29590.
0.
40932.
14543.
14493-
190.
17450.
15810.
1426785.
198855.
132040.
25082.
421885,
276059.
29446.
3168.
0.
40854.
268463.
242911 .
206910.
34215.
389272.
1051377.
1285982.
2921941.
67099.
1370942.
6597900.


0*
0*
0.
0.
0.
13800.
0.
1003.
341204.
30398.
8598.
12824.
9066.
929126.
402553.
110506.
6165.
323427.
213986.
47939.
29365.
1042*
294 00.
53752.
414780.
121853.
31193.
177565.
778495.
567978.
1066132.
32307.
1587213.
8347718.


0
0.
0.
0
5550.
45624.
0O
1328.
38769.
56515.
19954,
26678
6116.
172328
199091
2142500.
2621 7
210116.
516407.
135939.
8361.
0.
25285.
75572,
358521.
545071.
45023,
715229
1172663.
1210009.
1311591.
64235.
1304121.
14303507.


0
0*
0.
0.
67935.
10172.
0*
147.
1801.
12212.
180.
251.
1875.
25130.
7244.
17011.
168473.
109421.
241817.
135862.
8161.
0.
9797.
8100.
251726.
88921.
7108.
145791.
375681.
132351.
282257.
9923.
1360147.
3015068.


0

137
35913

344.
28693e
103402.
74900.
1(131
229233.
195962.
256655.
260963.
1393055.
2l 053 1 9
3019741.
784299.
210296.
133300.
253611.
65387.
392149.
368597.
99231.
413767.
24551 96.
124347.
2258347.
82150.
2913996.
28612956.







Table Al.--Broward county transaction matrix (continued).


Sector Name


Sector Number


.LIVESTOCK AND LIVESTOCK PPCD.
.CT-hE AGRICULTURAL PRCCUCTS
FORESTF Y AND FISHERY P-;IOUCTS
.AG, FORESTRY, FISHERY SERVE.
SVINING
CONSTRUCTION
.CRDNA>.JCE & -CC7ESSORIES
.FOCD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS
*TEXTILES & APPAREL
.LUMBER & WOOD PRODUCTS
*FURNITURE & FIXTURES
.PAFEF PRODUCTS
*PRINTING & PUBLISHING
.CHEMICAL PROC'UCTS
.RUESEF & PLASTIC PRODUCTS
.CLASS, STONE & CLAY P;CDUCTS
,PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES
eFAOFICATED Y.,ETAL PRODUCTS
.NONELECTRIC MACH:i:rE _Y
.ELECTRIC & ELECTRONIC EQUIP.
.*AIFCrAFT AND MOTOR VEHICLES
*SHI AND CBAT BUILDING
.IfSTRcL-'ENTS & RELATED FRODLCTS
*CTHER 'FG.
*POCT SERVICES
.OTHER TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
.*COMMUNICATION
.ELECTRIC, GAS & SANITARY SERVE.
WHOLESALEE & RETAIL TRADE
.FINANCE & INC'J-.ANCE
vSEFVICES
GOVERNMENTT ENTERPRISES
.DUMMY
.1- US HOLDS


O.

0.
0.
0.
78507.
0.
2207.
41469.
10-1024.
49763.
11983.
283430.
38e64.
743101.
7 39265.
1246061.
4313682.
273331_. _
15013745.
713247.
245E33.
660363.
173531.
861831.
443134.
266383.
605245.
7689422.
5578308.
5270334.
238432.
10120928.
66370153.


0.
0O
0.
0.
2955.
105849.
0.
0.
72090.
123291.
510464.
54289.
170978.
594347.
1529273.
1946712.
1038953.
5030229.
5886645.
49110814.
61186. .
0.
1646332,
184134.
1432971.
567315.
422853.
942204.
8479031.
6225628.
9132406.
378661.
161 41343.
87700800


0.
0.
0O
0.
0.
25272.
O.
0.
177548.
15671 0.
70671.
3219
4282.
552'4 4
483117.
304447.
332412.
2713801.
3443647.
2543473.
3873140.
45419.
429064.
44119.
174505.
295748.
67575.
192769.
2030715.
971731.
2443273.
968 15.
3234920.
20032241.


0.
O.
0.
0.

41645.
0.
0.
9 7 ,
687793.
38302.
1302.
7127.
121586,
140621.
5- ." 231 .
398914.
3813407.
735313.3.
919222.
209660.
1058498.
225919
43606.
27855.
308782.
104218.
302786.
3676888.
1337050.
1643458.
97493
1100281.
34136567.


0.
3195.
0.
C.
0,
580.
18890
0.
5014.
87592.
11352.
30029.
17112.
8941.
212779.
241078.
146443.
114228.
745528.
543004.
2463425.
67544 *
8736.
2270265.
399'4 r'.
159424.
67439.
6672 9.
101580.
1393320.
952175.
1751478.
61149.
2196991.
12046325.


I06-'.
174922.

09
0.
70831.
0O
25397.
130498.
00756.
10364.
19860.
49757.
252035.
366045.
80358.
42954.
335402.
191035.
190693.
14692.
0O
50499.
1081561.
939145,
418558.
28933.
3 97076.
1264755.
1963461.
2326004.
881 86.
3291529.
8826151.






Sector Number


LItVESTOCK AND LIVESTOCK PRCO.
*CTHER AGRICULTURAL PRGCUCTS
.FORESTRY AND FISHERY 3FPGOUCTS
.AG, FORESTRY, FISHERY SERV.
.FINING
CONSTRUCTION
ORDNANCEE & ACCESSORIES
.FOCD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS
.TEXTILES & APPAREL
.LL.r-'?EF & WOOD PRODUCTS
.FURNITURE & FIXTLCES
.PAPEP PRODUCTS
.PRINTING & PUBLISHING
.CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
.FL3E`ER & PLASTIC PRODUCTS
.GLASS, STONE & CLAY PRODUCTS
.PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES
FABRICATEDD METAL PRODUCTS
.NONELECTRIC MACHIlERYY
.ELECTRIC & ELECTRONIC EQUIP.
.AIRCRAFT AND MOTCR VEHICLES
.SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING
.INSTFUME'NTS & RELATED PFODOLCTS
.CTHER MFCG
.FCRT SERVICES
.OTHER TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
SCC MMUNICAT I CN
.EL'CTRICs GAS & SANITARY SERV.
WHOLESALEE & RETAIL TRADE
*FINANCE & INSURANCE
.SERVICES
.GOVERNMENT ErfTEREF. ISES
*DUMMY
. hUSE HOLDS


0.
2977.
0.
74933.
0.
161451.
0.
46678.
95194.
33096.
13853.
8985.
103763.
90702.
140929.
112699.
44328.
564822.
615152.
374663.
62950
1582401.
279778.
349370.
7347807,
853913.
253735.
267420.
705248.
5381927
5677250.
2362582.
14796993.
401335300.


959.
33559.
26.
0.
0.
374347.
0.
38029.
45997.
1914.
0.
4244.
62730.
33829.
273179.
47149.
27275.
135156.
397265.
349527.
310748.
0.
49068.
841569.
154057.
3145317.
293016.
462305.
4519.003
5695136.
4656495.
3892836.
2676946.
49950886.


0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
366252.
0.
0.
S14136.
0.
0.
5722.
293950.
3469.
121711.
0.
7954.
2785.
0.
4411993.
9664.
0.
27467.
156775.
66764.
164466.
1082434.
1307994.
2731763.
9797628.
26321737.
1429864.
7399685.
99305998.


O. 0, 716444
0O 7135. 13 1 -'.4
0. 0 77.
O. 760729. 1776733.
339. 0. 24313.
516113, 455267. 9108324.
0. 0 0.
284. 467412. 154289.
12137. 332210. 158554.
1103. 350135. 131320.
0. 136980. 38565.
2440. 211464. 58191.
13746. 1390917, 28s0o81.
32004. 652247. 751354.
34224. 1312182. 564928.
926. 93849 6 336220.
8418. 31833. 73313.
54742. 1388057. 587166.
121572. 2850574. 5818341.
282041. 3336114. 3288429.
1851. 405274. 495404.
0. 51508, 58897.
0. 1307746. 460377.
214676. 1867294. 1587639.
253262. 681487. 638053.
58C037. 2712655. 3414717.
90927. 2941741 2633090.
144573833 941495C. 4404568.
872985. 28150940. 24182222.
1807367. 90281115.215B82900.
1636608. 83327575. 87378953.
20460473. 20333656. 23002460.
1383346. 17821665. 18066726.
17995009 553010460 245778153.


Sector Name





Table Al.--Broward county transactions matrix (continued),


Sector Name


Sector Number


.LIVESTOCK AND LIVESTOCK PRCD,
.OTHER AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS
FORESTRY AND FISHERY i-FCDUCTS
*AG, FORESTRY, FISHi-rY SERV.
DININGG
*CONSTRUCTION
*CRCNANCE & ACCESSORIES
.FOCD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS
.TEXTILES & APPAREL
LUMBERR & WCCD PRODUCTS
.FURNITURE & FIXTURES
.PAPER PRODUCTS
*PRINTING & PUBLISHING
CHEM ICAL oODUCT S
RUBBERR & PLASTIC OrCOUCTS
.GLASS, STONE & CLv RCDUCTS
F IMARY METAL INDUSTRIES
.FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS
.NCt.ELECTRIC MACHINERY
ELECTRICC & ELECTRONIC -CUIP.
.AIRCRAFT AND MOTOR VEHICLES
*SHIP AND PCAT BUILDING
*INSTRUMENTS & RELATED PFODLCTS
*CTFER P FGC
*PORT S._VICES
*CTHER TFANSPORTATI'JE SERVICES
*CC -MUNICAT ICN
.ELECTRIC, GAS E SANITARY SERV.
I-HCLESALE & RETAIL TRACE
.FINANCE & INSURANCE
*SERVICES
.GOV=FNMENT ENTERPRISES
* DUMMY
*HOUSEHOLDS


41691
340949.
0.
349737.
0.
22727332.
0.
581985,
791536.
43074.
O0
93583.
66391456.
4221 341
4510874.
2557E093.

12501460.
15679841.
13392871.
36 03159.
0.
9626807.
4356260.
1193220.
3222620.
15494 75,7.
16457321.
6352351; I1
130565065.
140964598.
183 62948.
41 39303.
793733346.


0.
1956 *
0
10427.
0.
1554840.
0.
0.
30909.
0.
0.
2665.
188540.
167428.
98261.
23475.
2742.
53934.
195146.
152934.
22136.
13903.
24513.
158653.
743814
2250317.
100422.
4459984.
1101817.
4873022.
4688307.
198119.
21 99585
62115395.


110724. 1453505.
705463. 4558718.
8838. 237C7.
0. 2336955.
0. 0.
0. 0.
0. 0.
1224 4 25. 51881509.
320463. 40917313.
50736. 1126910.
0. 18628020.
565420. 362996.
48744970. 0.
351 90. 15061024.
459939. 10392428.
170942. 34239883
709307. 11115.
5789078. 73522'S.
5380378. 8276554.
113432 .34. 95056384.
996492. 32081723.
131019. 5753504.
9370420. 12665439.
S'- 3570. 43526485.
3382920. 36823293.
71566364. 33137 5-';..
0.279239652.
0. 86991977.
2382159. 0.

86603407.970829007.
O. 27752961.
60605114. 172102175.
0. 0.




Lau -L tl.-DoLuwaLU UUuLLL y te-U.iiiial CUVeliiCenLS mailcix,


Sector Name Sector Number


1 2 3 4 5
I *LIVESTOCK AND LIVESTOCK PRCD. 0.0127 0.0034 0.0013 0.0041 0.0 0.0
2 *CTIER AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 0.0284 0 0035 0.0061 0.0217 0.0 0.0C01
3 *FCF STFY AND FISHERY POCCUCTS 0.0 0.0 0.0001 0.0 0.0 0.0
4 *AG, FC-.ESTRY, FISI--'Y SERV. 0.0163 0.0444 0.0232 0.0 0.0 0. 001
5 .WINING 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0110 0.0
6 CONSTRUCTION 0.0007 0.0013 0.0 0.0 0.0015 0 0000
7 *CRDNANCE & ACCESSORIES 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
8 .FGCD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 0.0080 0.0 0.0009 0.0010 0.0 0.0
9 *TEXTILES & APPF-:L 00001 01 0.0005 0,0053 0.0030 C00001 0.0004
10 .LUMBER & WCOD *CF. Ci'.'TS 0.0000 0OC08 0.0 0.0008 0.0013 0.0129
11 *FURNITURE & FIXTURES 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0021
12 .PAPER PRODUCTS 0.0000 0.0000 0.0 0.0008 0.0000 0.0000
13 .PRINTING & PUBLISHING 0.0001 0.0002 0.0 0.0 0*0000 0.3000
14 .CHEMICAL PRCDUCTS 0.0006 0.0117 0.0004 0.0039 0.0035 0.0020
15 .RUBBER & PLASTIC PCRDUCTS 0.0004 0.0021 0.0009 0.0 0.0026 0.002Z
16 *GLASS, STONE & CLAy PRCDUCTS 0.0001 0.0004 0.0002 0.0 0.0006 0.0307
17 .PRIMARY '1MTAL INDUSTRIES 0.0000 0C000 0.0 0.0 0.0012 0.0021
18 *FAERICATED METAL PRODUCTS 0.0011 0.0010 0.0128 0,C024 0.0019 0.0498
19 .NONELECTRIC MACHINERY 0.0003 0.0092 0 0011 0.0011 0.0278 0.0154
20 .ELECTFIC & ELECTC::.IC EQUIP. 0.0005 0.0015 0.0010 0.0 0.0010 0.0236
21 AIFCF-AFT AND MOTCR VEHICLES 0.0000 0.0001 0.0014 0.CO00 0.0004 0.3000
22 .SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
23 ,INSTRUMENTS & RELATED PRODUCTS 0 0 00 0.0 0.0 C00001 0.0020
24 .CTHER MFG* 0.0009 0.0052 0.0032 0.0003 0.0005 0.0034
25 FORT SERVICES 0.0022 0.0056 0.0195 0.0004 0.0358 0.0020
26 *CTHER TRANSPORTATION SERVICES 0.0057 0.0038 0.0014 0.0025 0.0014 0.0061
27 CGCMLr;I CATION 0.0005 0.0006 0 00 0.0 0.0003 0.0007
28 .ELECTPIC. GAS & SANITARY SEPV. 0.0015 0.0041 0.0002 0.0004 0.0129 0.000'
29 V.HCLESALE & RETAIL TRACE 0.0431 0.0542 0.0226 0.0100 C00108 0.0791
30 .FINANCE & INSURAr-.C. 0.0255 0.0938 0.0157 0.0287 0.0614 0.0135
31 .SERVICES 0.0123 0.0517 0.0027 0.0002 0.0245 0.0491
32 .GOVERNMENT ENTERP-RIS73 0.0001 0.0002 0.0003 0.0002 0.0008 0.0007
33 CUMMY 0 0069 0.0157 0.2970 0.0200 0.1977 0.0074
34 .HCUSEHCLDS 0.0431 0.0737 0.0578 0.2763 0.2474 0.3750








Table A2.--Broward county technical coefficients matrix (continued)


Sector Name Sector Number

7 8 9 10 11 12

1 .LIVESTOCK AND LIVESTOCK PROD. 0.0 0.0144 0.0003 0.0 0.0 0.0
2 .CTHER AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 0.0 0.0081 0.0021 0.0010 0.0 0.0
3 .FORESTRY AND FISHERY PFPr-UCTS 0.0 0.0000 0.0000 0.0002 0.0 0.0
4 .AG, FORESTRY, FISH-;;Y SERV. 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
5 ,'1INING 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 O.0
6 .CCNSTRUCTICN 0.0 0.0004 0.0003 0.0006 0.0004 0.0008
7 .GRDiNNCE & ACCESSORIES 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
8 .FCCD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 0.0 0.0121 0.0001 0.0000 0.0000 0.0004
9 .TEXTILES & APPAREL 0.0 0.0003 0.0751 0.0005 0.0108 0.0019
10 .LU':MER & -:,rC' PRLDUCTS 0.0 0.0003 0.0001 0.0756 0.0302 0.0161
11 .FUFPlITURE & FIXTURES 0.0 0.0 0.0001 0.0012 0.0108 0.0000
12 .PAPER PRODUCTS 0.0 0.00C5 0.0002 0.0001 0.00C3 0.0045
13 .PRINTING & PUGLISHING 0.0 0.0028 0.0002 0.0001 C0.002 0.0038
14 .CHEMICAL PRODUCTS 0.0 0.0013 0.0123 0.0027 0.0025 0.0070
15 .RUSEBR & PLASTIC PRODUCTS 0.0 0.0025 0.0018 0.0016 0.01'-, 0.0050
16 .CLASS, STO,'N & CLAY PRCOUCTS 0.0 3.39.1 0.0009 0.0038 0.0053 0.0007
17 .PRINARY METAL I]rn'J'TLI'-1S0 0.0 O.OCO 00000 0.0002 0.0024 0.0001
18 .FAERICATED METAL PRCDUCTS 0.0 0.0149 0.0009 0.0093 0.0306 0.00061
19 .NONFLECTRIC MACHINERY 0.0 0.0020 0.0027 0.0040 0.0060 0.0057
20 .ELECTRIC & ELECTRONIC EQUIP. 0.0 0.0001 0.0004 0.0010 0.0027 0.0006
21 .AIFRCAFT AND MOTOR VEHICLES 0.0 0.0000 0.30000 0 CC2 0.0004 0.0
22 .SHIP AND 3BA- BUILDING 0.0 0.0 0.0000 0.0 0.0 0.0
22 .TNSTU-'j1ENTS & RELATED PFOD'JCTS 0.0 0.0001 0.0007 0.0003 0.0029 0.0010
24 .CT-HE MFG. 0.0 0.0004 0.0018 0.0015 C.0009 0.0012
25 .FCFT SE-'VICES 0.0 0*0071 0.0070 0.0162 0.0025 0.0076
26 .OTHER TRANSPORTATION SERVICES 0.0 0.0071 0.0030 0.0054 0.0050 0.0089
27 oCC f'UNICAT I Cr 0.0 0.0007 0.0007 0.0005 0.0011 0.003
28 .ELECTRIC, GAS & SANITARY SERV. 0.0 0.0036 0.0033 0.0047 0.031 0.0092
29 .WHCLESALE & RETAIL TRADE 0.0 0.0371 0.0284 0.0745 0.0411 0.0330
30 .FINANCE & INSURANCE 0.0 0.0130 0.0170 0.0156 0.0213 0.0194
31 .SE-VICES 0.0 0,0399 0.0168 0.0198 0.0260 0.0260
32 *GOVEINMENT ENTERPRISES 0.0 0.0010 0.0017 0.0007 0.0013 0.0011
33 .OUMMY 0.0 0.0344 0.0267 0.0664 0.0174 0.0745
34 FCUSEHOLDS 0.0 0.1446 0.2469 0.2437 C.3Z3C 0.2344




Table A2.--Broward county technical coefficients matrix (continued)


Sector Name


LIVESTOCKK AND LIVESTOCK PROD.
.CTHER AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS
FORESTRY AND FISHERY PRODUCTS
.AG, FORESTRY, FISHERY SERV.
INNING G
.CONSTRUCTION
.CRCNANCE & ACCESSORIES
.FOCD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS
.TEXTILES & APPAREL
.LUVSER & ILCD PRODUCTS
.FURNITURE & FIXTURES
.PAPER PRODUCTS
.PRINTING & PUBLISHING
.CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
.RUBBER & PLASTIC PRODUCTS
.GLASS, STONE & CLAY PRfDUCTS
.PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES
*FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS
NONELECTRICC MACHINERY
.ELECTRIC & ELECTRONIC EQUIP.
.AIRCRAFT AND MOTOR VEHICLES
,SHI- AND BOAT BUILDING
.INSTRUMENTS & RELATED PRODUCTS
.OTHER MFG.
.PCT SERVICES
.CTHER TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
.CO'-.1UMNICATION
.ELECTRIC, GAS & SANITARY SERVE.
hHCLE-SALE & RETAIL TRACE
.FINANCE & INSURANCE
*SERVICES
,GOVERNMENT ENTERPRISES
DUMMY
HOUSEHOLDSS


Sector Number


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0004
0.0
0.0
0.0009
0.0001
0.0001
0.0029
0.0536
0 003.1
0.0014
00
0.0001
0.0058
0.0011
0.0006
0.0000
0.0
0.0052
S0.0006
0.0009
0.0032
0.0025
0.0028
0 0269
0 0516
0o 0479
0.0129
0.0157
0.3708


0.0000
0.0002
0*0000
0.0
0.0003
0.00038
0.0
0.0011
0.0034
0.0004
0.0000
0.0005
0.0004
. 0386
0.0054
0.0036
0.0007
0.0114
0 0075
0.0008
0.0001
0.0
0.0011
0.0073
0.0066
0.0056
0.0009
0.0105
0.0285
0.0348
0.0791
0.0018
0.0371
0 1786


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0005
0.0
0.0000
0.0113
0.0010
0.0003
0.3004
0.0003
0.0308
00 133
0.0037
0.0002
0.0107
0.0071
0.0016
0.0010
0 .0000
0.0010
0.0013
0.0137
0.0040
0.0010
0 *0050
0.0258
0.0188
0.0353
0.0011
0 0526
0.2765


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0001
0.0010
0.0
0.0000
010009
0.0009
0.0013
0.0005
0.0006
0.0001
0.0040
0 0046
0 0492
0.0006
0.0048
0.0119
0.0031
0.0002
0.0
0.0006
0.0017
0*C082
0 0125
0.0010
0.0164
0.0269
0.0278
0.0301
0.0015
0.0300
0.3287


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0052
0.0008
0.0
0.0000
0.0001
0.0009
0.0000
0.0001
C 0001
0.0019
C. 0006
0.OC13
0.0130
0.0085
0.0187
0.0105
0.0006
0.0
0.0008
0.000
0.0195
0.0069
0.0005
0.0113
0.0290
0.0102
0.0218
0.0008
0.1051
0.2330


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0000
0.0004
000
0.0
0.0000
0.0003
0.3010
0.0008
0.0002
0,0023
0.0020
0.0026
0 C.0026
0.0141
0. 0273
0.0305
0. 0079
0.0021
0.0013

0.0007
0.0040
0,0037
0.0010

0.0248
0.0184
0.0228
0.0008
0.0295
0. 2893








Table A2.--Broward county technical coefficients matrix (continued)


Sector Name Sector Number

19 20 21 22 23 24
1 LIVESTOCKK AND LIVESTOCK PROD* 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0000
2 rCThER AGRICULTURAL -3RCCTJCTS 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0001 0.0029
3 FORESTRYY A ID FISHERY 'oFSDUCTS 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 00 0 0 0'
4 .AG, FCESTF.Y, FISHERY SERV. 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
5 .MINING 0.0 0.0000 0.0 0.0 0.0000 0.0
6 .CCNSTFUCTION 0.0004 0.0004 0.0003 0. 00.5 0.0005 0.0012
7 .CRCNANCE & ACCESSORIES 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
8 .FOOD AND KINDRED IF.-LJUCTS 0.000 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0. C 1 0.0004
9 .TEXTILES & APPV-c L 0.0002 0.0003 0.0023 0.0012 0.0021 0.0021
10 .LUMBER & WOCC .?.FCOUCTS 0.0005 0.0004 0.0021 0.0081 0.0003 0.0013
11 .FURNITURE & FIXTLRES 0.0002 0.0018 0.3r 0.0005 0.0007 0.0002
12 .PAPER PRODUCTS 0.0001 0.0002 0.0000 0.0000 0.0004 0.0003
12 *PRINTING & PUBLISHING 0.0013 0 0006 0.0001 0.0001 0.0002 0.0008
14 .CHEMICAL PRODUCTS 0 .rC'c4 0.0021 0.0007 0.0014 0.0052 0.0041
15 *RUErER & PLASTIC PRODUCTS 0.0034 0.0055 0.0064 0.0017 0.0058 0.0059
16 *GLASS, STONE & CLAY P;C JCTS CC33 0.0070 0.0040 0.0064 0.0035 0.0013
17 .PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES 0.0356 0.0038 0.0044 0.0047 0.0028 0.0007
18 *FAERICATED METAL P:CRDUCTS 0.0217 0.0182 0.0353 0 0448 0.0181 0.0054
19 .NONELECTRIC MACHINERY 0.1233- 0.0213 0.0454 0.0923 0.0132 0.0031
20 .ELECTRIC & ELECTRONIC EUITP. 0.C677 0.1776 0.0336 C.0108 0.0597 0.0031
21 ,AI7CFAFT AND MOTOR VEHICLES 0.0032 0.0022 0.0512 0.0025 0.0017 0,0002
22 .SHIP AND BOAT SUILDING 0.0011 0.0 0.0006 0.0124 0C00'2 0.0
23 .INSTRU '"tTS & S 2LATED C-GDLCTS 0.00 0C 0.0060 0.0057 0 0027 0 0550 0.0008
24 .OTHER MFG. 0.0008 0.0007 0.0006 0.005C 0.0010 0.0176
25 .FCrT SERVICES 0. :39 0.0052 0.0023 0. 003 0.0039 0.0152
26 *CTHER PT.ArNSPCTATICN 3-VICES 0.0020 0.0021 0.0033 0.0036 0.0016 0.0068
27 COFMMUNIC AT I Ci 0.0012 0.0015 0.0009 0.0012 0.0016 0.0005
28 ELECTFIC* GAS & SANITARY SERV. 0.0027 0.0034 0.0025 0.0035 0.0025 C O.0A
29 .H"ZLFS4LE & RETAIL TRACE 0.0347 0.0307 0.0268 0.0432 0.0338 0.0205
30 *FINANCE & INSUPNCE O0. 252 0.0225 0.0128 0.0157 00C231 0.0319
31 .SE FV ICES 02 *238 0.0330 0.0323 0.0193 0.0424 0 03'3 7'
32 .GOVE7RNMr NT ENTEF P ISES 0.0011 0.0014 0.0013 0.0011 0.0015 0.0014
33 *CUMMY 0.0456 0.0584 0.0427 0.0129 0.0532 0.0534
34 *HCUSEHOLDS 0. 316 0.3172 0.2646 0.4012 0.2919 0 1437




Table AZ.--Broward county technical coefficients matrix (continued)


Sector Name


.LIVESTOCK AND LIVESTOCK PRCD.
.CTHER AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS
.FORESTRY AND FISHERY PRODUCTS
,AG, FORESTRY, FISHERY SERVE.
*MINING
CONSTRUCTIONN
.CRDNANCE & ACCESSORIES
.FOCD AND KINDREC PPCDUCTS
.TEXTILES & APPAREL
.LUMBER & WOOD PRODUCTS
.FURNITURE & FIXTURES
.PAFER PRODUCTS
.PRINTING & PUBLISHING
.CHE'-1ICAL PRODUCTS
.RUBBER & PLASTIC PRODUCTS
.GLASS, STONE & CLAY PRCOLCTS
*PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES
.FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS
NONELECTRICC MACHI rrY
*ELECTRIC & ELECTRONIC EQUIP.
AIRCRAFTT AND MOTCR VEHICLES
SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING
*INSTRU-.I',TS & RELATED PRODUCTS
.CTHER MFG.
.FC~T SERVICES
CTHER TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
*COMMUNICATION
.ELECTRIC, GAS & SANITARY SERV.
*WHOLESALE & RETAIL TRADE
*FINANCE & INSURANCE
SERVICES
.GCVERNVENT ENTERPRISES
* CUMMY
*HOUSEHOLDS


Sector Number


0.0
0.0000
0.0
0 0007
0.0
0.0014
.0
0.0004
0. 0008
0.0003
0.0001
0.0001
0.0009
0.0008
0 0013
0.0010
0.0004
040050
0.0055
0 0033
0.0006
0.0141
0.0025
0.0031
0.0655
0 0076
0.0023
0.0024
0.0063
0.0480
0.0506
0.0211
0.1319
0.3595


0.0000
0 00C3
0.0000
3.0
0.0
0.0030
0.0
0.0003
0.0004
0.0000
0.0
ooC
0.0000
0.0005
0 0003
0.0022
0.0004
0.0002
0.0011
0.0031
0.0028
0.0025
0.0
0.0004
0.0067
0.0012
0.0249
0. 0023
0.0037
0.0357
0.0450
0.0368
0.0308
0.0212
0.3949


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0029
0.3
0.0
0.0000
0.0
0.0
0.0000
0.0010
0.0000
0.0004
0.0
0. 000
0.0000
0.0
0.0145
0.0000
0.0
0.0001
0.0005
0.0001


0.0 005
0.0036
0.0043
0.0090
0 0322
0.0866
0.0047
0.0244
0. 269


3.0
0. 0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0000
0.0036
0.0
0.0000
0.0001
0.0000
0.0
0.0000
0 0001
0.0002
0.0002
0.0000
0.0001
0.0004
0.0008
0. 0020
0.0000
0.0
0.0
0.0015
0.0018
0.0040
0.0006
0 1004
0.0061
0O0126
0.01.14
0.1421
0.0096
0.1250


0.0
C 0000
0.0
0.0006
0.0
0. 0004
0.0
0.0004
0.0003
0.0003
0.0001
0.0002
0.0011
0.0005
040014
0.0007
0.0000
0.0015
0.0022
0.0026
0.0003
0.0000
0.0010
0.0015
0.0005
0.0021
0.0023
0.0073
0.0219
0.0701
0 0647
0.0158
0.0138
C,4295


0.0004
0. 00
0.3000
0.0010
0.0000
0.0052
0.0
0.3001
0. 001
0.0001
0. 0000
0.0000
0.0017
030004
0.0003
0.0002
0.00000


0.0003
0.0000
0.3003
0.0004
040004
0.0020
0.0015
0.0025
0,0139
0,1237
0.0501
0.0137
0.0104
0.1 409







Table A2.--Broward county technical coefficients matrix (continued)


Sector Name Sector Number

31 32 33 34

1 .LIVESTO-CK AND LIVEST CK" PROD, 0.C0000 0.0 0.0001 0.0002
2 .CTl-EF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 0.0002 0.0000 0.0008 0.0008
3 .FORESTRY AND FISHERY PRODUCTS 0.0 0.0 0.0000 0.0000
4 .AG, FORESTRY, FISHERY SERV. 0.0002 0.0001 0.0 0.0004
5 .MINING 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
6 *CCNSTRUCTION 0.0011 0.0123 0.0 0,0
7 *CFON NCE F ACCESSORIES 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
8 .FOCD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 0.0003 0.0 0.0146 0.0007
9 .TEXTILES & APPAREL 0.0004 0.0002 0.0004 0.0063
10 *LU~9ER & WOOD PRCDUCTS 000000 0.0 0.0001 0.0002
11 .FURNITLPE & FIXTURES 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0031
12 .PAPER P'CDUCTS 0.0000 0.0000 0.0007 0.0001
13 *PRINTING f PUBLISHING 0.0308 0.0015 0.0582 0.0
14 *CHEMICAL PROCUCTS 0.0020 0.0013 C.0010 0.0025
15 .RUBBER & PLASTIC PRODUCTS 0.0021 0.0008 0.0005 0.0017
16 .GLASS, STONE & CLAY PRCDUCTS 0.0012 0.0002 0.0002 0.0006
17 .PRIMARY M:TAL INDUSTRIES 0.0000 0.0000 0.0008 0.0000
18 .FAERICATED METAL PRCDUCTS 0.0058 0.0004 0.0069 0.0012
19 .NONELECTRIC MACHINERY 0.0073 0.0015 0.0064 0.0014
20 .ELECTRIC & ELECTr'~C.I-;C EQUIP. 0.0062 0.0012 0.0136 0o0159
21 .AIPCRAFT AND MOTCR VEHICLES 0.0017 0.0002 0.0012 0.0054
22 .SHIP AND BOAT BUILDII 0.0 0.0001 0.0002 0.0010
23 .INSTRUMENTS & RELATED 7-C3DLCTS 0.0045 0.0002 0.0112 0.0021
24 *CTHER MFG. 0.0020 0.0013 0.0070 0.0073
25 .PORT SRVICSS 0.0006 0.0059 0.0046 0.0062
26 *CTH-R TRANSPCRTATION SERVICES 0.0015 0.0179 0.0855 0.0055
27 .C:- MUNIC T 1]3; O0. 072 0.0008 0.0 0 0466
28 *ELECTRIC, GAS & SANITARY SERV. 0.0076 0.0354 0.0 0.0145
29 .WHCLESALE & RETAIL TRADE 0.0295 0.0087 0.0028 0.0
30 .FINANCE & INS'JRAC,. 0.0605 0.0387 0.0 0.1971
31 *SERVICES 0.0654 0.0372 0.1035 0.1622
32 *GOVEFN'lUrT ENTERPRISES 0.0088 0.0016 0.0 0.0046
33 .CUMMY 0.0195 0.0238 0.0724 0.0287
34 .ICLSEHOLDS 0.3680 0.4931 0.0 0.0




Table A3.--Broward county matrix of interdependence coefficients.


Sector Name


.LIVESTOCK AND LIVESTOCK PCD.
.CTHER AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS
,FOGRSTRY AND FISHERY PFCCUCTS
.AG, FORESTRY, FISHERY SERV.
INNING G
CONSTRUCTIONN
.ORCNANCE & ACCESSORIES
.FCCD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS
.TEXTILES & APPAREL
.LUM3ER & WOOD PRODUCTS
FURNITUREE & FIXTURES
.PAPER PRODUCTS
*PRINTING & PUBLISHING
.CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
*RUBBER & PLASTIC PRODUCTS
,GLASS, STONE & CLAY PRODUCTS
.PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES
.FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS
.NONELECTRIC MACHINERY
*ELECTRIC & ELECTRONIC EQUIP.
.AIRCRAFT AND MOTCR VEHICLES
.SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING
.INSTRU'IENTS & RELATED PRODUCTS
*CTHER MFG.
.PORT SERVICES
.CTHER TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
*COMMUNICATION
.ELECTRIC* GAS & SANITARY SERVE.
WHOLESALE E F& RETAIL T-:ADE
.FINANCE & INSURANCE
*SERVICES
*GOVERNMENT r!TFRPRI SES
SCUMMY
*HOUSEHOLDS


Sector Number


1.0132
0.0295
0.0000
0 0.180
0.0000
0.0013
00
0.0095
0.0011
0.0002
0.0004
0. 001
0.0030
0.0016
0.0010
0.0005
0.0001
0.0024
0.0022
0.0044
0.0009
0.0002
0.0008
0.0024
0.0038
0.0088
0 0067
0.0051
0.0504
0. 0688
0.0470
0.0040
0.0169
0.1169


0 0038
1.0050
0.0030
0.0450
0.0000
C e 002(C
0.0
0.0026
0.0025
0.0011
0.0007
0.0001
0.0067
0.0136
0. 0033
0.0012
0.0003
0.0037
0. 0139
0.0100
0.0018
0.0004
0.0018
0.0079
0.0035
0.00'07
0.0122
0.0110
0.0654
0.1758
0.1171
0.0079
0.0355
0.2183


0.00 16
0.0073
1 0001
0.0236
0.0000
0 0008
0.0
0.0076
0 0075
0.0002
0.0006
0.0004
0.0239
0.0020
0.0022
0. 0009
0.0007
0.0177
0 0069
0 0130
0.0033
0.0006
0 0053
0 0077
0.0245
0 3333
0 0095
0.0053
Q00330
0 0754
0 90858
0.0062
0.3381
0.1791


0.0045
0.0224
0.0000
1.0014
0.0000
0.0010
0.0
0. 0049
0 0061
0.0011
0.0012
0.0008
0.0055
0 0027
0.0012
0.0006
0.0002
0 0045
0.0043
0. 0098
0.0024
0.0004
0.0019
0 0039
0 0037
0. 0091
0 0180
0. 0082
0.0183
0 1274
0.0817
0 0064
0.0404
0. 3635


0.0003
0.0001



0 0032
0.0
0 0075
0.0037
0.0018
0.0014
0.0003
0.0208
0 .0059
0,0046
0.0018
0.0020
0.0077
0.0385
0.0200
0 0038
0.0011
0.0054
0. 0065
0.0439
0 0275
0.0221
0.0249
0.0254
0.1891
0.1513
0.0130
0.2485
0.4265


0 ^3C3
0.0903
0 0300
0.0000
0 0022
0.0000
1.0017
0 .0
003362
0.0054
0.0145
0.0043
0.0002
0.0100
0.0051
0. 0056
0.0339
0 0034
0.0564 6
0,0259 N
0.0473 '
0.0044
0.0 00P
0.0053
0.0096
0.0085
0.0164
0 0316
0.0155
0.0980
0 1 843
0.1934
0 *0127
0.0484
0.6.129









Table A3.--Broward county matrix of interdependence coefficients (continued)


Sector Name


.LIVESTOCK AND LIVI--.S"O'CK PRCD.
.CTHEF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS
.FORESTRY AND FISHERY PRCDLCTS
.AG, FORESTRY, FISHERY SEFV.
* NINING
CONSTRUCTIONN
.CRCNA',CC & ACC-30oCRTES
.FCC- AND KINDRED-PROD0UCTS
.TEXTILES & APPAREL
.LU'"PEP & WOOD PRODUCTS
FURNITUREE & FIXTURES
.PA-PE PRODUCTS
PRINTING & PUBLISHING
.CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
*PUcEGE & PLASTIC PRCDOJ:TS
.GLASS, STC.N- & CLAY C-oUCTS
.PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES
FABRICATEDD METAL PRODUCTS
.NGCI,;LECTI rC MACHI'A"_, ,
&ELECTRIC & ELECTRONIC EQUIP.
.AIRCRAFT AND MOTCR VEHICLES
.SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING
.INSTRUMENTS & r-LATED PRODUCTS
*CTHPEr MFG.
*PORT SERVICES
CTHER TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
COMMUN IC AT ION
.ELECTTF.iC GAS & SANITARY SERVE.
.WHCLESALE & RETAIL TRADE
.FINANCE & INSURANCE
*SERVICES
.GC'V? FNNMCNT Er.TRFPRISES
.CUMMY
SHCUSEHCLCS


Sector Number


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
1.0000
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0


0.0149
0.0091
0.0000
0.0009
0.300C
0.0013
0.0
1.0156
0.0025
0.0005
0.0009
0.0006
0,0103
0.0028

0.0071
0.0004
0.0178
0.0060
0.00 7
0.0019
0.0005
0.0022
0.0035
0.0105
0.0149
0.0142
0.0108
0.0474
0. 0914
0.1 C94
0.0077
0.0555
0.2624


0.0005
0 0029
0.0000
0.0005
0.0000
0.0014
0.0
0.0043
1 0342
0.0004
0.0014
0.0003
0.0074
0.0155
0.0034
0.0018
0.0002
0.0037
0.0069
0.0115
0. -0026
0.0006

0.0059
0.0116
0.0114
0 0199
0.0134
0.0399
0 1228
0.1 080
0.0097
0,0533
0.3822


0.0003
0. 0017
0.0003
0 '.' 334
0.000
0.0018
0.0
0.0051
0.0038
1. 0321
0.0026
0.0003
0.0109
0.0049
0. 3,-.. 7
0.0052
0.0007
0. 0138
0.0096
0.0142
O, C330
0.0008

0. 0062
0.0227
0.0187
0.0208
0.0150
0 0430
0 1284
0. 1222
0 0098
0 1031
0.4021


000003
0,0007
0 OOC 0 1
0,0005
0.0000
0.0019
0.0
0.0054
0.0160
0 0333
1.0126
0.0004
0 0086
0.0055
0.0159
0.0069
0.0032
0. 0358
0.0129
0.0185
0.0039
0.0007
0.0061
0.0060
0.0083
0.0144
0.0266
0.0155
0- 0560
0.1609
0.1445
0.0113
0.0519
0.5090


0.0002
0.0006
00000
0.0004
0.0000
0.0020
C0.
0. 0054
0.0051
0.0177
0. 0013
1.0047
0*0149
0.0093
0.0066
0.0017
0.0005
0.0099 I
0.0110 (
0.0132
0.0027
0.0006
0.0042
0.0056
0.0123
0.0220
0.0 198
0.0193
0.0446
0.1254
0.1228
00104
0.1054
0.3753




Table A3.--Broward county matrix of interdependence coefficients (continued)


Sector Name Sector Number

13 14 15 16 17 18

I .LIVESTOCK AND LIVESTOCK PRCD. 00003 0.0003 0.0003 0.0003 0.00C3 0.0003
2 .CTHER AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 0.0008 0.0007 0.0007 0.00C7 0.0006 0.0006
3 *FCORSTRY AND FISHERY PRODUCTS 0.0000 0.0000 0.00 00000 00000 0.0000
4 .AG, FORESTRY, FISHERY SERV. 0.0305 0.0004 0.0004 0.0005 0.0004 0.0004
5 .WINING 0.0000 0.0003 0.0000 0.0001 0.0054 0.0001
6 *CONSITUCTION 0.0023 0.0021 0.0018 0.00.26 00020 0.001
7 *CRCNANCE & ACCESSORIES 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
8 .FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 0.0058 0.0052 0.0052 0.3055 0.0056 0O00OA
9 .TEXTILES & APPAREL 0.0054 0.0023 0.0159 0.0051 0.0033 0.0039
10 .LU'-'PER g WOOD PRCDUCTS 0.0004 0.0007 0.0014 0.0013 0.0013 0.0015
11 .FURNITu.-R & FIXTURES 0.0019 0.0011 0.0017 0.0022 0.0013 0.00?3
12 .PAPEF 'RCDJCTS 0.0032 0.0006 0.0006 0,0000 0.0002 0.0003
13 *PRINTING & PUBLISHING 1.0650 0.0105 0.0108 0.0095 0.0135 0.0109
14 *CHEMICAL PFCOUCTS 0.0059 1.0421 0.0346 0.0066 0.0040 0.0042
15 *RUBBER & PLASTIC PRCDUCTS 0.0034 0.3072 1.0154 0.0067 0.0023 0.0045
16 .GLASS, STONE & CLAY PRODUCTS 0.0011 0.0048 0.0050 1.0529 0.0024 0.0039
17 .PRIMARY METAL INCUSTRIES 0.0005 0.0012 0.0007 0*0011 1.0138 0.0152
18 .FAERICATED METAL PFODUCTS 0.0100 0.0156 0.0151 0.0091 0.0132 1.032"3 0
19 .NONELECTFIC MACHINERY 0.0066 0.0135 0.0134 0.0191 0.0270 0.0407 .-
20 .ELECTRIC & ELECTRONIC E3UIP. 0.0166 0.0127 0.0158 0.0194 0.0276 0.0.58
21 .AIRCRAFT AND MOTCR VEHICLES 0.0038 0.0026 0.0041 0.0037 0.0036 0.0055
22 *SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING 0.0007 0.0005 0.0003 0.0007 0.0008 0.0020
23 .INSTRUIENTS & RELATED RqCDUCTS 0.0089 0.0040 0.0042 0.0037 0.0045 0.0057
24 .CTHER MFG. 0.0061 0.0115 0.0067 0.0070 0.0054 0.0052
25 *PORT SERVICES 0.0060 0.0109 0.0194 0.0140 0.0255 0.0089
26 .CTHER TRANSPCRTATION SERVICES 0.0127 0.0151 0.0158 0.0236 0.0233 0.0133
27 ,COMMUNICATION 0.0309 0.0185 0.023 00.0264 0.0201 0.0233
28 .ELECTRIC, GAS & SANITARY SERV. 0.0164 0.0210 0.0171 0.0308 0.0219 0.0151
29 a8HCLESALE & RETAIL TRADE 0.0417 0.0417 0.0387 0.0410 0.0412 0.0377
30 *FINANCE & INSURANCE 0.2107 0.1384 0.1402 0.1678 0.1185 0.1.399
31 .SERVICES 0.1798 0.1714 0.1441 0.1495 0.1248 0.1276
32 .GOVE F:.AENT ENTERPRISC 3 0.0247 0.0115 0.0107 0.0139 0.0107 0.0097
33 *DUMMY 0.0490 0.0652 0.0860 0.0640 0.1430 0.0614
34 .HOUSEHCLDS 0.5626 0.3382 0.4 338 0.5053 0.3854 0.4438








Table A3.--Broward county matrix of interdependence coefficients (continued)


Sector Name


.LIVESTOCK AND LIVESTOCK PROD.
.CTt-E AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS
.FCgESTRY AND FISHERY PRODUCTS
.AG, FORESTRY, FISHIRY SERVE.
.FINI NG
SCONSTRUCTI ON
ORDNANCEE & ACCESSORIES
.FOCD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS
.TEXTILES & APPAREL
.LUMBER & WCCCD PRODUCTS
.FURNITURE & FIXTUR;-S
.PAPER PRODUCTS
.PRINTING & PUBLISHING
.CHEMICAL PRODUCTS
*.UE3EF & PLASTIC PRODUCTS
.GLASS, STONE & CLAY PRODUCTS
.PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES
.FAERICATED METAL PRODUCTS
NONELECTRICC MACHINERY
*ELECTRIC & ELECTRONIC EQUIP.
.AIRCRAFT AND MOTOR VEHICLES
.SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING
.INSTRUMENTS & RELATED PRODUCTS
CTHER MFG.
.FCFT SERVICES
.CTHER TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
COMMUNICATET ION
.ELECTRIC, GAS & SANITARY SERVE.
.WHCLESALE & RETAIL TRADE
.FINANCE & INSURANCE
SERVICES
.GOVEFN"-EN"T ENTERPRISES

HOUSEHOLDSS


Sector Number


O.C004
0.0010
O* C 2 C. ,
0.0013
0.0000
0.0036
0.0
0.0065
0.0057
0.0008
0.0021
0.0004
0.0198
0.0037
0* 0037
0.0037
0.0025
0.0011
0.0116
0.0152
0.0242
-0. 9
0.0160
0.0079
0.0102
1.0761
0.0302
0.0321
0.0171
0.0233
0.2157
0.2048
0.0345
0.1866
0.5868


0.0003
0.0011
0.0000
0.0006
0.0000
0.0051
0.0
0.0064
0.0C50
0.0004
0.0019
0.0002
0.0102
0.0028
0.0043
0.0016
0.0006
0.0051
0.0090
0.0199
0.0066
0.0007
0.0037
0.0126
0.0067
1.0359
0.0317
0.0134
0.0501
0.2076
0.1722
0.0430
0.0558
0.5861


0.0003
0.0007
0.0000
0.0004
0.0000
0.0043
0.0
0.0051
0.0039
0.0003
00 016
0.00020
0.0113
0.0022
0 .0 022
0.0011
0.00003
0.0037
0.0050
0.0314
0.0034
0.0006
0.0032
0.0053
0.0045
0.0094
1.0280
0.0160
0..0214
0.1659
0. 1998
0.0144
0.0536
0.4816


0.0002
0.0004
0.0000
0.0003
0. 0000
0.006 8
0.0
0.0032
0.0025
0.0003
0.0010
0.0001
0.0054
0.0017
0.0014
0.0008
0.0003
0.0027
0.0041
0.0114
0.0021
0.0004
0.0017
0.0049
0.0057
0.0128
0.0159
1.1245
0.0151
0.1014
0. 0"869
0.1646
0.0320
0.3015


0*000a
0.0009
0.00009
0.00000
0.0012
0.0000
0.0025
0.0
0.3066
0.00-51
0.0006
0.0021
0.0003
0.0114
0.0032

0.0019
0.0003
0.0054
0.0080
C.0201
0.0045
0.0008
0.0044
0.0074
0.0059
0.0118
0.0332
0.0225
1.0361
0.2417
0.2053
0.0285
0.0484
0,6142


0.00C6
0.0013
0.0000
0.0015
0.0000
0.0069
0.0
0.0029
0.0022
0.0003
0.0000
0.0001
0.0079
0.0018
0. C 0 14
0.0010
0.0002
0.0020. o
0.0072
0.0108
0,3022
0.0004
0.0021
0.0037
0.0029
0.0074
0.0152
0.0101
0.0237
1.2146
0.1206
0.0213
0.0285
0.2 .31




iauJ.e AJ.--Drowara county matrix ot interdependence coefficients (continued)


Sector Name Sector Number


19 20 21 22 23 24
1 *LIVESTOCK AND LI'vSTOCK PF.CD. 0.0003 0.C00C3 00003 0.0003 C.0003 0 .0002
2 *CTHEER AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 0.0008 0.0008 0.0007 0.0008 0 0008 0 0033
3 .FCRESTRY AND FISHERY PRCOUCTS 00000 0000 0 .0000 0000 0.000 0.0000 00000
4 .AG, FORESTRY, FISHERY SERV. 0.0005 0.0005 0.0304 0 0006 0,0005 0.0004
5 .NINING 0.000 0.OOOC 0.0000 0.0000 0.000 0.0000
6 .CONSTRUCTION 0.0020 0.0021 0.0017 0.0022 0.0020 0 .022
7 *CRCNANCE G ACCESS'r-IES 000 03 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
8 .FCCD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 0.0063 0.0069 0.0054 0.0065 0.0061 0.0040
9 .TFXTILES & APPAREL 0.0047 0.0051 0.0065 0.0063 0.0066 0.0045
10 .LUNtER & WOCD PRODUCTS 0.0010 0.0011 0.0028 0.0094 300007 0.0017
11 *F4JRNITURE & FIXTURES 0.0023 0.0042 0.0027 0.0026 0.0026 0.0011
12 ,PAPER PRODUCTS 0.0003 0.0005 0 0002 0.0002 0.0006 0 0025
13 .PRINTING & PUBLISHING 0.0132 0.0143 0.0107 0.0098 0.0124 C. 096
14 CHfEMICAL PRODUCTS 0.0033 0.0056 0.0034 0.0044 0,0084 0.0059
15 .gRUEER & PLASTIC PRODUCTS 0.0065 0.0092 0.0091 0.0045 0.0087 0.0073-
16 .GLASS, STONi & CLAY -'!C'UCTS 0.0058 0.0104 0.0061 0.0086 0.0057 0.0021
17 *PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES 0.0076 0.0055 0.0061 0.0065 0.0040 0.0011
18 .FAERICATED METAL PRODUCTS 0.0314 0.0231 0.0446 0.0535 0.0255 0,C085
19 .NCNCLECTRIC MACI-t --" "RY 1.1495 0.0365 0.0620 0.1143 0.0238 0.0073
20 .ELECTRIC & ELECTRONIC EQUIP. 0.1107 1.2365 0.0623 0.0400 0.0937 0.0129
21 .AIRCRAFT AND :OTOR VEHICLES 0.0079 0.0070 1.0575 0,0073 0.0057 0.0022
22 .SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING 0OC20 0.0009 0.0014 1.0135 0.0010 0.0006
23 *INSTRUMENTS & RELATED PRODUCTS 0.0078 0.0118 0.0100 0.0068 1.0623 0.0033
24 .CTHER MFG. 0.0066 0.0070 0.0056 0.0067 0.0065 1.0211
25 .FCFT SERVICES 0.0106 0.0126 0*0073 0.0068 0.0099 0.0195
26 .CT-ER TRANSPORTATION SERVICES 0.0156 0.0177 0.0159 0.0145 0.0150 0.0166
27 COMMUNICATION't 0.0290 0.0312 0.0247 0.0329 0.0275 0.0140
28 *ELECTRICs GAS & SANITARY SERV. 0.0164 0.0182 0.0143 0.0187 0.0152 0.0140
29 UHOCLESALE & RETAIL TRADE 0.0563 0.0534 .0.0444 0.0630 0.0522 0.0302
30 *FINANCE & INSURANCE 0.1810 0.1879 0.1443 0.1879 0.1674 0.1115
31 sSERVICES 0.1608 0.1816 0.1496 0.1649 0.1717 0.1100
32 .GOVERNMENT ENTERPRISES 0.0122 0.0133 0.0108 0.0130 0.0120 0. 088
33 .CUMMY 0.0944 0.1128 0 0830 0.0567 0.0967 0.0781
34 .HOUSEHOLDS 0.5484 0.5833 0 4695 0.6328 0.5086 0.2616








Table A3.--Broward county matrix of interdependence coefficients (continued)


Sector Name Sector Number
31 32 33 34

1 .LIVESTOCK AND LIVESTOCK PFCD. 0.0004 0.0004 0.0005 0.0006
2 .CTHER AGRICULTURAL PRCOCUCTS 0.0010 0.0009 0.0014 0.0014
3 .FCRESTRY AND FISHERY PrCDUCTS 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000
4 .AG, FORESTRY, FISHERY SERV. 0.0007 0.0007 0.0003 0.0009
5 INING 00000 0.0000 0.0000 0 .000 00000
6 .CCNSTRUCTION 0.0030 0.0144 0.0011 0.0024
7 .CFrlANCE & ACCESSORIES 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
8 .FCCO AND KI.EF.-D PRODUCTS 0.0062 0.0070 0.0138 0.0115
9 .TEXTILES & APPAREL 0.0049 0.0056 0.0022 0.0093
10 .LUtBER & WGCD PRODUCTS 0.0004 0.0005 0.0003 0.0005
11 .FUFlITURE & FIXTLAS 0.0319 0.0022 0.0007 0.0039
12 .PAPER PRODUCTS 0.0307 0.0002 0.0010 0.0002
13 .PRINTING & PUSLISHING 0.0430 0.0121 0.0736 0.0121
14 .CHEMICAL PRODUCTS 0.0047 0.0042 0.0027 0.0044
15 .RUE3ER & PLASTIC PRODUCTS 0.0043 0.0030 0.0022 0.0034
16 .GLASS. STONE & CLAY PRODUCTS 0.3'25 0.0017 0.0012 0.0017
17 .PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES 00005 0.0004 0.0014 0.0004
18 .FABRICATED .-IETAL PRODUCTS 0.0104 0.0051 0.011 0.0054 o
19 *NCNELECTRIC MACHINERY 0.0141 0.0075 0.0123 0.0075 5
20 .ELECTRIC & ELECTRONIC EQUIP. 0.0246 0.0201 0.0264 0.0296
21 ,AIRCRAFT AND 'l2TCR. VEHICLES 0.0057 0,0047 0.0032 0.0076
22 .SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING 0.3007 0.001 0.0005 0.0014
23 .INSTRU'.E--rTS & RELATED PrCDUCTS 0.0083 0.0038 0.0151 0.0051
24 .CITHER MFG. 0.0077 0.0079 0.0105 0.0105
25 *PORT S::VICES 0.0057 0.0121 0.0079 0C0094
26 *CTHE1 TRANSPORTATION SERVICES 0.0115 0.."' 5 0.0989 0.0137
27 .COMMUNICATION 0.00'. 0.0345 0.0103 0.0592
28 .ELECTRIC, GAS & SANITARY SERV. 0.0220 0.0542 0.0064 0.0242
29 .&kHCLESALE & RETAIL TRADE 0.0451 0.0237 0.0189 0.0170
30 .FINANCE & INSURANCE 0.2230 0.2192 0.0693 0.2'39
31 .*SRVICES 1*2006 0.1830 0.1730 0.2456
32 .GOVEFN'/NT Er TLF. PRISES 0.0214 1.0191 0.0089 0.0168
33 CUMMY 0.0543- 0.0617 1.0994 0.0554
34 .HOLSEHCLDS 0.5678 0.6764 0.1879 1.2116




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