• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Credits
 Table of Contents
 Economic importance of Florida...
 Purpose of study, source of data,...
 Methods of presentation, and seasonal...
 String beans
 Cabbage
 Celery
 Cucumbers
 Eggplants
 Lettuce
 Green peas
 Peppers
 Early white potatoes
 Strawberries
 Tomatoes
 Watermelons
 Miscellaneous crops
 Intra-state competition being...
 Appendix
 List of Tables














Title: Florida truck crop competition.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027680/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida truck crop competition.
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Noble, C. V.
Publisher: University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station,
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Credits
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Economic importance of Florida truck crops
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Purpose of study, source of data, and period covered
        Page 10
    Methods of presentation, and seasonal production
        Page 11
    String beans
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Cabbage
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Celery
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Cucumbers
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Eggplants
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Lettuce
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Green peas
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Peppers
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Early white potatoes
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Strawberries
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Tomatoes
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Watermelons
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
    Miscellaneous crops
        Page 77
    Intra-state competition being studied
        Page 78
    Appendix
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
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        Page 96
        Page 97
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        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
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        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127-129
        Page 130-132
        Page 133-135
        Page 136-138
        Page 139-141
        Page 142-144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
    List of Tables
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
Full Text

February, 1931


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
Wilmon Newell, Director








FLORIDA TRUCK CROP


COMPETITION


I. Inter-State and Foreign



By C. V. NOBLE AND MARVIN A. BROKER














Bulletins will be sent free upon application to the
Agricultural Experiment Station,
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


Bulletin 224






BOARD OF CONTROL
P. K. YONGE, Chairman, Pensacola RAYMER F. MAGUIRE, Orlando
A. H. BLENDING, Leesburg FRANK J. WIDEMAN, West Palm Beach
W. B. DAVIS, Perry J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary, Tallahassee

STATION EXECUTIVE STAFF
JOHN J. TIGERT, M.A., LL.D., President R. M. FULGHUM, B.S.A., Asst. Editor
WILMON NEWELL, D.Sc., Director IDA KEELING CRESAP, Librarian
H. HAROLD HUME, M.S., Asst. Dir., Re- RUBY NEWHALL, Secretary
search K. H. GRAHAM, Business Manager
S. T. FLEMING, A.B., Asst. Dir., Admin. RACHEL McQUARRIE, Accountant
J. FRANCIS COOPER, M.S.A., Editor

MAIN STATION-DEPARTMENTS AND INVESTIGATORS


AGRONOMY
W. E. STOKES, M.S., Agronomist
W. A. LEUKEL, Ph.D., Associate
G. E. RITCHEY, M.S.A., Assistant*
FRED H. HULL, M.S., Assistant
J. D. WARNER, M.S., Assistant
JOHN P. CAMP, M.S.A., Assistant
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
A. L. SHEALY, D.V.M., Veterinarian in
Charge
E. F. THOMAS, D.V.M., Asst. Veterinarian
R. B. BECKER, Ph.D., Associate in Dairy
Husbandry.
W. M. NEAL, Ph.D., Assistant in Animal
Nutrition
C. R. DAWSON, B.S.A., Assistant Dairy
Investigations
CHEMISTRY
R. W. RUPRECHT, Ph.D., Chemist
R. M. BARNETTE, Ph.D., Associate
C. E. BELL, M.S., Assistant
*J. M. COLEMAN, B.S., Assistant
H. W. WINSOR, B.S.A., Assistant
H. W. JONES, B.S., Assistant
COTTON INVESTIGATIONS
E. F. GROSSMAN, M.A., Assistant
PAUL W. CALHOUN, B.S., Assistant


ECONOMICS, AGRICULTURAL
C. V. NOBLE, Ph.D., Agricultural Economist
BRUCE McKINLEY, A.B., B.S.A., Associate
M. A. BROOKER, M.S.A., Assistant
ECONOMICS, HOME
OUIDA DAVIS ABBOTT, Ph.D., Head
L. W. GADDUM, Ph.D., Biochemist
C. F. AHMANN, Ph.D., Physiologist
ENTOMOLOGY
J. R. WATSON, A. M., Entomologist
A. N. TISSOT, M.S., Assistant
H. E. BRATLEY, M.S.A., Assistant
L. W. ZIEGLER, B.S., Assistant
HORTICULTURE
A. F. CAMP, Ph.D., Horticulturist
HAROLD MOWRY, B.S.A., Associate
M. R. ENSIGN, M.S., Assistant
A. L. STAHL, Ph.D., Assistant
G. H. BLACKMON, M.S.A., Pecan Culturist
C. B. VAN CLEEF, M.S.A., Greenhouse
Foreman -
PLANT PATHOLOGY
W. B. TISDALE, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist
G. F. WEBER, Ph.D., Associate
A. H. EDDINS, Ph.D., Assistant
K. W. LOUCKS, M.S., Assistant
ERDMAN WEST, B.S., Mycologist


BRANCH STATION AND FIELD WORKERS
L. O. GRATZ, Ph.D., Asso. Plant Pathologist in charge, Tobacco Exp. Sta. (Quincy)
R. R. KINCAID, M.S., Assistant Plant Pathologist (Quincy)
W. A. CARVER, Ph.D., Assistant, Cotton Investigations (Quincy)
RAYMOND M. CROWN, B.S.A., Field Asst., Cotton Investigations (Quincy)
JESSE REEVES, Farm Superintendent, Tobacco Experiment Station (Quincy)
J. H. JEFFERIES, Superintendent, Citrus Experiment Station (Lake Alfred)
GEO. D. RUEHLE, Ph.D., Assistant Plant Pathologist (Lake Alfred)
W. A. KUNTZ, A.M., Assistant Plant Pathologist (Lake Alfred)
B. R. FUDGE, Ph.D., Assistant Chemist (Lake Alfred)
W. L. THOMPSON, B.S., Assistant Entomologist (Lake Alfred)
R. V. ALLISON, Ph.D., Soils Specialist in charge Everglades Experiment Sta. (Belle Glade)
R. W. KIDDER, B.S., Foreman, Everglades Experiment Station (Belle Glade)
R. N. LOBDELL, M.S., Assistant Entomologist (Belle Glade)
F. D. STEVENS, B.S., Sugarcane Agronomist (Belle Glade)
H. H. WEDGEWORTH, M.S., Associate Plant Pathologist (Belle Glade)
B. A. BOURNE, M.S., Associate Plant Physiologist (Belle Glade)
J. R. NELLER, Ph.D., Associate Biochemist (Belle Glade)
A. DAANE, Ph.D., Associate Agronomist (Belle Glade)
FRED YOUNT, Office Assistant (Belle Glade)
M. R. BEDSOLE, M.S.A., Assistant Chemist (Belle Glade)
A. N. BROOKS, Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist (Plant City)
R. E. NOLEN, M.S.A., Field Assistant in Plant Pathology (Plant City)
A. S. RHOADS, Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist (Cocoa)
C. M. TUCKER, Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist (Hastings)
H. S. WOLFE, Ph.D., Associate Horticulturist (Homestead)
L. R. TOY, B.S.A., Assistant Horticulturist (Homestead)
STACY O. HAWKINS, M.A., Field Assistant in Plant Pathology (Homestead)
D. G. A. KELBERT, Field Assistant in Plant Pathology (Bradenton)
FRED W. WALKER, Assistant Entomologist (Monticello)
D. A. SANDERS, D.V.M., Associate Veterinarian (West Palm Beach)
M. N. WALKER, Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist (Leesburg)
W. B. SHIPPY, Ph.D., Assistant Plant Pathologist (Leesburg)
C. C. GOFF, M.S., Assistant Entomologist (Leesburg)
J. W. WILSON, Ph.D., Assistant Entomologist (Pierson)

*In cooperation with U. S. Department of Agriculture.
















CONTENTS
PAGE
ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE OF FLORIDA TRUCK CROPS...........................--- ........--- 5
PURPOSE OF STUDY ----......----.... --. .. ----------------- -----..10
SOURCE OF DATA ....----....-.....-----...................-------.. 10
PERIOD COVERED ...................---------..------------------------- 10
METHODS OF PRESENTATION-......---.................-------------.... 11
SEASONAL PRODUCTION ..---............... ------------.... ----.... 11
STRING BEANS .--.. ...........-- ...... ------. .------........ ...... 12
CABBAGE ---------............----------------. 15
CELERY ......- --...-...........---------------.----------.. 25
CUCUMBERS ---................. ....---------- .------........ 35
EGGPLANTS .--------......... ---...--.------------- --...--.--. 39
LETTUCE ........... ........ .............------------------------- ....... 42
GREEN PEAS ... .............................---------- -- ---..-- 48
PEPPERS .....-- ---.... ...---.. .......... --------------.-----. 50
EARLY WHITE POTATOES .............---------.---- .. ....... 52
STRAWBERRIES .................... ..-- ..-- -- .. ...... .. ...------.. --- 61
TOMATOES ...-----........---------.. ................. -- .---.-- 66
WATERMELONS .................. --... ...------------ ----------.... 71
MISCELLANEOUS CROPS .----------....---.............. .----. ------77
Cantaloupes ..............--.. ....-- ---........ ---------77
Cauliflower ................. ...-.............. --.... 77
Onions ..........-..--.........--------................. 77
INTRA-STATE COMPETITION BEING STUDIED ...............-.........-.............. 78
APPENDIX .....-- .....-------- -----........ .. ................. 79











FLORIDA TRUCK CROP

COMPETITION
I. Inter-State and Foreign
By C. V. NOBLE AND MARVIN A. BROKER

ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE OF FLORIDA TRUCK CROPS
The farm value of all Florida truck crops ranks close to the
farm value of Florida citrus crops.' The average seasonal esti-
mated farm value of all Florida citrus from 1924-1925 to 1928-
1929, inclusive, was approximately $41,500,000, whereas the av-
erage estimate for 12 of the leading truck crops of the state for
the same period was about $35,000,000 (Table I). Adequate
farm value data for all truck crops produced in Florida are not
available, therefore the 12 crops shown in Table I are used to
bring out the importance of truck farming in Florida. It is
estimated that these 12 crops represent between 90 and 95 per-
cent of the total farm value of all Florida truck crops. The rel-
ative importance of Florida in the production of these 12 crops is
shown in Table II. For the five-season period ending with 1928-
1929, Florida ranked first among the states in the combined farm
value of the 12 truck crops enumerated in Table II. For the
individual crops, Florida took first place in farm value with six,
namely, string beans, celery, cucumbers, eggplants, peppers, and
tomatoes; second only to Georgia with watermelons; and third
with white potatoes among the early and second early states,
being surpassed by Virginia and New Jersey. Florida's market-
ing competition for potatoes with these two states is very slight,
however. For this same five-season period, Florida had 11 per-
cent of the total United States acreage in these 12 truck crops
and received 15 percent of their total farm value. It will be
noted in Table II that with 10 of the 12 crops Florida's percent-
age of their total value exceeded appreciably her percentage of
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Most of the data upon which this study is based were obtained from
the files of H. A. Marks, Agricultural Statistician, United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture, for Florida. He also cooperated freely in offering
suggestions and constructive criticism as the study progressed. The
writers wish to express their indebtedness to Mr. Marks and to all others
who have assisted in the work in any way.
'All farm values computed from Crops and Markets, U.S.D.A., and in-
clude costs of picking, hauling, and packing.





Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


TABLE I.-ACREAGE AND FARM VALUE OF 12 OF THE LEADING FLORIDA
TRUCK CROPS.*
(Seasons 1924-1925 to 1928-1929)


Acreage


Crop

Beans, string ....

Cabbage ..............

Celery ................

Cucumbers .......

Eggplants ..........
Lettuce ................

Peas, green .......

Peppers ............

Potatoes, white .

Strawberries ......

Tomatoes ............


1924-25

20,530

4,650

4,320

10,830

1,400

3,400

2,250

3,560

21,920

4,240

33,470


Watermelons .... 22,100


Total .....


Beans, string

Cabbage ........

Celery ..........
Cucumbers

Eggplants ...
Lettuce .........

Peas, green .

Peppers .......

Potatoes, wh

Strawberries

Tomatoes .....

Watermelons

Total .....


1925-26

16,010

3,660

3,520

7,590

1,020

1,500

760

3,370

23,070

2,980

20,700

24,150


1926-27

19,690

3,010

4,240

7,720
730

1,840

700

2,700

28,000

3,680

29,800

29,420


1927-28

28,810

2,900

5,380

9,420

1,550

1,850

1,230

6,410

30,000

3,670

29,260

37,840


I I I I I
......I 132,670 I 108,330 131,530 158,320 :
Farm Value in $1,000 (i.e., 000 omitted)

.... $ 4,191 $ 3,982 $ 3,818 $ 3,295

...... 838 1,066 459 591

...... 4,480 3,960 3,969 6,243

...... 2,964 2,781 2,074 2,272

....... 499 525 301 339

....... 1,079 557 476 506

244 107 119 1'70

... 1,916 2,578 1,292 2,568

ite.. 4,729 8,275 5,410 5,588

.. 2,095 1,930 2,001 1,798

8,855 8,475 7,257 10,925

3,382 2,765 2,524 | 3,111

------. $35,272 $37,001 $29,700 1 $37,406


*Compiled from Crops
6, No. 12.


1928-29 Average

21,020 21,212

6,500 4,144

6,500 4,792

11,060 9,324

1,280 1,196

1,970 2,112

1,320 1,252

5,700 4,348

22,000 24,998

5,640 4,042

36,980 30,042

36,390 29,980


156,360 137,442


3,569

1,310

5,031

3,004
516

467

165

2,808

4,543

2,730

8,895

2,913


$ 3,771

853

4,737

2,619

436

617

161

2,232

5,709

2,111

8,881

2,939


$35,951 $35,066


and Markets, U.S.D.A., Vol. 5, No. 12, and Vol.






Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I 7

TABLE II.-FLORIDA'S PERCENTAGE OF THE TOTAL UNITED STATES ACREAGE
AND FARM VALUE FOR 12 OF THE LEADING TRUCK CROPS.*
(Average for 5 Seasons 1924-1925 to 1928-1929)

Farm Rank in
Crop IAcreage Value Value Among
S(Percent) (Percent) States

Beans, string .......................... 26 33 1
Cabbage .......................- 3 5 9
Celery ............ ..............-.. 19 37 1
Cucumbers ........-.---....--...- ... 22 36 1
Eggplants ...............-- ...... ...-- I 34 51 1
Lettuce ........... ........- ...-... 2 2 6
Peas, green ..................--- 2 2 9
Peppers ............................--.---. 27 52 1
Potatoes, white, early and
second early ........ ........... 7 12 3
Strawberries ...................-... 2 5 9
Tomatoes .............----.......--- 22 29 1
W atermelons ........... ............ 16 26 2

12 Crops ..... ....-.... 11 15 1

*Compiled from Crops and Markets, U.S.D.A., Vol. 5, No. 12, and Vol.
6, No. 12. Crops for manufacture or canning not included.

their total acreage. In fact, the average farm value per acre
of these 12 crops for Florida for the five seasons exceeded that
for the United States by 47 percent (Table III). It will be noted
that the farm value per acre for each Florida crop exceeded sim-
ilar values for all states with the exception of green peas. In
case of strawberries, the farm value per acre in Florida was
more than double that for all states.
The principal explanation of the high acreage value of Florida
truck crops is the fact that Florida is one of the nation's winter
truck gardens. Because of favorable climatic conditions, her
truck crops enjoy certain periods of the season which are free
from competition from other areas and, therefore, command a
high price. Another reason is that the yield per acre of Florida
truck crops averages better than that for the United States as a





Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


whole. In Table IV it is shown that for 6 of the 12 truck crops
under discussion, the five-season average yield per acre for
Florida exceeds similar yields for the nation as a whole. Of
the 12 crops shown, green peas seem to respond the least fav-
orably to Florida soil and climatic conditions. This is perhaps
the principal reason for the relative unimportance of this crop
in Florida. Lettuce, on the other hand, had an average yield per

TABLE III.-FARM VALUE PER ACRE OF 12 OF THE LEADING FLORIDA TRUCK
CROPS COMPARED WITH SIMILAR VALUE FOR ALL STATES.*
(Average for 5 Seasons 1924-1925 to 1928-1929)


Crop


Beans, string ............................
Cabbage .............................
Celery .........................................
Cucumbers -------..---------------........
Eggplants ................................I
Eggplants -.------ ..----
Lettuce ......................................
Peas, green ............. ...........
Peppers ........... ..................
Potatoes, white, early and
second early ...................
Strawberries ............................
Tomatoes ..................................
W watermelons ............................


Average ........................--


Farm Value per Acre


Florida


$178
206
988
281
365
292
129
513

228
522
296
98


$255


IUnited States

$143
151
509
172
247
245
149
268

143
254
222
59


$174


Florida's
Percent of
U. S. Value

124
136
194
163
148
119
87
191

159
206
133
166


147


*Compiled from Crops and Markets, U.S.D.A. Vol. 5, No. 12 and Vol. 6,
No. 12. Crops for manufacture or canning not included.

acre in Florida of 14 percent above the United States yield, but
the price per unit was only 5 percent above the average for the
nation. The principal cause for this is that consumers will pay
more for the Iceberg type, or hard head lettuce, than for the
Butterhead type grown in Florida, and a variety of the hard
head type has not as yet been found that can be produced eco-
nomically in Florida. All the other Florida crops shown in






Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


Table IV received an appreciable unit price premium over that
for the United States as a whole. The fact that Florida truck
growers usually receive a price premium for their products over
producers for the nation as a whole is no proof that they are
receiving larger profits. Unfortunately, adequate cost of pro-
duction data are not available from the different producing areas

TABLE IV.-YIELDS PER ACRE AND PRICE PER UNIT FOR 12 OF THE LEADING
FLORIDA TRUCK CROPS COMPARED WITH THE UNITED STATES.*
(Average for 5 Seasons 1924-1925 to 1928-1929)

Yield per Acre Price per Unit Florida's
Yield per Acre Percent Percent
Crop United of U. S. United of U. S.
Floridlorida States Price

Beans, string ..--. 70 bu. 84 bu. 83 $ 2.64 $ 1.73 153
Cabbage ....--....... 5.8 tons 7.7 tons 75 35.66 18.95 188
Celery ........- ........ 412 cr. 290 cr. 142 2.46 1.76 140
Cucumbers ....... 116 bu. 127 bu. 91 2.50 1.37 182
Eggplants ............ 294 bu. 238 bu. 124 1.29 1.05 123
Lettuce .......----.. 181 cr. 159 cr. 114 1.63 1.55 105
Peas, green .........( 48 bu. 77 bu. 62 2.86 1.92 149
Peppers ............ 339 bu. 244 bu. 139 1.56 1.11 141
Potatoes, white,
early and sec-
ond early ........ 118 bu. 121 bu. 98 1.97 1.23 160
Strawberries ........ 1845 qts. 1671 qts. 110 .29 .16 181
Tomatoes .-........... 97 bu. 123 bu. 79 3.21 1.82 176
1 1 1 2 1 2
Watermelons ........ 337 326 103 305-/ 183-/ 167
_________ _________ I ___________I _________________
*Compiled from Crops and Markets, U.S.D.A. Vol. 5, No. 12 and Vol. 6,
No. 12. Crops for manufacture or canning not included.
'Per car of approximately 1000 melons.

to make reliable estimates of net returns. Florida is also at
a disadvantage in the matter of transportation rates, as has
been brought out in another publication from this Station.'
Although the transportation study covered citrus crops, the re-
sults apply in a general way to other fruits and vegetable crops.

"A study of the cost of transportation of Florida citrus fruits with com-
parative costs from other producing areas. Florida Experiment Station
Bulletin 217.





Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


PURPOSE OF STUDY

Because of the great importance of truck crops in Florida
agriculture, this study was made to bring out the week-to-week
competition between Florida growers and producers from the
other states as well as from foreign countries. If this informa-
tion is before the growers of Florida, it is the thought that they
will be in a much better position to plan their plantings in order
to reduce to a minimum the disastrous peaks of overproduction.
It is realized that climatic factors determine to a considerable
extent the production period for each truck crop, but frequently
a shift of a week to two weeks in the marketing season de-
termines whether the crop is to prove a success or failure.

SOURCE OF DATA

All data for this study were obtained from the "Weekly Sum-
mary of Car-lot Shipments" issued by the United States Bureau
of Agricultural Economics. These data include an estimate of
all boat shipments reduced to car-lot equivalents, but do not
throw any light upon the quantities of truck crops used in the
local Florida markets. There is also no estimate made to cover
the movement by less than car-lot freight, by express or by
motor trucks.

PERIOD COVERED

While the seasons for marketing most Florida truck crops are
fairly constant, there is some variation from year to year of
the date at which the first products come on the market, and
the peak of the marketing season. The dates at which compe-
tition from other states and from imports become of importance
vary also over a period of a few days for some crops to several
weeks for others. While it is generally true that when crops are
late in Florida they are also late in competing states, and vice
versa, it is believed that data for one or two years would not
give a correct picture of Florida's truck crop competition.
Therefore data for a period of five years, from 1924-25, to
1928-29, inclusive, have been studied carefully to show the
periodic competition which Florida products meet on the market
and the trends of this competition.3
'Since this study was completed, data for the 1929-30 season have be-
come available and' a~e included in the appendix as supplemental data.






Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


METHODS OF PRESENTATION
Data showing the competition which Florida truck growers
meet in the markets are presented in both chart and tabular
form. Charts have been prepared for each commodity which
show the week-to-week competition which Florida producers
have met yearly during the period 1924-25 to 1928-29, inclu-
sive, from all competing states and foreign countries. The data
from which these charts were prepared are included as an ap-
pendix for the benefit of those who desire to make further an-
alyses.
SEASONAL PRODUCTION
The demands of consumers for larger and more constant sup-
plies of fresh fruits and vegetables throughout the year have
led to greatly increased production of these commodities. The
local vegetable gardens are no longer sufficient to supply the
home markets, since production in any given area is seasonal
while the period of consumption of a product occupies a much
longer period of time. During the spring and summer a large
part of the agriculture of the United States is devoted to the
production of fresh fruits and vegetables for use on the farm
and in the cities. Enormous quantities are shipped great dis-
tances under refrigeration from the better producing areas.
Large quantities, also, are canned or stored for winter con-
sumption.
During the winter months only limited areas of this country
are climatically adapted to the commercial production of fresh
fruits and vegetables. For a number of truck crops, during
this period of the year, Florida has very nearly a monopoly on
the supply available to northern markets. As the season ad-
vances, however, states to the north of Florida come into pro-
duction. During the winter and early spring these products
are always expensive to the ultimate consumer, but due to the
great distance of the Florida producing areas from the centers
of consumption, and the attendant high transportation costs,
Florida producers do not always receive a profit. Retail prices
that would result in substantial profits to producers in Tennes-
see, Maryland, or New York, might prove unprofitable to Florida
producers. For this reason, when states to the north of Florida
begin sending large supplies of produce to the northern mar-
kets, Florida is largely eliminated.
While it is physically possible to extend the season for most





Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Florida truck crops later into the summer than is usually done,
it is doubtful if such a policy would prove profitable. Late ship-
ments from Florida come in contact with strong competition
from states more favorably located with regards to the markets,
and any extension of the Florida season at that period of the
year would meet increasing competition. There is a definite
period to which Florida producers can fit their shipments of
fresh fruits and vegetables to escape the bulk of competition
from other states. To produce quality products, economically,
at this period of the year is the object of the successful Florida
producer.
An examination of statistics of car-lot shipments of some of
the leading truck crops from Florida in comparison with those
from competing sections on a weekly basis will help to determine
the most favorable period of the year for marketing Florida
produce.
STRING BEANS

Florida holds first place in the total volume of production of
string beans. The Florida season normally lasts from about
the first of November until the first of June. During that period
competition is met from about a dozen states and Cuba and Mex-
ico. The first beans to be marketed are the fall crop from
northern and central Florida which come into competition with
late shipments from Louisiana, South Carolina, Virginia, North
Carolina, Texas, and other states. This competition is usually
over by about the first of December, when shipments begin mov-
ing in volume from south Florida.
The first competition that Florida experiences with early
beans from other states comes about the middle of March when
Texas begins marketing the new crop. Louisiana begins shortly
thereafter, followed immediately by lesser shipments from Mis-
sissippi, Alabama, Georgia, California, and other states. Com-
petition is rendered extremely difficult for Florida with the
appearance of South Carolina on the market about the first
of May, followed in quick succession by North Carolina, Vir-
ginia, and other states.
Imports of string beans are of little importance but have been
increasing. During 1928-29 there were 57 carloads imported
from Mexico between Christmas and the middle of February.
At that season of the year Florida has no domestic competition
(charts 1 to 5 and Appendix Tables I to V, inclusive).






Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


Weeks DecMnbc Jahuarmy February Marc April May June
Elding 6 13 20 27 3 10 17 E4 31 7 14 1l 28 7 1t 21 28 4 11 18 25 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20

Chart 1.-Weekly car-lot shipments of string beans from Florida and total
competition from other states and imports, 1924-1925 season.


Weeks November Decenbar Januay elbruary March April Mas June
aEding 7 14 21 28 3 12 19 26 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 2. 6 13 20 27 3 10 17 24 1 8 15 22 29 5 12

Chart 2.-Weekly car-lot shipments of string beans from Florida and total
competition from other states and imports, 1925-1926 season.








Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


C,-
loada


550- --
Ilpor1s
tried
450


-4


vW.k ODct HNW~vber mber Jnuary Fe-ry eMwch Aprl Wa June
Il ~g 23 30 6 13 2D6 r 4 11 18 25 1 15 22 29 5 12 1926 5 12 19 6 2 9 16 23 30 T 14 21 28 4 11 19

Chart 3.-Weekly car-lot shipments of string beans from Florida and total
competition from other states and imports 1926-1927 season.


Cr--
1eads


W..k. ` Oct. I ov,1r le9en19 I J.-9 y .1r9 Y Ma2ch April My June
EriUng 22 29 5 1I 19 26 3 10 1T 24 31 7 14 21 28 4 11 18 25 3 10 1 24 31 7 14 21 28 5 12 19 26 2 9

Chart 4.-Weekly car-lot shipments of string beans from Florida and total
competition from other states and imports, 1927-1928 season.





Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


leads

Legend


Florida
60














150

200



Weeks XovYcb, Dece.,R Jaumar F "b2u 2 a3 30 6Vi21ll V 13y JuI
Endig 3 10 124 1 8 15 22 5 12 6 2 1623 2 9 123 0 6 T 4 1
Chart 5.-Weekly car-lot shipments of string beans from Florida and total
competition from other states and imports, 1928-1929 season.

CABBAGE

Cabbage production in Florida has trended slightly downward
during recent years, chiefly due to a decided increase in pro-
duction in Texas, the principal competing state for green cab-
bage. The shipping season in Texas is almost identical with
that of Florida. Since the Texas crop is mostly hard cabbage
that ships well in bulk without the costs for crates and pack-
ing that are necessary for the Florida crop, it offers severe com-
petition for Florida and promises to continue to be a limiting
factor in the successful marketing of the Florida crop. Cali-
fornia also ships cabbage throughout the Florida shipping sea-
son, but the volume is not large. South Carolina and Alabama,
however, ship in sufficient volume to be important competitors,
while Louisiana, Mississippi, and Virginia compete near the end
of the Florida season.





16 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Weeks December January rebruary M&ach Apcrl May Ju.e
Ending 6 13 20 27 3 10 17 2431 7 14 21 2g 714 21 t2 4 11 18 26 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27
Chart 6.-Weekly car-lot shipments of cabbage from Florida and total
competition from other states, 1924-1925 season.






Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I 17


Weeks Iece-ber Janury Tebruary March April nay June
Endig 5 22 19 26 2 9 16 23 53 613 20 27 6 13 20 27 5 10 17 24 L 8 15 22 29 5 12 19

Chart 7.-Weekly car-lot shipments of cabbage from Florida and total
competition from other states and imports, 1925-1926 season.





18 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


loads


WIekl December January February March Aprilf ay
En4din 11 18 25 1 8 15 22 29 5 12 19 26 5 12 19 2 2 9 16 23 30 ? I 21

Chart 8.-Weekly car-lot shipments of cabbage from Florida
and total competition from other states, 1926-1927 season.







Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I 19


Car-
loids
1200 -





1150 - - - -
135






















































'Weeks Nov. Decembr Janlsiy ?ebruay March April Hy
40'






















filing 19 26 3 10 17 24 3' 7 14 21 28 4 11 18 Z5 S 10 17 24 31 7 It 21 28 5 12 1 26

Chart 9.-Weekly car-lot shipments of cabbage from Florida and
total competition from other states, 1927-1928 season.






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Ca-
lo"d.
1AMo


Weeks DeceMbr Jaamy ebruu, March Aprl My
i i g 15 22 29 5 12 19 1 26 2 9 1 23 2 9 1 23 30 6 13 20 27 4 11 If

Chart 10.-Weekly car-lot shipments of cabbage
from Florida and total competition from other
states, 1928-1929 season.





Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


While Florida was shipping 3,064 carloads of green cabbage
in 1928-1929, 10 competing states shipped 14,053 carloads of
green cabbage and 12 states shipped 4,528 carloads of stored
cabbage. The Florida season began near the usual time, with
three carloads shipped Xring the week which ended December
15, 1928, but due to heavy competition and low prices ended
about the middle of May, somewhat earlier than usual. The
peak of the Florida movement was reached about the middle of
March. Texas was Florida's strongest single competitor in the
green cabbage market, shipping a total of 7,359 carloads during
the Florida season. The peak of the Texas movement was reach-
ed only slightly later than the peak of the Florida movement.
California and South Carolina, likewise, were on the green cab-
bage market throughout the Florida shipping season, with 336
carloads and 2,490 carloads, respectively, except that South Car-
olina did not ship for about two weeks during the first of March
because of a slight intermission between the fall and spring
crop from that state. The peak of the movement from South
Carolina was reached about the middle of April, thus very
nearly eliminating Florida, with her greater distance and high-
er transportation costs, from the market. Louisiana, Virginia,
Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and North Carolina also active-
ly competed with Florida on the green cabbage market during
this season.
Competition during the previous four seasons was similar
to that described for 1928-1929, except that the movement from
Florida was much lighter (charts 6 to 10, inclusive).
Formerly competition was mostly with the northern crop
and plantings were guided largely by the amount of cabbage
in storage, but now competition from green cabbage appears
to be more important. More than two-thirds of the stored cab-
bage marketed during the Florida season is produced in New
York. Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and Michigan, also, ship con-
siderable quantities of cabbage from storage. The bulk of the
stored cabbage competition comes during December and Janu-
ary. Competition from stored cabbage is negligible after about
the first of March (charts 11 to 15 and Appendix Tables VII to
XI, inclusive).







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Weaks l i January February rch AIrll
E"AIr 6 13 27 3 10 17 a 31 71421 29 7 1* 2 4 11 1

Chart 11.-Weekly car-lot shipments
of cabbage from Florida with total
stored cabbage competition from
other states, 1924-1925 season.


December January February March Apr
5 12 19 26 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27 6 13 20 2 3

Chart 12.-Weekly car-lot shipments
of cabbage from Florida with to-
tal stored cabbage competition
from other states and imports,
1925-1926 season.






Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I 23

car-
loads
900
Legeni
850


800 I Florida

750

700

650

600


550

















200











Weeks Decemner January February archh April
Ending I 18 25 1 8 15 22 29 6 12 19 26 5 12 19 26 2 9 16

Chart 13.-Weekly car-lot shipments of cabbage from Florida with
total stored cabbage competition from other states, 1926-1927
season.






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Weeks NoY Deceber January Y.eb7lary March April y
Hiding 19 26 3 10 17 24 31 7 14 ZI E 4 11 18 25 3 10 17 24 31 7 11 21 Z8 5 12 19
Chart 14.-Weekly car-lot shipments of cabbage from Florida with
total stored cabbage competition from other states, 1927-1928
season.





Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I 25
Ca-
loads

750
Legend.
700
700 Other
States
650 1 ~ lartida

600

550

500

450 |

400

350


300

250







100
SO





Weeks December January February March April
Ending 15 22 29 5 12 19 26 2 9 16 23 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27

Chart 15.-Weekly car-lot shipments of cabbage from Florida with
total stored cabbage competition from other states, 1928-1929
season.
CELERY

From the standpoint of value, celery ranks third in importance
among Florida truck crops. During the 1929 season Florida
shipped 8,871 carloads of celery, while California, her strongest
competitor, was shipping 4,998 carloads. California celery was
on the market throughout the entire Florida shipping season.






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Florida usually moves a few cars in late December or early Jan-
uary, but shipments are mostly from January 15 and extend into
June.
With the exception of California, Florida has practically no
competition from domestic spring celery. In 1929, Oregon,
Maryland, and Michigan began shipping new celery in June,
but only 23 carloads were placed on the market from these
sources during the Florida shipping season. Most of the celery
imported into the United States, however, comes from Bermuda
during May and June. This celery comes in direct competition
with Florida celery, since the two shipping seasons closely coin-
cide, and New York City is the largest single market for both
areas. Imports from Bermuda are yet relatively unimportant
but have been increasing during the past few years (charts 16
to 20, inclusive).
CAr-
loads


Weeks January February M arch April Ma June
Ending 3 10 17 24 31 7 14 21 28 7 14 21 28 411 18 25 2 9 1 23 30 6 13 20
Chart 16.-Weekly car-lot shipments of celery from Florida and total
competition from other states, 1925.





Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I 27






Car-
leads





Legend

Importo
































Weeks January Pebruary MarcK April (ty Jame
Erdrng 16 23 30 6 13 20 27 6 13 20 27 3 10 17 91 5 8 IS 22 39 S 1 19 26

Chart 17.-Weekly car-lot shipments of celery from Florida and total
competition from other states and imports, 1926.
50

450




30


















Weeks January Pebruary March April M"y June
gndir 16 23 3o 6 13 20 27 Q 13 20 27 3 10 17 2 I 89IS 22 29 6 12 19 26

Chart 17.-Weekly car-lot shipments of celery from Florida and total
competition from other states and imports, 1926.






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Weeks January February March April May June
Dhding 8 15 S. 29 5 12 19 26 5 12 19 26 9 16 23 7 141 4 11

Chart 18.-Weekly car-lot shipments of celery from Florida and total com-
petition from other states and imports, 1927.





Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


Weeks Dfereber Jauary February Mrth Aprilt My June
Finding 17 2 31 7 1 4 1 2S +# 11 18 25 3 10 1724-31 7 +212 1 6a 19 26 2 9 1625

Chart 19.-Weekly car-lot shipments of celery from Florida and total com-
petition from other states and imports, 1927-1928 season.





Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


loaI,

1100

71L60

1000

950




850

Soo


760

700

650

600

550

500

460

400


350

500
Soo
260


200

150

200

0so


WeeAs January February Marh April May June
AInd 12 19 2S 3 16 2. 9 10 23 30 6 15 20 27 11 18 25 1 9 15 21a9

Chart 20.-Weekly car-lot shipments of celery from Florida and total com-
petition from other states and imports, 1929.





Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


Car-
loads


Weeks January Febrarjy
Ending 3 10 17 24 31 7 14 21
Chart 21.-Weekly car-lot shipments of celery from Florida with total
stored celery competition from other states, 1925.





Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Celery is one of the Florida crops that must compete with
supplies in storage, but for only a part of the season. New York
is the principal source of this stored celery but there is also
some marketed from Michigan and other northern states at this
time of the year. There is competition from stored celery only
at the beginning of the Florida season and it usually lasts lit-
tle more than a month (charts 21 to 25 and Appendix Tables
XIII to XVII, inclusive).


Car-
loads


300.


Leend
Legend


Other
States
Florida


I I I
Weeks Jauary i FebrLuary
Ending 16 23 3o 6 13 20
Chart 22.-Weekly car-lot shipments of celery from Florida with
total stored celery competition from other states, 1926.


t


j






Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I








Car-
loads


Weeks
EndiAng


January February kla
8 15 22 29 5 12 19 26 5


Chart 23.-Weekly car-lot shipments of
celery from Florida with total stored
celery competition from other states,
1927.






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station



Clr-
loads


Weeks -December January VebTrasry
Ending 17 24 31 7 14 21 28 4 11 28 25

Chart 24.-Weekly car-lot shipments of cel-
ery from Florida with total stored celery
competition from other states, 1927-1928
season.


January lPetmy March
12 19 26 P 9 16 2? a 16 2S 30
Chart 25.- Weekly car-lot
shipments of celery from
Florida with total stored
celery competition from
other states, 1929.


Car-
loads





Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


Celery production has increased in Florida from 4,686 car-
loads in 1922 to 8,871 carloads in 1929. It is evident that the
greatest competition which Florida producers meet is among
themselves.
CUCUMBERS

Cucumbers move in small quantities from south Florida dur-
ing the fall and early winter, but most of the cars move out dur-
ing the spring months. California moves a few cars in compe-
tition with the Florida fall crop, but neither state ships appre-
ciable quantities at this season of the year.
Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio produce hot-house cucumbers for
market throughout the spring season when Florida's main crop
is being marketed.
The Florida shipping season normally opens about March 20
with shipments from the southern part of the state, followed
closely by shipments of trough-protected cucumbers from Sum-
ter County and then by open field crops from sections farther
northward in the state. While there are some shipments from a
number of states, real competition does not start until Texas be-
gins shipping in volume about the first of May, followed closely
by Alabama and South Carolina. Imports are negligible but have
increased somewhat and come in during the early part of the
Florida season. Cuba is the principal source. In point of vol-
ume Florida ships almost twice as many cucumbers as any other
state, and about one-fourth of the total car-lot shipments of
the United States (charts 26 to 30 and Appendix Tables XIX
to XXIII, inclusive).







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


CW-
lo da
600

550
ILgend


























Weklu March April May June October T.
HEding 21 28 4 11 18 25 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 17 26 31 T

Chart 26.-Weekly car-lot shipments of cucumbers from Florida and
total competition from other states, 1925.



1ds



























i|,, 10 X 2a 8 8 "1 22 23 N XC 19 2E

Chart 27.-Weekly car-lot shipments of
cucumbers from Florida and total
competition from other states, 192
45,












10





1o r1 24 ITy ue

Chart 27.-Weekly car-lot shipments of
cucumbers from Florida and total
competition from other states, 1926.







Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


Chart 28.-Weekly car-lot shipments of cucumbers from Florida and total
competition from other states, 1927.


Weeks Mr P Ap1 i June M.Ybr Denbe.r
ldig 31 7 14 21 28 5 12 19 26 2 9 16 3 10 1 24 1 8
Chart 29.-Weekly car-lot shipments of cucumbers from Florida and total
competition from other states and imports, 1928.








































Weeks P'brur rc h Aprl MWs June October Novembe December
ndtng 16 23 z 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27 4 11 19 25 1 s1 26 2 9 16 23 30 7 2i 21

Chart 30.-Weekly car-lot shipments of cucumbers from Florida and total competition from other states
and imports, 1929.





Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


EGGPLANTS

Florida normally produces a spring and a fall crop of egg-
plants which, together, are being shipped in car-lots for ap-
proximately eight months of the year. The spring crop usually
begins moving late in March and continues until mid-summer,
while the fall shipments begin in October and continue until
January 15 or February 1.
The Florida product experiences little competition from other
states at any time of the year. Shipments from Virginia are
relatively heavy beginning about July 1, but the Florida season
is practically finished by that time. South Carolina, also, ships
a few carloads during the summer. The fall crop meets some
competition from Texas during November and December, but
the weekly volume from that state does not at any time exceed
the volume from Florida.
Imported eggplants constitute serious competition for ship-
ments from Florida during the early spring. The strong-
est competition comes from Cuba, which country shipped a to-
tal of 223 carloads of eggplants into the United States during
the spring of 1929, while Florida was shipping 194 carloads.
Eggplants are being imported from Cuba when the Florida sea-
son opens in March, and continue to exceed shipments from
Florida in weekly volume until about May 1. There are also
light imports from Porto Rico and occasionally from Bermuda
(charts 31 to 35 and Appendix Tables XXV to XXIX, inclusive).











8C'


Weeks A. A June J1uy
Medi g 2 9 16 25 30 6 13 20 2? 4 1. 18 25


S libsorts





Wc. 2oJrber 8e eber Jm.t.
3L 7 1 21 28 5 12 19 a6 2


Chart 31.-Weekly car-lot shipments of eggplants fr om Florida and total competition from other states
and imports, 19 25-1926 season.

Car-
Lo~4w


Le(


4I0

i i rTTT~T~m R


WeeKs June July
aling. 5 132 19 2 3 10 IT 2a 31


I
rend
lupcrt

Lorlda


r T -_ L b7-7/ /


Chart 32.-Weekly car-lot shipments of eggplants from Florida and total competition from other states
and imports, 1926-1927 season.


October Novenber Decr Rt Jnua
16 25 30 6 13 20 27 4 11 18 Z5 1 8 15


L~~F~-


Iv


I I i I r -. I :


SI r I









g | --I




leek *ar. Ar aJnJ
Weeks #0 c ApnI 16,il J e .140 Octa20., Hov mo.b br JDC.be e / anujf ,f eb
ni as a q9 1 0 T it at 11 18 2z 2 9 t 23 M a 15 1z e9 a 12 26 5 10 17 1 74 21 28 4 I4 1a

Chart 33.-Weekly car-lot shipments of eggplants from Florida and total competition from other states and imports, .
1927-1928 season.

S -







Veell Itor. AV'i I }" l h




Chart 34.-Weekly car-lot shipments of eggplants from Florida and total ^
competition from other states and imports, 1928.
46-
Week s yech Aprl N *u J Oc* Ikt Aprt 1 T_







t 9 21 15 a 0 0 13 U 21 11 s 1 a 1 s 2 3 15 : I0 19 21 az 9 16 zo3s 12







Chart 35.-Weekly car-lot shipments of eggplants from Florida and total competition from other states and imports,
1929-930 season. I
Char 35-Weklycarlot hipent ofegglant frm Foria ad ttal omptiton romothe sttesandimprts
1929-193 season





Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


LETTUCE

Lettuce is now of minor importance in Florida as compared
with a few years ago. The same is true of practically all states
which produce the Butterhead type of lettuce. On the other
hand shipments from the west have increased steadily and at a
rapid rate. The ever-increasing popularity of the Iceberg type
of lettuce grown in the West, together with a growing dissatis-
faction for the Butterhead type grown in the East is the real
reason for this change in the source of supply of lettuce.
During the 1928-29 season Florida shipped 1,108 carloads
of lettuce, as against 2,633 carloads shipped during the 1921-22
season and 1,985 carloads during the 1924-25 season. Ship-
ments from California during the Florida shipping season of
1928-29 totaled 15,416 carloads as against 6,592 carloads ship-
ped in 1921-22 while the Florida crop was being marketed. Ari.-
zona, also, has been shipping large quantities of lettuce of the
Iceberg type.
The Florida season opens about the middle of November and
lasts five or six months, but the peak of the movement is in
December and January. California and Arizona are shipping
heavily throughout the Florida shipping season. When the
Florida season opens there is still some late lettuce of the But-
terhead type being marketed from New Jersey, and some Ice-
berg lettuce from Washington. Shipments from these sources
soon end, however, and do not come in again during the Florida
season. The chief competition in the East comes from South
Carolina during the last few weeks of the Florida season (charts
36 to 40 and Appendix Tables XXXI to XXXV, inclusive).






Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


Car-
icm

Weeks November December January February Aarch April
Ending 1 22 29 /5 2027 3 /0 17 24 3/ 7 /4 2/ 8 7 14 / ~/8 4 // 18

Chart 36.-Weekly car-lot shipments of lettuce from Florida and total com-
petition from other states and imports, 1924-1925 season.
*Less than 5 carloads.






44 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Car-
loaas


Weeks November December January february March 'A*i1
Ending 7 14 21 28 5 12 19 26 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27 6 13 20 27 3 10
Chart 37.-Weekly car-lot shipments of lettuce from Florida and total
competition from other states and imports, 1925-1926 season.
*Less than 5 carloads.






Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


Car-
loads

1500O


Weeks eoembder December J.nuary February Marck Ap
Ending /3 2O 27 4 // 18 25 / 8 /5 22 29 512 19 2 6 5/2/9 2,

Chart 38.-Weekly car-lot shipments of lettuce from Florida and total com-
petition from other states and imports, 1926-1927 season.
*Less than 5 carloads.






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Car-
/lo.us
IMt -


1400


ISO0

/400 -


I/oo

1000

900




700

oo00




400

500




/0o


Neeks Foveamker December J'anuary F-rutry MarcA Aril
Gndlng / /2 /9 26 3 /0 /7 ,4 3/ 7 /4 2/ 28 4 / 18 I2 3J/0 17 R45/ 7 I

Chart 39.-Weekly car-lot shipments of lettuce from Florida and total
competition from other states, 1927-1928 season.
*Less than 5 carloads.





Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


Car-
loads


Weekj Nov Dec ember January February MarcA
Ending /7 24 / 6 /5 22 29 5 12 /9 26 9 9 1623 2 9 /16 3 30
Chart 40.-Weekly car-lot shipments of lettuce from Florida and total
competition from other states, 1928-1929 season.





Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


GREEN PEAS

Florida ranks ninth among the states in average value of
production of green peas (Table II). Shipments are light and
irregular, but there are car-lot movements at intervals during
some seasons from late November until March or April. The
usual season is much shorter, however. During these months
the markets of the United States are almost entirely dependent
on southern California and Mexico for their supplies of green
peas. Steadily increasing quantities have been imported from
Mexico during the past few seasons. Practically all of these
imports come in during the four months December to March.
Shipments from California and an occasional car from Texas
constitute the competition from other states during the winter
months (charts 41 to 43 and Appendix Tables XXXVII to
XXXIX, inclusive.


Weeks Feb. Mar. November December
Ending 26 5 19 26 3 10 17 a2 31
Chart 41.-Weekly car-lot shipments of green
peas from Florida and total competition from
other states and imports, 1927.






Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I

Car-
loads


Week March
Ending 17 24

Chart 42.-Weekly car-lot ship-
ments of green peas from
Florida and total competition
from other states and im-
ports, 1928.


Weeks Jan. TFbrary
l ina 26 2 16 23
Chart 43.-Weekly car-lot shipments
of green peas from Florida and
total competition from other states
and imports, 1929.





Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


PEPPERS

Florida ranks first in the production of peppers with no close
competitor. For the past few seasons Florida has shipped
almost 50 percent of the United States total. The Florida ship-
ping season opens about the first of November and remains open
until mid-summer the following year. There is little compe-
tition from other states until about the first of June when Lou-
isiana begins shipping and soon assumes first place in weekly
car-lot movement.
Fall peppers from Florida meet some competition from Cali-
fornia, New Jersey, Texas, and other states until about the end
of November. After that time Florida producers have a clear
field, except for imports, until the spring movement from other
states (charts 44 to 48 and Appendix Tables XLI to XLV, in-
clusive).


I i Jrn, Y
Was Hnov December Janu-ry February March April May June July
Ending s 6 3 A20 7 3 10 17 24 31 7 14 21 26 7 14 21 28 4 11 18 2 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 7 4 11 18 25

Chart 44.-Weekly car-lot shipments of peppers from Florida and total
competition from other states and imports, 1924-1925 season.


Vee1a Oct Hovemb D .ec January FebruMay rch Jun JulAy
E)cg 4 31 7141 a 121 9 16 23 30 6 13 2 ,1 63 20o 3 1 17 24 1 8 1322 22279 21 6 I 3 10 17 4
Chart 45.-Weekly car-lot shipments of peppers from Florida and total
competition from other states and imports, 1925-1926 season.






Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


V ,k. "ov.t.M ecaber Jmu2y er ary 'arch D*pr le "ad u.4, "r
6 1di 2 2 5 4 II I 25 1 5 22 2s ai 5 1 1 9 26 2 16 23 30 7 14 Zl 26 4 11 18 25 2 9 18 23

Chart 46.-Weekly car-lot shipments of peppers from Florida and total
competition from other states and imports, 1926-1927 season.


We,* Oct .ovcmbT Dec-Ur Jjanr y peltnAry March Aprll May Jun2 July
W.l, 29 5 12 is 2 3 10 17 24 II 714 21 2 4 13 1 2 3 10 17 31 7 14 21 28 5 1;9 26 Z 9 16 23 30 7 14 21 a

Chart 47.-Weekly car-lot shipments of peppers from Florida and total
competition from other states and imports, 1927-1928 season.


Wes Nov Decembps January February March April May ,une July
E.dlng 1 8 15 22 29 5 12 19 26 Z 9 16 23 2 9 16 23 30 13 207 4 11 18 2 1 15 2 29 6 13

Chart 48.-Weekly car-lot shipments of peppers from Florida and total
competition from other states and imports, 1928-1929 season.





Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Imported peppers furnish real competition for the Florida
product during the period from December to May. Mexico and
Cuba are the principal sources of these imports. The total move-
ment from Florida is considerably greater than imports from all
sources combined, but imports exceed shipments from Florida
in weekly volume during January and February, and are heavy
during March and April. Imports were greatly encouraged
by the usual light shipments from Florida during January and
February which were made still lighter by the fall storms of
1926 and 1928, when much of the fall planted acreage of peppers
in Florida was destroyed. From January 15 to February 5,
1927, only one car of peppers moved from Florida and shipments
continued light during February, thus causing an increase the
next season in both Florida and foreign plantings. The trends
of shipments from Florida and imports of peppers are indicated
in Table V.
TABLE V.-CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF PEPPERS FROM FLORIDA AND IMPORTS,
1924-25 TO 1928-29.

Total
Season Mexico Cuba Other Imports Florida

1924-25 ........ ...... 309 18 327 865
1925-26 ........ 174 776 .... 950 694
1926-27 ........ 392 578 21 991 1,280
1927-28 ...... 442 308 .... 750 2,049
1928-29 ....... 289 276 .... 565 1,811

EARLY WHITE POTATOES

White potatoes are exceeded only by tomatoes in importance
as a Florida truck crop, when considered on the basis of value.
While white potatoes are very widely distributed in the United
States, the Florida potato area is probably more localized than
that of any other important crop of this state, with the city
of Hastings located well in the heart of the area. A few car-
loads are shipped from points in the southern parts of the state
in January, February, and early March, but it is not until near
the middle of March that the potato movement from this state
assumes real importance. Texas is an active competitor on the
early potato market during the greater part of the Florida ship-





Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


ping season. The volume is only about one-half as great as that
shipped by Florida, however, and the principal markets are in
the middle-west, whereas Florida ships principally to the east-
ern markets. Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, and South Caro-
lina usually begin shipping at about the peak of the Florida
season, and are followed shortly thereafter by Georgia, Arkan-
sas, California, North Carolina, and Virginia. Aside from the
Texas competition, the Carolinas, Alabama, and Virginia pro-
vide Florida's severest competition on the early potato market.
The last named state, however, seldom starts shipping until the
Florida season is practically ended. After about the middle of
May competition with states farther north largely eliminates
Florida from the markets of the country.
Imports of early potatoes are mostly confined to Bermuda and
Cuba, and, while not large, are becoming of increasing im-
portance. There are imports from Bermuda almost throughout
the Florida season. The peak of the imports comes about the
last of March, shortly before the peak of the Florida season
(charts 49 to 53, inclusive).






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Weeks Feb March April WM June
Ending 28 7 14 21 28 4 -I 18 25 2 9 1 23 30 6 1 20 27

Chart 49. Weekly car-lot shipments of
white potatoes from Florida and total
competition from other states and im-
ports, 1925.
*Less than 5 carloads.





Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I 55


"ets e Feb Mlch April May Jne
EPLing r b 1 20 27 3 10o i7 Z4 1 15 2 19 5 12 19 Z
Chart 50.--Weekly car-lot ship-
ments of white potatoes from
Florida and total competition
from other states and imports,
1926.
*Less than 5 carloads.


Lege9n


plorJda
[hr.


100
500





1200


FPb Mrch April MI y June July
26 5 12 19 26 2 9 6 23 4 a7 21 4r 18 i2 2 9
Chart 51.-Weekly car-lot shipments
of white potatoes from Florida and
total competition from other states
and imports, 1927.
*Less than 5 carloads.


B






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


I.- &hn..r S.,H Aw/ J-. J5T

Chart 52.-Weekly car-lot ship-
ments of white potatoes from
Florida and total competition
from other states and im-
ports, 1928.
*Less than 5 carloads.


Jan F.bruary MIrch Apri I 0My Jun J.u
2 9 2 9 163 6 23 30 C 13 20 2I 4 11 25 I 8 1522 2 6

Chart 53.-Weelkly car-lot shipments of
white potatoes from Florida and total
competition from other states and im-
ports, 1929.
*Less than 5 carloads.





Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


The heaviest competition that the Florida potato producers
meet is with the northern or stored crop. These potatoes are
harvested in the fall and large quantities go into storage for
winter use. They may be stored on the farm or otherwise by
the producers, or sold to dealers who may store a portion of the
crop for speculative purposes. These potatoes are brought out
of storage during the winter and placed on the market. As a
general rule when the northern crop is heavy large quantities
are stored and marketed late in the winter or in early spring.
At such times there is not much chance of the price advancing
to very attractive levels for the early potato producers. When
the northern crop is light the market is likely to be cleared for
the early southern product. As a matter of fact, however, the
location of the northern crop is also of great importance. A
crop of more than 400,000,000 bushels is a much more serious
menace to the Florida producer if it was produced mostly in
such surplus states as Maine and New York than if it had been
produced in states farther removed from Florida's principal
markets.
There were 81,602 carloads of stored potatoes from the late
1928 crop shipped while Florida was marketing her early potato
crop in 1929. The movement from storage was very heavy
that year, averaging about 5,000 carloads a week until the end
of March. About that time, however, the storage movement was
cut almost in half, thus leaving an opening for the early potato
crop which had to be shipped greater distances. More than
20 states shipped stored potatoes while the early crop was being
moved from Florida that year. There were 1,296 carloads of
stored potatoes imported from Canada during that period. The
Florida crop therefore had to meet heavy supplies of old po-
tatoes in most all markets. It is well known that storage po-
tatoes exert an appreciable effect upon the price of new potatoes,
so it is important for Florida producers to take stock of the quan-
tity of late northern potatoes being stored in planning their pro-
duction of early potatoes. Stored potatoes, as a rule, are less
desirable than new potatoes, but they are also cheaper. The con-
sumption of new potatoes is therefore greatly reduced in years
of heavy storage movements. If the supply of stored potatoes
is small so that there is not much difference between the price
of stored potatoes and new potatoes, then there will be a heavier
demand for new potatoes (charts 54 to 58 and Appendix Tables
XLVII to LI, inclusive).






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Weea Feb F arch April Majy un
Ending 28 7 14 2/ 28 42 /1 I 25 2 9 I 23 30 6 1s 20 27
.hart o.--vvekly car-lot shipments
of white potatoes from Florida
with total stored white potato com-
petition from other states and im-
ports, 1925.
*Less than 5 carloads.


Ab Marh Apri I Ma J.un
27 13 20 27 10 17 24 18 IS 222 9 5 1 1 26

Chart 55.-Weekly car-lot ship-
ments of white potatoes from
Florida with total stored white
potato competition from other
states and imports, 1926.
*Less than 5 carloads.






Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


SImports



4800 -








4400
0 &!4 4Dr: ,. -
5 _
























3800

















StS as l 34 ) 31 7 H 2B S tfl 5 i 9 sas30
Week Feb March Apri l May Ju.ne 8 7I 34 1 4 .
En. ing 2a 2 19 29 2 9 1 23 30 7 14 2 as1 4 11 Chart 57.-Weekly car-lot ship-
ments of white potatoes from
Chart 56.-Weekly car-lot ship- Florida with total stored
ments of white potatoes from white potato competition from
Florida with total stored white other states and imports,
potato competition from other 1928.
states and imports. 1927. *Less than 5 carloads.






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Ca-
lad


W.ek. Jan Fbruary M'arch April Mj J-u Ju~
Ending 26 2 9 16 23 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 7 4 11 IS 25 I 8 15 22 29 6

Chart 58.-Weekly car-lot shipments of white pota-
toes from Florida with total stored white potato
competition from other states and imports, 1929.
*Less than 5 carloads.





Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


STRAWBERRIES

Shipments of strawberries from Florida have been on the
increase during recent years. Unlike the northern crop which
remains in fruitage for only a few weeks, strawberries are pick-
ed from the Florida plants in late November and shipments
reach appreciable volume in January with picking from the
same plants continuing until rendered unprofitable by the com-
petition from Louisiana and other states.
In 1929 Florida began shipping strawberries in carload lots
the first week of January and it was not until the week ending
March 23 that two carloads were shipped from Louisiana in
competition with Florida. The next week, which ended March
30, Texas began with five carloads. Alabama began shipping
during the week which ended on April 6, while Mississippi,
North Carolina, and South Carolina began the following week.
Arkansas, California, Georgia, Tennessee, and Virginia began
shipping during the week which ended April 27 and Oklahoma
began during the week which ended May 4. By this time the
movement from Florida had decreased from 203 carloads ship-
ped during the week before competition from other states began,
to 3 carloads. In 1928 the situation was similar as to the dates
of competition, but the volume shipped from Florida was much
smaller. In 1927, however, Florida met competition from Lou-
isiana at a much earlier date, that state having shipped 14 car-
loads during the week which ended February 26, while Florida
was shipping 108 carloads. Shipments from Florida reached
their peak two weeks later and were then forced to decline in the
face of competition from Louisiana, Texas, and Alabama.
Shipments from Florida are in considerably greater volume
than the car-lot movement data would indicate, since large quan-
tities are shipped by express in pony refrigerators. This is
especially true of berries picked in late November and December
before there is sufficient volume for car-lot shipments by freight
and the price is high enough to justify shipments by express.
Shipments by this method are quite popular throughout most
of the shipping season.
There is no competition from imports (charts 59 to 63 and
Appendix Tables LIII to LVII, inclusive).






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Weeks January Febary March April
Edling 3 10 17 24 31 7 1+ 21 28 7 14 21 2 4 11 18

Chart 59.-Weekly car-lot shipments of strawberries from Florida
and total competition from other states, 1925.







Car-
l0 ois


Weeks
Ending


Febu sY
6 13 20


March April
6 13 20 27 3 10


Chart 60.-Weekly car-lot shipments of strawberries from Florida
and total competition from other states, 1926.







Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


Ce_-

14.d.


esteL
zu







1150
950---









90C1
804 ---- --- -* irt __ __ __ __ __






T500









65C
S O 0C __ __ __ __ __ __ %



1 15 0 _ __ __ _

li _ __ _ _ C


200z 1


January February March April
8 15 2z 29 5 12 19 26 5 la 19 26 2 9 L6 23

Chart 61.-Weekly car-lot shipments of strawberries from Florida
and total competition from other states, 1927.


r





Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


edo J.anuuy ebrur Much Apri Il
t3lk4 21 M 4 1 18i r 3 10 IT 24 3L 7 14 21 2
Chart 62.-Weekly car-lot shipments of strawberries from Florida
and total competition from other states, 1928.





Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


Chart 63.-Weekly car-lot shipments of strawberries from
Florida and total competition from other states, 1929.





Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


TOMATOES

Tomatoes are the most important truck crop produced in
Florida in point of acreage, value and car-lot shipments. Flor-
ida normally begins shipping in November or early December
from early plantings but the main crop in Dade County starts
in January and shipments from this section are usually heavy.
in February, March, and the first half of April, reaching a peak
some time in March. Manatee County and the Everglades sec-
tion follow and the season finally ends with shipments from
Marion and Sumter counties usually in early July.
Florida tomato producers experience little competition from
other states during the winter months, but imports of tomatoes
during this period have been increasingly important during the
past few years. Florida opened the 1928-29 season with 13 car-
loads shipped during the week which ended November 10, 1928.
These tomatoes were sold in competition with 327 carloads of
fall tomatoes from California and a few carloads from Texas,
Ohio, and other states. This fall competition ended with 4 car-
loads from Texas during the week which ended December 29,
1928. Competition with early tomatoes began with 1 carload
imported from Cuba during the week which ended November
17, 1928. The following week there were imports from Cuba,
Mexico, and the Bahamas. Imports from these three sources
combined exceeded the shipments from Florida each week from
the week ending December 1 to February 16, inclusive, and in
total carloads for this period were almost double the Florida
shipments. Again, during the two-week period March 22 to April
6, imports exceeded Florida shipments. Imports from the Ba-
hamas closed with the week which ended March 2, 1929, from
Cuba with the week ending April 27; while imports from Mex-
ico extended through the week which ended June 1. Spring
competition from other states began with light shipments from
California and Texas during the week which ended on April
27, while shipments from Ohio, Georgia, Mississippi, South
Carolina, Arkansas, and Washington began during the latter
part of May and early June, just before the end of the Florida
season.
The west coast of Mexico is the most important source of im-
ports of tomatoes. Cuba and the Bahamas are also of consider-
able importance. The movement from the Mexican west coast
runs from November through to June with the peak movement






Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


during the four months January to the end of April. Shipments
from Cuba come in from November to April but mostly during
the four months December to the end of March. The Bahama
crop comes in from November to March and is at its peak dur-
ing December and January. The competition of tomatoes from
Cuba and the Bahamas is particularly keen in the large eastern
markets. Mexican tomatoes compete mainly in the central and
western markets but considerable quantities are shipped to the
eastern markets also (charts 64 to 68 and Appendix Tables LIX
to LXIII, inclusive).
Imports of tomatoes during the Florida shipping season in-
creased greatly during the six-season period, 1923-24 to 1928-29.
This increase is indicated in Table VI.


TABLE VI.-IMPORTS OF


TOMATOES INTO THE UNITED STATES, 1923-24 TO
1928-29


Season Mexico Cuba Bahamas Other Total

1923-24 .......... 375 ........ ...... 375
1924-25 .......... 2,630 84 79 .. 2,793
1925-26 .......... 2,979 538 270 .. 3,787
1926-27 .......... 4,521 619 294 9 5,443
1927-28 .......... 4,061 802 366 .. 5,229
1928-29 ......... 4,604 1,284 402 1 6,291







68 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station







ar-
loadI


..k. .s, December anuarY February Maroh- Apxl May Jun ly
Ird n 22 29 6 13 20 27 3 10 17 M 31 7 14 21 28 7 14.21 28 4 1! 18 25 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 2r 27 4 11

Chart 64.-Weekly car-lot shipments of tomatoes from Florida and total
competition from other states and imports, 1924-1925 season.
*Less than 5 carloads.







































In ii S 0 ief 30 61 e1 0w2Il3 z 0 17 1 B 1 S 02 6 |214 i0.|7
Chart 65.-Weekly car-lot shipments of tomatoes
from Florida and total competition from
other states and imports, 1925-1926 season.
*Less than 5 carloads.


I,0l - ---




1- -














Chart 66.-Weekly car-lot shipments of
tomatoes from Florida, and total com-
petition from other states and imports,
1927.
*Less than 5 carloads.









































XWi )I D---n5b --7,20 I-, n A.lr.1 .fl 421<
Edlr S 310 U2 31 714212 111 8 10 17 4 3 2 51 124 1 0a 16

Chart 67.-Weekly car-lot shipments of
tomatoes from Florida and total com-
petition from other states and imports,
1927-1928 season.
*Less than 5 carloads.


I. a ..s Z. 2916M . .5,30 6. 4 IN N. .O 17

Chart 68.-Weekly car-lot shipments of toma-
toes from Florida and total competition from
other states and imports, 1928-1929 season.
*Less than 5 carloads.





Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


WATERMELONS
During the eight-year period from 1922 to 1929, inclusive,
Florida shipped an annual average of 7,794 carloads of water-
melons as against an average of 8,055 carloads of tomatoes
shipped each year during this period. Tomatoes were the only
truck crop to exceed watermelons in volume of movement. The
car-lot value is less than for most truck crops, however, so that
in point of value watermelons occupy about fifth place among
the truck crops of the state.
Movement of watermelons from Florida usually begins with
a few cars about May 1 and extends through July, with the
peak of the movement about the middle of June. Georgia, the
strongest competing state, usually begins shipping in June and
furnishes competition for the rest of the season but misses the
high market for the early shipments. In 1929 the Florida season
opened with five carloads during the week which ended April
20, and increased rapidly to 566 carloads during the week which
ended May 18, when the first competition was encountered to
the extent of three carloads from Texas. California began
shipping the following week. Arizona, Georgia, Alabama, Mis-
sissippi, and South Carolina followed in rapid succession. Com-
petition from Georgia was more important than from all other
sources combined. Florida, however, was more than half
through her shipping season when Georgia began, the lat-
ter state shipping 7 carloads as against 2,609 carloads from
Florida during the week which ended June 8. From that time,
however, Georgia increased her shipments rapidly, reaching a
peak of 5,222 carloads during the week of June 21 to 29, while
shipments from Florida rapidly decreased. Shipments from
Florida during the last two weeks of the season were from the
extreme northern part of the state (charts 69 to 73 and Appen-
dix Tables LXV to LXIX, inclusive).






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Chart 69.- Weekly car-lot ship-
ments of watermelons from
Florida and total competition
from other states and imports,
1925.
*Less than 5 carloads.







Bulletin


224, Florida Tr:ck Crop Competition I 73




1926.
t7 a


























44O0












W -

























Chart 70.-Weekly car-lot shipments


1926.
*Less than 5 carloads.






Chart 70.--Weekly car-lot shipments
of watermelons from Florida and
total competition from other states,
1926.
*Less than 5 carloads.


w"a






Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Weeks Aprl May J4"e Ju Auaust
Entd 3 7 14 22 28 4 II Is P2 2 e 16 23 6 13 20 27
Chart 71.-Weekly car-lot shipments of watermelons from Florida
and total competition from other states and imports, 1927.
*Less than 5 carloads.






Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I 75
Car-
10.1,


.dg 5 12 19 26 2 9 126 S 7 1<1" 21 Y-1

Chart 72.-Weekly car-lot shipments of watermelons
from Florida and total competition from other
states and imports, 1928.
*Less than 5 carloads.






76 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Car-









































ei s I





















E n 2sl? 4 11 1 2 a 1 IS 2 J 4 ]3 30

Chart 73.- Weekly car-lot shipments of
watermelons from Florida and total
competition from other states and im-
ports, 1929.
*Less than 5 carloads.





Bulletin 224, Florida Truck Crop Competition I


MISCELLANEOUS CROPS

The other recorded truck crops that moved in car-lots at any
time during the five-season period 1924-1925 to 1928-1929 are
briefly mentioned. None of these crops is of general economic
importance in Florida, though each one has a definite place on
a limited number of Florida farms.

CANTALOUPES
Cantaloupes are of minor importance in Florida and ship-
ments have trended downward during the past 10 years. This is
due both to tremendous competition from other states and to dif-
ficulties of production because of insect pests and plant diseases.
Although competition is very keen from California and Arizona
after the middle of May, prior to that time there is a minimum
of competition and probably an opening for shipments from
Florida if cantaloupes could be produced economically in this
state at that season. Mexico ships a few carloads of cantaloupes
into the United States during April and May, but competition
from that source is not serious (Appendix Tables LXXI to
LXXV, inclusive).

CAULIFLOWER
Shipments of cauliflower from Florida are light but have been
increasing in importance during the past few years, having in-
creased from 2 carloads in 1925 to 25 carloads in 1929. Any
material gain in shipments of this crop, however, must be in
the face of severe competition from California, Arizona, and
Texas, during the entire Florida shipping season. California
leads in the production of cauliflower and shipments from that
source are well established in the markets of this country. The
normal Florida season is January to March.

ONIONS
Onions move from Florida to a very limited extent in April,
May and early June. In 1928 there were 19 carloads but in
1929 only 2 carloads moved from Florida. The competition from
Texas and California is severe.





78 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

INTRA-STATE COMPETITION BEING STUDIED

Recognizing the fact that for a number of truck crops Flor-
ida's greatest competition is with herself, this study is being
extended to bring out the competition between different sec-
tions of Florida. In making this further study, Government re-
ports have proven inadequate. The cooperation of all trans-
portation agencies serving the state has been obtained to the
extent that they have made their files accessible from which the
weekly movement of each truck crop from every shipping point
of importance in the state has been compiled for the 1928-1929
season. Not only the freight car-lot movement, but the express
and boat movement as well have been obtained. The results
of this study will appear in a later publication.



























APPENDIX









TABLE I.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF STRING BEANS BY STATES AND IMPORTS FOR SEASON 1924-1925.


DOMESTIC


Week Ending Fla. Cal. Tex La. Ala. Miss Ga.N. C. S. C. Va. Tenn. Ark. Del.

Dec. 6.... ...... 8 ....... ....... ................. ............... .....
Dec. 13 ....--........ 9 ..... -I .......- ..-- .... ...- ............ ... .... ... ....
D ec. 20.............. 13 - .. ....- --. .- ........ ..:::: :: ::.:::::::... .....:::::: ...... ... .. .. .
Dec. 27............. 51 .. .... .... ............. .. ... .. .. .. .... ....
Jan. 3 .... 9 ..... .... .
Jan. 10-....-......... 134 ..-- ---........... ........ ........ ... .... . ......... .. . ----... -- -. ........ ....
Jan. 17...... ........ 104 ...... ...... ....... ..... ............. ... .. .. ... ......
Jan. 24.......... 75 .... ..... ..... .
Jan. 31 ... 63 4 .... ........ ........ ........ .......... .. . ........
Feb. 7.......... 25 1 ........ ........ ... ... ......... .... ....... ..... .....
Feb. 14-... ...| 24 12| .... .... ............. ........... ..-
Feb. 21........... 341 .... .......... .... ] . -- . .. I .
Feb. 28............. 1 ....... ...... .. .......... ............ ........ .. ..... .. ...
M a r 1 4 - - - 5 . . .. - - --l-- - I- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
M ar. 7.............. 10 ...... ....... .............. ................... ......... .........
M ar. 14.... ......... ... ... ... . -(........ ........... ..... -- .... .. .... ... ....
M ar. 21...... 33 ....... ...... ...... ....
M ar. 28--.... .... 25 ........ 1 ................ .... ........ ..... - .......-. .. ...... ...
A pr. 4........... 58 1 33i ........I........... ............. .. ..... ........
A pr. 11... ....... 129 6....... 601 ........ I........ ... I ........ .... .... ....... ........
A pr. 18.......... 247 3 1351. ... ... ..... ........ .. ...-..............| .. ........... .........
A pr. 25-......-.. 297 2 1141 44 ....... ..... ..... .... .......... ........ .... .....- ........
May 2......... 276 1 121 143 2 18. .... ..... .. ..
May 9..--..-- 159 7 3] 107 5 23 2 4 43...- ---................
May 16.......- 20 9 ...... 89] 5 11 5 14 91 -............ .......
May 23--......... 7 3 1 46 7 4 3 3 72 ....2....... ...........
May 30--............ 8 5 1 21 9 5 1 31 43- ........ ........
June 6........... 4 51....... 46 12 8 4 189 34 58 36 3 1
June 13.......-... 2 ...... 5 ...... ...... 1 167 2 141 26 1 .....
June 20.....-..... 1 ._..-.. .. ..-.. ... .... ........ 21 31 83- ..... ........--
Total .... ..19521 551 3601 5011 401 691 161 4291 2881 2841 671 41 11


Md. Okla. N. J.


Z ::L::Z::::Z::
-- ------ ---.. -----


...... .......






6 4
-------I--------
5 ----i----- -




111 41


-- -








2- 15
21 17


I IMPORTS I
I Can- I -
S Cuba ada I

8 ..
8 ----- --i------- ------- --
9 ..........
13 ........ ..
51............
13 ........ .
10 ...
35 ............... .........

10 ............... .I
75----- .-.- --- -----
67 --------------



26 .--.- 2 2--
36----- -- --- .----

392 ...... 2


385 ............ ..... .... .


24 1 ........ ...... --
1891 ........ ........ I ........



134 0 .......................
355 ......
9244----- -- I------


3 85 .------. -----. ------
467 ....... ........ . .....
1302 -------- .-------

130 .......... ........
4100| 21 2] 4!


8

9
13
51
100









TABLE II.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF STRING BEANS BY STATES AND IMPORTS FOR SEASON 1925-1926.


DOMESTIC


Week Ending Fla. Te

Nov. 7..........- 1
Nov. 14 .......-.. 6 1
Nov. 21 -......-... 27
Nov. 28 .........1 23 2
Dec. 5.............. 26
Dec. 12.............. 45 .....
Dec. 19........... 33 .....
Dec. 26........... 13 ...
Jan. 2 .......... 16 ...
Jan. 9 ......... 15
Jan. 16......... 21 .....
Jan. 23 .... 8 ....
Jan. 30....... 6 ....
Feb. 6........ 5 ....
Feb. 13 .. ....... 2 ....
Feb. 20........... 3 ...
Feb. 27 ........ 2 ..
Mar. 6.....................
Mar. 13......-... 1 .....
Mar. 20............ 1
Mar. 27........... 22 ....
Apr. 3 ............ 36
Apr. 10 -........... 44 1:
Apr. 17 ........... 74
Apr. 24......... 91
May 1 .........-... 56
May 8 ..- .. 87
May 15............. 124
May 22-............ 47
May 29 .............. 11
June 5............ 8
June 12.............. 1
Total .......... 855 41


xas

4
19
23
1
4
















4

33
17
91
64
9
2
7
1
1
3

03


La.

38
34
17



























17
32
72
83
51
344


S. C.

7
3
5












....... :i














43
195
83
20
356


Va.

4


....... ..
..........
..........








----------


...................30
.............17
....... .....1
..-..... 30
...... 17


S.... 1

56 .......
67 I 79


Ala. Ga. | Miss. N.C. Ky.


: : .. ..:........ .. --:::::-::--. -
-- ----.------ --. ........ ..... I---
.. .. ........ ---------- ---------
.. .......I ........ ..... .. -
........ .. .......... .......... -------- -


....... ....... ...... ...
... .................... .....




















....6 .......... 19.. .. ......... ..

13. 15 37 21 .
12 15 40 103....... .......
.4 15 151 .
35 40 I 111 ( 2751 3 |


Im- I
ports I
Total o Total '
Other Do- Im-
Ark. Tenn. I States mestic Cuba ports S

...... ........... 3 57 ...... - ..-..
......... ......... ......... 62 ......-- ...--
. ... ......... 2 74 .........- ..........
. ... ....-... .. 1 45 ...- ... ..- ..-
-...... .. ....-......... 30 ... .....
...... ....... ....... ... ... ......
S... ..- ...... .. 33 ...... ......
.. ......... .. .......... 13 .-.. ... ...
--- .... ..........6 ... ..... ...... 2
....... ....... .......... 15 -...-..- .- ..- ... -
S.. ... ........ ... .. 21 ... .......
...-...- ..-.....- .- .....- 8 ..- ...--- ..-


.. .... ............... .. 6 ... ........
.....-.... .... ........ 5 .. .. ...
. .......... .. ... 2 ......... ..-- .-



........ ................ 3 ........ ......

......... .... ...... .. .... .. ...
...... ... .. ......... ... 1.. ... ... .. .
... . .... ... .. .. ------ 5 ...... ... ...... ..



.... ....3..... .... ........ 69 .
--...... -- --- ....... 161 2 2


......... .............. .. 16 .......
....... .. .... ...... 1 5 .......... ...1 - ... -
-- ..... - -.. ...... 9 ........ .... ....
....... ........ ........ 106 ......... ....... -
-- - - ---- .-- ---- 1 6 7 ....... ----------
....... ...... .. ..... 161 ...-... ....... I
... ......... .- 366 .......... . I
......... .......... .- .. 357 ......... .... .I----
1 29 1.......... 333
1 29 ] 6 12604 1 7 1 7 1


Total
All
sources

57
62
74
45
30
45
33
13
16
15
21
8
6
5
2
3
2

1
5
25
71
163
165
159
95
106
167
161
366
357
333
2611


,







TABLE III.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF STRING BEANS BY STATES AND IMPORTS FOR SEASON 1926-1927.


Week Endingl Fla. La. S. C. Miss. N. C. Va. Texas Cal.

Oct. 23.... 4 65 17 3 40 143 ................
Oct. 30.... 6 53 34 3 14 44 ..........
Nov. 6.... 18 59 7 1 1 33
Nov. 13.... 19 34 ....-....-.........-........... -10 2
N ov. 20.... 41 1 ..-....... .......... -.................. 13 .
Nov. 27.... 35 ---...-...--... ......... 10 ........
Dec. 4.... 68 .................................... 9
Dec. 11.... 53 8--------- -- --- -------------------- -----
Dec. 11.... 53
D ec. 18.... 62 ................---.. ..... ... .
D ec. 25... 58 .......... ... .... ...... ... ... ..
Jan. 1... 71 .......... .... -- -
Jan. 8.... 23 ....... .. .....
Jan. 15.... 8 -
Jan. 22 .... 4 .......... .......... ........... ..
Jan. 22.... 4
Jan. 29.... 2 ... ...
Feb. 5.... 6 -......
Feb. 12.... 8 ------- 1-------------------
Feb. 19.... 13 .......... ........... ..... .........
Feb. 19 13 -----
Feb. 26... 23 8 .
Mar. 5.... 63 --
M ar. 12.-.. 77 ......... ... -
Mar. 19.... 149 .......... ..........-------------------- ........10
M ar. 26.... 136 ..........--------- ----......... ......... ... .. 29
Apr. 2.... 129 ..........------------- ......... ......... 80.
Apr. 9.... 149 .......... 2 ----------.......... --.....---........ 128 1
A pr. 16.... 126 .......... 1 .........-......... .......... 62 .
Apr. 23-..- 198 14 .......... 1 .....1..... ......... 13
Apr. 30.... 355 46 ---------.......... 1 -.......... 2.
May 7.... 354 123 29 10 -----...............I 1 3
May 14.... 128 121 136 41 ---------.... ----...--- 4 21
May 21.... 27 63 108 38 2 .......... 3 12
May 28.... 16 41 63 18 35 2 .......... 10
June 4-..- 9 2 19 5 89 6 ....... 1
June 11.... 6 1 6 1 127 47 .. .........
June 18.... 3 2 8 ....... 149 196 ....................
Total 12447 1 625 | 430 122 4.57 481 T367 148


Ala. Ga.







I------------


I------


















17 33
13 19
9 24
S.... ...















-- -
. . .. . .
--------- ----------
----------- -- --------

l------------ ------------
-- ------ - - -
-- - - -
-.. .. ----------


-- ------ - - -
-- ------ - - -



-- ---- - - -



1 1







59 91


] _I IMPORTS 1 |
Total I Be Total Total
Other Do- er- Im- All
Tenn. Ill. Md. States mestic Mexico muda ports Sources

3 275----275
.... ......... .......... 3 275 ........ .................... 275
.... .................. 1 155 -- ... . 155
.. . ..... ..... .......... 119 --- ..... .......... 119
...... .......... .......... 65.......... 65
... -- 55 -......... ......... .. ..... 55
.. .... ............... ..... 45 -- --- -- ... 45
77--- 77
... ... ............... .......... .. 77 .......... ............... ........ 77
---------- ...1 .......... ........... ...... 53
2-..2.. .......... . ------ ....- .....- 62
7. 8 .................... 7.. 68
---------- -------- .. .. 1 -.......... .... ......... 758
........71 .. 3 ......... ... ....... --... ..- -71
.23. .....- .-..........--- - 23
4 ....-------------------.............. 4
....2 ..- ............----- ---------- 2
............. .. --- ------ 2!------ --------- ------- 2
S .. ... .......... 6 ........................... 6
... ....... .. ......... .......... 9 -- ..--- ...--..-.. 9
S13 .--....- ......... ---.... 13
23 1 ....- 1 24
63 1 1 2 65
77 .......... .......... .. .. 77
.. 159 .....--...- .. .... .......... 159
... 165 ------ .......... .......... 165
... 209 ..........-----..--......--........ 209
... 280 --------..........----........---......... 280
.. ............................. 189 .......... .......... ........ 189
... 226 -------......... .......... 226
.......... ........ .. 406 .......... .................. 406
.......... .......... .................... 549 ...--------- ...--....... .......... 549
.......... .......... .......... .......... 501 ........ .......... ......... 501
.. ........ ...... .......... 285 ......... .................... 285
2 .......... .................... 220 ..... .... ..220
1 ........ .. 1 136 ---------.-... .......... 136
3 .. ............... .. 191 .........------- ---.... -......-191
18 1 3 1 2 383 --------... -..------ 383
24 1 | 3 7 15162 1 2 11 1 3 5165





TABLE IV.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF STRING BEANS BY STATES AND IMPORTS FOR SEASON 1927-1928.


Week Ending | Fla.

Oct. 22............... 3
Oct. 29................ 16
Nov. 5.............. 73
Nov. 12 ............ 115
Nov. 19 .............. 271
Nov. 26.............. 152
Dec. 3................ 198
Dec. 10............... 120
Dec. 17............ 160
Dec. 24.............. 116
Dec. 31............. 35
Jan. 7............... 20
Jan. 14................ 14
Jan. 21 ................ 31
Jan. 28 --............ 24
Feb. 4................ 25
Feb. 11........ ..... 23
Feb. 18................ 24
Feb. 25................ 29
Mar. 3................ 30
Mar. 10............... 32
Mar. 17 ............... 44
Mar. 24................ 39
Mar. 31........... 54
Apr. 7................ 52
Apr. 14................ 117
Apr. 21.......... ... 137
Apr. 28 .. ...-- 313
May 5 .............. 156
May 12 ............. 90
May 19................ 28
May 26................ 11
June 2............... 6
June 9........... 5
Total ......... 12563


La. S. C. Va.

36 15 64
76 33 78
58 23 83
47 ......... 12
25 .......... ..........


---- --I-- --------
... .... ------ ----- -


















.21.. ... ... .........




110 11 1
163 39.
-- - --- .. .

-- - ---- -- -














88 124.........
-- - -.. .... I - - -









76 109 20....

32 100 66
732 1 454 1 324 (


DOMESTIC

N. C. Texas


24
..... ......








......... .







---25
24
......... 68
22
5
......... 25




5 12
74 10
391 ..........
485 1 307


1

1
5
11
19
15
25
22
5
4
108


r`~'~"m~~


.......... ... ..... .... ....... .. ... 50
..------- ...._ ..... ..- ...... ... ... -...... - 79
.......... ...... .. .......... ....... .......... 89
- ...... ...... .. .......... .... ... -- 123
.... .... ... .................. 167
...... .. .... .......... ........... 348
.......... ... ......... .......... 264
8 2 1 ........ ........ ....... 260
11 4 23 ....... ...... 298
8 5 25 ............ 300
20 8 72 ........... 1 401
8 22 20 2 5 ....... 655
55 1 41 1 141 F 21 5 1 18 15235


"' I IMPORTS I
Total | i Total
IOther Do- | Im-
Ala. Ga. Miss. Ark. Ten. States mestic Cuba Mexico ports

.... .......... 2 126 ........ .... .. ..... .
3 215 ........... ........ .....
8 249 .......... ..... ..........
.... .... ... ... ...... 3 198 .... .... ... ..........
........ ... ..--.... ... ......... 1 329 -. --. ... .....
....... ....... ..... ......... ..... ... 152 ......... .... .... ........
...... ..... .. ....... .. ......... .......... 198 2 .......... 2
-........ ....... .......... ... .... ......... .......... 120 .......... .....-... ........
. ...... ... ... ... ...-- .......... .......... 1 60 ..... .... _ ---- .---- ---......
- ....... ..... .. .. ... .. .......... .......... 116 ......... ...... ... ..........
S... ....... ... ..... 35 ...... .......... .........
.......... . ........ 20 .. ..... ..... .... ........
--- -- ........ --- .. .. 14 1 ......- ...............
... . .... . 1......... ....... 31 ..... .... ......... ..

-.......... ....- ... .......... .... -. -- --- --. ...-.-- -- 2 4 ..... .... ......... ........- -
-........ ............ -..... .. I ....... - - 23 ......... ......... .. ........
...... ... ... .. ..... 23 ...... .......... .... .


. 24 ...... 1 1
.......... ..... ...............I ......... .......... 29 .......... -... .......
........ ......... ......... ... ..... .. .......... 30 ......... 1 1.
.. ..... ... ..... ...... 32 ......- .. .......
..... . ... .. .. -.. ---...-.. -..-- .. 51 ........... ... .........


50
.......... ... .... .. ........ 50
........ ... .. .. 79
. .. 89
....... ..... 123
... .. .. ...... 167
.. ............... 348
....... .....- ... ....-- 264
........ .......... .... 260
. ....................... 298
.....- ....... ........... 300
. .--.. ...... 401
.....- . 655
2 2 4 5239


Total
All
Sources

126
215
249
198
329
152
200
120
160
116
35
20
14
31
24
25
23
25
29
31
32
51


------









TABLE V.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF STRING BEANS BY STATES AND IMPORTS FOR SEASON 1928-1929.


DOMESTIC

Week Ending Fla. La. S. C. I Va. Texas Cal. Ala.

Nov. 3............. 3 63 4 21 .....................
Nov. 10 ............ 7 36 4 21 ........ ........
Nov. 17.......... 21 12 12 5 3 ... .....
Nov. 24. ..... .. 87 ......... 9 -.. ... 13 .. .....
D ec. 1............... 43 ......... 2 ......... 8 .......
Dec. 8................ 74 ..... ... .......... 11 ...........
Dec. 15................ 45 ........ ... .. ....... 4 ... ..
D ec. 22 .... .......... 34 .......... ....... ... ....... .......... ....
Dec. 29............... 32 --- --- --
Jan. 5-.............. 15 ...... ....--....
Jan. 12................ 18 ................. .. ...
Jan. 19 --- 1.......... ..... .... .... .......... .............. ...
Jan. 26........-............... 24
Feb. 2......... .... 47 ....... ..- .-- .. --. ..
Feb. 9........ ...... 50 ... ...... ....
Feb. 16... ...... 70 .. .. .......---- .. .. -.--
Feb. 23 .............. 130 -.--- .------ --.---- ------ .----- .------
Mar. 2 .............. 180.. ........ -- ......---
Mar. 9 ........... 150..... 1.......
M ar. 9.............. 150 ...... ........ .. .... ..........
M ar. 16. .............. 179 ......-- ..........j..........-... ..... .--
Mar. 23............. 19 .. .. ........ 2..........
Mar. 30. ......... 173 1....... ........ 34 ......... .....
Apr. 6....---.----------- 191 ...........- -----... 111 1 ....
Apr. 13.............. 326 ---.. --...... ....... 52 ....................
Apr. 20 .............1 313 1 1 .... 46 .......... ..........
Apr. 27 ............ 350 29 1 ........ 31 ......... .....
May 4................ 256 128 21 .......... 21 4 5
May 11................ 148 253 161 I......... 7 14 17
May 18............... 34 142 216 I.........- ........ 22 27
May 25 .............. 7 39 83 30 1 11 14
June 1................ 9 40 29 80 ........_ 5 5
Total ......-... 3154 743 1 543 I 157 1 345 1 57 68


_[ [ IMPORTS I
Other D- Im- All
Miss. N. C. Ark. Md. States mestic Cuba Mexico ports Sources

............ ... .... ....... 4 9 .... ...5..-.............. 95
......... .................. .......... 2 70 .......... ..... -- ---- 70
3 56 2 ... 2 58
.............. .. .. 6 115 1 .. 1 116
......... .. ..... ....... ---- 1 54 ..- ...- 1 1 55
. .......... .. ....... .....-...- 6 91 .......- .-.... ...- .. 91
. ........ .... .... ........ .. .. 49 .... ......... ...-- 49


--------- -.- .. .... .....
---- ---- ---- --- -------
......... . ..... ... ......


.......... ...... . .. . .
.......... ...... - .
.......... . - . .
------ --- -- .... .
.......... ..... -- -


.15
......





43
37
22
6
I 123


16
52
56
32
22
1 178


1
6
7


34
...... ..32
--- -- 15
S..... .. 18

---------------- 24
--------- ---- ---- 47
........ 50
---------- ---- --- 70
.....- -- . 70
130
.180
..... .......... 15180
.151
.... ... 179
...... 121
....- .... 207
......... ........ 303
-- --- 378
..-- 361
... ...... 411
..-..- . 466
.695
..... ---- ------. 556
.-- -......2---- 5 391
2 2....... 508
| 2 1 22 15876


1
5
4
10
14
14
5
4
.--.- --.--


1
5
4
10
14
14
5
4


......... ...... .. .





.......... .......... ..........
.......... .......... ....... ..




.......... 58------ .-6--- -- .--
- --- --- .. - - -
-- -- .- .. . - - -


.......... -. ------. ---....
3 1 58 61 ]


54
33
20
22
29
38
61
55
74
130
180
151
179
121
207
303
378
361
411
466
695
656
391
508
5937


00
CO


I----------




SUPPLEMENTAL DATA
TABLE VI.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF STRING BEANS BY STATES AND IMPORTS FOR SEASON 19


Week Ending Fla. Ark. La. Miss. N.C. S.C.


Oct. 26 .... 1 8 6 7 8 61
Nov. 2...... 13....... 4 4 49
Nov. 9...... 31 20....... ... 32
Nov. 16... 31 ...... .... ... .... 7
Nov. 23... 60 ......... .....
Nov. 30 164 ............ ....
Dec. 7...... 144 ....... -........ ....
Dec. 14 .. 356 ....... .... ......
Dec. 21...... 301 .. . ....... ....
Dec. 28 ...... 139 ..................
Dec. 284-.... 139 ----- ------ -- -----
Jan. 4...... 138 ....... ... .... ......
Jan. 11...... 146 ---.... .. .... ......
Jan. 18...... 133 ...................
Jan. 25...... 140 ........ .. ....... ...
Feb. 1...... 115 ....... ...... .......
Feb. 8..... 95........ .. ......
Feb. 15 .. 98 .. ..... ............ ..
Feb. 22..... 117 .......- -......
Mar. 1...... 142 ........ ...........
M ar. 8...... 130 ..... ... .... .. ....
M ar. 22...... 70 ...... ........ ... ... ... ...
M ar. 22...... 61 ........ .... .... ....... ...
M ar 29 ---- 6 1 .. .. -. . . .
Apr. 125.... 60 .. .. ............ .......
Apr. 19 ..... 98 .... ... ......
Apr. 26...... 202 .......... ...--........
May 3...... 329 ....... 18 .... .......... .
May 10...... 329....... 150 ... 7.
May 17..... 155 ........ 218 7.. 95
May 24...... 55 ..... 115 10 31 209.
May 31...... 34 3 97 46 291 94
June 7...... 23 29 23 7 322 33
June 14..... 15 39 13 64 208 17
June 21... 12 22 ........ 2 6 7
June 28...... 8 11 -. .. ...... ..
July 5...... 7 10 ........... 2 4
Total 140971 1221 7251 2341 9421 6151


DOMESTIC


Va. Tex. Ala. Cal.


67 ...............
68 3 ...............
38 3 ......
4 19 .
1 4 ............

6-- .. ........
.... -- -- ....... ... .- ....


....... ........ ........
...... ........ -..... ----
- ------ ------ --- ---- ....


....... 89.... ...........
--- I1 .... .......- ....
.. ........ ...... ..


....... ..... .-- -------- .......





.... 105 1 2
....... 66 14 ........
........ 2 6 1 -- -- --- -


...... 21 3 22
...... 51 9 34
.... 16 21 17
.. 3 13 9
8 10 8 7
76 5 7 2
157 .... .......
120 .............
37 ..................
4 ........ ........ 1
5401 6041 761 941


Ga. Tenn. Ill. Md. Okla. N. J. De


........ .. .... ....... .. .... ... ..








- - -- - - i- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

........ .... ... ... ... .. .. .. .....
....... ...... -. .... ......... ...... .....










1... 2 .. .. .......
---- -------- -------/-- -------- ----(---- ----I-----
. .------. .. ---- -- --... .....
---.--- .--- ....... ---------.. .....
...... ........ ....... ........ ...... |.......















20. 30........ ...........................
S 63...... .... ...........
----- 2 2 5 1 -------- ----







29 1 12 9 2 1....








2151 2251 411 2311 61 271
-- -- --- --- ----- - -- - -
-------- --- --- ---- .. -. .


- - - --.- --- --- - - - - - .
--------- ---- - -- -- ---------
3 1........ ... .... -- --.-- -- -- - -

2 0 1 - -- ---- --- --- -- -- - - -- -


29-1930.


IMPORTS i

a l0
10 'n | | E-,


1 220 .................. 220
3 102 ....... ......... l. 102
2 126.-............ .... 126
.... .....61 ..... ........... 61
1 65 ............. ... 65
.- ..-.- 175 ........ ........... 175
... ... 144 ... ................ 144
--. .356 ............... 356
.....-.- 301 2 ..... 2 303
........ 139 3 ....... 3 142
-- ....... 138 .. ......... ... 138
... .... 146.......... .... 146
-........ 133 2 ... 2 135
.... ...... 140 1 ....... 1 141
--. ...... 115 3...... 3 118
..- ---. 95 ............. 95
-...- .. 98 ......... .... -. 98
-........ 117 .............. .. 117
... ... 142...... .............. 142
... .. 130 -.- ..- ..... 130
- .--.- 86 .......... ....... 86
.. .... 75 ... 2 21 77
... . .87 .. 2 2 89
....... 148 ....... 3 3 151
-:. --::: 230.............. ..230
--- ........206 .............-- 206
S 282 ........-... ...... .. 282
.... 393 .......-.. .... 393
.. .. ... 584 ......... .............. 584
.... 549 ....... ....... ........ 549
... ... 86 .. ... ........ 486
.:: ....: 648 ....... ..... 648
.... 664 .... .... ........ 664
... ..... 651 ........ .. ....... 651
...... 418 .............. 418
3 228 ....... ....... ... 228
11 7 134 .....- .--........... 134
11 17188121 111 71 181 8830














TABLE VII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF CABBAGE BY STATES FOR SEASON 1924-1925.


Week Ending x 1 )



. 6 ........ ........ .. 3 ........
. 13 .................. j... 2 11 23 ..... .
S20 ...................... 6 14 13 2 .......
27 ........................... 2 5 4 4 ........ ..
3 ................... 22 11 6 46 5 .... ...
10 ..... ...... 46 72 9 40 3 ........ ......
. 17 .......... ...... ... 66 66 14 54 4 ........ .........
24 ........................ 80 07 8 64 ....... ........
.31 ..................... 76100 16 1 1 1 ......
. 7.................... 120 187 10 49 1 3.......
S 14 ........................ 87 254 9 40 ....... 1 .......
. 21 ...................... 117 3311 11 21 ........ 1 2
S28.......................... 153 310 14 19....... 1 1
. 7 ......................... 164 93 10 28....... 1 3
. 14 ................ 293 3 9.. ....... ...1 ....... 6.
. 21 ........................... 178 362 2 68........ 19 4
. 28...................... 185 351 1230 45 7
S 4 ...................... 149 406 9 370 73 5
. 11 ........................... 44 222 11 527 ....... 178 2
. 18 ......................... 41 138 1 620 ....... 250 6
25 ............................ 9 4 6593.. 246 3
S 2 ......................... 2 9 12 393 198 4
S 9 .................... 11 9 25 353 90 111 3
y 16 ........................... ........ 5 63 163 355 73 5
7 23 ........................... 2 3 75 18 313 38 .......
r 30 ...................... 5 1 16 38 301 7 1
e 6 ........................ ... ..... ...... 10 2 300 5 ........
* 18 ..................... 1 1 31 ........ 120 ....... ........
e 20 .................... ........ 41 ....... 27 ........ ...
e 27 .................. 2 15 ....... ........ ..


Total ....................... 1865 3775 478 3785 1545 1251 52


N .







... .. ......






....16. ........ ........




35 2 2
50 ... ......
...51 ........ .......





55 2 10
55 1 76
98 ........ ..218..





85 --.142
53...... ........ 138........






24 5......
18 ........18........
9 ........ 1..
8 ........ ........
16 ..... .. ......
35 2 2f
50 4_ _
51 4 660
55 2 10
55 1 76
98 .....218
85 142
53 ... 138
24 ... 55
18 .... 181

8.
4 ........ ... ....


5691 131 6601


.. .. 2 6
5 EZ E 0


26
39
36
20
90
170
- 204
....... ... .... ........ ........ ..... 2
260
.- ....- ..... .... .9225
370
....... ........ -------- -------- ... ... ...... ........ ........ ........ ..... ---- .. .. .. ------. -------- -------- -------- -- - -2 0---





----. ........ ... .. ... ........ .. ........ ........ ........ .. ....... ........ ... ... 37 0
....... ........ ...... ........ ........ ........ ..... ... ........ ........ ..... ... 391
....... ........ ... . .... ....... ........ ....... 483
S....... .... .. .... .... .. ........ ........ .... ........ ....... ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ 498

661
S..... ... ........ ........ ........ ... ........ ........ ... ........ ..662
1 ......_. 835

3 39 11 .6 1039
S........ -- ... ....... .. 811295
3 ..................... . ............... 1008



..58 13 .. ..... ........ ........ . ..... .... ........ ..... -. 1 7110
9 54 6 ....... .... ...... ........ ........ ....... ........ ..... .... ...... ... ... 492
4 127 3 40 ...... . ....... .. ........ ..... ....... .. . ........ .. ..... 27
73 3 67 2 8 323 9 1 1 3 .. 1 57
..... 42 2 99 16 19 13 46 17 45 2 2 4 2 3 388
9 4 27 20 13 9 27 4 98 1 ....... 1 5 5 3 265


334 319 18 233 38 40 25 96 30 146 21 3! 20 9 7 9 15322
334 219 18 61 8 4














TABLE VII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF CABBAGE BY STATES FOR SEASON 1924-1925.-Continued.
STORED CROP I Total
I Total New &
Week Ending Colo. Mich. Minn. N.Mex. N. Y. Ore. Penna. Utah Wis. Ill. Me. Mont. Ohio Wash. Other Stored Stored
States Crop Crop

Dec. 6..................... 14 5 21 1 475 2 9 1 196 28 2 1 2 1 1 759 785
Dec. 13 ........................ 5 6 4 1 414 15 8 .............. 157 15 2 ............... ........................ 2 629 668 tE
Dec. 20 ....................... 2 2 2 1 260 6 4 1 73 ............................... .............. 2 353 89 t
D ec. 27 ........................ .... .......... ............. 1 135 ........... 1 ............. 65 .............. 1 .............. ....................... 2 205 225
Jan. 3 ....................... 5 3 1 .......... 372 ........... 5 .............. 187 .............................. .. ......... ....... ....... .. 11 584 674
Jan. 10 ........................ 6 7 2 .............. 795 ........... 20 .......................... 257 4 ........ .................... 2 1096 1266
Jan. 17 ........................ 6 2 6 ......... 424 ........... 34 ............. 166 ..... 1 ...... .......... 2 2 643 847
Jan. 24 ...................... 4 2 10 .............. 10 ........... 31 .............. 188 .............. .......... .... ... .... .......... 3 4 552 812
Jan. 31 ................... ... ........... 3 3 .............. 219 ........... 14 ............. 127 ... .......... ... . ..... ............. 2 8 371 596
Feb. 7 ....................... 1 3 2 .............. 407 ............ 20 .............. 105 .......... ........ ......... ..... ...... 6 2 546 916
F eb. 14 .................... ...... ... 8 3 .............. 424 ............ 16 ............. 65 .............. .............. .............. ..... .... 3 1 520 911
Feb. 21 ............. ............. 10 3 .............. 245 ........... 27 .............. 69 .......................... ......... 8 1 363 846
Feb. 28 ........................ .............. 7 1 .............. 93 ............ 9 .............. 33 ........................................ 8 2 148 646 6
Mar. 7 .... ............ .. 7 1 .......... 132 ......... 4 ........ 17...... .. .. ............ ..... ............ 3 164 7638
M ar. 14 ...................... .............. 3 ........................... 172 ............ 11 .............. 5 ............. ...................... ......... 46 237 898
M ar. 21 ............................... 5 ...... 59 ............ 8 .............. 2 ............. ........ ..................... 74 736 "
M ar. 28 ...................... .............. 6 .............. ........... 54 ............ I .............. .................................... ... ............ 28 89 924 9
A pr. 4..... ................... .... ..... ..... ............. 60 ............ 2 .............. ....................... ................ ... ............ 4 66 1117
Apr. 18 ........................... .. .. 9....... .................................. ... .-.........9 1338
Apr. 21 ........................ .. ....... .................... .. ...................... ............. ........... 10089
M ay 2 ............... ......... ............. .............. .............. .............. .............. ............. ............ ............ .............. .............. .......... .. ... .... ............. ....... 839
M ay 9 ........................ .............. ... ............. .............. .............. ........... .. ...... .... .... .. ............. ......... .. ............. .............. .... ....... ..... .. ..................... 996
M ay 16 ........................ ... ........... ...... .... ............. .............. ............. .................. ......... ....... ......... ............ 951
M ay 23 .......... .... ...... ............................... ...................... .. ............ ............. .............. .. ....... ............. ...... .. ....... ............. .......... 711
M ay 30 .......... ...... .... ............. ... ............ ... ........................... . . ..... .................. ............| 492
J une 6 ..................................... ....... .......................... .............. .... ............ .... .................................... ........... ........................... ... ...... 527
June 13 ........................ ....................... .. ......................................... .................................................................. .................... ........ ................ 357 .
June 20............................. .... ....... .............. ...... .... ............... .......................... ........................ 388
June 27 ....................... .................... .......... ............. .. ....... .... ............................ ........... ......................... ..... .. ..... ............. ........... 265


Total 4 5099I 23 224 2 1712 10 1 2 30 117 744812277


-3











TABLE VIII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF CABBAGE BY STATES FOR SEASON 1925-1926.


Week Ending] i 0
jh U 02 E

Dec. 5 2.. ..1 2 1 ..
Dec. 12..... 1 2 2 3 .
Dec. 19 5
Dec. 19.. 1 7........
Dec. 26.. 15 ... .. 12 1 .
Jan. 2 .. 1 9 2 1.............
Jan. 9 .... 9 421 28 261 3
Jan. 16......... 24 35 1 45 10 1 1
Jan. 23...... 1 39 30 56 7 3
Jan. 30 ....... 31 19 38 45 6 2 ........
Feb. 6...... 20 21 151 3 4
Feb. 13.... 45 43 10 206 2
Feb. 20........ 43 39 7 335 5 5 .
Feb. 27.......... 66 28 11 453 31 9 ..
Mar. 6 .......... 82 20 6 424 2 6
Mar. 13.......... 91 18 457 ....
M ar. 20.......... 137 47 ....... 245 2 13 ........
Mar. 27.......... 200 42 5 916 1 21 .......
Apr. 3.......... 151 21 2 66 2 2 2 .
Apr. 10 ...... --- 2241 2 27 641 2 39 ........ -
Apr. 17.......... 194 33 187 449 7 61........
Apr. 24.......... 97| 17 313 270 13 89 ........
May 1 .......... 421 9 468 128 20 253 ........
May 8. ......-. 24 21 5 48 127 46 342 6
May 15........ 5 19 4801 80 62 355 21
May 22.......... 1 12 321 18 30 193 53
May 29 .......... 1 6 189 6 39 98 80
June 5.......... 1 8 29 2 17 28 49
June 12......... 1 13 9 3 9 37
June 19..........1 1 1 13 11 ..... ........ 20

Total 1545 5662776 781 29411546 268
Total ...... 1 541!} 294115467 268


NEW CROP
Domestic


... ... ......
1 ------2






3 176. 1..
------ ------ -----




.8 372 .... ....1 158
7 131 15 4 314
11 26| 8 7 335
....... 51 3 238

43 1014| 54 1511061


--0
'
I










------ .....
.. ... ...
.~...~.I------- ---------- i
.S---- -5 -- -- -- '

















1 2. 2 ". 1 3 0 ..........-.---------...... .. ..... . ... .. ....
- 1- ] 4 1 ~ 2 6 1. ........ ....... ....... ........

71 14 39 ........ 2| 21 ]| 101 12


38 27 6 4961 4 45| 11 2| 1| 10 12|


~~


4 4

...... ........ ........I 21
8 ........ ..... I 8
21 .. . 21


11 ... . .. 131
...... 149 ............ 149
141..... ... 141
228 228
309 309
434 .I I 434
S570 1 1 571
I 5401 51 51 545
5661 1 1! 567
444 1 11 445
11851 1 1 1186
860 1 11 861
935 .. ... 935
931 ................ 931
S802 .......... 802
923 .. ... 923
1192 ........ 1192
1202 ........ 1202
S890 ........ 890
I 97 .............. 975
650 ........ ........ 650
31 75 ... ...... 755
9 60 .... ...... 604

13 156151 101 10115625
r I t I












TABLE VIII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF CABBAGE BY STATES FOR SEASON 1925-1926.-Continued.


Week Ending



c. 5.......... .......
e. 12......... .......
c. 19.................
c. 26..................
n. 2......... ....
n. 9.......... ......
. 16.................
n. 23 ......... ......
n. 30...........
b. 6........
b. 13..........
b. 20......... ....
b. 27..........
ir. 6.......
Lr. 13..................
Lr. 20..............
Lr. 27..................
pr. 3.............
r. 10............
r. 17................
r. 24..........
Ly 1..........
ay 8..................
ty 15...... ........
ly 22.................
ly 29...................
ne 5...-... ........
ne 12...................
ne 19...................


Total ................. .


s E



52 6
57 3
9
5
13
20 3
14 9
4 6
1 11

2 7
2 5
4 ............
1 ............


















184 57


STORED CROP


Domestic




s z


5 651
468
.... 295
1 209
2 351
......... 773
586
282
221
257
236
237
S 120
56
S 33
. 9
4
7














8 4795


............ ...........
..... ............
.......... ...........
------------ -----------
............ ............
............ ............
------------ -----------
............ .
............ ............
............ .. ... ..
............ ...........


11 1 37


o


101 .........
110 ...
60 ..
90
96 6
195 20
157 37
114 33
89 21
120 11
72 .....
45 .........
14 ............
5 .......:::::::::::...
....1268 129



.. .. .. .. .
..~i?) ............


-----------




2



1.......;.


...... ...........

....... ......

....... ...........
....... ...........
....... ...........
..........

...........
....... ......... -
.................
-----------
1--

4 6


^ 0 'a
*d m
0r o 8 60 E- z
-o ~ -oO -Z


2
3
11
3
1
13
15
12
8
6
12
10
7
4
28
5
1















141


.- -- -------. 1202
1202
890
975
650
755
604


6853 22478


I


I I I


I t


I:.:::















TABLE IX.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF CABBAGE BY STATES FOR SEASON 1926-1927.


Week Ending



Dec. 11..... ........................ 1 13
Dec. 18......... ............... .... 5 22
Dec. 25................................... 5 70
Jan. 1.......................... ... 50 94
Jan. 8........................ 34 148
Jan. 15........ ......................... 35 206
Jan. 22............................... 63 329
Jan. 29.................................. 77 327
Feb. 5- ................................. 64 268
Feb. 12................................. 89 220
Feb. 19.................................... 111 322
Feb. 26........ .................... ..... 70 367
Mar. 5....................... .. ...I.. 103 567
Mar. 12.................................... 71 767
Mar. 19.............................. 75 376
Mar. 26................................. 63 400
Apr. 2.................................... 43 447
Apr. 9.................................... 19 226
Apr. 16 ........................................................... 4 77
Apr. 23 .......................................... 28
Apr. 30 .................................. 2 12
May 7................................ 51 8
May 14.......................... ......... 5 11
May 21................................. 1 6


Total .................. 995311


NEW UROP


14 2.
8 1. .
12 3.....
13 8
6 9 2
21 16 2
11 19 1
17 16 6
20 20 19
18 11 37
5 13 59
8.


15 2 12 8 2 1
16 51 26 140 ...... ........ ........
15 296 41 286 3 ........ ........
151 296 41 286
8 358 66 341 2 3 ...
1 242 48 288 1 21 ........
13 316 74 275 4 148 2
11 267 62 159 14 264.....
24 150 42 51 6 128 3
24 41 16 6 65 .....
21........ 2 39 2


327 1883 508 1810 46 669 8


.. .. .. .. .. . -- -
.J ...






.... ........


1 ........
1 ........

7 ....
18......
36 2
58 68
36 201
291 371


1871 642


181 13
.. 46 4.
5... 81 5
1671 1
200 2
... 272 3.
.... 419 2
S 469 1
... 381 1
... 35 .......
510 ........
... 529 ........
... 770 ........
947 .......
... 541 ..
697 ........
... 1132 ........
... 1024 .......-
689 ........
... 878 ........ .
... 829 ........
... 543 ........I.
... 4111 ........
5 4791 ........1


5 12391 32


S;

1 603
2 471
5 293 ..
1 406
3 625..
....... 531
1 435
2 301.
1 303.
....... 236 ..
....... 172 ..
..... .. .
236[_
....... 114 .
....... 26 ..
....... 16 ..
. ........ 14 .







16 5175


----- ----


STORED CROP pi 0




2 0 w

4 18 3 3 196- ........ ..... 9 850 868
1 18 1 105 2 2 608 654
..... ..... 1 1 4 58 143
9 1 4 141 ........ ........ 4 8 543
8 134 ....... ........ 4 6 723
15 1 5 145 1 6 5 8081 1008
5 19 1 4 153 3 ........ 2 721 993
3 5 3 170 7 ........ 9 648 1067
....... 18 1 144 5 1 1 474 943
....... 14 79 7 ........ ....... 407 788
15........ .... 59 6 ... 3201 675
8 2 34 4. 3 223 733
...... 9 7...... .. .. 233 762
4 .... 2 25 8 ........ 1 230 1000
8 2 8 6 ........ 21 281 1228
4 ........ ....... ........ 6 22 146 687
....... ...... ........ ....... ........ 31 728
16 1148
3 17 1041

878
829

411
.. ...... 16 705



....... ...... ...... ....... 1 9 43
. ..... ........ -------- -------- --- -- ---- -- 4 7


14 180 11 33 1422 62 7 917043! 19434


- -








TABLE X.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF CABBAGE BY STATES FOR SEASON 1927-1928.


Week Ending


Fla.


Nov. 19...................... 2
Nov. 26...................... 1
Dec. 3............................. 3
Dec. 10 ............ .....- 5
Dec. 17-...................... 12
Dec. 24......................... 6
Dec. 31..-.......-............. 17
Jan. 7....................... 25
Jan. 14.........................-.. 72
Jan. 21........................... 81
Jan. 28......-................... 75
Feb. 4 ........................ 65
Feb. 11......... ............ 87
Feb. 18....................... 70
Feb. 25-..........-...... 69
Mar. 3.............. ..... 62
Mar. 10......... ............. 56
Mar. 17 ..................... 54
Mar. 24.......................... 94
Mar. 31........... ....... 61
A pr. 7................ ....... 50
Apr. 14.....-............. 57
Apr. 21....-............. 39
Apr. 28...................... 29
May 5.................. ......... 10
May 12..................... 6
May 19..................... 6
May 26..... .......I 2
Total ..................... 1116


Texas

7
11
10
10
45
18
91
175
244
344
289
341
528
642
613
576
776
729
476
463
280
203
174
78
30
17
22
42


I C.

13
10
13
27
57
8
37
16
19
9
5


............



1
2
33
142
280
367
427
401
288


SN. C.

2
1
1
1
3


10
24
31
49


7234 2155 i 122


NEW CRO:


Va. Cal.


1 ..........
........... ..........
3 1
........... 1
1 3
7 ..........
9 5
12 9
5 7
........... 10
2 6
........... 8
........... 10
........ 23
........... 13
.... 21
74
35
18
. 23
.......... 44
1 59
1 53
1 60
17 73
79 94
205 40
344 1 690


P


2
3
2
2
6
5
4
3
2
1



4
1
6
19
46
60
68
67
43
59
63


Miss.





--"---"2-"


2







............







5
115
258
281
228


Ala. I Ariz.


............



3
4
7
1
14
46
99
156
169
152
118


4661 891 I 769


Ga. I Ark.

.......... ----------
.......... ......
.......... --------.
.......... ..........
..... ----------

.. . ... ----------


Total
I New
I Nev. ITenn. Crop

........ -...-..... 24
..... ......... 24
-....-- ........ 27
...-.....- -.-..-. 47
-....-- ....-.--. 120
.-..-.- ........ 39
......... ......... 154
-.-.-...- -....-.--. 234


S.. .........._ ... .....
... ...... ... .. ...... .... ..........







-- 1 3 ... ......... ....... .
1 ......... .......... .......... .........
---------- I ---------- .......... -------.---



1 --............. -------- ------- -----------

4 5 4 1 1
121 9 41 1| 1


362
451
383
417
625
723
705
651
853
864
611
558
375
397
524
613
816
1038
1129
1050
113814


.








TABLE X.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF CABBAGE BY STATES FOR SEASON 1927-1928-Continued.


STORED CROP

Week Ending r .C r .


Nov. 19 ........-- ..- 11 41 9 19 1 840 17 1 43 12 2 170 3 1 1
Nov. 26 ................ 4 ....... 2 4 ... 369 13 1 27 1 7 64 ..... .. 1 ......
Dec. 3 .. .............. 1 1 ........ 3 2 295 ..... 4 12 2 4 84 ..... ......... ....
Dec. 10 ........... -- -... -- -- --..-- 3. ....... 3 8 ....... 3 9 ....... 3 113 ...... ... .. ..
Dec. 17 .......... .......... 2 .......... .. 5 ........ 378 .... 6 3 2 3 157 ...... ... .... .....-
Dec. 24......... ....- 1....--.......-...--- ....... 261 -....... 15 5...... ... 84.. ... .....
Dec. 31........... ....... -j. 1- 3..7...-.. -... 370 ..... 7 6 2 1 95 .. ...
Jan. 7 .................... ........ 423 .... .... 8 1 3 155 ....... ............

Jan. 21...... ............ 7 2........ 394 ..... .... 12...... 2 153 ....... ..........
Jan. 28................... 8 1.----- 303 ........ 10.. 5 79...... ---- ..........
Feb. 4............... ...... 1 1 ........ 282 ........ ...... 5 ....... 2 83.............
Feb. 11.... .............1 5 ........ 292 ...- ........ 18-.. 4 73.............. ........
Feb. 18 ................. 2 ............ 288 -....... ...... 6.6 87 . ......
Feb. 25 ........... ..... .... -- 2 ... ... .... 239 ........ ...... 8 ... 2 40 ......- ..............
M ar. 3 ...................... .. 1 3...... ....- 215.. 4........... 5 21.................
M ar. 10......... ..... --........ 1 .. -.... ........ 2 -..... ..... .. 7 1 9 ........ .........
Mar. 17 ....... ....... 1 6 ........ 1... 13 .. 1 ....... 1 ... .........
Mar. 24...... ...........--.... -- 7-- ..... 1 .... ....- 7 ....... 7 ............ ........ .... ..
M ar. 17............. .................. ..... 6 .... .... .. .. .. 8 111..........................
Apr. 7 ......... .......--- ...-- 7 ...... .... 31 ........ .... 1 . ............. ....
Apr. 14.......... ---- .....-- .. 3 -- -....... ......... .. 1 .....---- .. -- -..-
Apr. 21.... ........ -- 6 ........ .117 .-.. ..-.- ....... .............. .
Apr. 28 ............ .. 5 --............ 66................ ... ....... ...
May 5----...... --- ..----..- -------- --- 30 -............ .. ...... ...... --
May 1.......
M ay 12.......... .......... -- --- -- ------ ------ ----- - -- -------- --- - - -----
May 19.--- -..-- --- -- ... .... ..--- --- --
May 26... --- --- I --- ---- -- I -- -I-- ---- --- -- ----- ------
Total .... ..........-- 21 151 94 45 371481 301 37) 2141 22| 77117041 3! 2| 1|


3 1 ...... 3 11411 1165
5 ........ 1 4991 523
2 ............ 2 412 439
-..-..... 3 492 539
..-......- 4 560 680
.... ... 5 371 410
1 4831 637
..... .. .. .. ... ..... 5931 827
-...- 1 310611 1423
.......... .. 5 576 1027
... .- 2 408 791
.. .. ..... 1 3791 796
.. ..... -. 4 3971 1022
... ..-..- 2 3911 1114
...... ....... 1 2921 997
--... 5 2541 905
... 1 2221 1075
...... ... 38 3931 1257
..-.. .... ... 9 211 822
....... 6 81 639
....... .... 39 414
....... -. 451 442
-. -- ..... 3 126 650
-..-..--..- ... -..-.-.. 3 741 687
...2.... .. 2 321 848
----... .- - -- .-..-. .. -.. 1038
------ --..- 2 2! 1131
------- -- ------ ... .......- 1050
101 11 1| 10619534123348












TABLE XI.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF CABBAGE BY STATES FOR SEASON 1928-1929.


Week Ending


Dec. 15.......................
D ec. 22.......................
Dec. 29.......... ........
Jan. 5..
Jan. 12...............
Jan. 19........ ..........
Jan. 26... ........ .......
Feb. 2...... ........
Feb. 9......... ......
Feb. 16...........
Feb. 23.......... ........
Mar. 2....
Mar. 9 ... .. ......
Mar. 16... ...
Mar. 23..... ..........
Mar. 30..........
A p r. 6....................
Apr. 13..... ..................
Apr. 20........... .......
Apr. 27......................
May 4......................
May 11 ......................
May 18........................


Total .......


NEW CROP


x


8 21 1 1 ....
9 33 8 29
7 41 5 12......
2 84 6 42
9 169 14 31
0 272 15 30 .
2 345 13 36 i
1 270 7 10 11
9 504 16 7 1
1 442 15 5
4 509 14 5 1(
7581 8 3


1





2 .
1 ... ...
5 ^^.^l
5 ........ ........
2 - - -- -
5.
5 2...
1 2 ...
B ......


340 640 9 1 12 2 5 1
358 708 16 ............. 1 5..
S38 0 5 9 8 1 4 2 0 4 ...... 3 1 2 1
219 750 6 104 11 13 13 1
541 365 3 31 15....... 47 5 3
17 325 8 403 30 88 9 6
6 425 18 659 69.......160 14 40
4 153 26 397 61 ....... 187 11 120
4 81 31 317 47 89 181 7 297
6 27 43 44 60 315 92 12 407
2 16 40 6 26 632 24 7 339


.1364 739I 336124901 40911092 817 109 1215
I 3 7 1 III


L? 0


STORED CROP



2 4UI 5 a a ^ a a
\ I 1 I
41 5 1 1i 8 2 354 13 6 3
83 1 ............ 4 3 186 3 ......
77 3 2 .... 5 536 1..
97 1 ...... 460 20...
291 3 ...... 457 2 1
443 .. ............. 10 7 401 13
575 ........ ............ 3 3 397 8
5 16 .... ........... 4 2 126 9
784 ..... ..... 7 3 133
760 ... ......... 1 118 5..
8 06 .... ... ........ 70 5 ........
928 ........4.. ...... ... 4 ....... 64 . ....
10 10 ... ..... ................ 0 ..... ... . ........
10 88 1.. I. ...... 4 ....... 28........ ........
982 ....... ......
.. 1117 ....... ................ .
8 05 ........ ........ -- 3 1 ........ ...... ........
8 05 ............. ........... 3 ....... .
29 ....... 888 ......... 4....... ........
9 .. .......... 2 1..... ... .....
35 ... 94 ........ ........ ......
695 ....... 11075 ........ ...............................

56 1 11 49 ........ ........ ..............................


226 1 171171 91 7 1| 112 39 3200 19 94 3


-*

I I 552

3 150 2 61 41 595
1 87 2 ........ 292 375
154 5.. 40 617
179... 1670 867
5 165 ............. 667 958
5 116 2....... 554 997
52 ............. 463 1038
51 1 2 195 711
26 ... . 173 957
12.......... 144 904
3 ........... 84 890
1... 1 70 998
... 1 81 1041
15 47 1135
1 21 1003
8 1125
... 4 809
4 892
3 1403
4 998
....... 1108
...... 1149



14 996 7 27 4528 21645


I I










SUPPLEMENTAL DATA
TABLE XII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF CABBAGE BY STATES AND IMPORTS FOR SEASON 1929-1930.


Week

Dec. 7.......
Dec. 14........
Dec. 21.......
Dec. 28 -...-..
Jan. 4......
Jan. 11........
Jan. 18.......
Jan. 25 ......
Feb. 1 .....
Feb. 8.......
Feb. 15........
Feb. 22........
Mar. 1 ......
Mar. 8.......
Mar. 15.......
Mar. 22........
Mar. 29 ..-..-
Apr. 5 .......
Apr. 12........
Apr. 19 .......
Apr. 26 .....-
May 3 .....
May 10.......
May 17 .......


Total .


NEW CROP
Domestic

Ending I Fla. ITexas Cal. S. C. Ariz. Ala. I La.

. ........... 2 12 3 55 ....- .......... .. ... .... ..
............... 6 26 3 88 ... .................. ...
...... 18 36 3 21 .... .......... .......
......-... ....... 30 41 9 12 ...... .. .... ............
.-..-.. .. .... 53 184 9 28 ......... ........ ....- ..-
-- ....-.... 93 328 9 13 ......... ...... ......
................. 140 346 11 7 ............ ...... ........
--..- 112 51 18 8 ...................
...... 139 332 33 3 ... .... .......... .. ..
....... 98 262 34 .......... 2 ..... .. ........ ..
...... 127 374 40 ....... .......... ....
............. .. 148 518 45 .......... 4 ....... .. .....
..... 147 366 24 .......... 2 ..... ........ .
.... -.... .-.. 143 371 31 .......... 6 .... .
-..---... 183 273 19 ..........-...... .....
-..---- 275 294 18 7 ......................
-. ...... 157 287 15 36 ...... .........
-.-....- ..- ..-.- 154 291 26 75 ..... .......... .. ...
.--- ... 106 213 29 289 .......... ............
................ 79 238 51 408 .... 9 3 ..
...... ..... 26 108 42 407 ........ 56 18
..-- 15 109 58 641 ........ 137 35
.... 10 58 69 313 ............. 131 35
....... 1 4 94 170 ......... 175 45


............2... 262 5122 693 2581 14 508 136


liss.






















3
73
102
246


424


N. C. I Ark. )Tenn.



-------. ------ .. .. .
......... ......... .........
......... .......... .........








1............ .. .....
33... ...........
.......... ......... ...........
.......... ........ ...........


......... ......... ..........






---------- -------.. ...... .



42 2 ....
71 5 5


156 7 5


S importsl
Total Total
Other Do- Im-
Va. States mestic Cuba ports

......... .......... 72 ...... ..........
........ -- 123 ....- ........
---- -- - 78 ........ ..........
... ....... 92 ......... ........
. .......... 274 ........ ........
--..- 443 ....... ... ...
504 ......... .........
.- .. .....- 189 ........ ........
. --.. -. .. 507 ...... .......
-.. -. -. 396 ...... .........
...... .. ... 541 ........ ..........
-- .- -.-.. 715...........
.-..- .. -.- ..... 539 ..... .-.....-
. 551 .......... ........
. .. 475 .... .....
..... 594 ...... ...
S.......... 495 3 3
.- ..... -.- 546 ..... ..-.
--..-- ...... 637 ......... ....
... .788 ..........
....... 670 ........... ......
...... ... 1101 ....... ...
.-....... 762 ......... ..
121 5 942.........


121 5 12034 3 3


Total
New
Crop

72
123
78
92
274
443
504
189
507
396
541
715
539
551
475
594
498
546
637
788
670
1101
762
942


12037


-L------








SUPPLEMENTAL DATA
TABLE XII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF CABBAGE BY STATES AND IMPORTS
FOR SEASON 1929-1930-Continued.


STORED CROP


Week Ending I Colo.

17 ...4 ..- 3
1 4 ---- ---- ---- ---... --------- ----------..
21... .................
28 .............................. ...... ...
4 ..- -........ ........ ....
18 ......... ...... ......... ....... .

5 .............. ............... .........
S..................... .... ........
15 ........... .... ..............
15 ......... ...........................
22.....................................

22 .............................. ............
2 .....-............. .........
5 .............. ...............-

12 ........................... ... ..........
19 ............-.......................
26 ..............- ..--.....---- .......
29 .............- --- ------ --------

19 .... --- ..-- .......

26. .. .... . ...........
3 ........ ---- -.. - ---------- -..
1 .... ............... ..............
17 ........- ...............


Total .................... 3
I


Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Mar.
Mar.
Mar.
Mar.
Mar.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
May
May
May


Me. I Mich.

2 1
2 4
1 6
2 3
1 12
14
........... 14
..... 13
-----------. 6
6
8
............ 8
7
4
3
.......... .......
..... ... ... ..

- --------






---------- ---------



8 81


87 4011


Ore. Penna. I Utah

5 3 2
5 15 1
1 10 1
-.. -....... 2 ...... ...""
1 10 .............

--------- 17 .....--.......
........... 8 ............
............ 6 ...........
........... 7 ........... .
...........- 2 ...........


Wash.

4
3

1

1
1
3
4


Wis.

225
205
106
105
202
211
106
71
91
56
3
2


Ohio

............

............
............







.. .........


Total
Other Stored
States Crop
- I


Minn. N. Y.

6 541
6 483
4 204
4 276
26 578
14 533
11 336
4 291
9 323
2 234
1 116
......... 59
26
........ 11
---- ---- -----------


...-- - - ........ ... . - -- - - -- . . .. . . .


1001 4 17 1383 1 1 108 5815


12
8
6
5
11
23
7
11
9
6

4
5
1

.......... -


804
733
339
398
841
816
491
394
450
312
126
68
31
12


----------- -- ---------- -----------


'


I


Total
New and
Stored
Crop

876
856
417
490
1115
1259
995
583
957
708
667
783
570
563
475
594
498
546
637
788
670
1101
762
842


17852


-
.











TABLE XIII. WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF CELERY BY STATES FOR 1925.


Week Ending


3 .......................
10.------
10..........................
17.........................
24.......... ....... ...
31................ .....
7. -................
14 .....................
21....................
28 .... .............
7-..........-...............
14 ......................
21............- ........
28.......... .............
4.......................
11.......................
18..........................
5-.- ---------.

25.....................
2......................
9 .......................
16 ....................
23.- .................
30 .....................
6......................
13..... --................
20 ........................


Total ................


Total
New
Crop


ch.


I STORED CROP_

I I Other
N. Y. Mich. State


NEW CROP

Fla. Cal.


9 214
118 352
204 273
303 157
304 91
331 81
394 83
491 106
566 87
419 104
442 89
589 86
562 67
374 22
483 10
420 .......
409 18
405 39
419 57
278 35
138 39
122 50
70 54
31 47
5 40


7886 2201


La. Mil



------------....__.....
.. ....... .... .. ... .....
..-.............. ... ... .

.. ....... ... .. ..
...... .... .. .. .......


................ ...

.................. .........

................... I.
.................. .........
................. ....... ..


................. .........
................ .........
.. . ................ .
............................




1


1
1


Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Mar.
Mar.
Mar.
Mar.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
May
May
May
May
May
June
June
June


S. ........ ....... .. ...
. 675 .......
.... 629 ----- --
--.... 396 ....
.... 493 .-.--.--. ---... ......--
- ...... 420-- ------
......... 427 ...... .. .. ..
.... .. 444 ......... ..... ..
... 476 ..
...- 313 ..

-.... 172 .................................
........ 78 ...--
-..------ 78 .. ---- .............. ..............
1 47 ................ .......... -....


1 10089 504 2 2


Total
Stored
Crop


202
197
72
27
4
5

1


508


Total
New and
Stored
Crop


10597


201
194
72
27
4
5

1


2


.








TABLE XIV.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF CELERY BY STATES AND IMPORTS FOR 1926.


NEW CROP
DOMESTIC


Week Ending Fla. Cal.

Jan. 16 ............................ 36 540
Jan. 23 ....................... ... 100 278
Jan. 30 ....... .......... ....... 73 164
Feb. 6 .......... ..... .... .... 152 52
Feb. 13 ........................... 179 148
Feb. 20 ......................... .. 267 107
Feb. 27 ........................... 368 173
M ar. 6 .............................. 353 131
Mar. 13 ......................... 281 109
M ar. 20 ............................. 442 69
Mar. 27 ............. .... ...... 441 32
Apr. 3 ............... .... 473 40
Apr. 10 ............ ..- .. .. 478 8
Apr. 17 ...................... 675 25
Apr. 24 ..-.................. 424 38
May 1 ....................... 1 180 64
M ay 8 ........... ..... .... 115 21
May 15 ......... .......... 105 13
May 22.... -.....-- 96 26
May 29 ........... ............. 127 73
June 5 ..............- 42 69
June 12 ................... 19 66
June 19 .--.. .......... . ............ 75
June 26 .......--...... ..... 1 93


Total .............I 5427 2414


2.1ch.:::l

- - - -



- - - -


Total
Do-
N. Y. metic

... ... 576
... 378
.. 237
........ 204
.....- 327
.. 374
.. 541
. 484
..... 390
511
.- 473
S513
....-.... 486
.. 700
..- ....- 462
244
..-- 136
..- 118
. 122
..- 200
111
.. 85
.. 75
3 100


3 7847


Imports I
1Total
_ Bermuda Imports
-------Y- -


..... .......... . .......
1------.--------- -------.----
(-------------- (-----.-

...-------------- ---..-------
l -------- ---- -- -------- --
1---------------- --------
1 -------- ------- ----.--------
/---- --------- -- /------------
---- --- ... ........ .



I---- ----------- --- ------
..------ ------ -----------




--------------- 1-----------
(---- --------- -
1------ -----------
-------------- (------- -
I: : : : : ; : : : : : : :



I: : : : : : : ; I: : : : : :


S 85
14 89
....... 100


14 7861


STORED CROP


Mich.

4
2


N. Y.

162
93
45
7


Total
Stored
Crop

167
95
45
8


Other
States

1


1

1














-- - - -


Total
New and
Stored
Crop

743
473
282
212
327
375
541
484
390
511
473
513
486
700
462
244
136
118
122
200
111
85
89
100


8177


S307
6 / 307 |


3 316











TABLE XV.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF CELERY BY STATES AND IMPORTS FOR 1927.
1 1 1


NE.W LUKCR


Week Ending


DOMESTIC
( Fla. I Cal.


8 ................-.. 23
15 ..............-.. 143
22 --.............. 217
29 ...... .... ...... 301
5 .. ............ 357
12 ................-- 413
19 ............... 492
26 .............. 492
. 5 .......... ...... 501
. 12 ---............. 561
. 19 ....... ........ 724
. 26 ... ............. 557
S 2 ...............- 386
9 -................ 430
S16 ..-... .... 427
S23 -...- .........- 301
.30 ............. 191
S 7 .................... 199
S14 ................. 159
y 21 ............... 110
S28 --.....-........ 127
e 4 ................... 54
e 11 ... .......... 32
e 18 ............... 7


Total ............... 7204
1


Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Mar
Mar
Mar
Mar
Apr
Apr
Apr
Apr
Apr
Ma3
May
May
May
Jun
Jun
Jun


N. Y. Texas


..............
.. .....








.............

............ .



...








1
--------
._ - - -
- - - -- -

- -- -- - -


..............
..............
..............
..............

..............
... -





------

..........
. ....... ..





............
............


1


I1


Total Imports
Do- I Bermuda Total
mestic I Bermudal Imports


11644


.- - --------------
...... -- ---..... ---.- -
---- --- _-I
.............. ..............




.. -- . ----------.
..............--.............


I-- -----------------

-----------I-- -----------
------ --------------
......................




1 1

13 13
42 42
38 38
56 56
32 32


182 182


Total
New
Crop

455
870
733
700
552
531
526
763
696
744
971
700
460
528
508
347
287
362
279
198
215
130
146
125


11826


85


4438


Mich.

17
10
11
8
3
1
1



----. ...-.


N.Y.

246
152
92
29
15
1


Other
States








1
1


Total
Stored
Crop

263
162
103
37
18
2
1
1
1


STORED CROP


. . ..... ..............
-- ---... .. . ...........
. . . . ..............
. . ..... .......I.......
. . ..... ...... - -.. _
. .............. ........... .
. . . ..............
. . ..... ......... .
. .............. ...........
- -------------- ------ -- ----
S........ I..... ..............
............... ....... ..
. ... -.--- ..... .............



535 2


'- --


I
| Mch
j7




10


Total
New and
Stored

718
1032
836
737
570
533
527
764
697
744
971
700
460
528
508
347
287
362
279
198
215
130
146
125


12414






TABLE XVI.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF CELERY BY STATES AND IMPORTS FOR SEASON 1927-1928.


NEW CROP


[ S T O RE D C R O P


Domestic

Week Ending Fla.

D ec. 17 ......... ..... 4
Dec. 24 ............. 2
D ec. 31 .......... ..... 17
Jan. 7 ......... 57
Jan. 14 ........ ... 174
Jan. 21 ...... 251
Jan. 28 ..... 250
Feb. 4 ....... .... .. 319
Feb. 11 ... ...-- 466
Feb. 18 ........- .....- 447
Feb. 25 ... ............. 633
Mar. 3 ............. 533
Mar. 10 ........... 557
Mar. 17 ......... 616
M ar. 24 ... ............ 541
Mar. 31 .--------.. 513
Apr. 7 ...-- 404
Apr. 14 ........... 490
Apr. 21 ......... 494
Apr. 28 ............. 329
May 5 .............. 378
May 12 ..... ........ 270
May 19 ............ .. 162
May 26 ..... ......-- 146
June 2-- ........ 126
June 9 ....... ....... 153
June 16 ....... ... I- 32
June 23 -..... ..-.... 5
Total .......... 8369


Cal.

447
365
219
575
77q


I Imports
Mih. Domtali Bermuda
Mich. Domestic Bermuda I


.. 451
S-- .... 367
.----... 236
... 632
...- 953
714
684
--- 566
... 642
..- 622
.----...- 775
.. 672
..--. ... 733
--.. 825
.. .. .. 752
............. 606
-.. 503
...- 585.
... 543
..... 412
..- .... 573
-. .... 419
..... .... 250
....-- ... 274
............ 265
265
... 263
........... 133
1 126
1 (14576


1
4
10
16
27
41
44
42
48
16

249


I


Total
Total New
Imports Crop Mich.

... 451 19
...... 367 15
.-...- .. 236 8
...... 632 5
953 1
........ 714 ..... ....
684 ...
566 ...
642 ... ..
I ----- 622 .
...... . 775 ..
672 ..- ..
733 .... ..-
825
............ 525
--.---------- 7 52 ----- -.- .--- --
..... 606 .. .-
-.....- 503 ............. ..
1 586 ...- ..- .
4 547 ... ...... ..
10 422 ....- ... .
16 589 ....- ..... .
27 446 ......- .
41 291 ............. .
44 318 ..............
42 | 307 .............
48 311 ........... .
16 149 -...........
............ 126 ...........
249 |14825 48


i.....


N. Y.

478
269
258
223
181
62
37
12


Other
Utah States

1 2
.............. 1



2
. --... -. .. 1
............. 3
......-.... 2..
............. 1
.............. 2

.-..-........ 1

















. I 15
-----------.. --------------
---------- -. --.... -----


6206


--~~I--


Total
Stored

500
285
266
229
185
64
38
14

2
1


















1584
-.----------.--











1584. .


Total
New and
Stored
Crop

951
652
502
861
1138
778
722
580
642
624
776
672
733
825
752
606
503
586
547
422
589
446
291
318
307
311
149
126
16409


------------





1520....











TABLE XVII.-WEEKLY SUMMARY OF CAR-LOT SHIPMENTS OF CELERY BY STATES AND IMPORTS FOR 1929.

NEW CROP I STORED CROP
Domestic I Im- I I Domestic I m-
Sports e 1 I ports Total
-- New
Total Total I Total I Total Total Total | and
Do- Ber- [ Im- I New Other Do- Can- Im- Stored I Stored
Week Ending l Fla. Cal. Ore. Md. 1 Mich. mestic muda ports Crop N.Y. Ohio Utah States mestic ada ports Crop Crop


n. 12 ...............
n. 19 ................
n. 26 ...............
b. 2 ...............
b. 9 ...........
b. 16 .........- ....
b. 23 ................
ir. 2 .............
ir. 9 ..............
r. 16 ........... -
r. 23 ................
.r. 30 ........... ..
r. 6 .........- ....
r. 13 .-... ..... .
r. 20 ............
r. 27 ......... ....
y 4 ..............
y 11 .............
y 18 ............
y 25...............
ne 1 ...-...........
ne 8 .............
ne 15 ..............
ne 22 ...............
ne 29 ...............


.... .... .. . ... ....
.. .. ....I ..... ......... 1

.......... ..... I..... .... .....
---------- -.. .. .. .....



-------------
-- ---------- .....
-.. . ------- .. ..........
.......... I........ . . .





----. --- --- -... . ........
-------- ------- ---... .........
..... ..... .......... ... ...

-- --. --- -- - -.. . --- .....

.......... .......... ........
I ~ ~ .. ........ ..........
--- -------- ... ...

21 1 19


742
667
731
698
602
897
903
880
823
199
1061
857
689
794
466
339
5831
627,
311
255
164
133
117
213
141


88711 4998j 3j 1! 19113892


......... -.........
----------- --- -....











2 2
31 3
151 15
20 20
501 50
461 46
551 55
73 73
71 7
12| 12
21 2

2861 286
- ---- ---- .. ...
---------- ... ...
-- - - --. .
---------- ---- ----


742 100 2 1
667 50 1 .........
73 35 1 ..........
698 19 ........ .....
602 4 ......... ...
897 1 ........ ..........
903 ..--..... ....-.. ---
8801 1 ... ...- I...-
823! 11 ....... ..-
199 ...... ..- -... .
1061 ................. -...
857 .... .... .....-
6891 ..... ..- .... I.. ..... ..
7956 .-... ....- --. -.....
4681 ...... . .... .....


Jal
Jai
Jai
Fe!
Fe
Fe
Fel
Ma
Ma
Ma
Ma
Ma
Ap
Ap
Ap
Ap
Ma
Ma
Ma
Ma
Jui
Ju
Ju
Ju:
Ju:


731
541
470
317
153
252
183
1951
177|
144
106
101
120
163
78
26
149
219
99
116
113
110
111
208
116


11
126
2611
381
449
645
720
685
646!
55
955
756
5691
631
388
313
434
408
212!
139!
51
23

4
3'


--_---------
..........
............







41 1


.... 103 ....... ...... ... 103 845
-.-- 51....-.......- 51 718
36 ...... ....... 36! 767
1 201......- ..... .. 20, 718
-...-4. 4 ..... ........ 4 606
1 2 1 1 3 900
-- 903
1! 2 ------ 2 882
11 2 ....... ....... 2 825
----....-.......... 199
--- ..........1 ---- I .. ................ 1061
3 3! ------ 3 860
........-- I... .. ....... 689
---.... -(. ....- ................ 795
..-.......--. ......... ... .......-......... 468
-..----........... .... ........ 342
........--- ....... 598
647
-------- ----- ----- 361
---I....----- ..-.----... ... ...... 301
.. --.. -. -- -.. - - -... .... 219
-.-... -.-. .. ...... 2 06
......-- --.. ----.----- ---------- 124
I. .1. 2.. .. 225
.. ...... --- ... .. 143

1 71 223! 11 1! 22-414402


3421
598|-
6471
3611..
3011-
219 -
206.-
124.
225.
143


2111


1143781


Total .......


I;


-[




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