• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Credits
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Purpose of the study
 Method of gathering the data
 Methods of shipping to market
 Competition denied
 Methods of presentation
 Major crops
 Sub-major crops
 Minor crops
 Miscellaneous crops
 Summary
 Appendix














Group Title: Bulletin - University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; 238
Title: Florida truck crop competition.
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027681/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida truck crop competition.
Series Title: Bulletin - University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; 238
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Wann, John L.
Publisher: University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Publication Date: 1931
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027681
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Credits
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Introduction
        Page 5
    Purpose of the study
        Page 5
    Method of gathering the data
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Methods of shipping to market
        Page 7
    Competition denied
        Page 8
    Methods of presentation
        Page 9
    Major crops
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Sub-major crops
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Minor crops
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Miscellaneous crops
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
    Summary
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Appendix
        Page 85
        Page 86
Full Text


August, 1931


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
Wilmon Newell, Director








FLORIDA TRUCK CROP


COMPETITION


II. Intra-State


By JOHN L. WANN












Bulletins will be sent free upon application to the
Agricultural Experiment Station
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


Bulletin 238








BOARD OF CONTROL

P. K. YONGE, Chairman, Pensacola RAYMER F. MAGUIRE, Orlando
A. H. BLENDING, Bartow FRANK J. WIDEMAN, West Palm Beach
W. B. DAVIS, Perry J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary, Tallahassee

STATION EXECUTIVE STAFF
JOHN J. TIGERT, M.A., LL.D., President R. M. FULGHUM, B.S.A., Asst. Editor
WILMON NEWELL, D.Sc., Director IDA KEELING CRESAP, Librarian
H. HAROLD HUME, M.S., Asst. Dir., Re- RUBY NEWHALL, Secretary
search K. H. GRAHAM, Business Manager
S. T. FLEMING, A.B., Asst. Dir., Admin. RACHEL McQUARRIE, Accountant
J. FRANCIS COOPER, M.S.A., Editor

MAIN STATION-DEPARTMENTS AND INVESTIGATORS


AGRONOMY
W. E. STOKES, M.S., Agronomist
W. A. LEUKEL, Ph.D., Associate
G. E. RITCHEY, M.S.A., Assistant*
FRED H. HULL, M.S., Assistant
J. D. WARNER, M.S., Assistant
JOHN P. CAMP, M.S.A., Assistant

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
A. L. SHEALY, D.V.M., Veterinarian in
Charge
E. F. THOMAS, D.V.M., Asst. Veterinarian
R. B. BECKER, Ph.D., Associate in Dairy
Husbandry
W. M. NEAL, Ph.D., Assistant in Animal
Nutrition
C. R. DAWSON, B.S.A., Assistant Dairy
Investigations
CHEMISTRY
R. W. RUPRECHT, Ph.D., Chemist
R. M. BARNETTE, Ph.D., Associate
C. E. BELL, M.S., Assistant
J. M. COLEMAN, B.S., Assistant
H. W. WINSOR, B.S.A., Assistant
H. W. JONES, B.S., Assistant

COTTON INVESTIGATIONS
E. F. GROSSMAN, M.A., Assistant
P. W. CALHOUN. B.S., Assistant


-ECONOMICS, AGRICULTURAL
C. V. NOBLE, Ph.D., Agricultural Economist
BRUCE McKINLEY, A.B., B.S.A., Associate.
M. A. BROOKER, Ph.D., Assistant
ECONOMICS, HOME
OUIDA DAVIS ABBOTT, Ph.D., Head
L. W. GADDUM, Ph.D., Biochemist
C. F. AHMANN, Ph.D., Physiologist
ENTOMOLOGY
J. R. WATSON, A.M., Entomologist
A. N. TISSOT, M.S., Assistant
H. E. BRATLEY, M.S.A., Assistant
L. W. ZIEGLER, B.S., Assistant
HORTICULTURE
A. F. CAMP, Ph.D., Horticulturist
HAROLD MOWRY, B.S.A., Associate
M. R. ENSIGN, M.S., Assistant
A. L. STAHL, Ph.D., Assistant
G. H. BLACKMON. M.S.A., Pecan Culturist
C. B. VAN CLEEF, M.S.A., Greenhouse
Foreman
PLANT PATHOLOGY
W. B. TISDALE, Ph.D., Plant Patholorist
G. F. WEBER, Ph.D., Associate
A. H. EDDINS, Ph.D., Assistant
K. W. LOUCKS, M.S., Assistant
ERDMAN WEST, M.S., Mycologist


BRANCH STATIONS AND FIELD WORKERS
L. O. GRATZ, Ph.D., Asso. Plant Pathologist in charge, Tobacco Exp. Sta. (Quincye
R. R. KINCAID, M.S., Assistant Plant Pathologist (Quincy)
W. A. CARVER, Ph.D., Assistant Cotton Investigations (Quincy)
RAYMOND M. CROWN, B.S.A., Field Asst., Cotton Investigations (Quincy)
JESSE REEVES, Farm Superintendent, Tobacco Experiment Station (Quincy)
J. H. JEFFERIES, Superintendent, Citrus Experiment Station (Lake Alfred)
GEO. D. RUEHLE, Ph.D., Assistant Plant Pathologist (Lake Alfred)
W. A. KUNTZ, A.M., Assistant Plant Pathologist (Lake Alfred)
B. R. FUDGE, Ph.D., Assistant Chemist (Lake Alfred)
W. L. THOMPSON, B.S., Assistant Entomologist (Lake Alfred)
R. V. ALLISON, Ph.D., Soils Specialist in charge Everglades Experiment Sta. (Belle Gladei
R. W. KIDDER, B.S., Foreman, Everglades Experiment Station (Belle Gladel
R. N. LOBDELL, M.S., Assistant Entomologist (Belle Glade)
F. D. STEVENS, B.S., Sugarcane Agronomist (Belle Glade)
H. H. WEDGEWORTH, M.S., Associate Plant Pathologist (Belle Glade)
B. A. BOURNE, M.S., Associate Plant Physiologist (Belle Glade)
J. R. NELLER, Ph.D., Associate Biochemist (Belle Glade)
A. DAANE, Ph.D., Associate Agronomist (Belle Glade)
FRED YOUNT, Office Assistant (Belle Glade)
M. R. BEDSOLE, M.S.A., Assistant Chemist (Belle Glade)
A. N. BROOKS, Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist (Plant City)
R. E. NOLEN, M.S.A., Field Assistant in Plant Pathology (Plant City)
A. S. RHOADS, Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist (Cocoa)
C. M. TUCKER, Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist (Hastings)
H. S. WOLFE, Ph.D., Asso. Horticulturist in charge, Sub-Trop. Exp. Sta. (Homestead)
L. R. TOY, B.S.A., Assistant Horticulturist (Homestead)
STACY O. HAWKINS, M.A., Field Assistant in Plant Pathology (Homestead)
D. G. A. KELBERT, Field Assistant in Plant Pathology (Bradenton)
FRED W. WALKER, Assistant Entomologist (Monticello)
D. A. SANDERS, D.V.M., Associate Veterinarian (West Palm Beach)
M. N. WALKER, Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist (Leesburg)
W. B. SHIPPY, Ph.D., Assistant Plant Pathologist (Leesburg)
C. C. GOFF, M.S. Assisant Entomologist ILeesburg)
J. W. WILSON, Ph.D., Assistant Entomologist (Pierson)
*In cooperation with U. S. Department of Agriculture.












CONTENTS


INTRODUCTION ....--- -..... --.. ..-- ..------------.....
PURPOSE OF STUDY ....... .............. -- ..--
METHOD OF GATHERING THE DATA.. --------..---..--
METHODS OF SHIPPING TO MARKET -..- -.-......-- ...- .
COMPETITION DEFINED .-........-............ -------- -----.-------
METHODS OF PRESENTATION ...............------------------
MAJOR CROPS ...........-.-- ....--
W atermelons .. ......................... .... ----- ....
Celery .............. -........... ....... .... ------.- --. ---- .--
Tom atoes ..... --.- .....- .... .........
Green Beans .. .................. ....... .---
Early White Potatoes .......----....... ---------.................-
Cabbage ... ...- ........ ....- -------------------------
Cucumbers --..... ---.......- --- --------....... ... ...


Peppers


..---.. ---_- .... -- ............... 39


Straw berries .......... ...- ..- -..... .............................
SUB-MAJOR CROPS -.........- ...- ..- .-....- ...... .......
Lettuce ......- ..-.---------............--
Escarole .... .-- ..-- -- .. -- ---.....--... ....... ..
Eggplants --.....-... ---.... ..... ........
Romaine ..... ....-- --... -..... ...-- ... ... ...-..-......
Green Corn ..--...... --.---------..... -.... ....-....
Squashes ..-- ...-- .. .... .........
Okra .. --....... -- -- ...-........--... ........
Green Peas ..--------- .. -----... ............
M INOR CROPS .......-...... .. ..-.... .....
Cauliflower -................ -------------------... .........
Avocados ..... ...... -...-- ... ..... .... ...
Cantaloupes .......... .. .. ....... .. .......... .....
Grapes -.....---.... ------........... .....
Pineapples ........ .... .................. ..... ........ ....... ..... ..
Blueberries .....---------...........---- ---- -----...........-.
MISCELLANEOUS CROPS .............- -.- ----.-....--.
Mixed Greens .....----.-- ..... ........--. ..... ........ ....
Collards ............... ...--- ...---------------------------
Sorrel
Sorrel ---------------------... ........---...... ... ..... .
SUMMARY ...............
A PPENDIX ............. .........


43
45
45
48
50
53
55
58
62
65
68
68
69
70
70
71
71
72
75
77












FLORIDA TRUCK CROP'

COMPETITION2
II. Intra-State
By JOHN L. WANN

INTRODUCTION
Florida Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition, is a
study of the competition of Florida with other states and for-
eign countries in the marketing of truck crops. This bulletin
is a continuation of the above study, but is confined to the
State of Florida.
PURPOSE OF THE STUDY
The purpose of this study is to learn how Florida trucking
areas compete among themselves, to determine the degree of
keenness of that intra-state competition, and to attempt to
designate the production areas for each crop. Also, it is hoped
to see whether the competition can be decreased, in some cases,
by earlier or later planting as the case may be, thus permitting
the shipment of a greater total number of cars but with lower
peaks spread over a longer period of time.
METHOD OF GATHERING THE DATA
The data come from the three principal modes of transporta-
tion: freight, express and boat (Figs. 1 and 2).
To obtain the number of carloads shipped by freight, a count
was made of the number of carloads of each commodity from the
original conductors' waybills. These waybills are the records
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS: Much credit is due the railway companies,
the Railway Express Agency and the water transportation companies which
furnished the data from their books and records and made this study pos-
sible.
This study was made under the direction of Drs. C. V. Noble and J. E.
Turlington. Mr. Marvin A. Brooker, Mr. Bruce McKinley and Dr. C. V.
Noble assisted in the field work. Mr. H. A. Marks, Agricultural Statis-
tician, United States Department of Agriculture, helped determine the
areas for each commodity. To these and to any other persons who assisted
in the preparation of this work, the writer expresses his thanks.
'This study also includes some fruit crops other than citrus.
'This is in substance a thesis prepared to meet in part the require-
ments of the Graduate Council of the University of Florida for the degree
of Master of Science in Agriculture.









FLORIDA TRUCK CROP'

COMPETITION2
II. Intra-State
By JOHN L. WANN

INTRODUCTION
Florida Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition, is a
study of the competition of Florida with other states and for-
eign countries in the marketing of truck crops. This bulletin
is a continuation of the above study, but is confined to the
State of Florida.
PURPOSE OF THE STUDY
The purpose of this study is to learn how Florida trucking
areas compete among themselves, to determine the degree of
keenness of that intra-state competition, and to attempt to
designate the production areas for each crop. Also, it is hoped
to see whether the competition can be decreased, in some cases,
by earlier or later planting as the case may be, thus permitting
the shipment of a greater total number of cars but with lower
peaks spread over a longer period of time.
METHOD OF GATHERING THE DATA
The data come from the three principal modes of transporta-
tion: freight, express and boat (Figs. 1 and 2).
To obtain the number of carloads shipped by freight, a count
was made of the number of carloads of each commodity from the
original conductors' waybills. These waybills are the records
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS: Much credit is due the railway companies,
the Railway Express Agency and the water transportation companies which
furnished the data from their books and records and made this study pos-
sible.
This study was made under the direction of Drs. C. V. Noble and J. E.
Turlington. Mr. Marvin A. Brooker, Mr. Bruce McKinley and Dr. C. V.
Noble assisted in the field work. Mr. H. A. Marks, Agricultural Statis-
tician, United States Department of Agriculture, helped determine the
areas for each commodity. To these and to any other persons who assisted
in the preparation of this work, the writer expresses his thanks.
'This study also includes some fruit crops other than citrus.
'This is in substance a thesis prepared to meet in part the require-
ments of the Graduate Council of the University of Florida for the degree
of Master of Science in Agriculture.









FLORIDA TRUCK CROP'

COMPETITION2
II. Intra-State
By JOHN L. WANN

INTRODUCTION
Florida Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition, is a
study of the competition of Florida with other states and for-
eign countries in the marketing of truck crops. This bulletin
is a continuation of the above study, but is confined to the
State of Florida.
PURPOSE OF THE STUDY
The purpose of this study is to learn how Florida trucking
areas compete among themselves, to determine the degree of
keenness of that intra-state competition, and to attempt to
designate the production areas for each crop. Also, it is hoped
to see whether the competition can be decreased, in some cases,
by earlier or later planting as the case may be, thus permitting
the shipment of a greater total number of cars but with lower
peaks spread over a longer period of time.
METHOD OF GATHERING THE DATA
The data come from the three principal modes of transporta-
tion: freight, express and boat (Figs. 1 and 2).
To obtain the number of carloads shipped by freight, a count
was made of the number of carloads of each commodity from the
original conductors' waybills. These waybills are the records
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS: Much credit is due the railway companies,
the Railway Express Agency and the water transportation companies which
furnished the data from their books and records and made this study pos-
sible.
This study was made under the direction of Drs. C. V. Noble and J. E.
Turlington. Mr. Marvin A. Brooker, Mr. Bruce McKinley and Dr. C. V.
Noble assisted in the field work. Mr. H. A. Marks, Agricultural Statis-
tician, United States Department of Agriculture, helped determine the
areas for each commodity. To these and to any other persons who assisted
in the preparation of this work, the writer expresses his thanks.
'This study also includes some fruit crops other than citrus.
'This is in substance a thesis prepared to meet in part the require-
ments of the Graduate Council of the University of Florida for the degree
of Master of Science in Agriculture.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


kept and turned in by the conductor when he returns to his
headquarters from his trip into the state to get his trainload of
freight.
All express points in the state were visited where, in the
opinion of the officials of the Railway Express Agency, there was
movement of any quantity of truck crops by this mode. The
express data are an actual count of each hamper or other con-
tainer of each commodity recorded on the express waybill by
the express agent when the commodity was shipped from his
station. Data were obtained from 306 shipping points (Fig.
2). Several shipping points have two express offices.


Figure 1.-Points through which freight shipment
of Florida trunk crops passed before leaving the
state; also the three ports for boat shipping.
season 1928-29.
X Freight points
0 Boat points


Boat shipments of Florida truck crops moved from the state
at three points, viz. Jacksonville, Miami and Tampa. The boat
captain keeps a record similar to that of the freight conductor.
The data herein were obtained either from the reports of boat
captains or from the books of the various ship companies.
The crates, hampers, or other containers of the express and
boat shipments were converted to equivalent carloads. Equiva-
lent carloads mean the average number of crates, hampers, or






Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


other containers in a car. This was actually determined for 13
commodities as shown in Table I in the appendix. For other
commodities the estimates of railroad officials who work with
these shipments from day to day were accepted.
The data for this study are for the year September 1, 1928 to
August 31, 1929, inclusive.


Figure 2.-=ap of express stations visited
in gathering data, season 1928-29.
(306 towns and cities).


fote: Points in northwest Florida were not
visited because the authorities reported'
the movement from that section by express
was negligible.


In 1929 Florida shipped 12,465 mixed carloads of fruits and
vegetables, of which 2,978 were vegetables and the rest were
citrus'. The freight records do not show the names of the com-
modities contained in these mixed cars.
No attempt was made to ascertain the amount of these crops
that is moved by auto trucks, nor of the amount consumed with-
in the state.

METHODS OF SHIPPING TO MARKET

A total of 50,705.3 equivalent carloads of truck crops went out
of the state during the 1928-29 season, as shown in Table LX.

'United States Department of Agriculture. Shipping Fruits and Vege-
tables in Mixed Carloads. Report for August 1930. (Mimeographed.)






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Of this grand total, 1,871 carloads, or 3.7 percent, went by boat,
4,037 carloads, or 8 percent, went by express, and 44,792 carloads,
or 88.3 percent, went by freight. (Table I.)

TABLE I.-QUANTITIES AND PERCENTAGES OF FLORIDA TRUCK CROPS SHIP-
PED BY DIFFERENT METHODS, SEASON 1928-29.*


Crop


Watermelons .......
Celery ..................
Tomatoes ............
Green Beans --......
Early White Po-
tatoes ..............
Cabbage ................
Cucumbers ..........
Peppers ...........
Strawberries ......
Lettuce ................
Escarole ...............
Eggplants .....--.
Romaine .............
Green Corn ......
Squashes ............--
Okra ................-
Green Peas ........


EQUIVALENT CARLOADS
By By By
Freight Express Boat


9,960
8,731
7,169
3,116

4,907
3,034
2,159
1,613
1,620
902
675
202
290
272
22

31


17
241
2,043

14
5
145
329
524
34
1
116
3
21
179
227
85


2
845
133

342
134
4
357
1

11

35
3


By By
Freight Express

100 ................
99.8 .2
86.9 2.9
58.9 38.6

93.2 .3
95.6 .2
93.5 6.3
70.2 14.3
75.5 24.4
96.4 3.6
99.9 .1
61.4 35.3
99 1
92.8 7.2
9.3 75.9
100
26.1... 71.4


*Crops shipped in less than 100 carloads per year omitted, also frac-
tional carloads omitted.
tWeekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.

Of the nine major crops green beans, peppers and straw-
berries figured high in the movement by express, while the per-
centage of tomatoes, peppers and early white potatoes going by
boat was rather high.
It is to be expected that these percentages vary for many of
these crops for different years. It was said by express agents,
for example, that the proportion of strawberries moving by ex-
press is often greater than for the year in question. Volume
and price of the commodity determine, more than any other
factors, the method of shipment to be used.

COMPETITION DEFINED

There are many things which have a bearing on competition.
Among them are market demand, season of production, price,
destination, different types of the same crop, number of areas,
competition from other commodities, number of pickings, time
of shipment and competition from other states and imports.


PERCENT OF TOTAL SHIPPED


By
Boat


t
10.2
2.5

6.5
4.2
.2
15.5
.1

3.3

14.8
2.5








Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


Since all the above factors have a bearing on competition, the
following is a very broad definition of the term: There is com-
petition when one unit of a commodity is prevented from selling
for what it would have sold had not the second unit been pro-
duced.
METHODS OF PRESENTATION

For the purpose of better presentation of these data the 51
truck crops (including some fruits) have been divided into
major, sub-major, minor, and miscellaneous crops. The basis
for this classification is the car-lot shipments from the state for
the season 1928-29, and not the value of the commodities.
Since volume was the first consideration, the commodities are
discussed in the order of their equivalent car-lot movement. The
first nine crops fall naturally into one group because they are of
major importance in the state. There was a difference of 1,208.9
equivalent carloads between strawberries, the crop with the
smallest volume in the major group, and lettuce, the crop with
the largest volume in the sub-major group. No doubt lettuce,
escarole, eggplant, and some of the other sub-major crops are


17? 30
55 46 32


65 62 61 12
23 19 34 4 10

15 1 54
18

64
Figure 3.-Alphabetical list of counties in Florida 9 35
Numbered to agree with key map. 60
1. Alachma 23. Gulf 45. Nasga 51 5
2. Baker 24. Hamilton 46. Okaloosa
3. Bay 25. Harder 47. Okeechobee 53 49
4.* Bradford 26. Hendry 48. Orange 29
5. Brerard 27. Harnando 49. Oceola 31
6. Broward 28. Highlands 50. Palm Beach
7. Calhoun 29. Hilllboro 51. Pasco 47
8. Chatlotte 30. Holmes 52. Pinellas
9. Citrus 31. Indian River 53. polk 6 14
10. Clay 32. Jackson 54. Putnam
11. Collier 33. Jefferson 55. Santa Rosa 22
12. Columbia 34. Lafayette 56. Sarasota 50
13. Dado 35. Lake 57. Seminole 36 26
14. DeSoto 36. Lee 58. St. Johns
15. Dixie 37. Leon 59. St. Iucei
16. Dural 38. Levy 60. Sumter 11 6
17. EBcambia 39. Liberty 61. Suwannee
18. Flagler 40. Madison 62. Taylor
19. Franklin 41. Manatee 63. Union 13
20. Gadsden 42. Marion 64. Volusia
21. Gilchrist 43. Martin 65. Wakulla
22. Glades 44. Monroe 66. Walton
67. Washington






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


of major importance in certain local sections of the state, but it
has been found convenient to place in the sub-major group all
those crops of which between 100 and 1,000 carloads were ship-
ped during the year. All crops of which from 10 to 100 car-
loads were shipped were placed in the minor crops group, and
those under 10 carloads were considered in the miscellaneous
group.
Data for the major and sub-major crops have been presented
in four ways: the text, tables showing weekly summaries of
equivalent car-lot shipments of each commodity for the year,
tables showing the weekly summary of equivalent car-lot ship-
ments of each commodity by areas for the year, and maps of
Florida showing equivalent car lots of each commodity by coun-
ties and areas. The minor and miscellaneous crops have been
presented by means of text, and tables showing the weekly
summary of equivalent car-lot shipments of each commodity for
the year. The principal factors considered in determining the
production areas for the different truck crops were: Time of
shipment; geographic location; methods of production as in-
fluenced by type of soil, topography, drainage, land values, etc.;
and advice of growers, shippers and others directly interested in
the truck crop industry of Florida. It was not deemed feasible
to cross county boundaries in designating areas. The areas
were numbered in the order in which their first shipment was
made.
For the convenience of the reader who may not be entirely
familiar with the counties of Florida, a key map of the state has
been included. (Fig. 3.)

MAJOR CROPS

TABLE II.-TOTAL EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA MAJOR
TRUCK CROPS, SEASON 1928-1929.
Equivalent
Crop Carloads
W atermelons ...........................--.......-..... ... 9,960.2
Celery ..----............................... ... 8,749.8
Tom atoes .....-...............-.. .......-............... 8,255.4
Green Beans ........................................ ....... 5,291.7
Early W hite Potatoes .................................. 5,262.5
Cabbage .....................--- ....... ....---............ ....... 3,173.1
Cucum bers ..................................................... 2,307.5
Peppers ......................................................... 2,299.3
Strawberries .................................................. 2,144.8





Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


WATERMELONS

During the season of 1929 Florida shipped 9,960.2 equivalent
carloads of watermelons (Table III). The first cars moved from
the state that year near the middle of April. Within the state
there are at least four important areas (Table IV), as shown in
Fig. 4, and they do compete. The extreme southern area, in-
cluding all counties south of Polk County and designated as Area
1, came on the market first during the week ending April 20
with 5 carloads. The peak for that area occurred May 11 (Table
IV) when 85.2 carloads were shipped. This area had no com-
petition from other states, and imports were negligible'. This
suggests a possible opening for a slight increased production in
this area during March, April and early May. There is the pos-
sibility that the public may be taught to consume more water-
melons in cool weather, as has been done with ice cream.


Figure 4.-Zquivalent car-lot shipments of
Florida watermelons by counties and areas.
1929. (Less than 1 carload omitted).
Total for state 9960.2 carloads.

SArea 1 240 carloads
] Area 2 3742 carloads
SArea 3 3340 carloads
] Area 4 2638 carloads


The next area to ship was Area 2 (including Marion, Sumter,
Orange, Polk and Lake counties) which started the week end-

'Noble, C. V., and Marvin A. Brooker. Florida Truck Crop Competition.
Fla. Agri. Exp. Sta. Bul. 224: 1931.













TABLE III.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA WATERMELONS BY COUNTIES, 1929*


April

May



June




July


Sa

a 0 p
a: -
8 1 a
~ 3 -


Weeks Ending -.

a a



20.............................. 3 2 ... ........
27............................. 3 8 ..- ..
27----------------------- 1 8
4 3 14 5 4
114...-............. ... .. 1 17 4 2
18-...........---............... 1 1 --- 3
25..............---.......... -- 1 I. --- .... -
1-.............................--- ----------- ... .-------
8----............................... ........
15----------------- ----- ----------- .......
15....................... ............ I.. ......... i ..........
22...........----................... ...--- ...--. 1
29................................ i ............I .......- - ......... ........
6.-...-----.. ---------- ....--....... -------....---- ...----
6-------------------------------
13................... ...... ... ..... .........-- -


Total..................... 21 43 | 9 10


7
11
6
2


------------


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


6
12
8
7
3
2


1
2


..-..-------
-----------.


Sa
a


17
67
267
362
494
225
70
8


------------
3
10
6
6
1


S 3 1 10 2.......................6

38 3 1510 26


CS
a




............. ... .......


56 1 .2
80 1 ....
6 0 1 1 .- -
59 368 ............
46 664 ...
18 311 ...
............ 59
............ 5 ............
............ 1 .... ... ..

3 --------- 41 .-----------

328 1421 .2


5
23
11
7
6
2


::.









TABLE III.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA WATERMELONS
BY COUNTIES, 1929*-Continued.


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.












TABLE III.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA WATERMELONS
BY COUNTIES, 1929*-Continued.


Weeks
Ending


April 20 ........ ........
27 ......-. .......
May 4 ........ .......
11 ....... -.. --..
18 .......- .-....
25 ........ .....
June 1 ........ 2
8 ...... 75
15 ....... 311
22 ....... 415
29 ........ 264
July 6 ....... 18
13 ....... 1


Total.... 1086


pi

u
0

U


-- --- -- -





7
15
50
3
3



78


2
1


0


- 0
.W ,-


3
601
406
220
21
4


714


9
-- i




I
------------
------------
------------


0

0




-----------
----- -------


----- ------


1----- ---- -- 10

1 | 10


............
- --- --------- 1

.I !!..... ............
0













1---- 3
---1--






1 4


12
74
29
6
3


124 9960.2
124 1 9960.2


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


0



5
21
74
224.2
555
893
1999
2608
1543
1301
663
65
9


I






Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


TABLE IV.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA WATERMELONS BY AREAS, 1929.*
Weeks
Ending Area 1t Area 2t Area 3t I Area 4t I Total

A pril 20.......... 5 ......... .. -...... .................... ..-..... ........ 5
27.......... 21 ..--....................... ....... .. .. ........ ..... 21
M ay 4.....-.... 48 26 ................ ................ 74
11 ....... 85.2 138 1 ................ 224.2
18 40 514 1 555


25-........ 24
June 1.......... 11
8 ........ 5
15.....1.... ...............
22......... 1
29... ... .............

July 6...................
13......... ..............

Total ........ 240.2


854 15 -------...
1,243 740 5
735 1,700 168
202 781 560
27 96 1,177
2 5 656
1 1 63

..3,742 3,340 2,638
3,742 3,340 2,638


893
1,999
2,608
1,543
1,301
663
65
9

9,960.2


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.
tSee Fig. 4 for counties included.


ing May 4; then came Area 3 (including Alachua, Gilchrist, and
Levy counties) the week ending May 11; and the week of June
1 Area 4 (all counties north of Alachua, also West Florida)
started shipping. The peak for Area 2 was June 1 with 1,243
carloads. The peak for Area 3 occurred the following week.
Two weeks later, June 22, Area 4 had its peak and shipped
1,177 carloads. The total shipments from all areas during the
heaviest week, June 8, was 2,608 carloads. It would seem very
probable that keen competition occurs within the state itself,
especially since some of the areas ship their highest amount
only one and two weeks apart. It is true that later in the sum-
mer when the weather is warmer a much larger weekly volume
of watermelons goes on the markets and is sold and consumed,
but at a price at which Florida cannot compete with states
farther north.
CELERY

Florida shipped 8,749.8 carloads of celery during the season
1928-29 (Table II). Unlike watermelons, which were shipped
from several counties, the bulk of celery moved from only three
counties-Manatee, Sarasota and Seminole. In fact 73.6 percent
of the total carloads from the state originated in Seminole
County. There are two distinct areas growing celery (Fig. 5).





TABLE V.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA CELERY BY COUNTIE, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending


Dec. 29.................. .2
Jan. 5.............. ..-......
12..................... 3.1
19..................... 43.4
26................... 16.6
Feb. 2 .................... 40.2
9................ 45.1
16..... .......-........ 43.3
23..................-.. 40.2
Mar. 2..............-....... 45.2
9 ...................... 16.1
16..........-. ..I 8
23................... 30.1
30................... 17
Apr. 6-.................. 1
13.....-...........-.... 9
20...................... 12.1
27................... 42.3
May 4.................. 147
11................ 168.2
18...............I..... 132.2
25... --............ 19
June 1 ..................... 15
8..................... 8
15............................
22.................... ............
29....-.............- .............

Total ..-........... 902.3


C)


1)0,
o~ o


a)


..... -......... ...... ...... --... ...................
. . -- .- -


6 2 .... ... ..........
34.2 55.3 1 .3 ..........
79.2 157.1 I....... .1
108.1 229.5 -..............
109.2 293.4 I..............
119.1 450.6 ....... .1
80.2 584.4 .......... 1
57.1 563.5 I 1 1.1
34.1 592.8 I...... 4
30.1 18.2 ......... ........
53.3 845.3 ......... 6
30.1 695.4 ........... 6
40 501.6 -.....................
122.1 486.4 .7 4
98.1 265.5 ........... 6
57.1 189.5 --......... 5
78.2 182.2 1.......... 10
56.2 132.3 -........ 8
15.1 44 -.... 11
1 109 I-........ 3
1 29 -....-- 1
.1 10 I........ .. ........
....1 |.....................
......---......... 2 .. ........... .........
,209 ........... ......6 6,440 ---2 166.3

1,209.6 6,440 I 2 66.3


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


CI 0
.4.)


_1 .~. .. -
B J2


5


3
1
1.1
5
4
3
1
.2

1.1
2
1

1
1
2
3

50.5


.......... -------- !
1 --..
9 -- -

4 ...... .. ......
1 .1
10 ---....
2 ........
4 1------

---------- .----------







1.. .........
S---- ----











28 i .1
.. . ----- -
- ------- | ...-- -

.......... ------- --

---------- ------ --

28 |.1


.0





....... I---------- i----------1
- ... -
........ -- --1
- ... ...3


..........
-.....- ... I


.---1 -

-----------
----------
-------------
-----------


---------- 1----------










1 .......... /
.......... .........






---.. ..... 4
----.--.-- 4
2 3

.......... 8
S 2




5 32


388.8
450.7
618.1
708.9
683
653
61.3
936.8
757.5
549.6
626.2
383.7
296.1
430.4
369.8
209.3
135
54
21.1
6
4
3

8,749.8


.2

.2
1.2


25fi9


.






Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


Figure 5.--Equivalent car-lot shipments of
Florida celery by counties and areas,
season 1928-29. (Less than 1 carload omitted).
Total for state 8749.8 carloads.

SArea 1 2112 carloads
SArea 2 6506 carloads


They are the Manatee-Sarasota and the Seminole-Orange Areas.
Another district which is comparatively new could be designated
as a separate area if it shipped larger amounts. It is Brevard
County. This district is unique in that during the time of this
study it put its entire product on the market late, after the first
of May. The growers there evidently planned to grow celery
to market after Seminole County had nearly finished (Table
V). They encountered direct competition with the second peak
of the Manatee-Sarasota area. It appears that the Manatee-
Sarasota area manipulated its production so as to have two
peaks which were quite wide apart as to time on the market,
and thus they partly missed the strong competition from Area
2 which had several weeks of rather heavy shipments (Table
VI). The low shipments shown for the week of March 16 from
Area 2 were due to a voluntary abatement of shipping on the
part of the dealers and growers for the purpose of improving the
price.






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


TABLE VI.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA CELERY BY AREAS, SEASON 1928-29.*


I I I
Weeks Ending | Area It Area 2t Other
I I Countiest



n. 5 ----.... ...... .....-- ..... ---.............. ------..... --
12..-......-.....-.... 9.1 2
19................... 77.6 55.3 .3
26.................. 95.8 157.2 6


Feb. 2.......
9.....-..
16......--
23 -.....

Mar 2 .......
9 -- -- -
16. .....
23 .....
30 ......

Apr. 6.........
13.........
20.........
27.........

May 4..-.....-
11.........
18.........
25.........


148.3
154.3
162.4
120.4

102.3
50.2
38.1
83.4
47.1

41
131.1
110.2
99.4

225.2
224.4
147.3
20


June 1................... 16
8------ 8.1
15..........I.... ... 8.1
15....................|.,........... ............
22.......... ---.... ..................
29.................- ................


Total .....- 2,111.9
I I


229.5
293.4
450.7
585.4

564.6
596.8
18.2
851.3
701.4

501.6
490.4
271.5
194.5

192.2
140.3
55
112

30
10
1
2



6,506.3


11
3
5
3.1

16.1
6
5
2.1
9

7
4.7
2
2.2

13
5.1
7
3

8
3
5
2
3


131.6


Total


.2


11.1
133.2
259

388.8
450.7
618.1
708.9

683
653
61.3
936.8
757.5

549.6
626.2
383.7
296.1

430.4
369.8
209.3
135

54
21.1
6
4
3


8,749.8


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.
tSee Fig. 5 for counties included.


TOMATOES

A total of 8,255.4 equivalent carloads of tomatoes were shipped
from Florida during the season 1928-29. Tomatoes are grown
for market over most of the state south of Union County (Fig.
6), and they can be produced around Homestead in Dade County
continuously from early November to the end of May (Table
VII). The state has been divided into three large tomato pro-
ducing areas (Fig. 6). Eleven southern counties constitute
Area 1. This area produced 5,181.8 carloads of tomatoes in
1928-29, and had an extremely long season.


......... ..|
.-.---------
------------)






TABLE VII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA TOMATOES BY COUNTIES, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending
a3 6 0

0 i- B 0


Nov. 3 .................... .3 ............ ........
10...................... 10.8 ...................
17...................... 40.2 ............ ........
24...................... 37.5 .1 .
Dec. 1 ... .... 57.8 2 .1 3
8 ............... 72.1 1.7 .1
15 ..................... 117.8 5 5.1
22 ............ ... 95.9 6.7 6.3 ........
29................ 56.4 8.8 6.1
Jan. 5 ......... 68.3 5.8 9.6
12 .................... 60.4 10.9 4.4
19................ 131.6 7.3 12.6 ....
26...................... 123.2 8.7 11.5
Feb. 2................... 171.3 7.7 14
9...................... 209.2 4.3 6.9
16...................... 265.1 4.1 15.7 ...
23 ....... ...... 304.7 5.2 16.9
Mar. 2 .................... 294.5 1.2 14.5
9...................... 266.6 .4 17.9 ........
16................ 340.1 .2 30.1 ....
23...................... 300.1 .2 37.1
30...................... 287.6 .5 60.8
Apr. 6...................... 165.3 .3 50
13...................... 107.9 1.9 61
20.................... 119.6 1.1 54.5
27................. 58 1.6 31 1
May 4........ ........ 32 .3 27.2 2
11 ............... 13.8 .3 31.9 ..
18...................... 7.7 ......... 14.5 3
25 ................ 1.3 ............ 1.1 2
June 1.............. .5 ....................... 3
8 ............. ....... ......... ..... ... ............ 1
15...................... .. ....... ... .............. 1
22................... ........ ..... ............ .....
29....... ........ .... ........... ...... ................


Total -............ 3,817.6 86.3 540.9 16


1
............

1

1
.. ....... ..........1



.... ..... ....... 3.
3
.... ..... ...... 6
.... ............ 3
... ... ........ 3
.... ............ 4

. .......... 3
.... ............ 13
. .4........


.... ............ ........ 3
1 1
.... ............ 1






... 1 ............
.. I - -


11.5 30


.1



1
1


---.----...-











1.1
.3
.8
.7
.1


I








1
3.1
1.1
5.2
2.6
3.4
1.3
3.1
2.1
1.2
3.4
4.4
9.2
15.1
24
46
19
16
7
14.1
12
8
: 1 1 1 1


5.1 202.3


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


1 0



--- ...... ...... ....... ............- ............


a........ ... 0 ... -. ..........
a........... a a. a .... ............
.1

........... | 1 -- .
.. .. .I :::: .

............ .



.3 1 .1 .2 .2 .3
1.9 .... 2.2 .1 1.3
1.9 ... ........ 3 .3 ............ 1.7
2.9 4.1 .......... .......... 6.7
5.6 1.3 ............. ....... 6.4
5.2 ... ..... ........... .2 ......... .... ......... 8.4
12 6 ............ ........ .3 .............. .......... 16.7
8 6 ......... ... .. ... .. .1 ....... ... ... 12.6
11 1........ ... ...... 4 ........ ............ 6.5
11.7 ... .. ............ .2 .... .. .......... 5.3
9 .5 ....... .......... .6 ........... ............ 1.1
8.5 ..... ....... .3 ......... .3 .2
7.8 ........... .1 12.1 2.1 .1 2.1
6.5 5.3 44.3 36.1 .2 1.1
19.1 18.7 101.5 187.7 .1 1.1
14.1 .1 32.6 91.5 345.2 2.1 1.3
36.5 i .1 34.8 67.6 332 1.1 1
41.7 .4 30.9 46.5 188.1 .1 ............
32.2 ] .4 16.2 24.6 40.3 ... ....
8.6 .2 2.1 2.4 4.3 ............ ............
.2 I .1 .3 .2 1.2 ............ ............
I .1 .... .. 1.1

1. ..1 1 ..



246.7 1.5 141.3 404.6 1,138.8 4.2 73.8


1








.1
.4
.5
.4
2.1
4.4
9.3
23.1
36.3
23.1
4







104.7


[-


U


-------1---




............ I-


.......... ... ......2




........ 1.3
....... .5

I .1
........... 1.2
.......... .1
... I 3.1






3.1 36
.1 I 2.
........... | .2
.11 .2

2 12.4
3 33.5
3.2 43.3
3.1 36
.1 I 25
1 5








15.7 165










TABLE VII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA TOMATOES BY COUNTIES,

SEASON 1928-29-Continued.*


Weeks
Ending


N ov. 3................. ............
10 .................. ............
17 ..................-.. ........
24..... ........................
D ec. 1...................... .
8.................. ............
15...................... ..........
22 2.................... ........
29...............................
an. 5..................
12.................... ..........
19 ............... ............
26................... ...
Feb. 2.................... .1
9.................... ......
16................... ..........
23 --....................| ..
M ar 2 ................. .........
9 ....... .......... ........
16..............................
23.................... ..........
30 ............ ...... .........
Apr. 6-....................------------....


20 ................... ...........
2711.................... -...........-

18May 4........................... ...
2 ............. ... .....
June 1......................1.....-- .
85.................... .....--....
1 ................... ............
22.................... ............

29 .................... --. ......
Total .................. ] .1


.1









.1
.2
.4
1.9
2.4
3.6
.4
1.5





10.6


.1 .- ...........







.1 .
.. .1

............ .1 ........
.1 .1 ......-
1.1 2.5 ...--..
4.5 8.9 .3
4.3 37.7 4
13.4 54 32.7
11.6 53 52.9
16.6 39.8 104.9
4.3 8 124.6
3.3 3.7 89.9
.3 .2 56.5
....- .... .1 12.8
.. .......... ---- 5 .5


59.6 1 208.1 1 484.3


...... .....















....










1.4
44.7
90.4
108.3
102 .9
40.3
22 .1
9.3

.2


422.7


.1







1.2


.1
1.1
2.1
1.1
1.1






5.5
..---..-----.--
..-.----.------
--.-----------


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


r






l













--- -- ---. .. .. .














1 .1 .2-
2 .3 1.2
3 .3 .1
1 | .... 1
1 .1 1
1 .. 1



9 .8 4...


. .















.2
1.2
1.3
3.7
3.6
4.6
3.4
.3
18.3


-- ---




.. ... ...

.. .. ..




-- - --



-- - ---
- ---

.. . ...

-- - ---
-- - ---



.. .....







. . ....


" '


..







































1
.2
.5
.2
.2
4.1
-- -- -
.. 1... .
-- ---2 -
.5----- -
.2-- -- -- -


.3
10.8
40.2
37.6
63.9
75
130.1
113.1
74.4
92.2
84.5
167.4
155.8
214.1
240.2
305.2
362.4
338.1
312.4
406
374.7
405.4
262.4
300.6
568.9
741.3
804
S665
449.6
214.6
135.3
76.7
22.9
9.5
.8
18,255.4


I I '


I


i ....


I






Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


Observation of the peaks discloses that Area 2 (including
Alachua, Marion and Sumter counties) came on the market
strongest after Areas 1 and 3 were dropping off, but Area 3,
which includes Manatee and Indian River counties, came on the

TABLE VIII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA TOMATOES BY AREAS, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending


Nov. 3..................
10-.....................
17......................-
24....................

Dec. 1...................
8....................
&8-------------
15........-............
22....................
29..................

Jan. 5.................-
12................
19 .................
26.......-...........

Feb. 2 ..................
9 ..................
16 ...-~..-.....-....--
23 .....-...............

Mar. 2 ................
9 .....................-
16.---...............
23 ...................--
30 --................

Apr. 6..................
13 ............-------........
20 .....................
207.............
27.......


Area If


.3
10.8
40.2
37.6

59.9
74.9
130
113
73.4

91.1
83.1
165.1
152.4

208.7
238.5
302.7
360.5

336.8
311.6
402.6
372.5
404.5

246.2
199.8
214.4
139


May 4 -..................- 149.7
11.-.................... 143.8
18 .................. 95.1
25 .....--.......... 19.3

June 1............. 4
8 ..................... .3
15 ..................-- .. .... ............ .... .....
22-............................. .....
29......................................


Total .............. 5,181.8


Area 2t







4
.1
.1



1
1



1
.1
..........
------ -- 3""""---







.1


1.4
.3

.2
.1
3
51.6

127.8
174
224.8
177.1

123.4
74.1
22.6
9.5
.8


999.5


Area 3t




......................... .




..........................
.1
1

.1
.4
2.3
3.4

5.3
1.7
1.5
.8

1.3
.5
3.3
.8
.6

16
100.7
351.5
550.7

526.5
347.2
129.7
18.2

7.9
2.3
.3
----------- .------


2,074.1


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.
tSee Fig. 6 for counties included.


Total


.3
10.8
40.2
37.6

63.9
75
130.1
113.1
74.4

92.2
84.5
167.4
155.8

214.1
240.2
305.2
362.4

338.1
312.4
406
374.7
405.4

262.4
300.6
568.9
741.3

804
665
449.6
214.6

135.3
76.7
22.9
9.5
.8


8,255.4





Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Figure 6.--Equivalent car-lot shipments of
Florida tomatoes by counties and areas,
season 1928-29. (Less than 1 carload omitted).
Total for state 8255.4 carloads.

SArea 1 5183 carloads
SArea 2 1000 carloads
SArea 3 2074 carloads


market with the bulk of its shipments in a very narrow space of
four weeks time (Table VIII) in which it marketed 1,775.9 car-
loads of its total of 2,074.1 carloads. However, Area 3 had a
higher peak than any other area, even more than Area 1 ex-
perienced when no other state was competing. Area 1 was
forced to compete with imports which were heavy during Feb-
ruary and March'.
GREEN BEANS
Green beans are widely grown in the United States, and prob-
ably every county in Florida produces at least a few. The total
shipments for the 1928-29 season in Florida were 5,291.7 equiv-
alent carloads (Table IX). Three of the areas indicated (Table
X) are heavy shippers. Area 4 (Broward and Dade counties)
started off early in November and continued to ship heavily
until early April (Table X). Area 3 (all counties bordering on
Lake Okeechobee) started the same week but had a high peak

'Noble, C. V., and Marvin A. Brooker. Florida Truck Crop Competition
Fla. Agri. Exp. Sta. Bul. 224:1931.







TABLE IX.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA GREEN BEANS (INCLUDING LIMA BEANS)
BY COUNTIES, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending



Oct. 20..... ............
27....................
N ov. 3..................
10....................
17....................
24....................
Dec. 1.. ................
8....................
15....................
22....................
29....................
Jan. 5....................
12....................
19...................
26....................
Feb. 2....................
9....................
16....................
23....................
M ar. 2..................
9....................
16....................
23....................
30....................
Apr. 6....................
13..................
20....................
27................
M ay 4....................
11....................
18...............
25.................
June 1...................
8....................
15 ...................
22..................
29...................
July 6.. .......
S13 ...................
Tota ...............
Total.


I





2.2 ..........
3 ..........
3.5 ..........
2.7 ..........
.8 ----
.1 ..........

.1 ..........


.1
.5
23.8
49.5
69.2
55.9
35.6
12.7
10.1
5.2
3.1
1.2
.7
.2
.1
.1
280.9


0



......... .......... ...... -
.1 .1 .7
.2 ......... 2.9
1.6 .......... 2.8
1.4 .3 1.3
.2 2.7 1.4
2.4 .7
......... 3.7 .4
......... 2.7 ..........
... 1.1 ..........
......... .3 ..........
.1
.1 ..........










.8 -.- 1-9
.......... .1 ..........
......... ....... ..........


.......... .1 .......... .
.......... .1 ----------
.......... .1 .......... .
.......... .1 .......... .
.......... .2 .......... .


......... 1 .1 .
.8 1.3 1.9
5.8 3 36.5
9.8 3.6 101.5
10.4 5.7 141.6
3.5 2.3 135.6
2.3 1.1 85.9
.2 1.8 15.1
.1 1.6 5.3
.......... .5 2.5
.......... 1.1

......... .......... .3

.......... .......... .1
6.......... 37.6 3

36.4 37.6 j538.3


.1
.2
.5
.2
.7





















5.5
14.3
12.3
9.5
3
.2
.1

.1

.1
.1

48.6 |


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


0 9


..................
..... --... ----- -- ....
.4 1.3 .4 ...
1.3 3.8 1.9 1.1 .9
8.4 9.6 10.5 10.9 2
8.2 12.7 21.3 22.8 3.2
6 1.1 7.9 25.6 2.8
7.3 4.2 6.4 48.5 3.4
1.1 1 .4 50 4.9
1......... .1 49.9 5.1
S .......... ........ 27.8 6.8
......... ......... 20.6 4.6
S .......... ........ 28.4 4.9
......... .......... 44.6 8.7
... ....... 74.6 6.1
......... ...56.2 15.1
......... .......... ......... 50.3 4
... 51.1 17.4
......... ........ .......... 72.7 7.6
1 .......... 61.1 13.9
........ 1 55.2 14.9
....... .... .3 66.4 10.9
........ .1 .9 40.7 7.4
.4 .3 5.2 44.3 8.7
1.4 2.4 34.4 12.7 13.2
.8 6.6 112.3 2 4.9
.4 5.3 81.9 .1 4.2
2.4 3.9 54.2 ..... 1.6
1.7 7.3 16.2 1.2
... 3.3 1.8 .......... .4

--- ....... .6 .2 .......... ..........


..1





39.9 63.71357 917.6 178.8


. I ......... o. ..........
.3 .... 1.2 .......
2.......... .3



S.


60.5 131.8 271.5 ~1,618.3~ 12.5


.......... .. .. .. a.
................- 11



.2 .1 .2 ..
2.6 .6 .1 8.5 1.4
.9 3.4 .......... .2 2.3
1 10.2 .7 1.7 1
.1 7.6 .5 .5 .2
.2 8.4 2 1 I .2
.......... 6.7 .9 1.6 1 .1
......- 5 .3 .4 .....
.......... 3.4 .1 .1 ......
.......... 5.4 .1 ............
.1 9.2 .3 .1
.......... 13.8 .6 .... .. ....
.......... 14. .6 ..........
.1 16.5 2.6 .3
.1 17.8 1.9 1.3 ............
.1 12.6 9.9 7.5 ..
.5 15.7 9.2 6.5 .
3.3 13.1 8.8 13.4 .1
7.1 5.9 7 8 .2
12.8 5.4 6.2 9 1.6
6.4 3.9 4.7 14 2.1
6 1.8 4.1 14.9 5.5
5.6 .7 1.4 13.5 8.8
2.4 .8 .7 2.5 12.7
1.6 1.5 1.3 5.1 5.5
.8 .1 2.4 2.2 1.6
.5 ....... 3 ....... .1
.2 ....... .6 ..... .1
.1 -.....- .2 .......... .1
....... ......... ............


.......... .. ........ ............


7.1.847 5i 70.7 2. .........3
I 52.7 1184.5 1 70.7 1112.3 I 43.6






TABLE IX.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA GREEN BEANS (INCLUDING LIMA BEANS)

BY COUNTIES, SEASON 1928-29-Continued.*


Weeks Ending



Oct. 20.............. ............... .. ... .....
27........ ................ ..........
Nov. 3..... .... .................... ..........
10.................................. .......
17................... ... ... .. .....
24.................................. .7 .2
Dec. 1.................................. .1 1.4
8. 2.6 1.6
15.................................. .4 1.6
22................................... 1.1 2.6
29............................... .6 1.6
Jan. 5 .......................... ... ......... 1.2
12................................. .1 1
19............................. .1 .6
26................................. .3 2
Feb. 2................................. .5 2.7
9.................................. .6 2.2
16............................. .6 2.5
23............................... .9 3.1
Mar. 2............................ .7 2.1
9 ....................... .... 9 1.9
16........................ .... .8 2.4
23..... .................. ..... .5 3.5
30.......... ............ 5 4.1
Apr. 6.............................. .5 1.2
13 .......................... ....... ... .3
20.................................. .. ... .2
27................................. ...........
May 4...............--.................
11o................................ .....
18 ..................................
25................................ ....
June 1 .......... ............... ...
8............................... .......... ......
15... .........
22..... ............ .. .....
29................. ....
July 6 ..................................... ...
13............................................
Total ............................I 12.5 I 40


I


o o -
0 Id 0 '
om L A
3 0 1 3


I.


1.1











.2


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


0
T3
fi
na

I


B


I I
...... ......... III. ...






.. .. .2 .
.2 .1 ..


.1 .4 .. .... 1 2 |
.1...... ........ ...............
.3 41 .......... ---------- ----------. ...-------
.......... ... .......... ........ .........






....... .4 .1 1 1. .
.4 .1
.|

.1 1.

.........


.I 1
.......... .4 .......... ..... I .... ...
.. .. ... ..... ...... .. .1 2 3 1 .9 ...
........ 3 .......... .1 1 1







.......... .......... .......... 4 1.1
1.. .. ... .. ... .. ... .3 .8 ...
4.. ---------- ---------- .......... -- -- -- -- ...





I. .2
- ----- -- ......... .......... .......... 1
7 ~| ~ 4 1.2 .. .1 5 \.8


.4 ---------- .1 2 .3 1.






I.
1.7 1 4.2 1 .4 1 1 24.3
-- .- -- - .. -- ---- ---- .4 1 :


r

.0
0

.
a

I -
. I -
- - - -
- - - -
- - - -


k.


.1
.1 .1 ...
.. -.. -. .... ..... .3 -- -
S......... 1.1 4.8 .1
....... ..... 1.9 14 .1 .2
.2 7.5 22.4 .1 1.3
1.1 30.8 ......... .4
.1 .4 20
.1 5.5 ..... .1
.1 .9 .......... .3
.....--- -- ---.. --------- -- -- -- ........ .2












...- ........ .5 -.....-..- .2

.4


.2
--- ..2.. .......... ........


.1 1 .4 1 12.6 |100.3 ] 2.7


.1 .2
.2 .2
.1 .1
.1 .4
.......... .3
.......... .2 .
.......... .3
..
.3



.2 ..

.7 1.7





0 0

I .1

| 1.5
...... 7.6
18.8
......... "63.2
- I-.----- 132.1
.......... 78.5
S129.9
95.7
101.1
.......... 61.1
I... 43.1
....... 46.5
I| 67.1
.... .. | 111.1
.......... 114.3
.......... 111.3
....... 155.1
.......... 198.8
....... 308.7
.......... 280.7
.......... 274.8
... 236
... 275.5
.... .. 298.7
......... 450.6
- ....I.. 468.6
......... 466.1
.1 366.2
.......... 213.2
...... 71.1
22.1
-..--... 11.2
......... 6.2
2.3
1.1

.9

.1 15,291.7


,






Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


TABLE X.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA GREEN
BEANS (INCLUDING LIMA BEANS) BY AREAS, SEASON 1928-29.*

I| Other I
Weeks Area 1 I Area 2+ IArea 3t IArea 4t Area 5t I Coun- I Total
Ending I I ties ]


Oct. 20...........
27..........

N ov. 3.............-
10-.............-
17... ......
241 ..............


D ec. 1..............
24........ .

Dec. 1.: :
8............
15--..--
22............--
29--........

Jan. 5...........
12..........
19..........
26........-....

Feb. 2..............
9--............
16..........
23..............

M ar. 2..............
9..............
16 ..............
23............
30...--.....-.

Apr. 6.--........-
13..............
20..............
27..............

M ay 4..............
11 ............
18----
25..............

June 1...........
8..............
15.....-.......
22............
29..............

July 6.............
13.......-.....


.1 .........
1.2 .1

5.7 ..............
8.2 .1
15.5 .5
27.5 8.6

11.7 5.8
7.9 7.1
.6 3.1
.4 1.5
.1 .3

.............. .1


-- --......... .1


.............. .3
............. .2


Total .......... 1368.7


.2
.7
4.5
12.8
29.5

37.6
53.2
36.5
17.2

14
4.9
4
2.5

1.8
1


.5
2
23.9

12.5
25.7
18.1
21.5
14.6

11.5
7.9
11.2
21.7

35.5
46.3
73.1
101.3

208.8
185.5
159.7
147.6
162.4

175
178
143.5
103.3

78.6
45.7
28.2
1.8

.5
.1
.1



.2


248.8 2046.3
1


2
12.9
26

28.4
51.9
54.9
55
34.6

25.2
33.3
53.3
80.7

71.3
54.3
68.5
80.3

75
70.1
77.3
48.1
53

25.9
6.9
4.3
1.6

1.2
.4



..............
-----------..--


1.3
12.9
24.3

12.9
22.1
16.4
21.2
10.9

6.2
4.9
2.1
7.3

6.8
9.7
11.7
14.4

23.3
23.1
26.3
25.5
21.3

10.1
5.3
2.3
.5

.2
.1


.......... --- .... ..... ...-I
------------. .-------.------
-------------- ----.--------.
-------------- ----.-.--------


1096.4 324


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.
tSee Fig. 7 for counties included.


j


.............

.4
1.1
7

38.9
184.6
261.2
314.4

256.3
154.4
37
16.8

8.5
4.6
2.2
1.1
.5

.5
.3


----------- 1 -------------- --- .1........


......... .1
.2 1.5

1.9 7.6
6.7 18.8
19.4 63.2
21.8 132.1

7.2 78.5
15.2 129.9
2.6 95.7
1.5 101.1
.6 61.1

.1 43.1
.3 46.5
.4 67.1
1.3 111.1

.6 114.3
.7 111.3
1.5 155.1
2.6 198.8

1.4 308.7
1.3 280.7
6.6 274.8
.9 236
2.3 | 275.5

11.2 298.7
22.6 450.6
20.8 468.6
29.1 466.1

15.9 366.2
6.8 213.2
1.9 71.1
1 22.1

.4 11.2
.5 6.2
.. .. 2.3
...- 1.1
....5

.2 .9
.3


207.5 5291.7






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Figure 7.-Equivalent car-lot shipments of
Florida green beans/1 by counties and areas,
season 1928-29. (Less than 1 carload omitted).
Total for state 5291.7 carloads.
/I Green beans includes lima beans.

0 Area 1 1369 carloads
SArea 2 249 carloads
Area 3 2045 carloads
SArea 4 1097 carloads
] Area, 5 324 carloads


over a long season of 10 weeks from the middle of February
through April. Area 1 (Alachua, Marion and Sumter coun-
ties) had a fall crop and a spring crop, both of which covered
narrow seasons, and the spring crop had a very high peak which
climaxed April 27 after Area 4 had practically finished and
Area 3 was on the decline.

EARLY WHITE POTATOES

For the season 1928-29 Florida shipped 5,262.5 equivalent car-
loads of early white potatoes (Table XI). The production of this
crop in Florida is largely concentrated in the territory known
as the Hastings Area, designated as Area 1. Included in Area
1 are the smaller sections known by the shipping points as
Bunnell and LaCrosse. In order to get an idea of the import-
ance of Area 1, it will be noted in Fig. 8 that this area shipped
4,779 equivalent carloads from its nine counties while the re-
mainder of the volume moved from 27 counties, with no one of
these 27 counties shipping more than a total of 70 carloads. Ob-
servation of Table XII shows that Area 1 had competition from





TABLE XI.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA EARLY WHITE POTATOES BY COUNTIES,
SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending



Oct. 6
13.... ... .........................
20 ....
27 ............................................. .
N ov. 3....1 .. ... ....
10............ ........... .......
17......... ..... ......
24..........................................
Dec. 1....................... ............
8........................... .............
1 5 ............- ...........................- .....- ..
22 .............................................. ...
29 ................. .......... ..
Jan. 5............................................
12 ..............................................
19 .................
26 .... ........... .....
Feb. 2.... ............ ...



16 ......... ... .... ..
23 .......................... ....... ....
M ar. 2 .......................... ............... I
9 ...........................................






1627 ................ ........ ...........
23 ..............................................

Apr. 6 .. .. ...................
13 .............................................
2 0 -- ------------- -------------- .. .. ..
20............................................
M ay 4...........................................
18... ...... ..................................
25 ..............................................
June 1.......................................------
8 ............................................
15...........................-- -..... ....
22..........................................
29......................................
July 6..........................................
13............................................
20 ....................................
27.......... ........ ............
Aug. 3.........................................
10.................... ......................


Total


.0


5 0
.r w 0
o0 .


...... ---


.. .- : :::- ---- --


52.7 .........
145.2 .......... 4
211.1 ..... .5
226.2 .......... .5
435.4........ 7.3
516.4 ......... 8.2
728.6 .......... 4.2
618.1 .......... 2.1
112.8 .......... 1
8.4
8.4 .......... ..........
4.7.......... ..........







4.17 .......... ..........
1 .......... ..........


4.1 --



078.71 .1 5 34.5


0


0
.. -- -- -
.. .. -- -- -
-- -- -- -- -

-- - . .


.1


.......... .. i....

1
.1 1
S ........
..........
1.4
1.1
1


.1 4
5.1 3
1
4 1


---------.-... ...... ...
.... .. -- ..... .........
-- --- ..... ..... .
-- .. ..... .
...


..-. ....
15.6.. --- .....
-- ... .. - -
. .. -- ... ..... .

---- ---- ...... ..
= -.... --- --------
15.6 9.7 1 16.2


-11 4.8
11 1 4.8


.31











70.3 1 3


.1
.5
1.2
1.5



2.3
6.5
10
9.1
14.4
8.2
5.1
3
3
4


8 1 5
4 .......... 8
10 .......... 2
18 .......... 12.1
9 1 15
1.5 3 5.3
2 .7 1
.6














5.1 5.7 48.4 --


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


0













S27




S29
- ---- ----- I- I














23.3 '.











I**1



I.


I.1
S............ (





















*-1
--1 .4-------









............
...... .... .
...........





23 *t


I 30.4 | 16.1
30.4 ] 16.1


4::::::::: :::::::
4 6


i1
1


i


.2
6.2
2.1
1
4
5
3
4

4
6
1











37.4 I


........... (3,






TABLE XI.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA EARLY WHITE POTATOES BY COUNTIES,

SEASON 1928-29-Continued.*


Weeks Ending


Oct. 6..................... .......... -
1 3 ................ .....................
20................ ..... ---
27................... .-------
N ov. 3...................... ........
10................................
17.........................................
24....... ................. -..- --
Dec. 1....................................--
8.........................................
15................................ ......
22..................... ............. ...
29............. .................... .
Jan. 5....................................
12...... ........................... ---
19...--... ----....... ...........
26 ....................... .....
Feb. 2....................................
9........ ....................... ...........---
16........................................
238.................................... --
M ar. 2..........................................
1 ................ ............................
16............... .-..-
23................... ....................
30....... .........................
Apr. 6....................... ..............
13..........................................
20..........................................
27..... ....................... .
M ay 4................................ ----.... ..
11ay 4......................................

18....................................
25............................................
25............. ...............
June 1--- -----------
8...................................... ..
15............. ................-
22 ......................................
29........ -.......... .........
29---------------------------------
July 6......................... ..............
13.........................................
20..... .................... ....
27.......................................
Aug. ............................... .. ...
10................ .... .


Total


--- -- -- ..........
.......... -..........
.......... .--------
---------- ..........
......... ---...--..-

2.3 1162.7


E 0 a e
0)5
Q P ;: P
.. . .. . .. -. .. . .
.. .. .. -- .. .. .


.......... .......... .......... .... ...... ..........
......... .......... .......... .... ..... ..........

.......... ------ 2-------- .... ... .. .---- -
---------- ......... .......... -- -....... ----------
.......... ......... .... .... ......... .... ...

3.6 |575.3 1 24 2.1 1 20


---------- -------
a











.I.
---------- ----------







.......... I ..........









..
.... ....






'----------
...... I .









...... .... 1 ..2
........ ........



















--1-- .----------
- --------- - -
.......... ...

.... ..........



.......... ...



I .
----. ---.-..... ......


....... --------.













-- ------
...- --- -


..........
.......... I..........
.......... ..........









S6 1.2


16.1 I .6


1254 1260.2 1 38 1


'C
.e




.......... .......... -.1
.......... ..... .. .1







........ ......... I .1
......... .......... I .1
------ --- ....... | ---------




.......... ......... I 1
....... ....... .. 1.
- --... .......... """ -








... 2.3
.... ...... 2.8
........ .......... .3


......... ......... i 2.3
.................... 19.9
.......... 20.
44.1
.......... .......... 4 .7

......... .......... 43.8
...........-.... I 23.8





.................... 630.3
.... ......... 719.9
.................... 965.3
.......... ......... | 982
.......... .......... 313.7
24 1 59.1
21 .......... 32.7
1 ........ 4.3
......... ....... .... I 1
.......... ......... 330.2







.......... .......... 46.6

.......... .......... J 4.1
......... .......... 965.3
.......... ......... 982
S 313.7
2i4 1 59.1










I --------- I 1-

46 1 15,262.5
46 1 1 15,262.5


*Wn~rl~ .k;nmnntl n~ 1~.. *Ira- 1 nprlnarl ~r:cC~rl


, -~' I ,


'


--- --- .. ... ... .. ... ..


................ ..









Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


TABLE XII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA EARLY WHITE POTATOES BY AREAS, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks
Ending


Area 1I


Oct. 6............................1
13................. ...-....1
20......-- ---.. ....------..-
27--- --..........I...-----------
Nov. 3 ----.... .. ---........ ---
10.............---.......-- ..---...
17..---.........--..... -----
24. --.............------ --------
Dec. 1......... -------------.................
8.............................. .... ............
15.............. .................... ... ....
22...........................- .1
29 .....................................
Jan. 5.....--...... --........----- ..
12................. ---.... .. -----....... ..
19....... --..............-.... .---
26 ..... ... ...............-- ...
Feb. 2......................... ............ ..........
9............ ..... .... ..... ........... .......
16..... ............................. .....- ----- -..
23-........................---............I----
M ar. 2............................--.-------- -----..
9............................ 15
16....----...............- I ....86.7
23......--.................. 267.6
30................. .... 430.5
Apr. 6........................ 413.8
13 ..............-.....- .... 607.9
20 ....................I--.... 695.6
27.. .........9............... 948
May 4 ...................-... 949.9
11.. ............... ......309.7
18-.....-.........-......... 26
25-........................-- 4.7
June 1..- .................... 2
8--------............................ .1
15.......................... 12
22-....-.............-... 4
29.-.........-- .........I 4.6
July 6..................- 3
13....-..........-..-.. 1
20........-.................. I 4.1
27........................---- 2
A ug. 3 ........................... 1
10.---- .................... .1

Total ........................ 4,778.6


*Weekly shipments of less than .1
tSee Fig. 8 for counties included.


Other
Counties



-------------------1:-- --
............................
............................



.................I.......... I

.1
.1
.3
.2
1
.1
1.2
.7
2.3
2.8
.3
2.3
19.9
20.5
29.1
61.7
62.6
63.2
50
22.4
24.3
17.3
32.1
4
33.1
28
2.3
............................
....... ....

2

......... ............

.........................
|............................
-------------------_-------
I----------------------------



483.9


carload omitted.


Total


.1
.1





.1
.1
.3
.3
1
.1
1.2
.7
2.3
2.8
.3
2.3
19.9
20.5
44.1
148.4
330.2
493.7
463.8
630.3
719.9
965.3
982
313.7
59.1
32.7
4.3
.1
1
4
6.6
3
1
4.1
2
1
.1

5,262.5







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


other counties throughout the greater part of its shipping sea-
son. Some counties in south Florida, such as Dade, Indian
River, Lee, Manatee, and St. Lucie, marketed a few carloads
during a period of 10 weeks before Area 1 began shipping, light
shipments being made as early as the week ending December 1.
If the cost of early production is not too great, and a more valu-
able crop would not be displaced, this would indicate an opening
for a greater production of early white potatoes in those few
counties farther south where the climate permits. This would
be especially true in January and February following years of
a short crop stored in the north.
When the season for Area 1 was over, or practically over,
Escambia County in the extreme west end of the state sent 46
carloads of potatoes to market.


Figure 8.--quivalent car-lot shipments of
Florida early white potatoes by counties and areas,
season 1928-29. (Less than 1 carload omitted).
Total for state 5262.5 carloads.


0 Area 1 4779 carloads







Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


CABBAGE

Cabbage is another important crop, as shown by the fact that
3,173.1 equivalent carloads were shipped during the season of
1928-29. With the exception of Areas 1 and 6 (Fig. 9), the peaks
are all within a period of three weeks' time (Table XIV).
There was no fall crop from any place in the state. Area 1
had its peak on January 19, when it shipped a total of 60 car-
loads of cabbage. Area 2 did not reach its peak until March
23. The three weeks of March 9, 16 and 23 contain the peaks for
Areas 2, 3, 4, 5 and other counties.


Figure 9.-Equivalent car-lot shipments of
Florida cabbage by counties and areas,
season 1928-29. (Less than 1 carload omitted).
Total for state 3173.1 carloads.


SArea 1 485 carloads
SArea 2 808 carloads
Z Area 3 206 carloads
SArea 4 821 carloads
m Area 5 294 carloads
D Area 6 194 carloads







TABLE XIII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA CABBAGE BY COUNTIES, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending



Dec. 8.....-..- -..................
15.....-- ...............----....
22........................ ..
29.......................---
Jan. 5...... ... ..... .. ..... ....
12.....................- ......
19...............-..-. ....----
26..........................
F eb. 2................................
9.-...... ------.....................
16..................... ..........
23 ................ .. .........
Mar. 2...........................
9................... ...-
16....-............. .......-....
23...........- ..............
30 --...~~.............. ..
Apr. 6 .........................
13.................... ....
20...-- ....... .........
27 ............. ...................
May 4................. ..........
11...........-......-........
18..........................
25...... ....................
June 8......... ................. ... .
T otal ...................


5
9
20
14
11
18.1
6.1
18
10
4
4
4
2
1


1-
1- ........

.2
3 .6
1 4.5
8 5.5
15 6.7
19 21.6
17 10.8
32 21.5
22 24.3
32 19.9
36.1 24.9
31.2 22.6
42 9.1
25 20.9
3 11.3
.3
.4

1--
1 ..

. 1. .1
.1


I s





... I ---- ....... --------
S1.14

2 2 4
1 10 2
7 22 12
2 21 19
8 34 21
6 23.11 21
4 38 27
6 29 25
5 10.123
6 5 27
4 ..... 129
2 -------- 18


.---...--- ...---- ...--..----10

........ ..... 3


-..... I ..... .-.
: : :;:: ::


358.31127.41290.3 205.51 53 1194.21241 1258


0
;4 a g9 P



S... .... .
S4. 9 0 1 ..







2 10 3 ........ 22 30 13 ...... ........
8 9 3 ........ 19 50 21 3 .











12.1 5 7 2 20 731 8 5 Q 1
S13 8 6 .. .... 17 -681 2 7 3
7 3. .... 5 .... .. .. ... 12 .. 9 -2 2...
8 6 4.... 1 .... 9 20 1 12 ......-.. .1





13 7 6 ... 26 37 .. 12 1 ........
2 .. .. ... ......... ......5 1 ........ -
9 8 2 2 26 62 1 1 .1 5 I 1........
118 9 3 ...... 19 50 5 21 3 .......
7 3 12.1 5 7 2 20 73.1 5 8 5 1.2

2 8 ... 7 4........ 1 2 1 2 .3 1
13 7 6 2 3 ..........2 1 7-- 1 1 ....- 1




S 10 3 ...... 22 30 5 1.... .. -- .......
9 8 2 2 26 62 --.2 31 13.1 5 ........
8 9 3 -------- 19 50 5 21 3 I. .




5 .. ..--......... I ........ I. ..I





----8 - -- -i... ........ .- ...I

1 98.31 71 1 63.11 5 1162 1401.21 36 1126.11 35 1 9.5


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.





TABLE XIII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAr-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA CABBAGE BY COUNTIES,
SEASON 1928-2--Continued.*


Weeks Ending 'i


0


D ec. 8.............. ... ...-..... .
15......................... ---
22........ ..- ............. ----- ..
29 ................ .. -------
Jan. 5 ............- ....... ----------.
12............. .........---- -
19 ...........--. .....--- .------
26 .................-- ------- 2
Feb. 2 ....---......... .....-.------ 6
9 ...-........ ..-..... .-.......... 6
16 ......... ..... .... .... .......... 12
23 .................. ........- ------ 8
MIar. 2 ................--...-----..--. 23
9 ..... ............ ............... ..... 16
16.-............... ---........... ... 24
23 ...................---.......... 28
30 .......................------. 24
Apr. 6................ -.......--- 4
13 -...---- .-----...--- 1
13........................ .......-- ....---- 1

27-....------...-.........----- ---.....
May 4... ------.....................
11........................---------...... ......
18 .............................
25... ....................
2 5 -- -- -- -.......... -- -- ------------ -- -----
June 8.... .....................---- ....
Total ............................-- 1154


1 3
2 1

2
........ 1
1









4 ....



-------- |- -----
-------- --------

4 |7


,. ;I
*0-d
C)
0-- I-- ,---


--- -1 --- --- -- I- -
------ --...- I-----

3 ....... ....
13.1 2 --
23 1 .......
21 ..... I 1
24 1 ........
30 3 1
33 5 ....-.
45 1 --
25 1 I.....
20 ....


.... ... .... ....




2 .... ... 1 ..-- -
2 1- --- ----
. .. ... ....- -
--- 1... 1- 1 ----
238.11 14 1


0 ~C
'0 '0~
03
.0
C)x


1---- --- -- -- ..... 1 .... ... .......
1 --..- .- -..-..- ........ ........ 1 ........-

S1 2
... .. ...... ....... ...... 1 ..



.2. ------ -- .. ....1 ..1 1 1

2 1 .1| 1 1 1 1 4 5


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


m
1
c
U


........ | 1.1
.....- 3.1
....... 12
........ 18.2
........ 44.7
........ 68.5
--..- 1137.5
.... 171.9
........ 231.9
........ 225.3
......- 310.8
.- ..-- 285.3
....... 316.1
........ 338
........ 364
..-.-.- 325.2
....... 224
........ 56.3
....... 14.3
... 6.4

5
........ 5
4
1 2
.... 12
........ .1
1 3,173.1


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


TABLE XIV.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA CABBAGE BY AREAS, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks
Ending


Dec.



Jan.



Feb.



Mar.




Apr.



May



June


Total ..


485.7


-I-








1

9
25
47.1
58
77
67
98.1
106.1
108.2
116
77
10
2


1 .
1

1 ...



808.5


205.5 821.2
1 1


.2 ...
.6
4.5
5.5
6.7
21.6
10.8
21.5
24.3
19.9 1
24.9 1
22.6 1
9.1 1
20.9
11.3
.3



. ....
..4..
.3


294


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.
tSee Fig. 9 for counties included.


CUCUMBERS

Florida shipped 2,307.5 equivalent carloads of cucumbers dur-
ing the 1928-1929 season (Table XV). In this commodity, also,
the competition of areas among themselves is serious. There
are five of these areas, as shown on the map in Fig. 10. In some
seasons Area 1 around Wauchula is on the spring market for a
time unmolested by other areas. It was not so fortunate, how-
ever, in 1928-29 because its most serious competitors, which are
Area 2 (Sumter County) and Area 5 (Orange and Lake coun-
ties), came along with it (Table XVI). By the use of board
troughs and by banking, Area 2 frequently can come in with or
near to Area 1. In fact, in 1929 Area 2 actually had its peak


6
3
19
21
29
27
31
31
28
33
33
20
10
3

-- -- --. -


1
2
9
20
32
43
86
76
09
.18
42.1
08
65
7
2

.1


1







TABLE XV.-WEEKLY SUMMARY


OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA CUCUMBERS BY COUNTIES,

SEASON 1,28-29.*


Weeks Ending


Oct. .....
20......
27.....
Nov. 3
10....
17....
24.....
Dec. 1.....
8....
15....
22....
29.....
Jan. 5.....
12.....
19....
26.....
Feb. 2
9




27 ......
23.....
Mar. 2..

16......
23......

Apr. 6....





18....
20.....




25.....
June 1....
Total.....
Total


.2
4.8
24.8
109.3
100.9
80.4
26.5
11.6
1.4





.425.2


..


.4 .3
.3 .4
.2 .4
.8
.2






















3.4 77.3
82 90.2
126.1 122.8
126.1 29
60.3 .4
1.4 ........
......... .
..........


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


.0~


I


S m


.2 .1
.2
.3 .2
1.4 .2
.5
.5














.. .3.
........ .......
11.7
79.2
.3 155.9
.9 104.4
1.2 67.9
9.1 19
38.2 4.6
31.2 .4
6.3.
6.3 ..........
2.4

91.7 ..........

91.7 |444.9


.1 14.7
.2 12.4
2.2
.1





3.5 | 43.2


.1 1 8 |


--------......



.1
.1 1
.1 2.4
.1 1.5
.1 .2











1.3 .... .... .1
2 .1 .1
1.3 | .1
2.2 .5
3.1 .7
16.2 .2
14.3 1
5.2 .1






42.6 .6 6


Co
>a




00



.1 1

.1
1 1
.12
2
.1 3.
1 j| ?


.1

.1
.1 1
.1 ......
.1 s
.1










.1 3.1


.1
.1

.1
.1


.7 | 1.4


.1 1.2





3 8 3.3 3.5
38 3.3 3.5










TABLE XV.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA CUCUMBERS BY COUNTIES,
SEASON 1928-29-Continued.*


Weeks Ending


.0


I ......... ......... ........
a 6 S a























.3 .3 ..... ......
2.4 3.7 .1 .....
3 18.1 .3 .2
9.2 27.2 .3 .5
16.6 51.2 .2 .2
19.4 34 .1 .1
15 29 .1 .1
1.2 16 .. ... ..
.2 9 .. .. ....
---- -3 ...... .
.. ..... .. .........


67.3 1191.5 1.1 1.1


I


Oct. 13 .........
20...........
27.........
Nov. 3........
10..........
17........
24.........
Dec. 1..
8......
15.........
22.........
29.......
Jan. 5.........
12 .......
19 ..........
19
26...
Feb. 2.......
9 .........
16.........
23 .......
Mar. 2.........
9 .....
16 ..........
16 -
23..........
30.........
Apr. 6.........
13....
20...
27..
May 4..
11..
18.........
25.........
June 1.......
8.........
Total ..


i.........







.1
.1
.2
.1
.1
..-- ----
..-----


1
|-------- ..
---------- ---
.......... -----------
.......... .......... .





















1.1

1.. 1... .......
..... ..... -- -





Si ..........

S1 4


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


1.1
2.1
1.1
.2







4.5


.... .



---------- B ....

.4 23.6 1
.1
2.1
5.3
6
5
5


.4 | 23.6


a C
:0 0


---- ... .
.... -- -


4.3 I .6


I

3
Li


'0
I 0
I '0
on a
B
-- -- -- -- -- -


.1 .1
.2 .2 .5
.2 .1 .3
.1 .......... 1.2




.6 .4 3I .2


--


|
4






18.4
5I .8
2.4
6.3
.......... ............. ... 15








.2
18.4
23.4
8.5
I ..... 9.9




1145.8
2.9












298.1
......... 2........-.. ..- .6
S. .2




387.7
.. ..1. .4
.......... .... .......... 19
.......... .. .... 114.8
--- -- .......... .---- 298.1
262.2
.......... ---- I------- -- 260.8
I 217.5
.1 1 ---- 87. ..... 3 187.7
.1 4 .............-- ... 1 317
..... 8 .. ......... .......... | 194.4
...12 .5 .......... I 93
2 --....-- 3 11.8
---- ..- -- .. ......... -- -- .2 3
.------ ---- -- ---- 2 7.2
.2 1 27 1 .5 1 3 [2,57.5








Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


ahead of Area 1 and the peak was also higher. The peak for
Area 5 came only one week later than that for Area 1, and the
Area 3 (Levy and Marion counties) peak came two weeks after
that of Area 5. The peak of Area 4 (Alachua County) ship-
ments was only one week later than that of Area 3. Although
each area sold its crop within a narrow period of four or five
weeks, it experienced competition from at least three or four
other areas. It is true that Area 1 had a light fall crop. One
week (November 10) 18 carloads were shipped (Table XVI),
and as many as five carloads came from other sections of the
state, both north and south, in less than carload amounts but
the total fall crop was light.


iguro 10.-lquivalent ear-lot shipments of
Florida ccunbers by counties and areas,
season 1928-29. (Less than 1 carload omitted).
Total for state 2307.5 carloads.

SArea 1 535 carloads
l Area 2 445 carloads
SArea 3 523 carloads
] Area 4 400 carloads
SArea 6 235 carload@








38 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

TABLE XVI.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA CUCUMBERS BY AREAS, SEASON 1928-29.*
Weeks i Other I
Ending Area 1 Area 2t Area 3t Area 4t Area t Coun- I Total
Ending | i ties [

Oct. 13......... .1 ......... ..... ... ......1
20........... .3 .1 .5 .4 ........... 1 2.3
27......... 3 ... .6 .3 ... .. 2.4 6.3
Nov. 3........... 12.4 .2 .7 .2 ........ 1.5 15
10........ 1 18.1 .2 ( 2.2 2.5 23
17- 15.2 .5 .2 .............. 2.5 18.4
24........ 14.6 .5 ----- 8.3 23.4
Dec. 1 ........... 1.1 ....... .. ................ .1 7.3 8.5
8...... .9 ... ---- --- 9 9.9
15. --.......-- ........ -- ---- .---- 5.8 5.8
228 ............---..- .....- ......... 2.9 2.9
29 .............-....... -- ---.. ..--... .6 .6
Jan. 5 .... --...... ... ..... ---- ---- ------. .2 .2
12_----- ------- ----------- ------ .4 .4
19..............................................2 .2
19------- --- -- ..... .. .... --- .2 .2
26 ------............ -- ------ --------- ---------- ---- .5 .5
F eb 26.......................... .............. ..ii!!!----- .............. 1.4 1.4
Feb. 2--..-- .... .....--- ...- --....-- 1.4 1.4
9 ........ ................ .... ............ 1.9 1.9
16 ...................... ---- -...--- ------........... 4.3 4.3
23 ......... ........... ...----- .... ....... ... -- -- 1.7 1.7
M ar. 2........ .. ..... .............. ........ ..............-- 2.5 2.5
9 _...1 .2 .3 .............. -- -- -- .9 1.4
16 5.1 j 11.7 --- -- ---- .5 1.7 19
23 ....... 27.5 79.2 5 3.1 114.8
30 ........ 115.6 155.9 .3 20.3 6 298.1
Apr. 6 ....... 119.9 104.4 .9 30.3 6.7 262.2
13 .......... 111.7 67.9 10.2 ..- 67.4 3.6 260.8
20 ........... 58.3 19 86.4 3.4 48.3 2.1 217.5
27 ........ 28.8 4.6 228.4 82 34.2 9.7 387.7
May 4 ........ 2.7 .4 154 126.1 16 17.8 317
11......... .2 ... 35.3 126.1 9 24.3 194.4
18 -............ ----- --------- 2.8 60.3 3 26.4 93
25 ............... .. ------ --- 1.4 ...- -- 10.4 11.8
June 1 ........ .... .. -- .3 -......... .---- .. --- .3
8 -- -.... ....... -... --- --..... .. ...... .2


Total -...... 535.7 444.9 522.8 400.4 234.1 169.6 2,307.5

*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.
tSee figure 10 for counties included.






Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


PEPPERS

Within the state six areas have been designated (Fig. 11).
Besides, there were 17 other counties where peppers were grown
and shipped during the year (Table XVII). The total from the
state was 2,299.3 equivalent carloads (Table XVIII).
Areas 2 (Broward and Dade counties) and 1 (Hillsborough,
Manatee and Hardee counties) led all others as to quantity put
on the market. That part of the state usually known as South
Florida, and containing Areas 1, 2 and 3, appears to be the only
place in the United States where peppers can be grown and
marketed profitably throughout the winter. In case there should
occur a curtailment of importation of peppers into the United
States, South Florida could increase its production, provided
the production costs are not too high and provided that other
more valuable crops are not displaced.


figure ll.-Zquivalent car-let shipments of
Florida peppers by counties and areaa,
season 1928-29. (Less than I carload omitted).
Total for state 2299.3 carload.


Area 1 495 carloads
SArea 2 1068 carloads
Area 3 97 carloads
9 Area 4 204 carloads
] Area 26 carloads
SArea 6 163 carloads






TABLE XVII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA PEPPERS BY COUNTIES, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending



Oct. 27 .................... .........
Nov. 3............. ................................
10 .................................. .... .......
17 ............................................... .......
24 .......................................... ....
Dec. 1 .........................................
8............................ .......... ..............
15 .................................. ........ ....
2 2 ............................................. .... ....
2 9 ............. ............. ............. .............
Jan. 5- .............
12......... .. ..................
19 ......... ...... ....... ....-... ..
26..........................................
Feb. 2............................................ ...
9......................................
16....... ...........................................
23........................................
Mar. 2.......................... ....
9 ........ ...................--......--.
16......... ................ .............
23..................................................
30............ .... .... ........
Apr. 6.....................................................
13 ......................... ..................
20............... ............-......
27.---------

11........ .... .......................
18............ ............................... ...



15.........
S.29.......................... ......
July 6 ..... ........... .. ...
J u n e I ......------......--






13To .............--.......................... ..... ..
20July 6 --. ..................----- ------
1 3 - - - - - - - --_ - --.


27......... "..
Aug. 17..--....................... .............
Total ......777--------------. ........7777777


*0 g




.4 ..........
.8 ..
1.9 .1
1 .1

1.8 .4
1.7 .2
4.7 .6
2.1 .4
1.6 .5
1 .9
.9 .9
1.3 1.4
1.1 1.8
.8 1.2
.8 2
.8 1.1
1.2 1.4
3.3 2.2
3.2 3
5 2.8
1.2 2.5
1.8 1.5
.8 3.4
1.1 2.3
.9 2.5
1.1 1.6
2.2 1.8
1 1.7
.5 2.1
.2 .6
.2 1
.1 1
.1 1






46.8 44\


......----- .... ......


.1 .. .... 1.4
1.4
.1 1 .3
.1 .......... 2.1
.1 1 2.1
.2 .......... 3.9
.4 ......... 6.1
.3 2.1 6.3
.5 -...... 4.8
3.9 ......... 2.1
3.9 4 10.6
10.2 .......... 6.5
5.8 _. ...... 13.8
19.9 ...... 1.3
20.4 .......... 3.5
38.1 ......... 5.8
15.3 2 8.2
37.3 -........ 2.4
16.8 2.1 2.4
39.2 2.1 2.1
40.6 .2 3
25.1 2.5 3.1
37.1 3.7 .1
25.3 19.2 ..........
1.8 29.5 ........
1.2 24 1
1.9 24.5 1.1
17.6 57.2 1
.5 42.3 2
.2 27.5 -.-.-
.5 22 .1
1.7 1
.3 .... .........
.3 ...... ---
.3 .... ..........



367.1 1268.9 97.2


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


.6


I..........


3) c
5 0
a o
-- --- -------
- i--------i
. 2.5 ..........
-------- i-- --
2.3 2.5
2.1 1
4 | .3
6.1 1.1
4.8 I......
3.4 ...--
1.9 1
2.5 ..........



. 3 1 ..........
3.5 I..........
1.4 I..........
.5 .1

2.4 1
4.9 8.1
S 3.7 2
.7 2
.71 ...---
5.4 1
24.4 I...-
26.3 | 2.1
11.7 -.....
19.2 | .1
29.3 ---
3.4 ..........
1 1
1.1 I..
......... 2
.......... | 1..........

.I. l
.{I.iii !i!i~


1 5.9 1179.1 126.3 1155.6


.1

9









.1
.1
.3
.2
.3
.4
.4
.4
.1
.6
1.3
.5
1.4
2.3
1.6
5.5
3
2
2.6
3.2
1.7
3.7
2
2.1
2.2
3.4
2.1
.5
2.4
.2
.1





46.7


| 0








S.. 1 .. ......
..... 1.1.

4.3
.1 2.1




.. 4.2
50.9
.------- 20
-------- 15.1
.......... 14.2

. 5..- 54.2
-- .... 57.1
-- 64
....... 55.6
..- 59.1
S46.4
42.3
33
.-- 27.4
... 55.3
..... 38.5
33
.. .. 2.3
.-- .1

3.1
1.1






.2 1700.7


o c












.1 .1
.1
.1 ......
.... --
.2 .1

1 .1
.2 .2
.5 1.4
2.2 .5
1.7 1.7
3.4 .4
.8 2.2
1.2 .7
.1 1.8
........ 1.1
..... 1.5
1 1.1
1.7
1 1
.2 .3
2 1.5
.3
......... .3

r ---- -- 1.1






15.8 18.9


W












.1 ....... -
.2



-----, I ----




.. --- --- I-------- ------


----- -- -I -------..---
. . . .. . 1 ------- -- -




:4 .. .i::.:::::...



2.3 .1 .1
1.4 ... ... .1
3.6 .......... .
8.3 --- .1
3.8
5.5 .1
5.4
13.9 .1- .1
7.1 ........ .1
6.8 .... .1
3.7 ---- -. ...- -
3.4 .......... .2
6.6 \ .3
6.6 .......... .3
7.4 .1 .2
8.4 ..... .2
7.7 .......... 3 3.1
8.4 .......... .1
10.6 ..........
3.8 ............
4.1
3.. .... ...
1.9 .......... I .--
..... .... .......





129.6 8 I3 4.


I .. .


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.




TABLE XVII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA PEPPERS BY COUNTIES,
SEASON 1928-29-Continued.*



Weeks Ending I Z


O 24.0. .. ...... ..... ).
N ov. 3....................................... .....|. .....
10............. ................. .... ..... ... 1
No 17.. .d 13..


S27........ ..... .............. .-. - .45....... ...... | 2 1
1e ............ ...................... 1 46.
1 2-........... .................. .......... ........ .. ................. .... ... ----- --- .
2 .................... .... .................. ................ .......... .... ..........
......................................................... ........... ......... ........ .......... ::::: .17


1. .......... .... .............. ...... 1 6.
S............. .......... .. ......... ......... .......... .......... ..........


2 .. ................ ............................... .......... .4.
19 ... ............. ............................. ........... .. .......... .
1 9 -- ... .. ..... ...... ......... 1 ..... ... ....... .......... ...... .... 1 2.

23......................... ................................ -.16 ..6 .- 10 8 i
250 .................................................. ... ...... .......... ......... .1 .1 .......... --- .......... 5 .8 2.. .... .......... .2........ 1.4.5 4
A p r .. ............................... .... .1 .1 1.47 .. 1 1. 1 2 4

a ......................................................... 2 3 1 .1 .

11. 1.6 .3 3.1 .2 .3 1.1 .4 .1 .1 1g
18 ............................................................ 4.4 ......... 4 ...... .3 1 6.2 2.9 ..6 .1 .1 --2 |. -- . 91269
2 ............................ ........ ....... ..... 1 1 1 .1 .1 1 4
1........................................ ............ ... 1. 1 .3 1 4. 2.1 .1 .1 .8 1 1 11.
8 6........ ................... .... .... .... 1 .1. 921 .
1 5:........ : .: 2.......1. 9 2 1 .1 1 3 2

23.:................. ..... ........ 6 ... 1 8 .1 .1 1. 3.9
2y 6 ....................................... .................... 1 2 ..... .................. ..... 1 3
12 1 1 ..... .... 1 8. .3 a.
l ........................................ ................ ........ ........ .... .. ......... .......... .. 1
1 3. - - - - 2-- ... . . . . 1 .2 .. I . . . .
M -. 1-- - .. 1 k .1 2



Total ......... ....... ................... 29.3 2.1 6.9 I 6.6 | 3.2 | 15.6 | 47.5 I 29 I 16.1 1 .7 .2 | 8.4 3.5 1.5 .1 .2 1.3 2,299.3
*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.








Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


TABLE XVIII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA PEPPERS BY AREAS, SEASON 1928-29*.


Weeks C co
Ending C
a )


Oct. 27........... ... .......
N ov. 3 ........... .....- --- ............
10 ........... ...
17 ... 2.9 .1 .1
24 .......-.. 3.3 .1 1.4
Dec. 1.......... 3.1 .1 .3
8 ......- 5.81 .1 2.1
15 ........... 8.8 .2 2.1
22 ........... 9.5 .4 3.9
29........... 5.5 .9 6.1
Jan. 5........... 5.6 2.4 6.3
12 .......... 3.5 4.4 4.8
19.......... 3.4 8.2 2.1
26 ......-... 9.1 20.8 10.6
Feb. 2........... 3.8 30.2 6.5
9- ........ 3.8 20.9 13.8
16 .......... 4.3 34.1 1.3
23 -.......... 2.2 71.3 3.5.
Mar. 2 -......- 1.7 92.3 5.8
9 ......... 5.7 72.4 8.2
16 ......... 5.6 101.3 2.4.
23 ........ 12 72.4 2.4
30 ........ 7 98.3 2.1
Apr. 6 .......... 2.7 87 3
13........... 4 67.4 3.11
20........... 10.2 70.1 .1
27....--...... 44.5 52.7 .....-...
May 4.... ...... 56.9 57.1 .-.....-..-
11........... 37.9 39.7 1
18 .......... 44.7 34.9 1.1
25.........-.. 87 19.9 1
June 1 .........- 45.9 .6 2
8 ......... 28.7 .2 ............
15 -......-. 23.2 3.61 .1
22 ......... 1.1 2.8 ......
29 .. ....... .. .3 ...........
July 6 .......-.. .......... .3 -.... ..
13 ... ....- ........ .3 .....
20 ........ -........ ......... ---.. ..........
27 ..... ..... ... .........
Aug. 17 .- ..... ..... -.... ..... -


Total ........ 494.8 1,067.8 97.2


2.5 ... 3 7
.4


.1 2.5 .3 7.7
P P P 0 0


.....---- ... ------.. ... .... .. ............ .2
-.--- -- --.-.-------.. ---------... ------.... .4
-------- ............ ------------ ....-- ... .8
--------- ............ .---- ....-.- .2 3.3
.1 2.5 ------------ .3 7.7
.. 1 ...... .2 4.7
........ .3 .1 .5 8.9
.. 1.1............ .5 12.7
.... ....... ............ 1 14.8
........ .. ...2 .8 13.5
...- ..... 1 .3 1.1 16.7
... .....-... .1 1.4 14.2
....... .4 1.5 15.6
.. .. .. 2.2 1.8 44.5
.--- -.-. 2.4 3.6 46.5
--- --....... 1.5 4 44
--.- ---- 3.8 2.7 46.2
-- ...... --- 9.7 3.1 89.8
---... .1 4.3 5.9 110.1
--- ---- 7.3 5.7 99.3
1 5.8 12.2 128.3
8.1 16.3 6.9 118.1
2 8.1 6.9 124.4
2 8.7 5.3 108.7
..... 5 8.7 88.2
..... 1 5 7.5 93.9
.1 .... 7.9 9.7 114.9
5.2 2.1 13.1 7.8 142.2
7.8 ............ 12.8 8.8 108
18.7 .1 8.4 18.1 126
55.3 ........... 12 19.5 194.7
35 1........... 13.1 20.9 117.5
28.5 1 3.9 29.9 92.2
34 -......... 4.2 18.3 83.4
7 2 4.6 17.7 35.2
10.4 1 1 10.6 23.3
1 ..... ............ 2.5 3.8
....... .6 .9
.. .. ... .. .... 1.2 1.2
--- .4 .4
............ ............ ..... .....1 .1


203.1 26.31 162.2 247.9 2,299.3


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.
tSee Fig. 11 for counties included.





Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


STRAWBERRIES

An equivalent of 2,144.8 carloads of strawberries moved from
the state, mostly within a period of nine weeks (Table XIX).
There are three areas (Fig. 12), two of which are large in vol-
ume of shipments. Area 1, known as the Plant City Area, was
first to come on the market, starting December 8. Two weeks
later this area was shipping more than five carloads per week.
It reached its peak March 2 with 324.3 carloads. Area 3, around
Starke and Lawtey, reached five carloads February 23 and its
peak of 97.4 carloads occurred March 16, only two weeks later
than the peak for Area 1. The Winter Garden section (Area 2)
did not have any time in which to ship unmolested by the other
areas. Its peak of 14.7 carloads moved March 2, the same date
as the peak for Area 1 and its season ended before either of the
other areas finished shipping.


Figure 12.-ralyTalent ar-lot shipments of
Florida straWberries by counties and areas,
season 1928-29. (Les than 1 carload omitted).
Total for state 2144.8 carloads.

Area I 1630 carloads
SArea 2 64 carloads
SArea 3 416 carloads






TABLE XIX.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA STRAWBERRIES BY COUNTIES,
SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending


Dec.



Jan.



Feb.



Mar.




Apr.



May


8...............
15 ... ........
2 2 ------- --- ---
15_------_---
22..................
125......... --
5..................
192.--..............
19................
26..................
2...................-
9-.... ..........
16.................-
23.....---....
2...............
9...... ........
16...-----
23................
30.................
6....................
13 ................
20........-- .......-
27...........----- -
4....-- ............
11.------.........
18............---- -.
25 .......-........-


3.9
7.5
.7
3
4.6

7.8
17.1
70.6
70.4
84.1
90.2
152.2
204.6
122.1
103.3
55.4
17.6
1.8
.4
.2


.1


2.8
4.9
8.

16.1
13.5
23.9
25.6
46
51.6
32.3
29
17.4
5.2
.1
.1

.2
.2


Total ...............11,010.61311.41280.11


a


--


aa



-- --- -------- I-------- -------- --------

.1 .1 .... ......... .
.. .. ........ .1... ...... .I-.... .. .
.1 .3 : ... .: ::: .1 -
.1 .5 .2 .2 ...... .
.3 1 .3 .6 .31
2.9 6.2 .3 .7 .11
3 5.3 .4 1.4 .2
2.2 4.5 1 .... ........ |
3.5 5.6 .8 .....- ........
4.9 7.9 1.7 .1| .1
7 14.7 2.5 2.1 ........
1.9 8.2 2.2 .11... ....
1.1 5.3 1.3 .11.......
.8 1 .9 .1........
.2 3.1 .5 .1........

........ ..... ....... ---


........ -...... .1 ....... ----..... -

. ..... .. ... .... ---- --- ---- .....- .. |- -
- .--- -- --- ...... ------ .-- ----- M .
28.11 63.71 12.61 5.6 .71
.I.iiIiiii/iiii


a)
0


I c
__7.. I..-.


.1 ........ .4 --..
........

.2 ---.....

-- -- -- .1 .......
S ...... .......
2.2 .5 .... ...1


2.21 .51 2.3| .1


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


o

0---- ----- 9

.9
1.4
5.9
S 8.3
11
........ --.... 17.9
36.2
..... 127
...... 123.1
...... 145.1
....- 156
.2 ...-.... 267.2
.8 .1 375.3
1 ........ 250.9
2 .1 262.8
2.3 .1 149.5
3.2 ........ 90.6
2.1 ...-... 46.8
.7........ 21.3
.8....... 12.6
1.6 .1 19
.8 ........ 8.9
.3 4.7
.1 .2.2
.... .. 2
15.9 2,144.8
15.91 .41 2,144.8


. - --- .. .
.2 .3 .3.
.1 1.1 .2
.1 .8 .2
1.6 .2
.1 5 .3
.1 27.9 .3
49 .1
95.4 .1
60.2 ........
55.8 ........
40.6 ........
19.6 .......
11.3 -.......
16.7 ........
7.8 ....--
4.3 --
2.1.....
.2 ........
.7 399.7| 1.7,





Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


TABLE XX.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA STRAWBERRIES BY AREAS, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending


Dec. 8................-
15....-........
22...... .....- .
29..............
Jan. 5.................
12 -..... ....-....
19..............
26..-...............
Feb. 2..... ............
9........--.....
16................
23................
M ar. 2................
9 ...............
16....-.............
23.......-.......
30..................
Apr. 6..........-- ......
13....-...........-
20..............
27 .......-....
M ay 4 .....-. .....
11 -........-- ...
18..... .........
25 --.....-.....

Total .........--


I I I
Area 1t I Area 2t I Area 3t I Otl
I I I Cour


.9
1.4
5.8
8.2
10.6
17
33.5
118.8
113.7
137.7
147
249.5
324.3
188.4
157.1
84.1
27.2
3.6
.7
.2
.2
.2
.1



1,630.2


-.-.. ----.. ......-.
.1
-----.----........--
.3
.5
1
6.2
5.3
4.5
5.6
7.9
14.7
8.2
5.3
1
3.1
63.7.--..... -- --- --

I ....................


_ .................. .
----63.7--
63.7


.3
1.1
---... .. ----- --







.8
1.6
5.2
28.7
50
97.4
62.5
59
42.7
20.3
12.1
18.3
8.6
4.6
2.2
.2


415.6 35.3 2,144.8


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.
tSee Fig. 12 for counties included.


SUB-MAJOR CROPS


TABLE XXI.-TOTAL EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA
SUB-MAJOR TRUCK CROPS, SEASON 1928-29.


Crop I Equivalent i Crop Equivalent
| Carloads I Carloads
I II

Lettuce .................... 935.9 [I Green Corn .......--....... 292.5
Escarole ............. 676.4 II Squashes .........-..........( 236.5
Eggplants -. ....-.. 329.1 I Okra .................--.. 227.2
Romaine ............ 292.6 I Green Peas ............... 119
I i

LETTUCE

For the season 1928-29 lettuce was the largest of the sub-
major crops. In some counties, such as Seminole, it is used as


11


I


her
itiest




.1
.1
.4
1.7
1.7
3
2.1
1.8
4.6
7.6
4.3
3
1.9
1.3
.5
.3
.3
.5
.1 I

. -- I.. .


Total


.9
1.4
5.9
8.3
11
17.9
36.2
127
123.1
145.1
156
267.2
375.3
250.9
262.8
149.5
90.6
46.8
21.3
12.6
19
8.9
4.7
2.2
.2


---.......-
------..----





Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


a minor crop preceding celery. There were 935.9 equivalent car-
loads for the season studied.
It is interesting to notice that geographic location and climatic
conditions apparently did not tend to regulate the time of mar-
keting lettuce. Area 1, Seminole County, was on the market first
(Table XXIII). It had its peak soon after Area 3 (Winter
Garden section) began shipping, and Area 1 had practically
finished by the time Area 3 had its peak, yet these areas are
only a few miles apart. Even more noticeable, however, Area
3 is about 100 miles northeast of Area 4 (Manatee County), yet
they came on the market only two weeks apart and their peaks
came the same week. It is evident that climate was not a factor,
but that the growers in Seminole County fit their time of plant-
ing to their crop rotation and they grow lettuce early, before
celery rather than let the ground lie idle. On the other hand,
Area 2 (Alachua and Marion counties) marketed the bulk of its
crop during the month of March as would be expected, since it
is a northern area. There was but little direct competition of
Area 2 with other areas in the state.


Tigure 13.-quivalent car-lot shipments of
Florida lettuce by counties and areas,
season 1928-29. (Less than 1 carload omitted).
Total for state 935.9 carloads.

M Area 1 322 carloads
SArea 2 170 carloads
] Area 3 216 carloads
SArea 4 226 carloads







Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


TABLE XXII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA LETTUCE BY COUNTIES, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks
Ending



Nov. 10 ..... ...
24 .........
Dec. 1......-...
8.. ......
15.........
22..........
29..........
Jan. 5 -........
12-.........
19 --.....-..
26 ..........
Feb. 2 .......-
9.........
16--.........
23..........
M ar. 2..........
9............
16...........
23............
30............


Total


S 0



.... I 1 .. I.
.----..--- 16.2 .11-
........... 47.8 .2
----..... 105.2 ......
-..... 1... 70.4 .....
.... ... 34.4 .. .
........ 21.2 ....-..
-....--... 12.51 ......
----I---- 11 I--
---...... 1.4 .1
-... ..... i .2 .1


-...........-- ... I
I .......I 1.1 9
. ........ 1 .1 26.4 .
............ ....... i 35.4 .
... |.... 25.31-
------- 21.41.
---- -- I 1.81.


Cd




3
21.
15
24
13
22
43
32.:
15.1
9..
4
7
7


...-...... ..--..1321.81120.91216


'0
C) B
B B
& C
Q M


----- I-----

5 --...... ......
8.1 -... -
7.2 .1.
8 ..
23.1..--
42.2 ........
3 35.81........
1t 25.5... .
1 19.2 ......
13.4 .1
16.4........
13.3 .......
12.1 ........
1.2 -.....
.2 ....... :


1225.71 .21


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


.1 .1 ......-
.1 .2 ........




12.4 -. --.--
14.7._ -........
10.3. ....... ......
... .... 1 ........ .

7.5 .---- ---. |
3.8 ........ 1
.1 --....... --
49 | .61 1


TABLE XXIII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS
OF FLORIDA LETTUCE BY AREAS, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending | Area 1t I Area 2t

Nov. 10 --..... .1 I........
24 .....-- 16.2 .1
Dec. 1 --......! 47.8 .2
8 ........ 105.2 ..............
1 5 ...... 7 0 .4 -- --- -
22 --~....... 34.4 ---
2 9 ......- .... 2 1 .2 -- .-- -
Jan. 5..........- 12.5 --
12 ...... ..... 11 .1
19- ....- 1.4 .2
26.. .......... .2 .1
Feb. 2 .. ........-- .1 ................
9........- .1 .1
16- .............. ....... 1
23.............. 1.1 21.4
Mar. 2............-- .1 41.1
9.....................-...- 45.7
16 ...-........ -...............--- 32.8
23 -.. ...... ...--........... 25.2
30 ...................... 1.9
Total ............. 321.8 169.9


I I
IArea 3t Area 4+


Other
Coun-
tiest
- ..... ... .....


r---------------
o o.1 ................
24 7.2 .1
13 8 ..........
22 23.1 .5
43 42.2 .2
32.3 35.8 .3
15.1 25.5 .1
9.1 19.2 .1
4 13.4 .2
7 16.4
...............7 16.4 ......... 2.1
7 13 ........ ....... 1.2
--------I---- 12.1 ---- ----
-- ---- 12.2----..
S----- ..........
216 225.7 2.5
1 216 225.7 I 2.5


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.
tSee Fig. 13 for counties included.


Total

.1
16.3
51
126.7
93.5
65.7
42.2
58.1
96.5
70
41
28.5
17.8
24.4
42.8
53.3
46.9
33
26.2
1.9
935.9


0

.1
16.3
51
126.7
93.5
65.7
42.2
58.1
96.5
70
41
28.5
17.8
24.4
42.8
53.3
46.9
33
26.2
1.9
935.9







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


ESCAROLE

A study of Table XXIV and Fig. 14 leads one to divide the
state into only two areas for escarole, with Seminole and Manatee
counties, respectively, as the chief centers. Volusia County pro-
duced 45 carloads of escarole that year, but it did not figure at
all in the production of lettuce. The two areas were in direct
competition practically throughout their entire marketing per-
iod (Table XXV). Like lettuce, escarole is a cool weather crop,
its season ending about April 1.


Figure 14.--quivalent car-lot shipments of
Florida escarole by counties and areas,
season 1928-29. (Less than 1 carload omitted).
Total for state 676.4 oarloads.

Area 1 499 carloads
SArea 2 174 carloads








Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


TABLE XXIV.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS
OF FLORIDA ESCAROLE BY COUNTIES, SEASON 1928-29*


Weeks Ending




Dec. 8......-..............
15....... ........
22.. ........... ....
29....- ...............
Jan. 5..............
12....-........-..-.......
19 .........-...........
26 ....................-
Feb. 2..........-....--..
9.... -.................
16 -.................
23-.....................
Mar. 2....................-.-_
9--....................---
16.....................
23..................
30 ...-.............. I

Total .......... 3


2 .... ..
1 4
1 10
6.3 4
4 7
2 12
7 9
1 5
4 9
6 1
8 9
3 13
3
...... 3

...... ....... i


....... .. -------

In .2 ... _... .......



.. ...... .. .
........ -- -
.2 .








.... ... ......
.2..- ....- 1...



.1 -....- .1

-------- --- ..... .


.2 ..- .......
------ ------ -------


..... .
.....~.~
......
......
......
......
... ... |
..... .. |
.... ... /
..~.. ... |

...... |
.....~..
......


I 45.3 89 .6 1 2 1 1676.4
65.41172 1 45.3 89 I .6 1 .1 2 1 676.4


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


TABLE XXV.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA ESCAROLE BY AREAS, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending


Dec. 8....--...........
15-...................
22.....................
29....... ........-.....
Jan. 5..................
12..................
19...... .-.........
26....................
Feb. 2.---.............. ...
9....................
16.-..................
23..................
Mar. 2......------..........
9...................
16.. --.................
23......................
30....................


Area It Area 2t


2
2 ............----- ..........
6 1
39 6
40 6
50.4 17
41 11
38 28
42.1 10
28 5
35 28
40 19
45 18
42.2 11
29 12
12 2
7 -......---....
3 --.... ........


Total ....-..........1- 499.7 I 174
*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload
tSee Fig. 14 for counties included.


I Other
SCountiest I






1








I I
I .2
--_---------- ...........






I-------....----.-------


2.7

omitted.


Total


2
7
45
46.1
67.6
52
67
52.1
33
63.2
60
63
53.2
41
14.2
7
3

676.4






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


EGGPLANTS

There are two important areas in Florida growing eggplants
(Table XXVII and Fig. 15). They are Area 2 (Manatee) and
Area 3 (Ft. Myers). Area 1 (Hernando County), though small,
is considered as a separate area due to the fact that it markets
most of its eggplants in the fall and early winter not much
in competition with the other areas. Area 3 came on the mar-
ket December 29. It had its peak April 6, just when Area 2
started shipping in carload lots. Then, during the week ending
May 4, Area 2 reached a volume of five carloads after having
shipped less than carloads by express for 25 weeks, and had its
peak on May 18 with 31.7 carloads. The intra-state competition,
therefore, is not so noticeable with eggplants as it is with many
other crops. Like the other openings revealed, there may be an
opportunity in South Florida to ship a greater volume of egg-
plants in the fall and early winter.


igure 15.--Zquivalent car-lot shipments of
Florida eggplants by counties and areas,
season 1928-29. (Leas than 1 carload omitted).
Total for state 329.1 carloads.

SArea 1 5 carloads
Area 2 143 carloads
SArea 3 93 carloads





TABLE XXVI.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA EGGPLANTS BY COUNTIES,

SEASON 1928-29.*


.1 .1 ...... ... ..... ...



S.4 3 .1. .1
..... .......







.4 1 4 .1 .....




.. .....
... ..... ...... .




-.8 1 ... 7 .1 .-- --
----- ---- -- ---- --- ------









. ........ .1 ........ .....







.1 ..1 ........ ...
.1. .4 .... .... .......
.1 1.3 .11.



........ 1 .. .... 3 ..... ... ......

18 ..1 ... ..3 .1 .
1. 3 .1 _-. 2 .1 3.. .
.2 .4 .5 ."1 .1 1 1
.8 1.2 2 ... ... .1 .3 .. ....
.1 2.5! .1 .. ........ 1 .. .. -


....... 1 ...... .. ... ... .1 .... .. .. ... ...... ........
7. 2.4] 11.6 1. 1.9 .1 .3
.8........- .. 2. 1








.3 .7 .1 .1
7.5, 16.8, 2.4 17.61.8! 1.9 3.2 5 2.1 .3


CS

I2
CC


S...... ....... .
.6
5 5
1.1
.. ..... .. .5
15
2
3.3
..... ...... .7
.4
.7

.5
.7
| .5
1..3.... 1
.5

16
.9
1.3
3.8
6
8.2
... ... .... 137.8
.... 0.3
S ... 14.7
.... ........ ..... .. 2 1.-,

S13.3
..... ... 12.8
.1 .. .. ........ 13.1i
...I..... _.I 17.3.

.1 .1 39
1.3 .1 29.3
1.5 .1 26.3
2.7 .1 24.4
.6 3 .... 23.2
1.7 ........ ...... 7
.6 2.2 .... 4
4 2.1
.3 .8

.. i.. .8
9 .9 ..5.9 ... .1
.11 9.9 5.9 .1) 329.1


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


-----





Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


TABLE XXVII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA EGGPLANTS BY AREAS, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending


Oct. 6............
13................
20...--..........
27..-.........
N ov. 3...............
10................
17..............
24.............
Dec. 1..............
8 .............
15..............
22...........
29----..........
Jan. 5 .... ........
12 ..... ........
19 -....--......
26 .......--
Feb. 2 ....-...-
9 ...........
16 -...........
23 ............
Mar. 2 -----.........
9 ...............
16.......----
23..... ......
30................
Apr. 6...............
13...........
20...............
27...............-
M ay 4............
11...............
18..............
25.........-.....
June 1-............
8 --...........
15...............
22...............-
29...............
July 6...............
13-.......-.......
20-.............
27. .....---......
Aug. 3.......-....
10...........


Total ............


Area 1t


.4
.6
.2
.1
.4
.9
.6
.6
.4

.1
.1

.1


.1


Area 2t Ar




.. . .... ...


*Weekly shipments of less than .1
fSee Fig. 15 for counties included.


I Other
ea 3t I Coun-
I ties


.2
.2

.2
.6
.2
.3
.2
.5
.2
.3
.2

.1
.2

.1
.1
.2
.3
.5
.7
.7
1.9
1.3
2.4
2.7
5.2
10.7
31.7
22.1
20.7
17.5
14.3
2.7
.8
1.4
.4
.4
.5
.5
.1


143.5


- ----------..
--------------------


....................
.1

.1
.4
.3
.7
.4
.4
.1
1.4
4.2
4.1
5.4
9.5
17.1
8.5
7.2
7.7
9.2
6.2
4.4
2.8
1.6
.4
.6
.1
.3
.1








93.3


carload omitted.


.1
.2
.5
.6
1.2
2.1
.1
.1
.4
.1
.2
.3
.2
.7
1
.7
.5
1.4
3.6
3
3.7
3.2
4.2
4.5
5.5
3.5
3.2
2.7
2.9
2.6
2.9
4.4
4
6.5
8.3
4.2
2.9
.6
.4
.2
.2
.1




87.7


I~


-


Total


.4
.6
.3
.5
1.1
1.5
2
3.3
.7
.4
.7
.7
.5
.7
.5
1.3
1.5
1.6
.9
1.9
3.8
4.6
8.2
7.8
10.3
14.7
24.5
13.3
12.8
13.1
17.3
19.5
39
29.3
26.3
24.4
23.2
7
4
2.1
.8
.6
.7
.6
.1


329.1


-----------








-----------

-----------


-----------
------------------
...........
-----------
-----------
----------- ........
-----------
...........
-------------
--- I .... ...........
----------------- -
---------- .........
....................

--------------------
-------------- I -----
--------- I ----------
-------------------
--------------------
....................





Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


ROMAINE

In the shipping of romaine there are conditions similar to those
of lettuce; that is, Area 1 (Orange and Seminole counties) came
on the market ahead of Area 2, yet Area 2 is farther south
(Fig. 16). These two areas competed during the greater part of
their shipping seasons. Area 3 (Alachua and Marion counties)
did not meet excessive direct competition from the other areas.
For all areas, there were weeks of high shipments followed by
weeks of low shipments, with no regularity throughout the sea-
son. (Tables XXVIII and XXIX.)


Figure 16.--quivalent car-lot shipments of
Florida romaine by counties and areas,
season 1928-29. (Less than 1 carload omitted).
Total for state 292.6 carloads.

SArea 1 133 carloads
SArea 2 12 carloads
Area 3 31 carloads






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


TABLE XXVIII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS
OF FLO IDA ROMAINE BY COUNTIES, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks
Ending


Nov. 17.......... 6
24......... 17
Dec. 1 .......- 10
8 ..... .... 33.3
15 ......... 5.1
22 ... .... 5.1
29 .....-... 2.2
Jan. 5 ......... 2
12 ......-- 1.1
19 ..- .....-- .2
26 .........- .6
Feb. 2........... .1
9.......- ...........
16.......................
23........... 1
Mar. 2...........
9........--- ............
16 ........... ---............
23...... ..........
30........ .........
Apr. 13 .....................-
Total ......... 83.7


a)






1
3.2
2
6.1
1
6
2
3
14
2
6
1
2






49.3


C)
-S






9
3
7
5
12
13.2
21
18.1
14
3
3.1
10
3.1
2
1


- -
- - - -
... ... ...
- -- -- -
-- -- ~
.. . .. .I. .


- -


.3






.1
1
-----------
-----------


124.5 1.4


2 .1
11 2.2
6 .1
3 ...........-
4.2 --...

26.2 1 2.4


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


3
1

1
.1
5.1
R. I....


0

6
17
11
45.5
10.1
18.2
8.5
20
16.3
24.2
32.7
16.1
9
4.2
14
5.2
18.2
8.1
3
5.2
.1
292.6


TABLE XXIX.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS
OF FLORIDA ROMAINE BY AREAS, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Area it
Ending
Nov. 17 ............ 6
24 .......-- 17
Dec. 1 ............ 11
8 -.......... 36.5
15............ 7.1
22 .. ..... ..- 11.2
29 ............ 3.2
Jan. 5........... 8
12............. 3.1
19.............- 3.2
26............ 14.6
Feb. 2.............- 2.1
9............. 6
16.............. 1
23............. 3
Mar. 2..............................
9..............-. ~...-.............
16-----.........................
23.............- ................
30..... --....... ...........
Apr. 13..............................
Total ........] 133


-I O
Area 2t Area 3t I Ct

- - -- -------------- ---- --. t
---- --.. .. -- --- -- --------- .-.-- .---


9
3
7
5


12
13.2
21
18.1
14
3
3.1
10
3.1
2
1



124.5


their
oun-
iest


.................... ---...................--





--------- -----------
.................... .







1
2 .1
14 2.2
7 .1
.................... -...
............ ... --- --------- ---------




S ........ .. .... ......


5.2 -----
.1
31.3 3.8


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.
fSee Fig. 16 for counties included.


Total

6
17
11
45.5
10.1
18.2
8.5
20
16.3
24.2
32.7
16.1
9
4.2
14
5.2
18.2
8.1
3
5.2
.1
292.6


.
.


..
.







Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


GREEN CORN

The largest volume of green corn was confined to the three
counties of Alachua, Bradford and Polk (Table XXX). Alachua
County led with a total of 132 equivalent carloads, largely from
the town of Alachua. Another heavy shipping center was the
town of Lawtey in Bradford County. Area 1 (Polk County),
shipped during a period of nine weeks, and its season was prac-
tically over before Area 2 was shipping heavily. The peak for
Area 2 occurred the week ending June 15 with a slightly de-
creased movement the following week. (Table XXXI.) Of the
grand total from the state of 292.5 equivalent carloads, 242 were
shipped from Area 2 (Fig. 17).


Figure 17.--_qivalent car-lot shipments of
Florida green corn by counties and areas,
season 1928-29. (Less than 1 carload omitted).
Total for state 292.5 carload

SArea 1 29 carloads
SArea 2 242 carloads









TABLE XXX.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA GREEN CORN BY COUNTIES,

SEASON 1928-29*


S

Weeks Ending




Sept. 8............... 1
Oct. 27 ....-..........
Dec. 15 ..... ...... .-
Feb. 23...... .......
Mar. 2...............
9.... ......... ......
30 ............-......
A pr. 6..... ..............
13....................
20............. ... ..
27............ .........
M ay 4 .......................
11.... .. ......
18...----...........
25.................... ....
June 1..................... ....
8 ................ ..
15....---... ......-......
22..------- .............
29 .......--- .....-.....
July 6.....--- .........
13.. ..-........ .....-
20......--- --............
Total .........


I I



.. .. ...



. 5 ...



.4 .1
.5 -.-
1.7-....
1.9
.3


4.1 1.6 1.2 4.8 .1)28.7)


0)
0 (
o^ o

a aa


..... 1.........

.......... --- ....

--....---- .. ..--...
--- ------ i------
--- ------ ---
------ i..... .--.----
--- ------ I------

...... .. ....
1 .1 .1
1 .6 ....-
...... .7 .....
.. .9 .....
...... 1.2 .....
...... .7....
...... 1.3 .
...... .1 .
------ ...... -----.1

...... .1.....



2 5.81 .1


.. ... ......



. ... ...



.1 .-
.1

.4 ......
.2 --
1.1.


1 .21 1.81 .11 .41 5


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


I 9 112.11 292.5


_ 1 I _ I


S...


,


,


I - I






Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


TABLE XXXI.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA
GREEN CORN BY AREAS, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending


Sept. 8..................
Oct. 27..................
Dec. 15..- .......... ...
Feb. 23....................
M ar. 2..............
9...................
30...................
A pr. 6....................
13.... ............
20-................
27................
M ay 4................
11..................
18..................
25 -...............
June 1 ...........-......
8 ..................
15 ..................
22 .................
29 ................
July 6 .................
13..........-........-
20..................


Total ........- .....


I
Area 1t Area 2t









.1 .. ...... ........ .
----------. .... ............. ------------


.4
5
3.9
4.2
5.1
7
2
1
. .. ............


28.7


*Weekly shipments of less than .1
tSee Fig. 17 for counties included.


.1
.7
.7
1.6
4.5
13.5
41.8
68.6
64.1
31.1
10.1
3.1
2.1


242


Other
Coun-
tiest

1
1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.6
.8
.8
2.1
3.4
1.8
2.4
6.1
1
.2
.2




....................
.......... .......... ..

..................... ..

.... -....... ........


21.8


Total


1
1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.6
.8
.9
2.5
8.5
6.4
7.3
12.8
12.5
15.7
43
68.6
64.1
31.1
10.1
3.1
2.1


292.5


carload omitted.






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


SQUASHES
Squashes were marketed both in the fall and in the spring
(Table XXXII). In some counties (for example Dade County)
shipments were started in November in very small amounts, and
continued until near the end of May. On the other hand, Marion,
Alachua, Levy and other counties had both fall and spring crops.
Each area had direct competition with the other areas (Table
XXXIII). Area 1 (Alachua and Marion counties), however,
had less competition from the others because of its early fall
crop and late spring crop. This area, also, had the highest peak
of total shipments. On April 27 it sent 17.1 equivalent carloads,
and the total shipments for the area were 66.5 equivalent car-
loads, mostly in a period of five weeks. Area 2 (Southeast Coast)
shipped 64.8 equivalent carloads, but over a period of six months.
The territory classed as "other counties" showed a large num-
ber of shipments extending from November to the middle of
May.
This study reveals that the growing of squashes is widely dis-
tributed in the state. Some squashes were sent from the state
every week (Table LX).


Figure 18.--Equivalent car-lot shipments of
Florida squashes by counties and areas,
season 1928-29. (Less than 1 carload omitted).
Total for state 236.5 carloads.

Area 1- 66 carloads
SArea 2 64 carloads
SArea 3 40 carloads
SArea 4 10 carloads





TABLE XXXII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA SQUASHES BY COUNTIES,
SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending


Sept. 15.....................
Oct. 6......... ....
13............
20.......................
27 .......................
N ov. 3........
10 ... ..............
17
24....................
Dec. 1................
8..................... .
15.................... ...
22..... .. .......
29..........................
Jan. 5.........................
12 ......................
19... .......
26...................... ...
Feb. 2................... .
9 .........................
16 ...........
23 ................ ......
M ar. 2.... ... ........
9.................
16............ .....
23.
30 ... .........
Apr. 6....
13.....................
20.... .........
27................
M ay 4...............
11
18 ------ ........................
25 ... ..............
June 1 ..............
8.. ..............
15 ......................
July 13........... ........
27.........................
Aug. .....................
Total ....................


3.1 | 47.4


.1 .1
.2
.5 .1
.4 .1
.1 .1
.2 .1


1 .1
1 .1
1 .2
.4
.1I
.1..
.. .1






........ .





|. 1.7
... .. 2.3.
3.6
2
1.7

.4
.11
.1 4.1









.4 14.1


- --


.1 ....
.1
.1

.3 .4
.2 .4
.2 .8

.2
.1 .4

.2 .3
.1 .7
.3 .6
.6 .8
.5 1
.3 .8
... ..... .8
.1 .7
.2 .5
1.2 .4
.2 .2















5.4 10.4


~----~-


I


6.3 1.8I 11.1
6.3 1 1.8 I 11.1


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


.1
.11
.2.



1.1 ...........
.1







S52 1 .4


1.5 .1
............ I 1.5 .1
.1 5 .4
1.7 5.6 .7
1.4 15.7 1.7
1.4 13.3 1 1
1.1 6.1 .9
2 .9 .4
2.1 .1 .1
.1 .1 ............




14 .. .... .4 1 1.
'14.11 52.4 I 6091


a











.3
.3

*"""- I-
.. ........ ..







.1





.1 I
.3 I
.3
.11


.1
.1
.1

.1
.3
.3
.2
.5
.3
.4
.8
.7
.6
.5
.1
.2
.2
.4
.3
.1


.1


....I 3.2






TABLE XXXII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA SQUASHES BY COUNTIES,

SEASON 1928-29-Continued.*


Weeks Ending


Sept. 15..........
Oct. 6..........
13..........
20..........
27...
Nov. 3......
10.........
17..........
24..........
Dec. 1..........
8..........
15.........
22
29 .......
Jan. 5..........
12..........
19..........
26........
Feb. 2......
9 ..........
16........
23.........
M ar. 2..........
9..........
16 .........
23.........
30.........
A pr. 6........
13......
20..........
27 ........
May 4 ........
11..........
18....
25.........
June 1........
8 ..........
15..........
July 13.......8
27..........
A ug. 3........

T total ........


-------------------------------
-------------------------------
-------------------------------
-------------------------------
--------------------------
----------- ----------- -------
.........................
---------------- ..... .........
-----------------
-------------------------------
-------------------- -------
------------------------------
...............................
------------------------
--------------------------------
-------------------------------
------------------------ I
--------------------------------
------------------------
...............................
-------------- -----------------
.......................
-------------------------------
-------------------------------
-------------------------------
-------------------------------
.........................
-------------------------------
...................
----------------------
------------------------
--------------------------------
--------------------------------
................................
--------------------------------
--------------------------------
----------------------
--------------------------------
...............................
--------------------------
--------------------------------

--------------------------


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


0
St
a p

'0 0

a o


I


.1





.1

S .1
.1
.1
...........
.1
.1
.7
1.4
1
.6
.6
.1
.1











. 5.3


0



........










-------
......... --

------------ .













.1
Siii











.1








.1
.2












.5


............
............
----------


'


' '


......... ............












.3 .5 .1
.3 1.5 .3
.3 2.6 1.6
.2 4 .1
.1 2.7 .3
.- 1.5 .2
.......... 2.4 .1
1.3 .3
.3 .4
.11










1.3 | 17 3.41


1.5 | 2.8


.1
.4
.5
.9
1
.5
.2
.1












3.7


a P


. .. -


































.1
.2 ............
.2 .1 .1
.2 .
.2 .
.2 .












1.1 .1 .1 |


.1
.1
.3
.2
.2
.2










1.1


.2
.7
.5
.5
.2
.1
.1
.1
.4
.1






S......


.1






















....


I


---


I


............












.1
.1
.1
.3


UO E2


.2
............ .3

............ 1 .7
.7
--......... 1.9
........... 1 3.8






2.8
..........-I 3.7
......... 2.8



1.8
1.7

2.8...
.........- 1 2.3
2.3
............ 2.4
2.6
3.5
5.5
... 5.5
............ 1 8.6
............ 8
------------ 9 .8



.1 29.5
------ 16.7
............ 19.7
------------ 17 .1
........ 15.8
............ 25.2
.1 20
.......... | 10.6
........... 5.3
... 2.5
............ .2
---...--.----- 2.3

2 .1
1----- .1
............ I .1

.1 1236.5









Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


TABLE XXXIII.-WEEKLY
OF FLORIDA SQU


Weeks IArea 19
Ending

Sept. 15............ .. -
Oct. 6............. .2
13. ......... .3


20-.............
27---..----
N ov. 3..............
24.v
10..............
17..............
24---.............
D ec. 1 ............
8..............
15 ............
22...........
29 ..........-
Jan. 5 ..........--
12 ............
19............-
26...........-
Feb. 2..............
9..............
16..............
9.


1.6
I.3
...... .. .
...... .



. .. .. .
....... .
...... .
... I -- --------
................


M ar. 2 -...-....- -......- -
9........................-
M ar. 2.............. ..............
16.........................---.
16 -_--. --- -------
23............ .1
30.............. .5
Apr. 6 .......... 1.5
13 ........... 5.1
20 ............ 7.3
27 ............ 17.1
May 4 .......... 14.7
11....-........ 7.2
18........... 2.9
25.......-... 2.2
June 1............. .2
8............ 2
15.............. ..
July 13. ..............
27........ .1
Aug. 3_ .1


Total ........... 66.5


SUMMARY OF EQU
ASHES BY AREAS,


Area 2t Area 3t


............... ................


... ....... .

.2 .1
.2 .1
.4 .3
.5 .7
.5 .5
1.1 .5
.7 .3
.8 .2
1.1 .2
1.5 .2
1.7 .4
1.3 .6
2.1 .5
4 .3
3.2 .6
5.6 .4
4.9 .4
7.4 .2
6.3 .4
4.5 2.4
2.3 4.2
3.2 7
5.9 7.4
2.1 4.9
2.3 2.7
.5 2.9
.2 1.5
.1 .3
.2 .1

................ ....... .








64.8 40.4


IVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS
SEASON 1928-29.*

| Other
Area 4t I Coun- Total
I ties I

.........1.1
.2
.- ---------- .3 .3
----- ---- ------------


.L
.2
.7
2.3
1.4
1.2
.2
1.1
.4
.3
.7
.2
.1

.6
.5
1.1
1.8
1.7
1.4
1.3
1.5
2.4
5.6
4.7
5
3.5
4.7
3.6
3
2.1
.3
.2
.2
.1




54.4


.1
.1
.5
.4
.4
.8
.4
.2
.7
.3
.7
.6
.8
1
.8
.8
.7
.5
.4
.2
















10.4


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.
tSee Fig. 18 for counties included.


I


236.5







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


OKRA
The heaviest shipments of okra are made in May, June and
July (Table XXXIV), while most other crops are shipped in
the fall, winter and early spring. During the season 1928-1929,
there- were shipments from somewhere in the state every week
except for the week ending January 12 (Table LX).
There was direct competition of all the areas with one another
(Table XXXV), yet the fall crop for Area 1 (Alachua, Levy and
Marion counties) did not encounter serious competition. This
was the most important area, shipping approximately 76 per-
cent of the okra from the state for the year. The peak came
June 1 with 18.6 carloads and there were 11 weeks of compar-
atively heavy shipments extending from the middle of May to
the middle of July.
Marion was the heaviest shipping county followed by Alachua,
Levy and Hillsborough counties, in order. Morriston in Levy
County and Plant City in Hillsborough County were the largest
shipping points for that year.


Figure s19.-quivalent car-lot Bhipments of
florida olra by counties and areas, season
1928-29. (Less than 1 carload omitted).
Total for state 227.2 carloads.

SArea 1 174 carloads
j Area 2 7 carloads
E Area 3 33 carloads






TABLE XXXIV.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA OKRA BY COUNTIES,
SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks. Ending


Sep.. 8.
15...
22..
29
Oct. 6
13.
20g
27..
Nov. 3
10.
17
24
Feb. 23.
Mar. 2
9
16
23.
30
Apr. 6..
13..
20.
27.
May 4.
11.
18.
25.
June 1.
8..
15.
22
29
July 6.
13..
20.
27.
Aug. 3..
10.
17
24.
31.
Total


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


I


......................
.................
-- ---------------
-- -- ---------------------------
----------------- ---- ---
-------------------------
-- -------------- ---------
.- ---------------
----------- ------ I ---------------
...... ..........
------------------ ------
.......... ........... -------------


p
.3





S..........| .4
.............. A.,
.5


.... ......... .9


.3
................ 2






I.......... .
------~-----------~








----- 2.
.............. 4.3
~---------~--------




.... | 5.8.
........ 4.9.
................. 4.6

:::::::::::::::: 43
| 3.7
3.3
2.1
. ......... 1.7
1.2
.5

.4.
....... ... .4
.................. 53.5


>
.d en

3. a. p .

g *I L i a..i I. : .

^ Cd o al p CL c C5 a



.2 .. ... ...... .... .. ....... I ..... ...... ............ ..



1 1 .4 1 ----1 I .. .. ..... .

. 1.3 ... .1 .2 .1 ..... I........ ........ ........ ... .... ....
S 1. .1 .1 .3 .1.. ....... ... ..... ....
.6 .4 .... 1 .. 1 ....... I........ ......... .... .......

. .1 .3 .1
.2 ... ... .1 ..... ... ........ .. ........ .... ...



....... ....... ... .2 1 1 ...
--:';--- _-::--_.2 -------- ::

.2 ----

..1 1 6... .... .3 .1 _' --
.4 .1 .1 ........
.7 2 .1 .6 .2 .1 .1 .4 ....
1 1.6 ..... 1 .1 .1 1.1
1.7 4.1 .1 1.2 .2 1 .1 .1 2
2.7 5.9 ....... .1 .81 .21 .2 .1 3.2
3.7 8.2 ------- ........ .2 .51 .2 .1 .1 4.7
4.2 8.6 1 .1 .2 .5| .1 .11 .1 5
3.3 7.9 .1 .1 .1 .2 .1 .1 .1 3.8 ...
2.8 7 ...... .1 .1 .1 .1| .1 ... 4 2 ...
2.9 7.5 .. ....... .......... .1 .1 .1 4.7
2.9 6.1 .... 2 -- --- .1 .1 .1 3
2.2 4 ....2 .1 .1 .1 .5 .
3.5 ........ ........ .1 ...1 ...
1. 2.9 .1 .14 .11...
.5 ... .. .1. .2 ..
.2 .6 ........ 6- .. ... .

2. I .5 2. .


38 1 82 .5 .8 3 .1 1.41 6.8 2.11 1.6 12 32.9


-0
o


... ....... ........ ........ i .9


... ... ... .. .... 2 4
.7

1C


1 8
.. .... I...... .
3 4


... ........ ... ... .. 1 .8
3.2
2.8
.".......... ..... ... .... .. 1.8
.8


.1
.2
... ... ..... ..... .1





.2
.4


1.7

1.1
S. ... ...... 25.2
... .. ....... 2











19.2
... ........ ........ ........ 5.2










.1 .1 .1 20.6
. .... 17.3..... .
.... ....... .. ... ........ .4
.... ....... ....... ........ | 1 .5
. 1 ... 1. ....... |- 2 .6
. ..... .. ..... ........ 1 22.4
.1 .1 .... ....... 1 205.





.1 .1 ....... ........ 11.8
.1 .... ........ 9.3
6.8
.... ... ...... ........ 4 .7


1.2
. ........ ------ 2 5 .2



.... ....... ....... ........ 1 2
1.1


.6, .51 .1! .21 227.2


. ........ ....... .1

. .. ........ .1




:4 . .2 .2.





41 .2 .21 1.1


------------------- --
--------------
--------------
............ --------------
................ -----------
.......................
-------------
- --------- --------------
- --------------------------
----- ----------







64 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


TABLE XXXV.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS
OF FLORIDA OKRA BY AREAS, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending I


Sept.



Oct.



Nov.



Feb.
Mar.





Apr.


8...--........
15.............
22.........
29..............
6..............
13.........
20.............
27..............
3...-........
10............
17..............
24 ............
23. ..



23 .............
30...
6......-....- -
13............
20.............


27.............. .3
May 4 ............. 3
11 ............- 7.1
18 ............ 11.4
25............. 16.2
June 1............. 18.6
8.........-... 16.1
15 ............ 14.4
22..........-.. 14.9
29............. 13.3
July 6... .......... 10.5
13...-.......... 8.6
20..--....... 6.4
27............. 4.5
Aug. 3.............- 3.2
10............. 1.8
17 ............. 1.2
24............ 1.1
31....-........ 1.3


Total ......... 173.5


.4
.6
1
1.2
.8
.5
.5
.2
.1















6.8
- ------- ------ ....
-- -------. ---..






..--..-------.. -.


.4
1.1
2
3.2
4.7
5
3.8
4.2
4.7
3
.5
.2
.1









32.9
------- -----..
...........-.........
................... ..


32.9 1


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.
tSee Fig. 19 for counties included.


Area 1i Area 2t Area 3t


1.4 ...... ........ ........... .....
.9 -...........- -...... ........... .....
.7 .............. ... ... ....
1 ---------... -------- .. ...... -... ..
1.3 .................... ........
2.2 ........... .....
2.8 ............... .....
2.3 ......... ...
2.3 ........ -.... .................



.7 .................. -- - -......-
1.3............. ........ .......





..2 ...................
.. .--... .1 ........I .......3
--- I--- .1 ----- ..... ......
--- --- -- --- -.2 ---- -----------. .

- ..---...... .3 .............
--------------.. .3 ---------.-.---- --


Other
Coun-
tiest

.1





.2
.6
.7
.4
.6
.5
.1



.. ----------- .


.1
.2
.2
.4
.7
.8
1.2
1
1.1
.8
.5
1
1
.8
.5
.3
.2







14
....................

---- ---- -


Total


1.5
.9
.7
1
1.3
2.4
3.4
3
3.2
2.8
1.8
.8
.2
.1
.1
.1
.2
.2
.4
.5
.6
1.7
5.8
11.1
16.6
22.4
25.2
20.9
19.2
20.6
17.3
11.8
9.3
6.8
4.7
3.2
1.8
1.2
1.1
1.3


227.2







Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II 65

GREEN PEAS
There were 30 counties shipping .1 carload or more of green
peas to the northern markets during the year under study
(Table XXXVI). Not any of these counties shipped large
amounts. The most shipped by individual counties was 28.2
equivalent carloads from Palm Beach, 16.9 from Hardee, and
10.7 from Indian River.
For this commodity the state has been divided into five areas
(Table XXXVII). A study of Table XXXVII and Fig. 20 re-
veals that so far as areas shipping at the same time are con-
cerned there is direct competition among them all. The late
spring crop for Area 2 (Hardee, Hillsborough, Polk and Man-
atee counties) did not appear to have serious competition. Area
1 (Alachua-Marion) experienced three minor peaks during: its
season.













Figure 20.-quivalent car-lot shipments of 5 5
Florida green peas by counties and areas,
season 1928-29. (Less than 1 carload omitted).
Total for state 119 carloads. -

] Area 1 13 carloads 17 1 1
SArea 2 36 carloads 1
Area 3 11 carloads 2
Area 4 10 carloads 4
[] Area 5 33 carloads








TABLE XXXVI.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA GREEN PEAS BY COUNTIES,
SEASON 1928-29.*


W


__


weeks Ending o.



13--............--.. .........2 ....
27..................... 2 .
3..................... .
10..................... 1
10............ .......
17. .2
24.................... .5
1 ................ 1



29...................
S 5................ .
12 ............
19 ..... .... .
26 ...................... ...
26

...................... .2
96...................... .1
16 .................. .2
230...............
2 02

. ...................... |
16 .............. .... .


2 ..................... ..


27 .1-.-
18.......... .... 1.6







25 -------- --- 7
Le I. -- ------ -- 5
8...................- .
S13......................-----


S 1..................... .

20 ................... .. -- 1
27.Total ......... .1
V 4.............. .1

S...................... .35

1................. .

226......--..- .7
y 12...................--
20 ...................... ....
20Total ................ 7.91
Total ..... .J 791


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


~


1 o
-0


S a 3 a





.1 I I
. ...... ...-
S...... I..... ....
.5 ...... i...... ...... i......
.1 .2| .11 .3 .1
. .1 .1 ...... ......
.2 .21 .1 .1
.1 ..- I.... ...... --
.1 .4 .1 ...... --
... .3 ...... .1 .....
.3| .1 .1 .
... 1.2 ..... .2 .
.1 1.6 .1 .5 ...
1.8 .7...
1.6 .1 .5 ......
1.61 .3 .4
.1 .... ......
.2 .1 ... .. ....
.3 .. ....... 1 .....


... 4 .. ..
.2 --- ..... I

*6| :2. 2 __ ... .......
... 2.4| 1.3 .....
.... 2.3 1.7 ......
.... 1 1.7 ...... ......
.7 .7 1.8 ......
.6 .1i ...... ...... ....

.2
.1 ---. --



5.2116.91 7.81 3


.1














1
















iI 1.1


I


.1.
.1
4 2









3 .2 1 -.. --



.2 ...... .3 .1
.2 .1 .1 .1
1.2 .3 ...... .2
.. 1.8 1 1.2 .8
5 1 1.5 1.1
.3 .6 .2 .8
.4 .7 .1 .4
.6 .6 .1 .1
.3 .2 .1 ...

.1 .1...... .1
...... ...... 1 .

.6 ....-
.6

S.6 .1


11
... .. .2 .6 .4
.. ...... .1. .


.......... ..... .--




S .2|10.7| 5.12 8.4 4.


81 1.21


.X 0









.. .. .... a - -- ... .. .2
s | I o 0 5 .- a ^ CC a .0 0




.. ... ...... ...... ...... ..... ..... .. ...... .2

...... ...... .. -- ...... -- ..... -......-...... ... ... 1.2



-- ---- ..... ...... .--- --..... -- ------ ------ --.. ------ ...... ----- ...... ------ --- l.6
......... ...... ....... ... ...... I

.. .... ... .. .1. 2.
..............6.
.. .... -- ------ .


..1 6 .. 2 7
.1 .2.. 1.5

.1 3 .4 6 1 1 ...... ----- ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ------7 .8--- ------ ------ 2
.31 ... ...... .... ....... .
6.3 .2 .-- -1 ---- 12.7
1 .4 .2 .. ..... ....... 7.
S 6. 1.3 ...... -- ...... ...... .... 16.6


1 .1 1 ...... .. ..... ... .


.. .6 .1 ... ... ...... .. 1 .9
.2 .1 .1 2 .3 ....- _.... ..... 4.4
9. 1 *4 -..- ...... ......... .... ....... ...... -..-- .
.. ...... 2 ... .. ... .. .7


-- .1 1.3


..2 .- | 1.7
.. ...... .2 ...... ...... --- ...... ....... ...... ..... ....... ...... 4 .9

.1 ...... ...... ..... ....- .. ... ..... .. ... ..... ... 5.8
.1 .2 ......... .... .. ..... ....... .... .. ..... ........ ......1 4.9
S.1.. .... ......---...2----. ..... .. 5.7
-------..... ....................... ..... ..... ....... I 3 .11 2.1
.1 .1 .. ... ..... 1.
.1 ... ...... .. ... ..... .. ... .. .... .. ...... ..... ...... ...... .4


------ -- -4 ----- I 1__ --2. ..... 2 .. : ... .. .2. ...... 4 .. .. 1 1
.-- ..... ...... ... .... ...... ...... ...... .21 .8..... ..... ...... .1
.-1-- 4. .... ----- --- .... 8- .1| .8| 2 5 .7| .1 | 11 9

^^l^^l^ ^^.ii.l^ ^ ^^^^ '







Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


TABLE XXXVII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS
OF FLORIDA GREEN PEAS BY AREAS, SEASON 1928-29.*


I I I I
Weeks Ending Area It Area 2t Area 3f IArea 4t IArea 5t
) | I I


Oct. 13..............
27.............
N ov. 3..........
10.............
17..........
24.............
Dec. 1..... ......
8.........
15..............
22..............
29 .....
Jan. 5.............
12.............
19..............
26---..... .
Feb. 2..............
9----
16..............
23..............-
M ar. 2-............
9.............-
16..............
23.............
30.............-
Apr. 6...-.......-
13..........
20--...........
27.............-
M ay 4.............
11..............
18..............
25..............
June 1..............
8.............-
22..............
July 13..............
20.........


Total .......
__________


.2
.2
.2
.2
.3
1.1
.6
.1

.2
.1
.1



.3
.1
.2
.3
.2
.6
.7
1.5
1
.2


.1
.1
.3
1.9
1.3
.6
.2
.1

.1


13.1


.1

.6
.2
.4
1
.5
.7
.6
1.4
3.4
4
2.4
2.4
.3
.2
.2



.8
1.4
4.4
4.6
3.3
3
.2





36.1----


36.1


.2


.2
.2
.2
1.2
1.8
5
.3
.4
.6
.3
.1
.1
.1


- -- -------








.1
.2
.1
.1
.2
.5
1.8
2.1
1.4
1.1
.7
.2
.2
.1



.1
.1
.6
.3
.3


I -- - - -
----- ... ..............

.. .. ..............



10.7 9.9


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.
tSee Fig. 20 for counties included.


I ------- ----
-- -- -------


..............



..............



.5
.3
.5
3.8
8.1
5.5
6.5
3.5
1.3
1.3
.7
.2
..............
.2
.1
.1
.1
.6
.2
.1

.1
.1


--------------


33.8 15.4


IOther
Coun-
tiest



------------

--------------
--------------
............ .
.3
.1


.1
.7
1
.9
1.2
1.6
1.9
.4
.9
.1
.2
2.4
.1
.5
.1
.2
.2
.4
.5
.4
.6
.3
.1
.2.....
..-----.--..---


Total


.2
.2
.2
.2
.3
1.2
.6
1
.5
.7
1.3
1.5
.2
2.5
7.8
16.6
18.3
12.7
8.1
4
2.7
1.9
4.4
1.3
.9
1
1.7
4.9
5.8
4.9
5.7
2.1
1
.4
.1
.2
.1


1 119






68 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

MINOR CROPS

TABLE XXXVIII.-TOTAL EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA
MINOR TRUCK CROPS, SEASON 1928-29


Crop


Cauliflower ................
Avocados ..............
Cantaloupes ................


Equivalent
Carloads


30
22.6 6
17.8


Equivalent
Crop Carloads


Grapes ..........-......... 17.3
Pineapples ....... ...... 11.4
Blueberries ....--............. 11


CAULIFLOWER

There were three rather definite sections in the production of
cauliflower (Table XXXIX). The northern section, consisting
of Putnam and St. Johns counties, was the leading area with a
total of 22.6 equivalent carloads for the year.

TABLE XXXIX.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS
OF FLORIDA CAULIFLOWER BY COUNTIES, 1929.*


Weeks Ending



Jan. 5..................
12..................
19.--.............
26..............
Feb. 2.................
9...-............
16.................
23................
M ar. 2.................


Total ............


W 0)
o 0

0 a)


.1
.5 1.4
.8 2.1
.2 .4







1.6 3.9


0




.1
.1
.1







.3


0 s
0




.3 1.1



.3--.---- ..




.3 1.2


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


0o
C 0

S 4+ o 0
PH M


1.1
5
1.2
.1
.1

7.5---

7.5


3
10
2


.1



15.1


...... ...
.1


.1








Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


AVOCADOS


Avocados were confined almost entirely to Dade County

(Table XL), although the west coast had shipments of less than

.1 carload per week. Dade County alone shipped 22.5 equivalent

carloads that season.

TABLE XL.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA AVOCADOS BY COUNTIES, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending



Sept. 8............................
15.........................
22........ ...........
29........................
Oct. 6...........-.............
13................ .........
20............-.......-....
27...........................
Nov. 3.........................
10 -...... ...............
17........................
24.......-................-
Dec. 1...........................
8......................
15.......................-....
22............ .............
June 22............. .....
29.......................
July 6......--............
13............. ...........
20.... .............
27..........................
Aug. 3......................
10............................
17................ ...
24........... .....
31........................



Total ....--............


Dade



1.J
1.2
1.8
1.2
1.4
1.1
1.1
.8
1
.8
.6
.7
.3
.6
.6
.2
.1
.3
.5
.6
.7
.8
.7
1
.8
1.1
1.4



22.5


*Weekly shipments of less than


Palm Beach



... .. . . .

.1
.............................
.. ...........................
..............................
.._...........................

............... ...... -
.................. .........
........................ -.---
..............................
..............................
.............................
..............................

................. I..........
.... ..........................
...... . .. . .
....... . . .
............--................
..............................
.... -. ---.-.-.. .. .. .


...... . .. . .
..................... ......
..............................
..............................
..............................
S..............................




.1

.1 carload omitted.


Total



1.1
1.2
1.9
1.2
1.4
1.1
1.1
.8
1
.8
.6
.7
.3
.6
.6
.2
.1
.3
.5
.6
.7
.8
.7
1
.8
1.1
1.4



22.6






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


CANTALOUPES
Marion was the only county shipping cantaloupes to any ap-
preciable amount (Table XLI). Sectional competition in Florida
was of minor importance with this crop.
TABLE XLI.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA CANTALOUPES BY COUNTIES, 1929.*


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


GRAPES
Grapes were shipped from Central and West Florida in small
amounts. Lake County shipped 11.7 equivalent carloads and
Washington County shipped four carloads. Marketing seasons
of these counties did not overlap (Table XLII).
TABLE XLII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS
OF FLORIDA GRAPES BY COUNTIES, 1929.*


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.






Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


PINEAPPLES

Pineapples were produced formerly in much larger quantities
in Florida than at present. Foreign competition and plant dis-
eases were the principal causes for the decline of this industry.
Only 11.4 equivalent carloads were shipped in 1928-29 from the
state (Table XLIII).

TABLE XLIII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS
OF FLORIDA PINEAPPLES BY COUNTIES, SEASON 1928-29.*


CW

Weeks Ending q
Cd ( _o
Cd Cd 0


Dec. 8............ ... .1
15...-..........- ...- ....... ..-...
May 25........................
June 1............ ......
15.................... ...
22... ............. .......
29............... .1
July 6..........-.... .1
13................ .1
20 ........ ..... .1
27........... .... .1
Aug. 17......--- ...........-
31................

Total .- ..- .6


.-........... ... .... ... ..........

2 ---- .... ... ... .
2 1 --.----
1 1 .1
1 .1
1.1 .2




....... .... --- ---


5.1 4.1 .6


1









1


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


BLUEBERRIES

Only West Florida shipped blueberries during the year under
study. Okaloosa was the only county shipping in car lots (Table
XLIV). Express movement was not obtained.

TABLE XLIV.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA
BLUEBERRIES BY COUNTIES, 1929.*


Weeks Ending

June 22............ ........... ............-
29.... ....... ---...... ... .. .......
July 6.... --- .... ---- ----.........
13................... .. .. ............
20.......................... .... .................
Aug. 3......................-............ ......


Okaloosa


1


Total ........................................ 11
*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.





72 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

MISCELLANEOUS CROPS

TABLE XLV.-TOTAL EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA
MISCELLANEOUS TRUCK CROPS, SEASON 1928-29.


Crop


Carrots ...............
Chicory .................
Onions ....................
Parsley .................
Beets ....--....-.......
Turnips ............
Broccoli ...........--
Mixed greens ........
Chinese cabbage ....
Collards ............
Sorrel .......-.......
Spinach ...................
Papayas .................
Radishes ..-......-......


Equivalent
Carloads


8.8
7
5.3
5.2
4.4
2.4
2.3
2
1.9
1
1
.4
.3
.2


Crop


Equivalent
Carloads


Dasheens .................. .2
Endive ....... ............ .1
Boctoy ....... .......- .... .1
K ale ................ ...... .1
Mangoes ................ x
Pumpkins ...............-. x
Mustard .............. x
Swiss chard ............- x
Kohlrabi .................. x
Artichokes .......... x
Blackberries .......... x
Chayotes .......
Parsnips ................ x
Brussels sprouts ...... x


In Table XLV is listed the group of miscellaneous crops ship-
ped from the state, shipments of no one of which equaled 10
carloads during the year. The shipments of each miscellaneous
crop from each county by the week for the season 1928-29, are
shown in Tables XLVI to LVI, inclusive.

TABLE XLVI.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS
OF FLORIDA CARROTS BY COUNTIES, 1929.*


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.







Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


TABLE XLVII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS
OF FLORIDA CHICORY BY COUNTIES, 1929.*


Weeks Ending I Orange Seminole I Total


Jan. 19......................... 3 ..... 3
26............................ 3 ........... ... 3
Mar. 30 -.....-.... ........- ......--..... ... 1 1


Total ............... ......... 6 1 7


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


TABLE XLVIII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS
OF FLORIDA ONIONS BY COUNTIES, 1929.*


Weeks Ending





Mar. 2. -....-............. .1
Apr. 20.........................---- -
27....................-..........
May 4.... ......-..- ....
11....--..........-..-..
18..-.......................
25 ...................... ........
June 1....................... ....
15..................... ....
22.................... ...


Total ................. .1


a)





1











1


a)
a)
0
0 Ue
CI CI ar
a C


aI
a)
Cd
CI a


' ---- --" --- .. - -
... I I


.2 .1 ..-- -- .......... ...
........ .1 -- .. ..... -- ..
-.--. -- ----- .1 1.2 ........ ....
........ .1 --... ... .1 .1 ......
----. -------- --- --- -. --.-.- .1 .... ....
...... -1 ....... .... ...... ... ...
.. ..... .... ....... ........



.2 .4 .1 1.3 .2 1


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


........ j
1 I





'I


I


I







74 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

TABLE XLIX.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS
OF FLORIDA PARSLEY BY COUNTIES, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending


Dec. 22.....---.......-...........
29.............................--
Jan. 5 -............................
12...........................
19-............- ...
26.--.---..-- ...-
Feb. 2.....................
9....----.......................-
16..........................
23.............................
Mar. 2 --......-..- ......
9 ...--............. ..
16 ...-....................
23....---......-..........-....
30............................-
Apr. 6 -.....................-........
13.....-....................
20.. .................
27..........- ..... .............. .


Total ........ ............


*Weekly shipments of less


Seminole


.1
.1
.1
.3
.2
.4
.3
.2
.4
.4
.3
.2
.4
.3
.2
.3
.2
.2
.1


4.7


Lake





................. ..........
.1
.1







---- --
.1
.1










.5.... - -


Total


.1
.1
.1
.3
.3
.5
.3
.3
.5
.5
.3
.2
.4
.3
.2
.3
.2
.2
.1


5.2


than .1 carload omitted.


TABLE L.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA BEETS BY COUNTIES, 1929.*


Weeks Ending


Jan. 12-..... -..... ....
19............... ...
26.... .. .........
Feb. 2 -..... ... --.........--.
9..........................
16.......-..........
23........................
Mar. 2................-
9.-...............-- ..-....-
16.......................
23......-.............- ...
30-.....................
Apr. 27 -....-.................
May 4 -....... --.--...


Total ..........-...


I I
Dade I Glades I


.2
.2


.5

.1
.1
.1


1.2


.1















.1


Seminole I Manatee Total
I I


.1
.1
.1
.2
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1




1.3


.1
.1
.1
.1
.. .... .....
.3
1.1







1.8


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.







Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II 75

TABLE LI.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA TURNIPS BY COUNTIES, 1929.*

Weeks Ending Hardee Bradford Levy Osceola Total

Feb. 9.. ......................... 1 ............ ..... ................. 1
23................... 1 ........... .. ............. .... ............ 1
M ar. 2................................... ..... ...... .1 ................. .1
Ma .... ...... ...-- ........ .................. .1
M ay 18....... ............... ............ ... ................ .... .1 .1
25......-..... ........ -... ............... .........................1 .1


Total .................. 2 .1 .1 .2 2.4

*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


TABLE LII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA BROCCOLI BY COUNTIES, 1929.*

o O
Weeks Ending .m -



Jan. 12.............. .2 .2 ........-- .. ---.... ... .............. .4
19 .............. .1 ............... .1 ----........- ............... .2
26 .. ........ .... .......... ... .2 .1 ............... .. ........ .3
Feb. 2........ .......... .1 .......... .............. ................. .1
9.._ ------ ...... -- ............... .1 --...---- .. .1
M a 16 .. ....-...... .. ... -... ... ... .. ....... ... ...... ... .3
9 -_. 2 ---------------- -. -------------- .------------- .2 .......... .2
9... .... ............... ............... ..... .... .2 .2
16 ....... --...... ... .. .. ... .......... .2 ............ .. .2
23......-..- ........ ............. ... ...... ... .1 .1 .2
30...........-...-----. -.......- .. ............. ... .1 .1


Total ............ .6 .5 .2 .8 .2 2.3

*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.

MIXED GREENS

The term "mixed greens" applies to those shipments which
went out billed as greens. There were other commodities ship-
ped which are used as greens, such as collards, and most of the
turnips, but the ones going out as greens were often mixed and
so could not be definitely named otherwise. The leading ship-
ments of this kind were from Polk and Seminole counties (Table
LIII).








76 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station





TABLE LIII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA MIXED GREENS BY COUNTIES, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending



Dec. 22....................
29.......-...........
Jan. 5.. ...................
12.................
19. --................ -
26 -....................
Feb. 9.....................
23..........-.........
Mar. 2.....-............
9 -.................-
16......................



Total ....... ..


Polk



.1
.2
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1



1.2


Seminole







.... ........2
.......... .. ..........


.............. .-.......
.......... .. ........
.2
.5


........................
........................



.7


Osecola




........--..............
.......-.........-------
............ ... -- ----
........................
........................
--- -- -----------------
....................



.1
........................




.1


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.


Total



.1
.2
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.3
.7
.1
.1


TABLE LIV.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA CHINESE CABBAGE BY COUNTIES, SEASON 1928-29.*


Weeks Ending



Nov. 3. .............. .. ....................... .................
Dec. 1...............-............................ ............-.............
8................ ........................ .... ... ...............
15..............- ...................... ..... ..............
22......... ... .........................- ................
29................ ....... ............... ...... ... ....
Jan. 5 ........................... ..........................
12 ............................. ............. .. ... .. .......
19.................. ........................... ...........
26...... -- ----................. ......-.............
Feb. 2....-.....- ....... ..... ............... .....................
9...................... .......... ..... ..... .... ...... .......
16......... ................................. .. .. ..................
23............................... .. .. .... .......
Mar. 2.....-............................................................



Total .............----.... ...-......


Osceola


.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.2
.3
.1
.1
.1
.2
.1
.1



1.9


*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.






Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II 77

COLLARDS

Although many home gardens of Florida contain collards the
only large shipment discovered was one carload from Palm Beach
County (Table LV).
TABLE LV.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF
FLORIDA COLLARDS BY COUNTIES, 1929.*

Weeks Ending Palm Beach

Feb. 2 ................ ... ...... ......................... ............... 1

Total ...- ... -----......-- ---- --------------1..1
*Weekly shipments of less than .1 carload omitted.
SORREL

One carload of sorrel for greens was shipped from the state
during the year (Table LVI).
In the above named crops falling both in the minor and mis-
cellaneous classes it is unlikely that the intra-state competition
is worthy of consideration. Some of them do have more than one
definite section in which they are produced as shown by their
tables, but their total production is relatively small. With a
few of these commodities which are peculiarly adapted to sub-
tropical climate there may be possibilities for expansion for a
limited number of growers.
TABLE LVI.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF FLORIDA
SORREL BY COUNTIES, 1929.

Weeks Ending Orange

March 30............ ...........................--- 1

Total ............... --------------- 1


SUMMARY

A summary of the total shipments of each crop studied from
each county for the season 1928-29 is given in Table LVII, and
Table LVIII groups the most important of these crops shipped
out that year from each county. There were 17 counties which
shipped more than 1,000 carloads of the various truck crops






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


during the year, 21 other counties shipped between 100 and
1,000 carloads, and the remaining counties shipped less than
100 carloads. Seminole County led all others in total shipments,
amounting to 7,585.3 equivalent carloads, 85 percent of which
were celery. The next four crops in Seminole County, in the
order of their importance, were escarole, lettuce, peppers and
cabbage.
The five next highest counties were:
Dade, with 4,738.1 total equivalent carloads and with tomatoes
amounting to 81 percent of the total from the county. Peppers,
cabbage and green beans were the next three leading crops.
Manatee, with a total of 3,537.7 equivalent carloads, with
celery and tomatoes of about equal importance and representing
two-thirds of the total shipments. Lettuce, cabbage and escarole
were also important.
St. Johns, with a total of 3,400.7 equivalent carloads, 91
percent of which were early white potatoes.
Alachua, with a total of 2,965.3 equivalent carloads, of which
49 percent were watermelons, 14 percent were cucumbers, and
cabbage, beans, and early white potatoes followed in the order
named.
Marion, with a total of 2,704.7 equivalent carloads, where the
leading crops were watermelons 31 percent, green beans 20
percent, and tomatoes 18 percent.
It is very likely that some of these counties do not remain
in the same order from year to year but that some shifting of
position occurs. It is easy to understand how a heavy potato
crop could enable St. Johns County to displace Manatee, and Mar-
ion may sometimes ship more than Alachua. Probably there is
other shifting, but on the whole these two tables give a clear
picture of each county and its relative place in the shipments of
the truck crops of the state and the names of those crops as well
as the relative importance of the crops to each county.
A summary of the total shipments per week of all truck
crops from each county is given in Table LIX. There were
shipments moving from the state every week in the year, al-
though only one county (Dade) actually made shipments every
week as large as .1 equivalent carload. Alachua County missed
shipping on the week ending December 15 and Marion County
did not ship for a period of five weeks. All other counties had
vacant periods longer than five weeks.






TABLE LVII. SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF TRUCK CROPS BY COUNTIES, SEASON 1928-29.


Tom atoes ..............----- 183 --
Green -beans* ................ 280.9
Early white potatoes.I 260.2 ..........
Cabbage ....................... 290 ..........
Cucum bears ....................| 400 -4 ...... i
P peppers .......................... 29 .......... I-
Strawberries ................ .4 ......... I
Lettuce ................-......... 49 I ....
E scarole ........................---- ........- .. --- I
Eggplants ...................... 4.5 .......... |
Romaine .. ...... 5.11 .
Green corn ............----........-- 131.9 9
Squashes ........................ 14.1 ..........
Okra .. ......... ..... 53.5
Green peas ........ 5.2 .....
Cauliflower ...-oae....- ---i -.
Avocados .... ..... ---- ----.--
Cantaloupes ........ .3
Grapes ..... ...... 0 -.-
Pineapples ............... ----
Blueberries -.- ..------ --.-i
Carrots ....... ... .. 1.2 .......... I
Chicory .... ....................- .......... --
Onions ..................
P arsley ....................... .
Beets ..................... ...... ..
Turnips ........... ...... .......
B broccoli ..................... .......... .......
Mixed greens ..-..- .
Chinese cabbage .
Collards .....
Sorrel ........... ........
Spinach
K inale c .................. .I......- ....


Total ......................12,965.31 9
Broccoli


100.3 12.5 917.6 .1 3 .7 1.7
'1 4 .8 6 ._ 4 -S -3




2.41 1.11 511.39 1.7.6 21 3 20.3
9.7 5.7i 4.8 6 254


S 44 700.7 15 ...... 16 1 1.1


1.511 7.5 24 1.4 ...... 2
.. 1. .. .. .. .... -..... ... ... .... ... .. .

1 .40 .......... ....5 ...... : .2...... -. --.. .

8 4 ::: 63 1 ..... 2 .8

.2 a -_.6
..... ......... ... ......


1 .... ...... .... ---- --
















772.31 118.72,2 63.1 43.1 48.4 286.9| 243.5 105
.......... ........ --.. .6 ....
.......... -- ... .... .... ..... ..... .....

.......... I .......... I .-.........






.. .......... i ......... ..
7--3-------. 4 2 6 4 5 1
---- ---- ---------- ... .~~





I------- --- -------


*Green beans includes lima beans.


I


'1




3,817.6 .
178.8
70.3
205.5
36.5
.7


12 .9
1.4 ..


....... ... / ......... 1,236 229
. ....... ........... ..........

3. 2.3 ...
......... 5 154 3.2. .. 229

1.... .. ... ..... 6 1 .
6 164 ......- ....... .... .........
: .......... .......... .7 .61 3

----- .......... ......... .......... .......... 2 ..........


.............. ... ...... 1. --
........ ..........
.. ... .8 .2 ..........
..
12.1





4. ... .. 1.. .1 .........2
2.4. .... .. -- -




........... ......... I ..........

.. i.........












S 4.2 51 60.51,250.4| 140 I 232
. .. . .. .... .. . .. - -
.. .. I . .
.. . -- -... .I.. -- - -
-- ..... . .. -.-- -
.... - -- ...... --
.1. .. . - .. ..

S----- -. .. 51- ------ 55 .51,25..4I 140-- 23


47.4 .
.5 ........ ..
4.4
.3 ........
22 .........






1.2
..........







. .......... .........
S.1







|4,738.1 44--
---------- i-*-











-4,7 3 M1 J 4,f







TABLE LVII.-SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF TRUCK CROPS BY COUNTIES, SEASON 1928-29-Continued.


Watermelons ............... 54 21 4
Celery .............. ...... ... ...
Tomatoes ............... 141.3 59.6 9
Green beans* .............. 52.7 112.3 12.6
Early white potatoes. 15.6 20 3
Cabbage ...................... 14 ... .1
Cucumbers ..............-.. 425.2 8 3.5
Peppers ........................ 46.8 6.9 .7
Strawberries ............... 280.1 .......... 2.2
Lettuce .................... ..
E scarole ...................... ..
Eggplants ................. 21.2 2.1 4.6
Romaine ...- ... .....- .....
Green corn .............. 4.8 .......- .1
Squashes ....................... 14.1 1.3 5.2
Okra ...................... 1.2 .4 ...
Green peas ................. 16.9 4.3 .8
Cauliflower .............. .. ........ ..... 1 .
Avocados ........
Cantaloupes
Grapes ...... ... ..
Pineapples ....
Blueberries ....... .... .. ... ........ .
Carrots .. ........ .. ---- --- .
Chicory .......... .... .......... ....
Onions .... ..... -. ...
Parsley ...................
B eets ......................... .........
Turnips ...................... 2 ..........
Broccoli .................... ............. .......
M ixed gree-s .. ....... ... -...- .
Chinese cabbage .. .........
Collards ...................... .......
Sorrel ........ .. ..... .
Spinach .. ................. .......... .... ...
Dasheens ..................... ......... ..... ...
K ale .............................. ..... ..........

Total .....................1,089.9 235.91 45.9|

*Green beans includes lima beans.


.0
bo
5 3
2 0
3 a
C) 0
- .0 C


26 38 170
8 2 .......
....... 238.1
.4 131.8
6 I 34.5
1 I 53
........ 67.3 ....
.21 238.9
.. 11,010.6
1
I .1 - -

11.16 ----------^
1 1.6

.11 17
... .. 32.. ..
.1 7.8


.1














...... .... ..........
----41 --- 1,885- 17 -----
----- I -- --- ---------

--- ----- --- --------
----- I---- ----i ---------
---i---- ----- ----

--- ---- -- -
---- -- -- -- ------
-- -- -- -------
---- I---- -- -- ----------


I ------------

41 811,885.91 170


3 -
o C
-a a


714 I 39


271.5
48.4
1
6
46.7
1.7



5.3
8----




1.6
10.73




















802.3


43 1 646 9
.........[........
86 3 8 .8
12.5 36 4
30.41 3
.1..1
19.8| 431.1
97.21 .1



93.3 .......... .......


10.4 6
38
......... 3 .......

.... .7 .......
-:'::--:! ---:::: ---::---
- -. -. - - I.. . .


26
1,209.6
1,138.8
37.6
16.2
194.2
43.2
179.1
28.1
225.7
172
122.3
124.5
.1
9.3
1.1
3
3.9
-i ----------


850 ..........

484.3 73.8
538.3 184.5
16.1 16.1
401 2 .....
91.7 1.1
8.4 18 9

120.9
.6 1.9
26.2
5.8
52.4 5.4
82 ....
7.9 .2


a

C, -
3 C C


30
1


.......... 2

.... 707
.......... 11
2
........... 2

.6
.... 6.6





......... I .5

.......... 1.2
.2
1.2




11


.. .. .. ..2 --- .......... ......... ..........
-----I:I I ......... -- -- ------ .... ...... .. --- --- --- -- --.1
-.11 | 1 .1
....... .... .. I ...
.............. 1.8 .. .................... I-------.
I ....... I ---- .. .. ..
----- ---..... ... I. I ......... I ..........

.... ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ..... ...----- ---- ------ ----- ----- ----- ..........
---- --- ---- --- ---- --- 2 --- ----- ---- I-- ........
-- --- --- ---- --- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- -- --- -- --- ---- ----------
1.......... i ......----



39 1,789.4 8394.911,164 51 9 13,537.712,7047r 302.71 31 11 1 199.7


714






TABLE LVII.-SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF TRUCK CROPS BY COUNTIES, SEASON 1928-29-Continued.


Watermelons ................
Celery ..........................
Tomatoes .....................
Green beans* .........
Early white potatoes..
Cabbage ....................
Cucumbers ....................
Peppers ...... ..............
Strawberries ..............
Lettuce ......................
Escarole ....................
Eggplants ......................
Romaine .......................
Green corn ..............
Squashes ..................
Okra .............................
Green peas ......
Cauliflower ..............
Avocados .....................
Cantaloupes .................
Grapes ..........................
Pineapples ...................
Blueberries ..............
Carrots ..........................
Chicory .................
Onions ...... ...............
Parsley ..........................
Beets ........ .........
Turnips .........................
Broccoli .....................
Mixed greens .............
Chinese cabbage ..........
Collards ........................
Sorrel ...........................
Spinach .....................
Dasheens .......................
Kale .. ..................


Total


0

396
66.3
16.2
39.9
1
358.3
191.5
26.3
63.7
216
89

49.3
5
..........


1.2






6








1


.....11,27


0 1.6 25 2 328
4.6 246.7 1. 0.6
4.2 1,618.3 21 24.
4 37.4 .6 ..... .
4 36 1 21
4. 1.9 4.31 .4 .8
1......... 2 3.29.





1 28.7 8
1.1 11.1 3.1. .... 2.8
6.8 3.1 .... .6
.1 28.2 .81 ... ..... 8.4

.......... ...... .... ... .........
.......... 5.1 .......... I .... ... ......
.......... .......... .... .....
.......... 5 .1 ----------



..... .......... ....... .... ..... .
.......... .......... .


.......... ... ... .. .... .. ... ..... ..
.2 74.4-. --- -


1.9 ......... .. .
........I..




25.612,148.31 74.41 3 111,004.11


m u



Co Co .
2 ....V ...W
.2


6,443 28 ...
5.1 ......... 165
63.7 1.7 40
.1 3,078.7 55.1
127.4 238.1 35
1 23.6 .1
155.6 5 9 4.9

321.8 ...
365.4 ..... .....
5.9 .1.
83.7
S 4.1 i:
3 4 .1 1.5
.1 2.1
1.1 1.3
16 15.1 ::


s
s 4


537 1.086

357 .........
422.7
357

258
444.9 .
15 6
12.6



2 4 .....
.1
3.7
1.4
4.8


1..
........ .. ....... 1 ...... ... .......... ..........



.... .... ..... .18. 4 .1


.7 .



......... ...

..... .7 8 .. ...... .......... ..........
1 932.417,585.313,400.71 309.412,062.7


a






10 10 45 1 124

4.1 11.5
48.6 7.8 ........ ....
S38 162.7.....
.... ....... 98.3
..... 19.7 3.1
1.3 47.5 .. ...
.15 9 I ----

4 5.3 1 .... ..... .... ..
------ ...... .. A L .. I .


1.086 I10 I140.31
1.086 1O 140.31


421.91


*Green beans includes lima beans.


9,960.2
8,749.8
8,255.4
5,291.7
5,262.5
3,173.1
2,307.5
2,299.3
2,144.8
935.9
676.4
329.1
292.6
292.5
236.5
227.2
119
S 30
22.6
17.8
17.3
11.4
11
8.8
7
5.3
5.2
4.4
2.4
2.3
2
1.9
1
1
.2

150,705.1
50,705.1


.. ... .







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


TABLE LVIII.-SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF TRUCK
CROPS BY COUNTIES, SEASON 1928-29.


Name of C

Seminole ..

Dade..-

Manatee ....

St Johns ..

Alachua ....


Equivalent I
county Carloads

S 7,585.3

4,738.1

....... 3,537.7

.....-- 3,400.7

.... 2,965.3


M arion .............

Broward .........-

Palm Beach ......

Sumter ..-...-

Hillsborough ......

Lake ...... ....--

Orange ........--.

Gilchrist ..........-.

Levy ............

Hardee ..........

Suwannee ...........

Polk ...................

Sarasota -.........

Putnam ..........

Indian River-......

Bradford ......

Jackson ........

Flagler -...........

Volusia .............


Lee ..............


St. Lucie ..........

Martin .............

Clay --------- ......


2,704.7

2,261.3

2,148.3

2,062.7

1,885.9

1,789.4

1,527

1,250.4

1,164.5

1,089.9

1,086

1,004.1

932.4

809

802.3

772.3

714

550 5

421.9


394.9


309.4

302.7

286.9


The Most Important Crops
for the Counties

Celery, 6,440; lettuce, 321.8: cabbage, 127.4;
escarole, 365.4; peppers, 155.6.
Tomatoes, 3,817.6; cabbage, 205.5; peppers,
367.1; green beans, 178.8.
Celery, 1209.6; lettuce, 225.7; escarole, 172;
tomatoes, 1,138.8; cabbage, 194.2.
Early white potatoes, 3,078.7; cabbage, 238.1.

Watermelons, 1,421; cabbage. 290.3; cucum-
bers, 400.4; green beans, 280.9; early white
potatoes, 260.2.
Watermelons, 850; tomatoes, 484.3; lettuce,
120.9; green beans, 538.3; cabbage, 401.2.
Green beans, 917.6; tomatoes, 540.9; pep-
pers, 700.7.
Green beans, 1,618.3; peppers, 129.6; toma-
toes, 246.7.
Watermelons, 537; tomatoes. 422.7; cucum-
bers, 444.9; green beans, 357; cabbage, 258.
Strawberries, 1,010.6; tomatoes, 208.1; pep-
pers, 268.9; green beans, 131.8.
Watermelons, 1,510; green beans, 43.6;
cabbage, 162; cucumbers, 42.6.
Watermelons, 396; lettuce, 216; cabbage,
358.3; cucumbers, 191.5.
Watermelons, 1,236; green corn, 12.1.

Watermelons, 646; okra, 38; cucumbers,
431.1; green beans, 36.4.
Cucumbers, 425.2; tomatoes, 141.3; straw-
berries, 280.1; watermelons, 54.
Watermelons, 1,083.

Watermelons, 328; cabbage, 241; strawber-
ries, 311.4; peppers, 29.3.
Celery, 902.3; cabbage, 7.

Early white potatoes, 575.3; celery, 50.5;
cabbage, 126.1; watermelons, 34.
Tomatoes, 404.6; early white potatoes, 48.4;
green beans, 271.5; peppers, 46.7.
Strawberries, 399.7; green beans, 100.3; wa-
termelons, 164; green corn, 81.4.
Watermelons, 714.

Early white potatoes, 396.4; cabbage, 154.

Early white potatoes, 162.7; peppers, 47.5;
watermelons, 45; cabbage 98.3; escarole,
45.3.
Peppers, 97.2; tomatoes, 86.3; watermelons,
43; eggplants, 93.3; early white potatoes,
30.4.
Tomatoes 165; early white potatoes, 55.1;
green beans, 40; cabbage, 35.
Green beans, 184.5; tomatoes, 73.8; peppers,
18.9.
Early white potatoes, 254; peppers 16.1; cab-
bage, 9.5.







Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


TABLE LVIII.-SUMMARY OF EQUIVALENT CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF TRUCK
CROPS BY COUNTIES, SEASON 1928-29-Continued.


Equivalent
Name of County Carloads

Collier ....... ....... 243.5

Hendry .............. 235.9

Hamilton ........... 232


Okeechobee .....

Holmes ................

Union .............


Glades ...........

Washington .......

Brevard ..............

Columbia .........

Pasco ...........-

Escambia ...........

Citrus ...............

Hernando ...........

DeSoto .............

Charlotte ............

Highlands .........

Lafayette .........

Monroe .............

Osceola ............

Okaloosa ...........

Taylor ..............

Baker ............

Madison ..........

Duval .............

Pinellas ...........

Dixie ...................

Walton .............


Total ...........


199.7

170

140.3


140

128

118.7

105

74.4

51

48.4

45.9

44.1

43.1

41.8

39

31

25.6

11

10

9

9

4.2

3.1

3

1

50,705.3


The Most Important Crops
for the Counties


Tomatoes, 202.3; watermelons, 9; peppers,
19.1.
Green beans, 112.3; tomatoes, 59.6; early
white potatoes, 20; watermelons, 21.
Watermelons, 229; cucumbers, 3.

Tomatoes, 104.7; early white potatoes, 11;
green beans, 70.7; peppers, 6.6.
Watermelons, 170.

Green beans, 48.6; cucumbers, 19.7; early
white potatoes, 38; strawberries, 15.9; wa-
termelons, 10.
Cabbage, 63.1; green beans, 60.5; tomatoes,
4.2.
Watermelons, 124; grapes, 4.

Peppers, 44; tomatoes, 17.9; celery, 32.

Watermelons, 78; cucumbers, 27.

Watermelons, 25; green beans, 21.

Early white potatoes, 46; cabbage, 5.

Watermelons, 45; eggplants, 1.4.

Green beans, 12.6; tomatoes, 9.

Early white potatoes, 24; cabbage, 5; water-
melons, 10.
Peppers, 15.8; early white potatoes, 6; toma-
toes, 15.7.
Watermelons, 26; early white potatoes, 6;
celery, 8.
Watermelons, 39.

Tomatoes, 30; green beans, 1.

Tomatoes, 4.5; green beans, 4.2; cucumbers,
4.5.
Blueberries, 11.

Watermelons, 10.

Green corn, 9.

Watermelons, 9.

Early white potatoes, 3.6; cucumbers, .5.

Watermelons, 2.

Watermelons, 3.

Watermelons, 1.


t
I






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


In Table LX is given a summary of the shipments of each crop
each week and a total in the last column on the right showing the
combined shipments per week from the state of all the crops
studied.
Florida shipped more than 1,000 carloads of these commodities
each week for 22 weeks from January 26 to June 22, inclusive.
For 12 weeks the total shipments were between 100 and 1,000
equivalent carloads. Then for 18 weeks very few truck crops
were shipped from the state. This slack period included the last
half of July, all of August, September and October, and the first
half of November.
The heaviest week was May 4, when a total of 3,185.2 equiv-
alent carloads of all these commodities were shipped from the
state.
The relative importance of crops as to the total number of
cars shipped shows that watermelons ranked first with 9,960.2
equivalent carloads. The fractional car in this case was occa-
sioned by a few going out by boat. Celery came next with
8,749.8 equivalent carloads; tomatoes 8,255.4; green beans
5,291.7; early white potatoes 5,262.5; cabbage 3,173.1; cucum-
bers 2,307.5; peppers 2,299.3; and strawberries 2,144.8 equiva-
lent carloads. These are designated as the major truck crops
of Florida. The other crops follow in order of importance based
on amounts shipped and are shown thus in Table LX. Several of
these crops shift position slightly from year to year, as the acre-
age of plantings and the yields per acre of the commodity vary.






Bulletin 238, Florida Truck Crop Competition II


APPENDIX

The total weekly shipments of each commodity from each
freight, express and boat shipping point were tabulated on
Form 1. The average car-lot loadings for one of the leading
carriers for the season under study are shown in Table I. These
were obtained by an actual count of the total packages of each
truck crop shipped in 1928-29 by this carrier. In case a com-
modity was shipped in containers of different sizes it was con-
verted to the most common size. The total number of equivalent
packages of each crop was divided by the number of cars of each
commodity shipped. Thus a representative average number of
crates or hampers or other containers per car for that year was
obtained.

TABLE I.-AVERAGE CAR-LOT LOADINGS FOR ONE OF THE LEADING CARRIERS
FOR SEASON SEPT. 1, 1928 TO AUG. 31, 1929, INCLUSIVE.
SI ( Average
Commodity Unit Total I Total I Loading
Units Cars IPer Car

Beans .......... .... % bu. hamper........i 370,445 I 775 478
Cabbage ...... 1 bu. hamper ........ 374,718 869 431
Celery .......... .... 2 bu. crate............ 414,191 1,168 355
Corn, green.... .... 1 bu. hamper...... 43,578 86 507
Cucumbers ............. 1 bu. crate........... 454,523 1,035 439
Eggplant ... 1 3/5 bu. crate .......... 55,309 127 436
Escarole .......... 12 bu. hamper....... 53 124 433
Lettuce.....--.......... 1 bu. hamper........ 110 261 422
Peppers... .. .... 1 3/5 bu. crate ......... 221,0z2 507 436
Potatoes ... Bbls., 2% bu.........- 25,865 142 182
Potatoes.. ampers .......... 61,322 110 557
Romaine........... 1 bu. hamper............ 49,480 118 419
Strawberries.........132 qt. crate ............... 147,851 821 180
Tomatoes............- 40 lb. crate ............. 908,537 2,051 443








Form 1


FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
Department of Agricultural Economics


Shipping Point-..................-.... ... ............. Commodity-..............................
Carlot Shipments by Weeks, September, 1928, to August, 1929


8





1






2





1


September
15 22




December
8 15




March
9 16




June
8 15


6






9 5





0 6


S 29





22 2





23 3





22 21


6


November
27 3_ 10 17 24




February
26 2 9 16 | 23





May
27 4 | 11 18 25


October
13




January
12




April
13





July
13


20





19





20





20


"rli


24 I 31


August
27 3 10 17

~1__C_




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs