• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Abstract
 Title Page
 Center information
 Table of Contents
 List of Tables
 List of Figures
 Acknowledgement
 Introduction
 The region's economy, commercial...
 Conclusion
 Appendix
 Reference
 Additional information sources






Group Title: Industry report - University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station ; no. 79-2 (
Title: Commercial fishing activity and facility needs in Florida
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 Material Information
Title: Commercial fishing activity and facility needs in Florida Okaloosa and Santa Rosa counties
Uniform Title: Commercial fishing activity and facility needs in Florida
Alternate Title: Industry report - University of Florida. Florida Agricultural Market Research Center ; 78-5
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Mathis, Kay
Cato, James C.
Degner, Robert L.
Landrum, Paul D.
Prochaska, Fred J.
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Market Research Center, Unviersity of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1978
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
Florida -- Okaloosa
Florida -- Santa Rosa
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027569
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Abstract
        Abstract
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Center information
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
    List of Tables
        Page iii
    List of Figures
        Page iv
    Acknowledgement
        Page v
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    The region's economy, commercial fishing and the seafood industry
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Conclusion
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Appendix
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Reference
        Page 22
    Additional information sources
        Page 23
        Page 24
Full Text



INDUSTRY REPORT 78-5


\ ':. : .,*





COMMERCIAL FISHING

ACTIVITY AND FACILITY

NEEDS IN FLORIDA:

OKALOOSA AND

SANTA ROSA COUNTIES


JULY, 1978














ABSTRACT


Information on the economies and the commercial seafood industries of
the counties covered here was obtained from published reports and from a
mail survey of commercial fishermen and seafood dealers. Total seafood
landings in the two counties were valued at $668,133 in 1971. By 1976,
landings in all three counties were over $.8 million. Over 127 people
were engaged in commercial fishing in 1977. Seventeen firms were register-
ed as dealers. Fishermen noted several improvements they felt were needed
in facilities and services at the landing areas used.


Key words: commercial fishing, seafood port development, port
facilities and services.


This research was supported in part by a grant from
the Gulf and South Atlantic Fisheries
Development Foundation, Inc., under contract 03-01-24000






















COMMERCIAL FISHING ACTIVITY AND FACILITY NEEDS IN FLORIDA:
OKALOOSA AND SANTA ROSA COUNTIES












A Report by
Kary Mathis, James C. Cato, Robert L. Degner
Paul D. Landrum and Fred J. Prochaska














a research project conducted for the
Gulf and South Atlantic Fisheries
Development Foundation, Inc.




July 1978
The Florida Agricultural Market Research Center
a part of
The Food and Resource Economics Department
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida, Gainesville, 32611


















The Florida Agricultural Market Research Center

A Service of
the Food and Resource Economics Department
of the
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences



The purpose of this Center is to provide timely, applied

research on current and emerging marketing problems affecting

Florida's agricultural and marine industries. The Center seeks

to provide research and information to production, marketing,

and processing firms, groups and organizations concerned with

improving and expanding markets for Florida agricultural and

marine products.

The Center is staffed by a basic group of economists trained

in agriculture and marketing. In addition, cooperating personnel

from other IFAS units provide a wide range of expertise which can

be applied as determined by the requirements of individual projects.


















TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

LIST OF TABLES....................................................... iii

LIST OF FIGURES...................................................... iv

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS............................... ...................... v

SUMMARY.............................................................. iv

INTRODUCTION........................................................... 1

THE REGION'S ECONOMY, COMMERCIAL FISHING AND THE SEAFOOD INDUSTRY...... 4

CONCLUSIONS ............................................................ 14

APPENDIX............................................................. 17

REFERENCES ........................................................ 22

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION SOURCES....................................... 23

















LIST OF TABLES


Table Page

1 Florida counties with fish and shellfish landings in excess
of $1 million, 1976, state ranking and major ports............... 3

2 Population, total and by race, Okaloosa and Santa Rosa Counties,
1940, 1950, 1960, 1970, 1976, and projected 1980, 1990, 2000..... 4

3 Personal income per capital, Florida and selected counties, 1950,
1965, 1970 and 1975........................................... 4

4 Volume and values of fish and shellfish landings in Okaloosa
County, 1971-1976............................................ 5

5 Volume and values of fish and shellfish landings in Santa Rosa
County, 1971-1976............................................ 8

6 Values of major species landed by commercial fishermen in Okaloosa
and Santa Rosa Counties, 1976.................................... 9

7 Questionnaire dispositions and responses, fisherman survey,
Okaloosa and Santa Rosa Counties............................... 10

8 Questionnaires mailed and responses or dispositions, dealer
survey, Okaloosa and Santa Rosa Counties *-................. ...... 11

9 Classification of volume of fish and shellfish sold by commercial
fishermen in Okaloosa and Santa Rosa Counties, 1976............. 11

10 Distance from home-to-port and from port-to-fishing grounds,
commercial fishermen in Okaloosa and Santa Rosa Counties, 1977... 12

11 Landing places used by commercial fishermen in Okaloosa and Santa
Rosa Counties, 1977............................................ 13

12 Use and rating of port facilities by active commercial fishermen
in Okaloosa County, 1977......................................... 15

13 Use and rating of port facilities by active commercial fishermen
in Santa Rosa County, 1977 ...................................... 16
















LIST OF FIGURES


Figure Page

1 Value of fish and shellfish landings by county in Florida, 1976... 2

2 Volume and value of seafood landings in Okaloosa County, 1971-
1976............................................................ 6

3 Volume and value of seafood landings in Santa Rosa County, 1971-
1976............................................................ 7














ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


Many people are due thanks for their help in the seafood port study

and in preparing this publication and the others in the series. Financial

support from the Gulf and South Atlantic Fisheries Development Fondation,

Inc., and assistance from its Executive Director, Dr. Roger Anderson, are

much appreciated. The Coastal Plains Regional Development Commission is

the ultimate source of funds partially supporting this study, and Mr.

Stanford Beebe, Program Director for Marine Resources, is to be thanked.

Mr. Bob Jones of the Southeastern Fisheries Association provided

invaluable assistance, for which we are all grateful. The Florida Depart-

merit oF Natural Resources was most helpful with a great deal of valuable

information.

Extension Marine Agents Jeffery Fisher and Joseph Halusky were valuable

advisers throughout this project. Ms. Patricia Beville and Mrs. Carol Beran

provided the secretarial and statistical work in an outstanding manner.

Several other career service employees of the Food and Resource Economics

Department spent many hours preparing and mailing questionnaires.

Finally, all the Florida fishermen and seafood dealers who took the

time to complete questionnaires and add comments have our thanks.















COMMERCIAL FISHING ACTIVITY AND FACILITY NEEDS IN FLORIDA:
OKALOOSA AND SANTA ROSA COUNTIES

Kary Mathis, James C. Cato, Robert L. Degner,
Paul D. Landrum and Fred J. Prochaska


INTRODUCTION


The commercial seafood industry is an important source of income and
employment along Florida's extensive coastline. Values of marine landings
for coastal counties are shown in Figure 1. Of the 35 coastal counties in
Florida, 18 had seafood landings of $1 million or more in 1976. There are
however, relatively few major seafood ports, and all of these are in counties
with $1 million or more in landings values (Table 1). Even though the re-
maining counties have substantial volumes of seafood and significant numbers
of fishermen, port and landing facilities are often limited. These limita-
tions and other restrictions may hamper the seafood industry in these areas.
This publication is one of a series of four which reports analysis of
data from published sources and from surveys of commercial fishermen and
seafood dealers in nine counties with no major commercial fishing ports.
This series includes Citrus, Clay, Dixie, Levy, Okaloosa, Putnam, St. Johns,
Santa Rosa and Taylor Counties (see reference list). The research reported
here was done as a part of a larger project concerned with the feasibility
of seafood industrial port development in Florida. Results of the more
detailed study will be reported in a separate publication.
Two general subject areas are covered in this report economic and
social characteristics, and key aspects of the commercial fishing industry.
Relevant published data and previous studies were used for the first area
and part of the second. A major part of the information on the commercial
seafood industry came from questionnaires completed by commercial fishermen
and seafood dealers in the respective counties.


Kary Mathis, James C. Cato and Fred J. Prochaska are associate pro-
fessors, Robert L. Degner is assistant professor and Paul D. Landrum is
assistant research scientist in food and resource economics, University of
Florida.




































I = Over $2,000,000

= $1,000,000 to $2,000,000

= $500,000 to $1,000,000

-- = Less than $500,000


Figure 2.--Value of fish and shellfish landings by county in Florida, 1976.












The remainder of the report is organized into two major sections. The
first describes the economic environment of the counties, including the re-
lative importance of the seafood industry. The first section also discusses
the counties seafood industries, giving volume and value of landings. Find-
ings from the mail survey are also reported. The conclusions are presented
in the second and final section.


Table l.--Florida counties with fish and shellfish landings in excess of
$1 million, 1976, state ranking and major ports.

Value of landings Overall
County Fish Shellfish Total state ranking
---------------$1,000o-------------
Bay 3,247 1,790 5,037 5
Brevard 1,120 1,496 2,616 9
Citrus-Pasco 471 1,018 1,489 14
Collier 666 732 1,398 15
Dade 520 2,463 2,984 7
Duval 687 1,702 2,388 10
Escambia 927 1,752 2,679 8
Franklin 431 7,837 8,268 3
Gulf 305 865 1,170 17
Hillsborough 107 2,933 3,103 6
Lee 3,434 9,284 12,718 2
Manatee 1,350 298 1,648 13
Martin 1,013 3 1,016 18
Monroe 3,640 19,965 23,605 1
Nassau 213 1,733 1,946 12
Pinellas 2,169 3,070 5,239 4
St. Lucie 2,353 12 2,365 11
Volusia 662 592 1,254 16


Source: Florida Department
Marine Landings, 1976.


of Natural Resources, Summary


of Commercial













THE REGION'S ECONOMY, COMMERCIAL FISHING AND
THE SEAFOOD INDUSTRY

Okaloosa and Santa Rosa Counties have both experienced tremendous
population growth in the past several decades. Okaloosa's population
increased from 27,562 in 1950 to 104,356 in 1976, and Santa Rosa's increased
from 18,554 in 1950 to 49,368 in 1976 (Table 2). Population projections
indicate substantial increases are likely in the decades ahead. Okaloosa
County's population is expected to exceed 144,000 and Santa Rosa's should
surpass 80,000 by the year 2000 (Table 2).


Table 2.--Population, total and by race, Okaloosa and Santa Rosa Counties,
1940, 1950, 1960, 1970, 1976, and projected 1980, 1990, 2000.

Year Okaloosa Santa Rosa


1940 12,900 16,085
1950 27,562 18,554
1960 61,175 29,547
1970 88,187 37,741
1976 104,356 49,368
Projected
1980 108,600 55,100
1990 124,900 69,300
2000 144,600 80,200


Source: Bureau of the Census, Bureau of Economic and Business Research.


Table 3.--Personal income per capital, Florida
1965, 1970 and 1975.


and selected counties, 1950,


State and county 1950 1965 1970 1975

-----------------Dollars----------------
Florida 1,280 2,404 3,738 5,640
Okaloosa 1,362 2,030 3,032 4,488
Santa Rosa 893 2,084 3,145 4,531

Source: Bureau of Economic and Business Research.







5


Personal incomes in both counties have increased substantially in the
past 10 years, but they are still low relative to the state average. In
1975, personal income per capital was approximately $4,500 in both counties,
about 80 percent of the state average (Table 3).
Commercial fishing is a relatively small contributor to employment
and incomes in both counties. About 92 people are directly engaged in
commercial fishing in Okaloosa County and 35 in Santa Rosa. These estimates
include both full-time and part-time fishermen, but do not include those
employed in fish houses and fishing related jobs such as crab-picking and
other shore services.
Seafood landings as reported by the Florida Department of Natural
Resources show considerable year to year variation in landings for both
counties, but there is no apparent long-term trend in landings in either
county. From 1971 through 1976 the total value of landings in Okaloosa
County has ranged from about $610,000 to $921,000 and has averaged slightly
over three-quarters of a million dollars (Table 4, Figure 2).
The total value of landings in Santa Rosa county during the same
period has been considerably less. The value of landings ranged from about
$44,000 to $73,000 and have averaged about $56,000 (Table 5, Figure 3).
Fish landings have increased in importance while there has been a decline
in the total quantity and value of shellfish in Santa Rosa County.

Table 4.--Volume and values of fish and shellfish landings in Okaloosa
County, 1971-1976.

Fish Shellfish Total
Year Pounds Dollars Pounds Dollars Pounds Dollars

1971 2,575,434 521,849 141,021 87,923 2,716,455 609,772
1972 2,666,557 543,220 226,941 205,607 2,893,498 748,827
1973 2,127,563 486,519 221,916 218,973 2,349,479 705,492
1974 1,802,791 463,133 303,607 282,419 2,106,398 745,552
1975 2,488,560 611,239 267,522 309,694 2,756,082 920,933
1976 2,026,380 589,732 151,447 212,875 2,177,827 802,107


Source: Florida Department of Natural Resources, Summary of Florida
Commercial Marine Landings, 1971-1976.


















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Table 5.--Volume and Values of Fish and Shellfish landings in Santa
Rosa County, 1971-1976.


Fish Shellfish Total
Year Pounds Dollars Pounds Dollars Pounds Dollars

1971 144,198 16,895 72,111 41,466 216,309 58,361
1972 173,111 22,319 44,366 21,596 217,477 43,915
1973 240,044 33,925 38,744 25,426 278,788 59,351
1974 285,092 43,711 44,000 28,907 329,092 72,618
1975 234,375 40,600 24,746 14,103 259,121 54,703
1976 157,078 37,402 20,729 8,655 177,807 46,057

Source: Florida Department of Natural Resources, Summary of
Florida Commercial Marine Landings, 1971-1976.

The major fish species landed in Okaloosa County in 1976 was red
snapper, which accounted for about 50 percent of the total value of fish
landings. Other important species included black mullet, grouper, scamp,
cigar fish, blue runner, croaker, and spotted sea trout, but none accounted
for as much as 10 percent of the total value (Table 6). The value of
Okaloosa County's shellfish landings is comprised almost exclusively of
shrimp. In 1976 shrimp landings were valued at approximately $211,000 of
the $213,000 total shellfish landings, or over 99 percent. Blue crab
landings were valued at $1,000 and all other species slightly under $700
(Table 6).
The major fish species landed in Santa Rosa County in 1976 was black
mullet, which accounted for 41 percent of the value of fish landings.
Spotted sea trout and croaker contributed 17 and 15 percent of the total
value, respectively. Red snapper landings comprised about 3 percent of
the value and grouper and scamp about 1 percent. All other species com-
bined the remaining 23 percent.
The mail survey conducted during the Fall of 1977 provided considerable
insight into fishing industry problems in Okaloosa and Santa Rosa Counties.
Questionnaires were mailed to all resident sin both counties having a 1975
commercial boat registration with the Florida Department of Natural Resources
and to all seafood dealers registered by the National Maring Fisheries
Service in 1975. Copies of the questionnaires used are in the Appendix.











Table 6.--Values of major species landed by commercial fishermen in
Okaloosa and Santa Rosa Counties, 1976.

Fish Shellfish
Value Value
Species Okaloosa Santa Rosa Species Okaloosa Santa Rosa

Red snapper 297,211 1,293 Shrimp 211,154 0

Black mullet 52,748 15,195 Bait shrimp 0 5,676

Blue runner 28,576 0 Blue crabs 1,057 2,935

Grouper,
scamp 43,091 426 All other
species 664 44

Cigarfish 38,347 0

Croaker 20,561 5,643

Spotted sea-
trout 9,043 6,348

All other
species 99,655 8,497


Total 589,232 37,402 212,875 8,655


Source: Florida Department of
Commercial Marine Landings, 1976.


Natural Resources, Summary of Florida


Questionnaires were sent to 173 Okaloosa County residents with commercial
boat registrations. Sixty-two responded, and slightly more than half were
still actively engaged in commercial fishing. It was assumed that people
who did not return the questionnaire were or were not actively commercial
fishing in the same proportions as those completing the survey. The per-
centage still fishing was multiplied times the total number of boat registra-
tions to provide the estimate of total active commercial fishermen. Based
on these returns, an estimated 92 people in Okaloosa County fish commercially,
either full or part time (Table 7). Two of the five registered Okaloosa
County seafood dealers responded (Table 8). Questionnaires were mailed to
122 Santa Rosa County residents with commercial boat registrations and 38
responded. Only 11, slightly less than one-third, were actively engaged in
commercial fishing. Thus, it is estimated that about 35 Santa Rosa County








10



Table 7.--Questionnaire dispositions and responses, fisherman survey,
Okaloosa and Santa Rosa Counties.

Disposition or County
response Okaloosa Santa Rosa

Number Percent Number Percent

Total mailed 178 100 122 100

Returned, unable to
deliver 29 17 16 13

Individuals receiving
questionnaires 144 83 106 87


Individuals receiving
questionnaires 144 100 106 100

Questionnaires not
returned 82 57 68 64

Questionnaires returned 62 43 38 36


Questionniares returned 62 100 38 100

No longer in businessa 29 47 27 71

Still in business 33 53 11 29


Estimatedbactive commercial
fishermen 92 --- 35

aNot fishing commercially but had commercial boat registration in 1975.

bEstimate is based on the proportion of respondents still in business
and the total number mailed, i.e., the total 1975 commercial boat registrants.

residents fish commercially (Table 7). Only one of the five Santa Rosa County
seafood dealers registered in 1975 returned his questionnaire, and he was no
longer in business (Table 8).
About three-fourths of the Okaloosa County fishermen sell less than
5,000 pounds of fish annually, and 57 percent sell less than 5,000 pounds
of shellfish. Almost a fourth of them sell more than 25,000 pounds of fish
and about a fifth sell more than 10,000 pounds of shellfish per year (Table 9).







11



Table 8.--Questionnaires mailed and responses or dispositions, dealer survey,
Okaloosa and Santa Rosa Counties.

Disposition or County
response Okaloosa Santa Rosa

Number Percent Number Percent

Total mailed 7 100 5 100

Returned, unable to
deliver 2 29 1 20

Individuals receiving
questionnaires 5 71 4 80

Individuals receiving
questionnaires 5 100 4 100

Questionnaires not
returned 3 60 3 75

Questionnaires returned 2 40 1 25





Table 9.--Classification of commercial fishermen in Okaloosa and Santa Rosa
Counties by volume of fish and shellfish sold, 1976.

Fishermen selling
Fish Shellfish
Pounds sold Okaloosa Santa Rosa Okaloosa Santa Rosa

Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent


Under 5,000

5,000-9,999

10,000-24,999

Over 25,000


17 74


7 78 8


3 21


0 2


4 24


8 2 67


Total 23 100 9 100 14 100 3 100


3 100


9 100 14 100


Total 23 100












In Santa Rosa County, almost 80 percent of the fishermen sell less
than 5,000 pounds per year. Only one fisherman reported fish sales in
excess of 25,000 pounds. Three Santa Rosa County fishermen reported their
shellfish volume. One sold less than 5,000 pounds and two sold over
25,000 pounds (Table 9).
Fishermen in Okaloosa County live particularly close to the port or
harbor when their boats are docked. Nearly 60 percent live less than
three miles and 85 percent live less than 10 miles from their docks. Santa
Rosa County fishermen tended to live slightly further away. About half
lived within 6 miles, but 4 of 10 lived over 10 miles from their usual
port (Table 10).
Almost 65 percent of the Okaloosa fishermen travel less than 10 miles
from their port to their usual fishing grounds, and 90 percent stay within
50 miles of their ports. Half of the Santa Rosa County fishermen venture
less than 25 miles of their ports, but 2 of the 10 reportly travel over 75
miles to their usual fishing grounds (Table 10).

Table 10.--Distance from home to port and from port to fishing grounds,
commercial fishermen in Okaloosa and Santa Rosa Counties, 1977.

Home-to-port Port-to-Fishing grounds
Miles Fishermen Miles Fishermen
Number Percent Number Percent
Okaloosa
Under 1 7 24 10 or less 18 64
1-3 10 34 11-25 4 14
4-6 3 10 26-50 4 14
7-10 5 17 51-75 1 4
Over 10 4 15 Over 75 1 4

Total 29 100 Total 28 100

Santa Rosa
Under 1 2 20 10 or less 3 30
1-3 0 0 11-25 2 20
4-6 3 30 26-50 3 30
7-10 1 10 51-75 0 0
Over 10 4 40 Over 75 2 20

Total 10 100 Total 10 100











Usual landing plans were given by most fishermen surveyed. The
majority of Okaloosa fishermen dock at Nicevi'lle, and a sizeable number
at Destin. Other locations given included Fort Walton Beach, Navarre, and
Valparaiso (Table 11). Most Santa Rosa County fishermen operate out of
Pensacola, but several mentioned East Bay and Milton as well (Table 11).

Table ll.--Landing places used by commercial fishermen in Okaloosa and
Santa Rosa Counties, 1977.

Okaloosa Santa Rosa
Landing Landing
places Fishermen places Fishermen

Niceville 16 Pensacola 6
Destin 6 East Bay 1
Ft. Walton Beach 3 Milton 1
Navarre 2
Valparaiso 1

Total 28 8



Active fishermen were asked to note which facilities and services they
used in their usual port and then asked to rate each as to whether each was
satisfactory or in need of improvement. Fishermen were also asked to indicate
which of the facilities or services they would use if made available or
improved (see questionnaire in Appendix).
Okaloosa County fishermen use a broad range of facilities and services,
but the most commonly used are fish ice houses and fuel sales. An
additional one-fourth of the fishermen indicated that they would use a
meeting room, gear supply and repair services, docking, and ice house facilities
if made available or improved.
As far as needed improvements, the greatest number of fishermen said
ice house facilities were needed in Fort Walton and Niceville. Existing
facilities,where available, were said to be in need of improvement by
fishermen. Others suggested that fuel and marine railway service and fish
and shrimp houses be improved (Table 12).
Santa Rosa County fishermen also utilize many different types of port
facilities. Fish houses, ice and fuel sales and electronics services and













docking were the items most commonly used. Only a very limited number
indicated that they would use various facilities if improvements were
made. All fishermen that currently use ice house facilities said obtaining
ice was a major problem and needed improvement. Others said docking
facilities, fuel sales, and fish house facilities needed improvement
(Table 13).


CONCLUSIONS

Commercial fishing and seafood processing, or wholesaling is a
relatively small contributor to the overall economics of Okaloosa and
Santa Rosa Counties, but to those in fishing and related activities on
either a full-time or part-time basis, it is very important. Over 90
people are directly involved in commercial fishing in Okaloosa County
and about 35 in Santa Rosa. In addition, there were 12 registered seafood
dealers in the two counties in 1975.
The value of fish and shellfish landings amounted to over $800,000
in Okaloosa County in 1976, and since 1971 has averaged slightly over
three-quarters of a million dollars per year. Santa Rosa County's total
landings have averaged to about $56,000 in value since 1971. The value
of landings in both counties was relatively stable from 1971 through 1976.
The mail survey indicated a need for improving some of the basic
facilities required by fishermen in both counties. Okaloosa County
fishermen expressed a particular need for ice house facilities, shrimp
and fish houses, fuel sales and marine railway services.
Similar needs were mentioned by fishermen in Santa Rosa County. Their
primary needs or improvements centered on ice house and docking facilities,
fish houses, and electronics, engine, and marine railway services.
Groups or individuals interested in improving conditions in the
seafood industry in these counties can use this report as a starting point
for identifying problems and possible solutions. The County Extension
Director in each county can assist groups in organizing to solve problems
and in contacting other groups and agencies for assistance. A list of
available marine economics publications are provided in the Appendix of
this publication.











Table 12.--Use and rating of port facilities by active commercial fishermen in Okaloosa County, 1977.


Facility



Shrimp house
Crab house
Oyster house
Fish house
Processing unused fish
Freszer and cold storage
Bait sales and supply
Ice house
Fuel sales
Groceries
Docking facilities
Gear storage area
Gear supply service
Gear repair service
Electronics service
Engine -epair service
Marine railway
Restaurant
Retail seafood market
Fisherman's meeting room
Solid waste disposal
Liquid waste disposal


Presently using


Number


Percent


Would use if
made available or
improved

Number :',-,. ,tb


Rating
facility


Needing
improvement


Number Numb er


Percent


8 24 10 4 40
4 12 0 0 0
9 27 3 2 67
9 27 1 0 0
4 12 9 1 11
7 21 10 4 40
5 15 9 8 89
1 3 6 0 0
2 6 7 3 43
10 30 1 1 100
4 12 4 3 75
5 15 2 2 100


a0f 62 questionnaires returned, 33 are active commercial


fishermen.


Percentage equals


Number presently
I M4 UI


using or ould uSe CPercentage eq alcome
using would s times 00. c Number indicating needs improvement
mercNumbeacive commercial fisen0. rating facility s times 100.
NumoeF active confishiecialmfishrn rating facilities










Table 13.--Use and rating of port facilities by active commercial fishermen in Santa Rosa County, 1977.


Facility


Presently using


Number


Shrimp house
Crab house
Oyster house
Fish house
Processing unused fish
Freszer and cold storage
Bait sales and supply
Ice house
Fuel sales
Groceries
Docking facilities
Gear storage area
Gear supply service
Gear repair service
Electronics service
Engine repair service
Marine railway
Restaurant
Retail seafood market
Fisherman's meeting room
Solid waste disposal
Liquid waste disposal


Percentb

27
18
0
82
.0
9
27
64
64
18
45
0
36
18
64
36
45
9
9
0
0
0


Would use if
made available or Rating Needing
improved facility improvement

ub: Percentb Number Number Percentb


a0f 38 questionnaires returned, 11 are active commercial fishermen. b


Percentage equals Number ren-ly
c \tr


using or would ims 100 ercenta deals Numr indicating needs improvement
merci-al -fishermen -ar active c cial is eating facial times 100.
mr lfhr: L"'r active com-,-ircial fish,,."ilen rating facilities times lO0.


































APPENDIX




















FLC;3S. .) S5AL OOD j

POr g5S STEDW







Dear Commercial Boat Owner:


Are commercial fishing facilities adequate in
your area? The Gulf and South Atlantic Fisheries
Development Foundation and your industry associa
tions have asked us to determine the need for new
or improved port facilities and possible locations for
them.


Your opinions are important to us. Even if you are not engaged in commercial fishing, please complete
the part of the form that pertains to you and return it to us today it will only take a few minutes Your
answers will show whether or not a commercial fishing port is needed. We are not promoting a port. but are
only asking for your views and opinions.
Your prompt attention is appreciated.
Sincerely,



Uames C. Cato
Marine Economist



ed J. Pr ha a
Marine E.(onomist

JCC:FJP:pb

A Cooperative Project of
Florida Agricultural Market Research Centei
Gulf & South Atlantic Fisheries Developmint Foundation, Inc.
Coastal Plains Regional Commission


- 0 0



eoL
Sal

&li


0Om -i -
0z
>FO
nr5i,






















COMMERCIAL FISHERMAN SURVEY
1. ou owned a comle fishlg boot n 1976 accod -g to sate Loat regs*rato. rec ords Do you rsll own one or more comnmercIal ooAts
SYes..- Please continue O No I no, please return today so we will know you received the questaonn're INO POSTACE PEQOUIRED Thakl you


2. Doyou 'se your boat for commercial t:
SYves-- Pease con-fnu
A. Ir coumn A, check and rate dle fI
B. In cBlumn B, check ohch ftacihes


hng
O No if no
-t ei and sr -,ces
o- ser-ices yl *a


please return today so we wll- know you received the questiarnaire INO POSTACE REQUORED Thank you
that you nor use


3. Check if you are also a dealer or suppler
4. What Florida post do you use mosl?


5. H-ow far Is I from you home to th s port? Ml!es
6. On tlee overage, how for is tihs port fiom your usucl f sbin
ground Mile
7 How many pound, d d you sell in 1976 CONFIDENT AL


Faciities r serve ces

1. Shrimp unload ng house

3. Oyster !huc g house
4. Fish hose
5. Processing of unused rsh
6. Bot sales and supply
7. Dockcngfaci, tes
8. Freezer and co'd stage
9. Ice house
10. Gear stage area
11. Gear supply
12. Gear reior seryvce
13. Electronics service
14. Engine epear ser-ce
15. Marine rnlwa,
16. Fuel soes
17. Crocers
18. Restaurant
19. Retail seafood market
20. Fshermns' meeting room
21. Liquid waste disposal
22. Sohd casle disposal
23. Other (hst)


Check on!'
those you uise

EO









OE
El



[El

El
El
0
0

OE
D]
D]
a]
D]
D]
a]
-[D
D]
a]


Column A
Rating
OK

El

OE

O

O
[]






















El
O
0
O
O
O
O






0
O
0
D3


Column B
Check those you would use
Needs tmproi.ng of ava'able or Rmpoved


Comments


FISH

E 0- 5,000 Ibs
E 5,000-10,000 Ibs
O 10,000-25,000 ILs
S25,000 or nore


SHELLFISH

E 0- 5,000 Ibs
O 5,000-10,000 ibs
E 10,000-25,000 :bs
D 25,000 or ,or


Comments



































Dear Seafood Dealer. /


SrC Are commercial fishing facilities adequate in
5 I your area? The Gull and South Atlantic Fisheries 7-
S Development Foundation and your industry associa
--< m ,ions have asked us to determine the need for new
,m-0 .. 3 I or improved port facilities and possible locations for .
I *?z them.
oP- -P

S ^ 5 Your opinions are important to us. Even if you are not now a seafood dealer, please complete the part
5 L i of the form that pertains to you and return it to us today it will only take a few minutes. Your answers
3, will show whether or not a commerical fishing port is needed. We are not promoting a port, but are only asking
for your views and opinions.

SYour prompt attention is appreciated.
SSincerely.



SJames C. Cato
Marine Economist



Fred J. PrCh aska
Marine Economist
a-o
iv5 JCC:FJP:pb

5U O A Cooprdative Proiuct of.
I Florida Agricultural Market Research Center
m g CGulf & South Atlantic Filheiils Developienun Founcltion. Inc.
Coastal Plain, Regional Commissiun

























SEAFOOD DEALER PROCESSOR SURVEY


1. You were a seafood dealer and/or processor in 1976
according to our records. Are you still in this business?

SYes -- please continue

O -No if no please return today so will
know you received the quesionnaire
(NO POSTAGE REQUIRED)
Thank you.

2. If you are in the seafood business please check the most
important products you handle.


FISH

E Croaker

f Grouper

E Spanish mackeel

O King ackerel

E Pompano

| Red snapper

O SPOt

I Sea trout

] King whiting

O Balt

S Other fish (lis,


SHELLFISH

0 Bluue crs

] Oysters

] Scarons

O Shrmp

D OtlcE shellfish
,list)


3. Please complete the following about your seafood business.
A. In column A, chlck the fai Cliels iand erces you now offrI Then,
B. In column B, check the facilitn and services you would Ihke added or improve

Column A Column 8
Thoso you Those you ouTIo lIke
Facrlihies or scirncs now offer added or improved


Cornmment


1 Shrimp unloading house
2. Crab unloudng
3. Oyster shucking house
4. Fish house
5 Processing of unused fish
6 Bait srles arid supply
7. rocking fac hties
8 Freezer and cold storage
9 Ice house
10 Gear storage area
11. Gear supply
12 Gea, repair service
13 Electronics service
14 Engine repair ilvce
15 Marine railway
16 Fuel sales
17 Groceries
18 Restaurant
19 Retail seafood mleiked
20. LiqLuid asteh rdis osa
21. Solid wvste dslusi (,h:imi heads,
fish, sceap, etc :
22 Other (lst)


4. What other items are needed to improve your seafood
business, or to help you meet government requnernmnts

Needed irnpovements Check all that app'y

More seafood from fish rmen EO

More workers ,

Better tramnd wo kers

Better roads or trucking O

Financial assistance to meet
sanitation or pollution
control requirements

Others (list)


5. Ho many pounds die yoJ sell n 19767
(CONFIDENTIAL)

FISH SHELLFISH

S Under 50.000 Ibs Under 50,000 'b

O 50.0 ,0l O00 IO s 50.000100,000 I5s
] 100000 300.000 bs 100000 300000

[] Over 300,000 Ib [I Over 300,000 I),

















REFERENCES


Bureau of Economic and Business Research. Florida Statistical Abstract.
University of Florida Press, Gainesville.

Florida Department of Natural Resources. "Commercial Boat Registrations
1975." Tallahassee: 1977.

Summary of Florida Commercial Marine Landings, 1971 through
1976. Tallahassee.

Mathis, Kary, James C. Cato, Robert L. Degner, Paul D. Landrum and Fred
J. Prochaska, 1978, Commercial Fishing Activity and Facility Needs
in Florida: Citrus County, Industry Report 78-1, Florida Agricultural
Market Research Center, University of Florida, Gainesville.

1978, Commercial Fishing Activity and Facility Needs in Florida:
Clay, Putnam, and St. Johns Counties. Industry Report 78-2, Florida
Agricultural Market Research Center, University of Florida, Gaines-
ville.

1978, Commercial Fishing Activity and Facility Needs in Florida:
Dixie and Levy Counties. Industry Report 78-3, Florida Agricultural
Market Research Center, University of Florida, Gainesville.

____. 1978, Commercial Fishing Activity and Facility Needs in Florida:
Okaloosa and Santa Rosa Counties. Industry Report 78-4, Florida
Agricultural Market Research Center, University of Florida, Gaines-
ville.

National Marine Fisheries Service. "Processors of Fishery Products in
the U.S., 1975." U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington, D.C.

S"Wholesale Dealers in Fishery Products in the U.S., 1975."
Unpublished. U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington, D.C.












Additional Information Sources


Cato, James C. "Publications in Marine Economics." Food and Resource
Economics Department, University of Florida, Gainesville. Issued
annually.

Marine Advisory Program. Florida Sea Grant Program Directory. Florida
Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, Gainesville:
1978.

Marine Economics Publications by subject area:

General

Cato, James C. and Fred J. Prochaska. Landings, Values and Prices in
Commercial Fisheries for the Florida East Coast. Cooperative
Extension Service Marine Advisory Bulletin, SUSF-SG-77-003. Gaines-
ville: University of Florida. September, 1977.

Cato, James C. and Fred J. Prochaska. Landings, Values and Prices in
Commercial Fisheries for the Florida Northwest Coast. Cooperative
Extension Service Marine Advisory Bulletin, SUSF-SG-77-004
Gainesville: University of Florida. September, 1977.

Prochaska, Fred J. and James C. Cato. An Economic Profile of Florida
Commercial Fishing Firms: Fishermen, Commercial Activities and
Financial Considerations. State University System of Florida Sea
Grant Report No. 19. Gainesville: February, 1977.

Prochaska, Fred J. Florida Commercial Marine Fisheries: Growth,
Relative Importance and Input Trends, 1952-72. State University
System of Florida Sea Grant Report No. 11. Gainesville: February,
1976.

Prochaska, Fred J. and James C. Cato. Landings, Values, and Prices in
Commercial Fisheries for the Florida West Coast. University of
Florida Cooperative Extension Service Marine Advisory Bulletin,
SUSF-SG-75-003. Gainesville: May, 1975.

Prochaska, Fred J. and James C. Cato. Landings, Values and Prices in
Commercial Fisheries for the Florida Keys Region. University of
Florida Cooperative Extension Service Marine Advisory Bulletin,
SUSF-SG-84-201. Gainesville: March, 1974.

Shrimp

Prochaska, Fred J. and James C. Cato. Primary Economic Impact of Shrimp
Landings on the Tampa Bay Economy. Staff Paper 47. Food and Resource
Economics Department. Gainesville: University of Florida. March,
1977.

Alvarez, Jose, Chris 0. Andrew and Fred J. Prochaska. Economic Structure
of the Florida Shrimp Processing Industry. State University System
of Florida Sea Grant Report Number o. Gainesville: February, 1976.











Prochaska, Fred J., Chris 0. Andrew and Jose Alvarez. Florida Shrimp:
From the Sea Through the Market. University of Florida Cooperative
Extension Service Marine Advisory Bulletin, SUSF-SG-75-005. Gaines-
ville: May, 1975.

Snapper-Grouper

Cato, James C. and Fred J. Prochaska. "A Statistical and Budgetary
Economic Analysis of Florida Based Gulf of Mexico Red Snapper-Grouper
Vessels by Size and Location, 1975 and 1975." Marine Fisheries Review.
Paper 1269, Volume 39, Number 11. November, 1977.

Prochaska, Fred J. and James C. Cato. Cost and Returns for Northern Gulf
of Mexico Commercial Red Snapper-Grouper Vessels by Vessel Size, 1975.
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service Marine Advisory
Bulletin, SUSF-SG-75- .Gainesville: December, 1975.

Prochaska, Fred J. and James C. Cato. Northwest Florida Gulf Coast Red
Snapper-Grouper Party Boat Operations: An Economic Analysis, 1974.
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service Marine Advisory
Bulletin, SUSF-SG-75-007. Gainesville: December 1976.

Spiny Lobster

Williams, Joel S. and Fred J. Prochaska. The Florida Spiny Lobster Fishery:
Landings, Prices and Resource Productivity. University System of
Florida Sea Grant Report No. 12. Gainesville, 1976.

Prochaska, Fred J. and Joel S. Williams. Economic Analysis of Cost and
Returns in the Spiny Lobster Fishery by Boat and Vessel Size: Florida
Cooperative Extension Service Marine Advisory Bulletin. SUSF-SG-76-004.
Ganesville: June, 1976.

Mullet

Cato, James C. and William E. McCluuough, Co-editors. Selected Papers on
the Economics, Biology, and Food Technology of Mullet; Current Knowledge
and Research Needs. State University System of Florida Sea Grant Report
15. Gainesville: August, 1976.

Cato, James C. "Dockside Price Analysis in the Florida Mullet Fishery."
Marine Fisheries Review. Paper 1187. Volume 39, Number 6. June,
1976.

King and Spanish Mackerel

Cato, James C., Robert A. Morris and Fred J. Prochaska. Production, Costs
and earnings by Boat Size: Florida Spanish Mackerel Fishery. Florida
Cooperative Extension Service Marine Advisory Bulletin. (In print).

Prochaska, Fred J., Robert A. Morris and James C. Cato. An Economic
Analysis of King Mackerel Production by Hook-and-Line on the Florida
Atlantic Coast. Cooperative Extension Service Marine Advisory
Bulletin, MAP-1. Gainesville: University of Florida. October, 1977.




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