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 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Method of procedure
 Results
 Discussion
 Conclusions and recommendation...
 Acknowledgement
 Literature cited






Group Title: Bulletin - University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Stations ; No. 656
Title: Sulfur fertilization of winter clovers, coastal Bermudagrass and corn on north and west Florida soils
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 Material Information
Title: Sulfur fertilization of winter clovers, coastal Bermudagrass and corn on north and west Florida soils
Series Title: Bulletin University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station
Physical Description: 14 p. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Thompson, L. G ( Leonard Garnett ), 1903-
Neller, J. R ( Joseph Robert ), 1891-
Publisher: University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1963
 Subjects
Subject: Sulphur fertilizers   ( lcsh )
Corn -- Fertilizers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Bermuda grass -- Fertilizers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Clover -- Fertilizers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Bibliography: p. 14.
Statement of Responsibility: L.G. Thompson, Jr., J.R. Neller.
General Note: Cover title.
Funding: Bulletin (University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station)
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Bibliographic ID: UF00027225
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000929038
oclc - 18353219
notis - AEN9802

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Introduction
        Page 3
    Method of procedure
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Results
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Discussion
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Conclusions and recommendations
        Page 13
    Acknowledgement
        Page 14
    Literature cited
        Page 14
Full Text

Bulletin 656
June 1963


SULFUR FERTILIZATION

of Winter Clovers,
Coastal Bermudagrass, and Corn
on North and West Florida Soils


L. G. Thompson, Jr.
J. R. Neller


University of Florida
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS
J. R. Beckenbach, Director Gainesville




















CONTENTS
Page


METHOD OF PROCEDURE .........................-- --- --.. 4


R ESULTS .................... .... ...---- ---- ...... ........- -- ---- 6

Crimson Clover on Virgin Soil .. ............. .. .---.-----...- 6

Crimson Clover on Fertilized Soil .. .......................... 6

Coastal Bermudagrass and Red, Crimson and
Ladino Clovers on Carnegie Fine Sandy Loam .................--. 9

Corn on Old, Fertilized Soil .......................... ... .......------- 9

Sulfur in Virgin Soil ..... ........... ........... 10

Sulfur in Rainwater ...............................--- 10


DISCUSSION .... ....... -----------... -....--..- .. .... 11


CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS .................... -------......-- .. 13


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ........... ....... ............ -------------------- 14


LITERATURE CITED .......... .... ........ .. ..... -- -- 14







SULFUR FERTILIZATION OF WINTER
CLOVERS, COASTAL BERMUDAGRASS,
AND CORN ON NORTH AND
WEST FLORIDA SOILS

L. G. THOMPSON, JR., AND J. R. NELLER1

Sulfur is an essential element for plant growth. It appears
to be required in largest proportion by legumes, which contain
higher percentages of nitrogen in their foliage than most non-
legumes (9).2 The sulfur content of many plants is equal to
or greater than the phosphorus content (2).
Superphosphate is a good source of sulfur, being about half
gypsum (calcium sulfate). Basic slag contains small amounts
of sulfur as gypsum; whereas, other phosphate sources-such as
triple superphosphate, calcined phosphate, colloidal phosphate,
and rock phosphate-contain no sulfur (9). Neller et al. (9)
observed that the deficiency of sulfur would nearly prohibit the
growth of legumes and seriously retard non-legumes in some
localities if it were not for the large quantities of superphosphate
used on the cropped soils of Florida.
Rain water contains appreciable amounts of sulfur, especially
in areas near pulp mills. According to a cooperative study for
the southern states by Jordan and Bardsley (4), the amount
of sulfur in rainfall averages 5.4 pounds per acre per year. Coll-
ings (2) summarized results from other workers showing that
the soil loses annually through leaching and cropping much more
sulfur than is added in rainfall. Neller (7) noted that a soil
with little or no soluble sulfate in the surface soil usually had
considerable soluble sulfate in the subsoil. Kamprath et al. (5)
found that clays can absorb and retain sulfates. Most of the
soils of northwest Florida have a clay or sandy clay subsoil, so
the sulfur from rainfall and gypsum may have leached out of
the surface soil and accumulated in the subsoil.
The sandy soils of Florida are often low in sulfur for many
crops. Bledsoe and Blaser (1) found that red clover and black
medic responded to sulfur where grown on Leon fine sand. Neller
et al. (9) observed that white clover in Alachua and Hardee
counties made very poor growth unless gypsum was present with
the phosphate, potash, and lime. A sulfur response by cotton was
SSoils Chemist, North Florida Station, and Soils Chemist Emeritus,
Soils Department, Main Station.
2 Numbers in parentheses refer to Literature Cited.






Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations


found by Harris et al. (3) in Florida by Volk et al. (10) in Ala-
bama, and by Younge (11) in Arkansas.
The purpose of this study was to determine whether sulfur
in addition to that supplied in low-sulfur fertilizers was neces-
sary for winter clovers, Coastal bermudagrass, and corn on north-
west Florida soils.

METHOD OF PROCEDURE
A crimson clover experiment was established at the North
Florida Experiment Station on virgin Orangeburg loamy fine
sand in November 1953, in randomized blocks with five replica-
tions. The various treatments used on these plots are shown in
Table 1. All treatments were made annually except Number 2
and the calcic lime, which were made the first year only. Gyp-
sum, fertilizer, and lime were broadcast by hand over each plot,
and then disked lightly about 3 inches deep. Inoculated crimson
clover seed was planted, and a good stand of clover resulted.
Later applications of gysum, 0-26-26, and triple superphosphate
were made as top dressings in November 1954 and November
1955. The clover was harvested once each year in April when in
full bloom, and a green forage sample was taken from each plot
for moisture and chemical determinations. At the end of the
experiment, soil samples were taken from each plot. Profile
soil samples were also taken to a depth of 36 inches from the
virgin Orangeburg loamy fine sand at the edge of the plot area,
and sulfate sulfur soluble in Morgan's (6) solution of sodium
acetate acetic acid was determined.
In 1957 another crimson clover experiment in randomized
blocks with five replications was established at the North Florida
Experiment Station on Ruston loamy fine sand which had been
fertilized with superphosphate for 21 years. The various treat-
ments used in this experiment are shown in Table 2. All treat-
ments except lime were made each year in November or Decem-
ber. Lime was applied the first year only.
A Coastal bermudagrass-clover experiment was established
on virgin Carnegie fine sandy loam at the West Florida Experi-
ment Station. Lime was applied to the soil at the rate of 1.8
tons per acre in January 1953. Coastal bermudagrass was
sprigged in February of 1953 and red, crimson, and Ladino
clovers were overseeded in the late fall of 1953, 1954, and 1957.
Annual fertilizer treatments were generally applied in the spring.
The number of grass and clover clippings per year were not con-










TABLE 1.--EFFECT OF VARIOUS RATES OF GYPSUM, MIXED FERTILIZER, TRIPLE SUPERPHOSPHATE, AND CALCIC LIME ON THE
PERCENT SULFUR, PERCENT PHOSPHORUS, AND YIELDS OF CRIMSON CLOVER FORAGE GROWN ON VIRGIN ORANGEBURG LOAMY
FINE SAND AT THE NORTH FLORIDA EXPERIMENT STATION.


Fertilizer, Pounds Per Acre

47.5%v
triple
super
Gypsum 0-2-2(; phosphate


500
0*
500
500
500
500
500
500
1000
1000


Air-Dry Forage


Calcic
lime

0
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
0


L. S. D. (.05)
L. S. D. (.01)


Percent Percent
sulfur phosphorus
1954 1954


0.125
0.156
0.139
0.147
0.148
0.158
0.179)
0.179
0.174
0.182


0.021
0.028


0.275
0.220
0.324
0.304
0.323
0.319
0.327
0.392
0.346
0.375


0.036(
0.048


Yield, pounds per acre


1954

1805
1373
1871
2192
2244
2272
2331
2537
2725
2474


1955

1348
1122
1533
1774
1788
1997
2011
2049
2156
1795


275 225
504 300


* 500 pounds 0-11-10 first year only.


Treatment
No.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6
7.
8
9.
10.


1956 U

2163
1419
2567
3113
3130
3647 7i
3461
3635
3846
3438






Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations


stant and varied from one to three. The dates of clipping also
varied from year to year. Profile soil samples to a depth of 36
inches were also taken and sulfate sulfur soluble in Morgan's
(6) solution of sodium acetate acetic acid was determined on
various layers of the soil.
A corn experiment was established at the North Florida Sta-
tion on old, fertilized Ruston loamy fine sand in March 1953 in
randomized blocks with four replications. The soil had been cul-
tivated for seven years, and had received yearly applications of
250 pounds of superphosphate. During the nine years of this
experiment, 400 pounds per acre of 10-20-20 fertilizer (0.228
percent sulfur) and 125 pounds of ammonium nitrate side-dress-
ing were applied annually.

RESULTS

Crimson Clover on Virgin Soil
Results of the Crimson clover experiment established on vir-
gin Orangeburg loamy fine sand are shown in Table 1. Gypsum
applied up to the 88-pound rate increased yields significantly in
plots fertilized with 500 pounds per acre of 0-26-26 (0.076 per-
cent sulfur) annually and 2,000 pounds of calcic lime initially;
further increase to 176 pounds gave insignificant results. At the
176 pound rate of gypsum, however, doubling the application of
phosphate or of both phosphate and potash gave further in-
creases in yield.
Increasing applications of gypsum gave consistent increases
in sulfur content of the forage; the difference between no gyp-
sum and highest gypsum treatments was highly significant.
Liming increased yields, both at the lower and higher levels
of sulfur, phosphorus, and potash.
These results indicate that for the first three years on this
virgin soil, crimson clover should receive a minimum of 88 pounds
of gypsum and 500 pounds of 0-26-26 fertilizer annually, and
2,000 pounds of calcic lime initially. Further increases in yield
may be expected from doubling these rates of phosphate or of
both phosphate and potash.

Crimson Clover on Fertilized Soil
Results of the crimson clover experiment established on
Ruston loamy fine sand which has been cultivated and fertilized
for 21 years, are given in Table 2.









TABLE 2.-EFFECT OF VARIOUS RATES OF GYPSUM, MIXED FERTILIZER, TRIPLE SUPERPHOSPHATE, AND CALCIC LIME ON THE
PERCENT SULFUR AND YIELDS OF CRIMSON CLOVER FORAGE GROWN ON RUSTON LOAMY FINE SAND AT THE NORTH FLORIDA
EXPERIMENT STATION.


Fertilizer, Pounds Per Acre
47.5%
triple
Treatment super Calcic
No. Gypsum 0-2(;-2(; phosphate lime


500
0:
500
500
500
500
500
500
1000
1000


0
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
2000
0


Air-Dry Forage


PIercent sulfur


1958

0.160
0.147
0.155
0.151
0.149
0.171
0.151
0.1(69
0.167
0.167


19(0 1958

0.180 51(67
0.15(; 3591
0.141 41(61
0.181 4457
0.171 4668
0.1(;5 4340
0.188 4559
0.174 417(
0.195 4527
0.194 4332


Yield, pounds per acre
1959 19(60 19(61

5000 6280 9900
3800 53(0 7900
3900 5(00 9800 o
4900 6040 9100
4900 65(60 8900
4300 6080 8600
5000 6040 8900 a
4500 6460 9500
4700 5620 10000
5100 5740 9300


L. S. D. (.05)
L. S. D. (.01)


0.035
0.046


840 910
1130 1210


940
1261


* 500 Ioulnds 0-] 1-10 finst year only.

















TABLE 3.-EFFECT OF MIXED FERTILIZERS AND GYPSUM ON PERCENT SULFUR, PERCENT PHOSPHORUS, AND YIELDS OF COASTAL
BERMUDAGRASS AND RED, CRIMSON, AND LADINO CLOVER GROWN ON CARNEGIE FINE SANDY LOAM AT THE WEST FLORIDA
EXPERIMENT STATION.


Air-Dry Forage


4CO


Fertilizer .. -----
Pounds Per Acre Percent sulfur Percent phosphorus
Annually Yield, pounds per acre
Annually July 24 Sept. 9 May 8 July 24 Sept. 9 July 8 Yield, pou
0-14-14 0-26-26 Gypsum 1953 1953 1954 1953 1953 1954 1953 1954 1955 1956 1958 1959


0.234
0.197
0.200
0.225
0.235
0.237


0.277
0.216
0.228
0.233
0.222
0.231


0.174
0.151
0.171
0.190
0.196
0.242


0.234
0.197
0.200
0.225
0.235
0.237


0.093
0.092
0.096
0.094
0.091
0.092


a


0.458 5716 1114 3520 5104 4584 5190
0.452 6628 900 3300 5260 4701 5046
0.454 6242 1100 3540 4814 5095 4863
0.502 6192 1007 3520 5841 4386 5181
0.486 6100 820 3600 4772 4476 4489
0.494 6523 861 3300 5353 4283 5474


L. S. D. (.05)


N. S. 0.026 0.022 N. S. N. S. N. S. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. a
C-
0-^
-------------- -----------------------------_ Co


1000







Sulfur Fertilization


Yield responses to gypsum at rates of 0 to 176 pounds per
acre, 0-26-26 fertilizer at 500 and 1,000 pounds, and lime at 0
and 2,000 pounds per acre were not significant. Responses in
sulfur content of the forage were not significant. These results
indicate that the soil was adequate in residual sulfur and cal-
cium.

Coastal Bermudagrass and Red, Crimson, and
Ladino Clovers on Carnegie Fine Sandy Loam

The results with a mixture of Coastal bermudagrass and
red, crimson, and Ladino clovers on virgin Carnegie fine sandy
loam at the West Florida Experiment Station are shown in Table
3. The dry forage clipped on September 9, 1953, and on May 8,
1954, from the gypsum treated plots was significantly higher in
total sulfur than the forage from the untreated plots. These
results show that there was sufficient sulfur in the soil for the
growth of the grass and clover; additional sulfur increased the
sulfur content in the forage but did not increase the yield. There
was no significant difference in the phosphorus content of the
forage for the different treatments.

Corn on Old, Fertilized Soil
Results of the corn experiment established on Ruston loamy
fine sand which had been cultivated and fertilized for seven years
are given in Table 4.

TABLE 4.-EFFECT OF GYPSUM ON THE YIELD OF CORN ON RUSTON LOAMY
FINE SAND AT THE NORTH FLORIDA EXPERIMENT STATION.

Pounds Yield, Bushels Per Acre
Per Acre
Gypsum 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 Ave.

0 69 30 42 57 47 75 61 74 81 60
22 70 30 44 59 53 74 57 74 83 60
44 67 39 41 59 49 74 58 77 84 60
88 67 32 40 55 51 79 58 72 77 59


L.S.D. (.05) N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S. N.S.


No response was obtained to gypsum at rates from 0 to 88
pounds per acre annually. These results indicate that this soil







Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations


had adequate amounts of residual sulfur to supply the require-
ments of corn for the nine-year period of this experiment.

Sulfur in Virgin Soil

Table 5 shows results of sulfate analyses and pH determina-
tions of profile soil samples taken from virgin Orangeburg loamy
fine sand on which the first crimson clover experiment was lo-
cated and from virgin Carnegie fine sandy loam at the West
Florida Experiment Station.

TABLE 5.-SULFATE SULFUR AND PH IN VARIOUS LAYERS OF THE SOIL
PROFILE OF THE NO-SULFUR PLOTS IN FEBRUARY 1955.

North Florida Station West Florida Station
Orangeburg Loamy Carnegie Fine Sandy
Fine Sand Loam
Soil Depth, Sulfate sulfur Soil Sulfate sulfur Soil
Inches ppm pH ppm pH

0-6 1.2 5.72 0.9 5.55
6-12 1.5 5.13 29.3 5.25
12-18 1.4 5.30 42.7 5.15
18-24 20.1 5.40 56.3 5.28
24-30 20.3 5.75 77.1 5.38
30-36 19.5 5.79 98.4 5.44

The virgin Orangeburg loamy fine sand from 0 to 18 inches
contained about 1 part per million of sulfur, and from 18 to 36
inches, about 20 parts per million. Apparently sulfur leached
readily from the surface sandy soil but slowly from the clay sub-
soil. The organic matter in the surface 6 inches and the clay
in the soil profile from 12 to 36 inches tend to hold the bases
against leaching; consequently, the pH is higher than in the
6 to 12-inch layer of loamy fine sand, which is low both in organic
matter and clay.
The virgin Carnegie fine sandy loam from 0 to 6 inches con-
tained less than 1 part per million of sulfur. However, the clay
layer from 6 to 36 inches contained 29 to 98 parts per million of
sulfur. As the sulfur was near the surface, gypsum applied to
the surface of the soil did not increase the yield of Coastal ber-
mudagrass and red, crimson, and Ladino clovers.

Sulfur in Rainwater

The amount of sulfur in rainwater for 1953, 1954, and 1955
at the North Florida and West Florida Experiment Stations and






Sulfur Fertilization


from a location one-half mile from the St. Regis paper mill at
Cantonment, Florida, is given in Table 6. The total sulfur in
rainwater for a 12-month period varied from 1.56 to 2.05 pounds
per acre, which is much lower than 5.4 pounds per acre, the
overall annual average for the southern states. This small
amount of sulfur from rainwater was probably of not much con-
sequence for crop production.
At the West Florida Station the total sulfur in rainwater per
year varied from 2.87 to 7.66 pounds per acre, which would be
of some benefit in the growth of crops.
One-half mile from the paper mill at Cantonment, Florida,
the total sulfur in rainwater varied from 18.94 to 56.45 pounds
per acre per year, which would be an important contribution for
the production of crops.

DISCUSSION
The low content of soluble sulfates found in the surface 18
inches of virgin Orangeburg loamy fine sand indicates that all
crops tested on virgin soil should receive a source of soluble sul-
fate at planting time. For shallow rooted crops such as white
clover sufficient sulfur should be applied to grow the crop to ma-
turity. The deep rooted crops such as corn and sweet clover
would need sulfur in the surface soil while the plants were small,
but after the root systems have grown into the clay layer below
18 inches, the crop could obtain sulfur from the subsoil. Crimson
clover, which has a medium depth root system, could secure some
sulfur from the clay layer, but not enough for good growth, and
would need more soluble sulfate in the surface soil than corn.
Neller et al. (9) have found that legumes require about as much
sulfur as phosphorus and consequently are more likely than
corn to need a source of soluble sulfate each year. Also, small
seeded plants are more likely to respond to sulfur early than
large seeded plants.
At the West Florida Station, the clay layer from 6 to 36
inches of the Carnegie fine sandy loam contains 29 to 98 parts
per million of sulfur, which indicates that most crops would need
a source of sulfur at planting, but would not respond to sulfur
after the roots have grown below 6 inches in depth.
Considerable soluble sulfate has been extracted from sub-
surface and subsoils in a number of areas. Neller (7,8) noted
that a soil with little or no soluble sulfate in the surface soil
usually has considerable soluble sulfate in the subsoil. Since







TABLE 6.-SULFUR IN RAINWATER OF 1953, 1954, AND 1955 AT THE WEST
FLORIDA AND NORTH FLORIDA EXPERIMENT STATIONS AND NEAR PULP MILL.


Location

North Florida
Experiment
Station,
Gadsden
County,
Florida


1953 Dec., Jan., Feb.,
March, April, May,
June, July, August
Sept., Oct., Nov.,

Totals
1954 Dec., Jan., Feb.,
March, April, May,
June, July, August
Sept., Oct., Nov.,

Totals
1955 Dec., Jan., Feb.,
March, April, May,
June, July, Aug., Sept.
Oct., Nov.

Totals

1953 Dec., Jan., Feb.
March, April, May
June, July, August
Sept., Oct., Nov.

Totals
1954 Dec., Jan., Feb.,
March, April, May
June, July, August
Sept., Oct., Nov.,

Totals
1955 Dec., Jan., Feb.,
March, April, May
June, July, Aug., Sept.
Oct., Nov.

Totals


Year


16.84
9.01
19.25
18.60

63.70
20.23
9.01
13.42
5.08

47.74
13.95
14.61
24.56
2.10

55.22

16.84
6.29
21.20
15.60

59.93
27.05
9.01
5.84
3.23

45.13
12.50
11.13
35.45
2.10

61.18


Month


Rainfall,
Inches

5.22
10.89
11.33

27.44

12.88
5.53
13.97
8.16

40.54
7.66
9.14
14.91
5.52

37.23


1953 March, April, May
June, July, August
Sept., Oct., Nov.

Totals

1954 Dec., Jan., Feb.,
March, April, May
June, July, August
Sept., Oct., Nov.

Totals
1955 Dec., Jan., Feb.
March, April, May
June, July, August
Sept., Oct., Nov.

Totals


Sulfur, Sulfur,
ppm. Lbs./A

0.29 0.34
0.06 0.15
0.06 0.16

0.65

0.06 0.18
0.08 0.10
0.24 0.76
0.28 0.52

1.56
0.56 0.97
0.13 0.27
0.18 0.61
0.16 0.20

2.05

0.60 2.30
0.64 1.31
0.08 0.35
0.04 0.17

4.13
0.10 0.46
0.23 0.48
0.40 1.22
0.62 0.71

2.87
0.50 1.58
0.37 1.22
0.80 4.45
0.86 0.41

7.66

5.10 19.52
4.38 6.24
3.79 18.21
3.53 12.48

56.45
3.15 19.31
1.73 15.59
4.41 5.84
1.04 0.76

41.50
2.23 6.32
2.37 5.98
0.80 6.43
0.44 0.21

18.94


West Florida
Experiment
Station,
Santa Rosa
County,
Florida


West Florida,
12 mile from
Cantonment
Pulp Mill






Sulfur Fertilization


most of the soils of northwest Florida have a clay or sandy clay
subsoil, the sulfur from rainfall and applied gypsum may have
leached out of the surface soil and accumulated in the subsoil.
It appears that in these soils the accumulations of sulfate vary
in amount with variations in the content of clay. Neller (8)
found that in general sulfates exist in soils in proportion to their
clay content.

CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Field plot experiments were conducted in north and west
Florida to determine whether sulfur in addition to that supplied
in low-sulfur fertilizers was necessary for the growth of Coastal
bermudagrass; red, crimson, and Ladino clovers; and corn.
The results of these experiments were as follows:
On virgin Orangeburg loamy fine sand or a similar soil type,
crimson clover fertilized with 500 pounds per acre of sulfur-free
0-26-26 fertilizer required 88 pounds per acre of gypsum ap-
plied annually for satisfactory growth. This sulfur could be
supplied in 600 pounds of 0-14-14 fertilizer which contains
gypsum.
An application of 1 ton of lime plus 500 pounds of 0-26-26
fertilizer per acre gave nearly significant increases in the growth
of clover.
On cultivated Ruston loamy fine sand fertilized with super-
phosphate for seven or more years, crimson clover and corn did
not respond to sulfur for four years and nine years, respectively.
The surface 18 inches of Orangeburg loamy fine sand was
extremely low (about 1 part per million) in soluble sulfur, so
that shallow rooted crops such as white clover and seedlings of
crimson clover should receive a source of sulfur such as gypsum.
The subsoil clay layer from 18 to 36 inches contained 20 parts
per million of sulfur, which was not sufficient for good growth
of crimson clover even after its root system had penetrated to
the clay layer. On this soil, sulfur gave a highly significant in-
crease in the yield of crimson clover.
On Carnegie fine sandy loam at the West Florida Station,
white clover, which is shallow rooted, responded to sulfur; and
the deeper rooted crops-Coastal bermudagrass and red, crim-
son, and Ladino clover-did not respond to sulfur fertilization.
Possibly there were factors other than sulfur which were re-
sponsible for the differences.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The authors are indebted to Drs. C. E. Hutton, W. R. Lang-
ford, R. L. Jeffers, and L. S. Dunavin, Jr., for their planning and
participation in the project at the West Florida Station; and
to Dr. H. V. Jordan for sulfur analysis of the rainwater and for
supplying sulfur-free fertilizers for the experiments.


LITERATURE CITED

1. Bledsoe, R. W., and R. E. Blaser. The influence of sulfur on the yield
and composition of clovers fertilized with different sources of
phosphorus. J. Am. Soc. Agron. 39: 146-152. 1947.
2. Collings, G. H. Commercial Fertilizers. The Blakiston Company. Phil-
adelphia. Fourth Ed. 1950.
3. Harris, H. C., R. W. Bledsoe, and P. W. Calhoun. Response of cotton
to sulfur fertilization. J. Am. Soc. Agron. 37: 323-329. 1945.
4. Jordan, H. V., and C. E. Bardsley. Response of crops to sulfur on
southeastern soils. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 22: 254-256. 1958.
5. Kamprath, E. J., W. L. Nelson, J. W. Fitts. The effect of pH, sulfate
and phosphate concentrations on the adsorption of sulfate by
soils. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 20: 463-466. 1956.
6. Morgan, M. F. Chemical soil diagnosis by Universial Soil Testing Sys-
tem. Conn. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 450. 1941.
7. Neller, J. R. Sulfur requirements of representative Florida soils. An-
nual Report of Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. p. 148. 1955.
8. Extractable sulfate-sulfur in soils of Florida in relation
to amount of clay in the profile. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 23:
346-348. 1959.
9. Neller, J. R., G. B. Killinger, D. W. Jones, R. W. Bledsoe, and H. W.
Lundy. Sulfur requirements of soils for clover grass pastures
in relation to fertilizer phosphates. Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Tech.
Bul. 475. 1951.
10. Volk, N. J., J. W. Tidmore, and D. T. Meadows. Supplements to high
analysis fertilizers with special reference to sulfur, calcium,
magnesium and limestone. Soil Sci. 60: 427-435. 1945.
11. Younge, O. R. Sulfur deficiency and its effect of cotton production on
Coastal Plain soils. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 6: 215-218. 1942.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The authors are indebted to Drs. C. E. Hutton, W. R. Lang-
ford, R. L. Jeffers, and L. S. Dunavin, Jr., for their planning and
participation in the project at the West Florida Station; and
to Dr. H. V. Jordan for sulfur analysis of the rainwater and for
supplying sulfur-free fertilizers for the experiments.


LITERATURE CITED

1. Bledsoe, R. W., and R. E. Blaser. The influence of sulfur on the yield
and composition of clovers fertilized with different sources of
phosphorus. J. Am. Soc. Agron. 39: 146-152. 1947.
2. Collings, G. H. Commercial Fertilizers. The Blakiston Company. Phil-
adelphia. Fourth Ed. 1950.
3. Harris, H. C., R. W. Bledsoe, and P. W. Calhoun. Response of cotton
to sulfur fertilization. J. Am. Soc. Agron. 37: 323-329. 1945.
4. Jordan, H. V., and C. E. Bardsley. Response of crops to sulfur on
southeastern soils. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 22: 254-256. 1958.
5. Kamprath, E. J., W. L. Nelson, J. W. Fitts. The effect of pH, sulfate
and phosphate concentrations on the adsorption of sulfate by
soils. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 20: 463-466. 1956.
6. Morgan, M. F. Chemical soil diagnosis by Universial Soil Testing Sys-
tem. Conn. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 450. 1941.
7. Neller, J. R. Sulfur requirements of representative Florida soils. An-
nual Report of Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. p. 148. 1955.
8. Extractable sulfate-sulfur in soils of Florida in relation
to amount of clay in the profile. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 23:
346-348. 1959.
9. Neller, J. R., G. B. Killinger, D. W. Jones, R. W. Bledsoe, and H. W.
Lundy. Sulfur requirements of soils for clover grass pastures
in relation to fertilizer phosphates. Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Tech.
Bul. 475. 1951.
10. Volk, N. J., J. W. Tidmore, and D. T. Meadows. Supplements to high
analysis fertilizers with special reference to sulfur, calcium,
magnesium and limestone. Soil Sci. 60: 427-435. 1945.
11. Younge, O. R. Sulfur deficiency and its effect of cotton production on
Coastal Plain soils. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 6: 215-218. 1942.




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