• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Title Page
 Board of control and staff
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Terminology
 Variety recommendations
 Buying seed
 Description of recommended and...
 Acknowledgement






Group Title: Bulletin - Florida Agricultural Experiment Station - 405
Title: Commercial vegetable varieties for Florida
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027168/00001
 Material Information
Title: Commercial vegetable varieties for Florida
Series Title: Bulletin University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station
Physical Description: 30 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Andersen, E. M ( E. Milton )
Publisher: University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1944
 Subjects
Subject: Vegetables -- Varieties -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by E.M. Andersen ... et al..
General Note: Cover title.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027168
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000925214
oclc - 18235736
notis - AEN5862

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Board of control and staff
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Table of Contents
        Page 4
    Introduction
        Page 5
    Terminology
        Page 6
        Kind, type, variety, and strain
            Page 6
    Variety recommendations
        Sectional differences
            Page 7
    Buying seed
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Description of recommended and promising varieties
        Bean, snap bush
            Page 14
        Bean, wax
            Page 15
        Bean, pole
            Page 16
        Bean, bush lima
            Page 16
        Beef
            Page 16
        Broccoli, green sprouting
            Page 16
        Cabbage
            Page 17
        Cantaloupe
            Page 18
        Carrot
            Page 19
        Cauliflower
            Page 19
        Celery
            Page 20
        Corn, roasting ear
            Page 20
        Corn, sweet
            Page 21
        Cucumber
            Page 22
        Eggplant
            Page 22
        Lettuce, crisp head or iceberg type
            Page 22
        Lettuce, big Boston (butterhead)
            Page 23
        Onion
            Page 23
        Pea, English
            Page 23
        Pepper
            Page 24
        Potato
            Page 24
            Page 25
        Squash
            Page 26
        Tomato
            Page 27
        Watermelon
            Page 28
            Page 29
    Acknowledgement
        Page 30
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida







December, 1944


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
HAROLD MOWRY, Director
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA





COMMERCIAL VEGETABLE

VARIETIES FOR FLORIDA

By E. M. ANDERSEN, J. R. BECKENBACH, A. H. EDDINS, E. N.
MCCUBBIN, R. W. RUPRECHT, F. S. JAMISON and E. C. MINNUM


Fig. 1.-Florida Belle beans.


Single copies free to Florida residents upon request to
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


Bulletin 405











BOARD OF CONTROL


H. P. Adair, Chairman, Jacksonville
N. B. Jordan, Quincy
T. T. Scott, Live Oak
Thos. W. Bryant, Lakeland
M. L. Mershon, Miami
J. T. Diamond, Secretary, Tallahassee



EXECUTIVE STAFF

John J. Tigert, M.A., LL.D., President of the
University3
H. Harold Hume, D.Sc., Provost for Agricul-
ture
Harold Mowry, M.S.A., Director
L. 0. Gratz, Ph.D., Asst. Dir., Research
W. M. Fifield, M.S., Asst. Dir., Admin.4
J. Francis Cooper, M.S.A., Editors
Clyde Beale, A.B.J., Assistant Editor3
Jefferson Thomas, Assistant Editor3
Ida Keeling Cresap, Librarian
Ruby Newhall, Administrative Managers
K. H. Graham, LL.D., Business Manager8
Claranelle Alderman, Accountants



MAIN STATION, GAINESVILLE

AGRONOMY

W. E. Stokes, M.S., Agronomist'
Fred H. Hull, Ph.D., Agronomist
G. E. Ritchey, M.S., Agronomist2
G. B. Killinger, Ph.D., Agronomist
W. A. Carver, Ph.D., Associate
Roy E. Blaser, M.S., Associate
H. C. Harris, Ph.D., Associate
R. W. Bledsoe, Ph.D., Associate
Fred A. Clark, B.S., Assistant

ANIMAL INDUSTRY

A. L. Shealy, D.V.M., An. Industrialist' 3
R. B. Becker, Ph.D., Dairy Husbandmans
E. L. Fouts, Ph.D., Dairy Technologists
D. A. Sanders, D.V.M., Veterinarian
M. W. Emmel, D.V.M., Veterinarians
L. E. Swanson, D.V.M., Parasitologist'
N. R. Mehrhof, M.Agr., Poultry Husb.3
T. R. Freeman, Ph.D., Asso. in Dairy Mfg.
R. S. Glasscock, Ph.D., An. Husbandman
D. J. Smith, B.S.A., Asst. An. Husb.4
P. T. Dix Arnold, M.S.A., Asst. Dairy Husb.3
G. K. Davis, Ph.D., Animal Nutritionist
C. L. Comar, Ph.D., Asso. Biochemist
L. E. Mull, M.S., Asst. in Dairy Tech.4
0. K. Moore, M.S., Asst. Poultry Husb.8
J. E. Pace, B.S., Asst. An. Husbandman
S. P. Marshall, M.S., Asst. in An. Nutrition
Ruth Faulds, A.B., Asst. Biochem.
Katherine Boney, B.S., Asst. Chem.


ECONOMICS, AGRICULTURAL

C. V. Noble, Ph.D., Agr. Economist' S
Zach Savage, M.S.A., Associates
A. H. Spurlock, M.S.A., Associate
Max E. Brunk, M.S., Associate


ECONOMICS, HOME

Ouida D. Abbott, Ph.D., Home Econ.1
R. B. French, Ph.D., Biochemist

ENTOMOLOGY

J. R. Watson, A.M., Entomologist1
A. N. Tissot, Ph.D., Associates
H. E. Bratley, M.S.A., Assistant


HORTICULTURE

G. H. Blackmon, M.S.A., Horticulturist'
A. L. Stahl, Ph.D., Asso. Horticulturist
F. S. Jamison, Ph.D., Truck Hort.
R. J. Wilmot, M.SA., Asst. Hort.
R. D. Dickey, M.S.A., Asst. Hort.4
J. Carlton Cain, B.S.A., Asst. Hort.4
Victor F. Nettles, M.S.A., Asst. Hort.4
Byron E. Janes, Ph.D., Asst. Hort.
F. S. Lagasse, Ph.D., Asso. Hort.2
H. M. Sell, Ph.D., Asso. Horticulturist2


PLANT PATHOLOGY

W. B. Tisdale, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist' 3
Phares Decker, Ph.D., Asso. Plant Path.
Erdman West, M.S., Mycologist
Lillian E. Arnold, M.S., Asst. Botanist

SOILS

F. B. Smith, Ph.D., Microbiologist' 3
Gaylord M. Volk, M.S., Chemist
J. R. Henderson, M.S.A., Soil Technologist
J. R. Neller, Ph.D., Soils Chemist
C. E. Bell, Ph.D., Associate Chemist
L. H. Rogers, Ph.D., Associate Biochemist4
R. A. Carrigan, B.S., Asso. Biochemist6
G. T. Sims, M.S.A., Associate Chemist
T. C. Erwin, Assistant Chemist
H. W. Winsor, B.S.A., Assistant Chemist
Geo. D. Thornton, M.S., Asst. Microbiologist
R. E. Caldwell, M.S.A., Asst. Soil Surveyor'
Olaf C. Olson, B.S., Asst. Soil Surveyor




1 Head of Department.
2 In cooperation with U. S.
3 Cooperative, other divisions, U. of F.
In Military Service.
5 On leave.











BRANCH STATIONS


NORTH FLORIDA STATION, QUINCY

J. D. Warner, M.S., Vice-Director in Charge
R. R. Kincaid, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist
V. E. Whitehurst, Jr., B.S.A., Asst. An.
Husb.4
W. C. McCormick, B.S.A., Asst. An. Hush.
Jesse Reeves, Asst. Agron., Tobacco
W. H. Chapman, M.S., Asst. Agron.4
R. C. Bond, M.S.A., Asst. Agronomist


Mobile Unit, Monticello

R. W. Wallace, B.S., Associate Agronomist


Mobile Unit, Milton

Ralph L. Smith, M.S., Associate Agronomist


Mobile Unit, Marianna

R. W. Lipscomb, M.S., Associate Agronomist


Mobile Unit, Wewahitchka

J. B. White, B.S.A., Associate Agronomist


CITRUS STATION, LAKE ALFRED

A. F. Camp, Ph.D., Vice-Director in Charge
V. C. Jamison, Ph.D., Soils Chemist
B. R. Fudge, Ph.D., Associate Chemist
W. L. Thompson, B.S., Entomologist
W. W. Lawless, B.S., Asst. Horticulturist4
C. R. Stearns, Jr., B.S.A., Asso. Chemist
H. O. Sterling, B.S., Asst. Horticulturist
T. W. Young, Ph.D., Asso. Horticulturist
J. W. Sites, M.S.A., Asso. Horticulturist


EVERGLADES STA., BELLE GLADE

R. V. Allison, Ph.D., Vice-Director in Charge
J. W. Wilson, Sc.D., Entomologist4
F. D. Stevens, B.S., Sugarcane Agron.
Thomas Bregger, Ph.D., Sugarcane
Physiologist
G. R. Townsend, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist
R. W. Kidder, M.S., Asst. An. Husb.
W. T. Forsee, Jr., Ph.D., Asso. Chemist
B. S. Clayton, B.S.C.E., Drainage Eng.2
F. S. Andrews, Ph.D., Asso. Truck Hort.4
R. A. Bair, Ph.D., Asst. Agronomist
E. C. Minnum, M.S., Asst. Truck Hort.
N. C. Hayslip, B.S.A., Asst. Entomologist
C. L. Serrano, B.S.A., Asst. Chem.
E. L. Felix, B.S.A., Asst. Plant Path.


SUB-TROPICAL STA., HOMESTEAD

Geo. D. Ruehle, Ph.D., Vice-Director in
Charge
P. J. Westgate, Ph.D., Asso. Horticulturist
H. I. Borders, M.S., Asso. Plant Path.

W. CENT. FLA. STA., BROOKSVILLE

Clement D. Gordon, Ph.D., Asso. Poultry
Geneticist in Charge2

RANGE CATTLE STA., ONA

W. G. Kirk, Ph.D., Vice-Director in Charge
E. M. Hodges, Ph.D., Asso. Agron., Wauchula
Gilbert A. Tucker, B.S.A., Asst. An. Husb.4


FIELD STATIONS

Leesburg

M. N. Walker, Ph.D., Plant Path. in Charge2

Plant City

A. N. Brooks, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist

Hastings

A. H. Eddins, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist
E. N. McCubbin, Ph.D., Truck Horticulturist

Monticello

S. O. Hill, B.S., Asst. Entomologist2 4
A. M. Phillips, B.S., Asst. Entomologist2

Bradenton

J. R. Beckenbach, Ph.D., Horticulturist in
Charge
E. G. Kelsheimer, Ph.D., Entomologist
D'. B. Creager, Ph.D., Plant Path., Gladiolus
A. L. Harrison, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist
David G. Kelbert, Asst. Plant Pathologist
E. L. Spencer, Ph.D., Soils Chemist

Sanford

R. W. Ruprecht, Ph.D., Chemist in Charge
J. C. Russell, M.S., Asst. Entomologist5

Lakeland

E. S. Ellison, Meteorologist 2 5
Warren O. Johnson, Meteorologist2


1 Head of Department.
2 In cooperation with U. S.
3 Cooperative, other divisions, U. of F.
SIn Military Service.
6 On leave.












CONTENTS
Page

INTRODUCTION ............... -----...-------.. ... -----5

TERMINOLOGY ...--------------- ----------- ------ ----------- 6

Kind ....... ~~.......----.-.--. ..- 6
Type -.....-------.. ------------- ----- --.-- ---------6
Variety -------------------------------------------------- 6
Variety ------------------6

Strain ....--...----------- .......--.. 6------------ 6

Stock ..----------- ------ ------------------------ 7

VARIETY RECOMMENDATIONS ..----....--.......--------------------- 7


Sectional Differences ...


...-----------.... .. ------ 7


Variety Classifications --...--...........----.--- ------------- -

Recommended .......-----------.-------- --------------------

Promising ..............-...-- .......-..----..----------

Not Recommended -.................----------------

BUYING SEED .........-..---- ..-------- ----------..--------

DESCRIPTION OF RECOMMENDED AND PROMISING VARIETIES .......--...-----

Bean, Bush Snap ...... .............--------------------

Bean, Wax ..... ....-................ ---------------------

Bean, Pole ..................-----.-------- -- -------

Bean, Bush Lima ..-- .....-------------------------------

Beet ....--...---......------ ----.

Broccoli, Green Sprouting ........-..-- ....-- ----- ------------------

Cabbage .....-- -- --------------------------


Cantaloupe ....

Carrot ..........

Cauliflower

Celery ..........


Corn, Roasting Ear ..................-------------------

Corn, Sweet ..........-.............-------- --------

Cucumber .--.........------- -------------------

Eggplant ........---.......... --- ---------
Lettuce, Crisp Head or Iceberg Type --....-..---.------

Lettuce, Big Boston (Butterhead) ........----- ----------

Onion ..-....-- -- ..... ....-------

Pea, English ............. ....... ......... -- -----

Pepper ...-. -- ...--------

Potato ......-- ..-----------------

Squash ....- ...------ ---------

Tomato ...-....--........---------------------

Watermelon ....... ---... --------


..... .. -.. -- 19

..~..~.-.-- .... 19

......- ...-. 20

.. ~~.--.-... 20

.-.. --.- 21

-----.. .-.-. --.-- 22

-....- 22
.22

---- -----.-.--. 22

------------... -.--.-.-..-- 23

............................ 23

--......------..--- -- 23

--.................. 24

....--.. 24

....-............--......... 26

................ ......... 27

.....---...............--....---- 28


---------- --------------------

.... I ------ ------------------

---------- -----------------------

-------------------------------


-------------------------

--------------- .-

-------------------------









COMMERCIAL VEGETABLE
VARIETIES FOR FLORIDA
By E. M. ANDERSEN,' J. R. BECKENBACH, A. H. EDDINS, E. N.
McCUBBIN, R. W. RUPRECHT, F. S. JAMISON and E. C. MINNUM

INTRODUCTION
It is always wise to know what vegetable varieties are best
adapted to a section. Growers, seedsmen, and research workers
alike now recognize the tremendous varietal variation in soils
adaptability, photoperiod requirements, eating and shipping
quality, and resistance to cold, heat, drought, excess water,
diseases and insects. During times of possible seed shortages
it is imperative to know what varieties are well enough adapted
to a section to be planted as second choice when seed of the best
adapted varieties cannot be obtained. The United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture, the Florida Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion, other state experiment stations, seed companies, and private
growers are constantly developing and introducing new varieties
and strains of vegetables. Although only a fraction of these new
vegetable varieties and variety strains have been tried in Flor-
ida, some of those tried have proven to be eminently adapted
to certain sections. Other new varieties probably are adapted
to conditions in Florida and many undoubtedly are unadapted.
The Florida Agricultural Experiment Station conducts a state-
wide program of testing new varieties and strains of vegetables
in comparison with established varieties. Its purpose is to find
which of the existing varieties and strains of each of the major
kinds of vegetables are best adapted to commercial production
in the principal vegetable producing sections of Florida.
This bulletin is the first of a series which will report the results
of the vegetable variety trials conducted by the Florida Agri-
cultural Experiment Station. It is designed to be of use mainly
to commercial growers, but many of the varieties listed as
recommended or promising for commercial production will also
be found to be desirable for home gardens. In addition, some
varieties which are unadapted for market and shipping may
be excellent in home gardens.2 Recommendations are given
1 Formerly Associate Horticulturist, Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station.
2 Home gardeners will find Florida Agricultural Extension Service Bul.
119, "The Florida Home Garden," more adapted to their needs.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


only for those crops that have been recently tried by Experi-
ment Station workers.

TERMINOLOGY

There is some confusion in the usage of the terms kind, type,
variety, strain, and stock in the horticultural classification of
the gradation of plant differences in vegetables. There are no
generally accepted hard and fast rules or standards which de-
termine the degree of plant difference necessary to separate
these classes. In this bulletin the flexible usage of the terms
which seems to be most common in the commercial seed indus-
try is followed.
Kind.-Kind is the most inclusive term. According to Work,3
"A kind includes all the plants which, in general usage, are
accepted as a single vegetable as, for example, tomato, cabbage,
bean. This is not the same as the genus or the species of botani-
cal classification. The species Brassica oleracea includes several
kinds (cabbage, cauliflower, and others). The beans come from
more than 1 species (Phaseolus vulgaris, P. lunatus, and so
forth) ". However, in this bulletin, snap bean and lima bean
are listed as 2 different kinds.
Type.-Varieties of the same kind are said to belong to the
same type when they have the same general gross character-
istics. The type name is usually a descriptive adjective applied
to the kind name or it is the name of a well-known variety
which is characteristic of the type, as red cabbage, savoy cab-
bage, and Copenhagen Market type of cabbage.
Variety.-All commercial vegetable seed has a variety name.
The term is less inclusive than are kind and type, and more in-
clusive than are strain and stock. Plants are said to belong
to the same variety and entitled to an identifying name if they
are practically alike in their major plant characteristics, espe-
cially in the portion used in commerce. Some varieties are so
similar that they are considered to be the same and their names
are listed as synonyms.
Strain.-Plants of a given named variety are said to belong
to a distinct strain if they differ in any important respect which
is not considered large enough to be a variety difference. Strain
names or numbers are commonly appended to the variety name

a WORK, PAUL. Better Seed for Commercial Vegetable Growers. Cornell
Ext. Bul. 122: 1-24. 1935.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


only for those crops that have been recently tried by Experi-
ment Station workers.

TERMINOLOGY

There is some confusion in the usage of the terms kind, type,
variety, strain, and stock in the horticultural classification of
the gradation of plant differences in vegetables. There are no
generally accepted hard and fast rules or standards which de-
termine the degree of plant difference necessary to separate
these classes. In this bulletin the flexible usage of the terms
which seems to be most common in the commercial seed indus-
try is followed.
Kind.-Kind is the most inclusive term. According to Work,3
"A kind includes all the plants which, in general usage, are
accepted as a single vegetable as, for example, tomato, cabbage,
bean. This is not the same as the genus or the species of botani-
cal classification. The species Brassica oleracea includes several
kinds (cabbage, cauliflower, and others). The beans come from
more than 1 species (Phaseolus vulgaris, P. lunatus, and so
forth) ". However, in this bulletin, snap bean and lima bean
are listed as 2 different kinds.
Type.-Varieties of the same kind are said to belong to the
same type when they have the same general gross character-
istics. The type name is usually a descriptive adjective applied
to the kind name or it is the name of a well-known variety
which is characteristic of the type, as red cabbage, savoy cab-
bage, and Copenhagen Market type of cabbage.
Variety.-All commercial vegetable seed has a variety name.
The term is less inclusive than are kind and type, and more in-
clusive than are strain and stock. Plants are said to belong
to the same variety and entitled to an identifying name if they
are practically alike in their major plant characteristics, espe-
cially in the portion used in commerce. Some varieties are so
similar that they are considered to be the same and their names
are listed as synonyms.
Strain.-Plants of a given named variety are said to belong
to a distinct strain if they differ in any important respect which
is not considered large enough to be a variety difference. Strain
names or numbers are commonly appended to the variety name

a WORK, PAUL. Better Seed for Commercial Vegetable Growers. Cornell
Ext. Bul. 122: 1-24. 1935.







Commercial Vegetable Varieties for Florida


to identify the strain. Strain differences are often in production
capacity, disease resistance, heat or cold resistance, and such
characters, rather than in the appearance of the plants under
ideal growing conditions.
Seedsmen ordinarily sell only 1 strain of a variety and give
strain ranking to the seed of each variety which they sell-and
rightfully so. Often they have selected for regional adaptability
or other factors. On the other hand, the strains of various
seedsmen may be very similar, or even identical when from the
same wholesale seed producer. Nevertheless, unless 2 strains are
known to be practically alike in all respects, it is safer to consider
them different when ordering seed.
Stock.-The stock or lot number is a code reference which
enables a seedsman to trace a particular package of seed back
to the seed producer. Stock numbers change from year to year
for a given strain as the new crops of seed are harvested in
order to indicate the year of production. Each seedsman may
have several stocks of the same strain of seed, each stock differ-
ing from the others by location of the field in which the seed
was produced. Unknown differences in stocks of the same strain
of a variety occasionally exist. Discovery of such differences
often leads to the establishment of a new, improved strain. Most
progressive modern seed companies place stock or lot numbers
on all packages of their seed. Growers should record these
identification numbers or letters and use them in re-ordering
good strains, avoiding unadapted strains, and in correspondence
about seed.

VARIETY RECOMMENDATIONS
SECTIONAL DIFFERENCES
Because of the varied climatic conditions and soil types in
Florida, variety trials are located in 7 of the principal vegetable
producing sections of the State of Florida where the Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station maintains stations or labora-
tories. Listed from north to south in the State, these locations
are as follows: Hastings, Gainesville, Sanford, Leesburg,
Bradenton, Belle Glade and Homestead. Variety recommenda-
tions are listed for the entire state in Table 1. However, where
trials in any particular area showed a variety to be unadapted,
this fact is recognized in the recommendations.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


VARIETY CLASSIFICATIONS
The varieties which have been tested by Agricultural Experi-
ment Station workers are listed in Table 1, under 1 of 3 classi-
fications: Recommended (1); promising (2), and not recom-
mended (3). The names and addresses of sources of seed are
given in Table 2. Brief descriptions of recommended and promis-
ing varieties are given.
Recommended.-The principal varieties and strains now grown
commercially in a section plus the new varieties proven adapted
to the section by 2 or more years of replicated trials are called
"Recommended." Desirable strains of most recommended va-
rieties are well known to the growers.
Promising.-Tested varieties and strains which look promis-
ing for commercial trials by vegetable growers in the section
are called "Promising."
Not Recommended.-Tested varieties and strains which in
these trials seem to be unadapted for commercial planting in a
section are listed as "Not Recommended."
It should be emphasized that these recommendations are very
general and are not to be construed as final. It is entirely pos-
sible that individual farmers will find that, for their own particu-
lar conditions, certain of the "Recommended" and "Promising"
varieties are unprofitable and certain of the "Not Recommended"
varieties are profitable. Additional strains of a variety may be
equal to the strains tested, or they may be better or worse. Of
course, no experienced vegetable grower would switch com-
pletely to a new variety or strain of a variety without thoroughly
testing that new variety or strain on his own land during his
main cropping season. The authors do believe, however, that
a farmer can safely plant the recommended varieties, profitably
test the promising varieties, and that he will usually find it un-
profitable to try any of the varieties listed as "Not Recom-
mended" for his section.

BUYING SEED
Catalog buying of recommended and promising varieties from
reliable seed companies is satisfactory, but growers usually ob-
tain more satisfactory service and often obtain more adapted
strains from seedsmen who maintain research staffs, stores, or
field representatives in the producing section involved. Seed of
all varieties mentioned in this bulletin probably will be available




TABLE 1.-RECOMMENDATIONS REGARDING VEGETABLE VARIETIES FOR


Recommended


Bountiful
Stringless Black Valentine
Tendergreen

Pencil Pod Black Wax
Sure Crop Wax


Bean, Green


Bean, Wax


Bean, Pole


Promising


Florida Belle
Plentiful
Stringless Green Pod

Florida White Wax
Improved Kidney Wax


Not Recommended


French Horticulture
Full Measure


Bean, Bush Lima Fordhook Baby Fordhook Baby Potato Dreer's
Henderson Burpee Dreer's Wonder
Jackson Wonder Burpee Improved Wood's Prolific

Beet Detroit Dark Red Crosby Egyptian
Early Wonder

Broccoli Italian Green Sprouting Italian Green Sprouting Italian Green Sprouting
(Early Strain) (Medium Strain) (Late Strain)


Early Copenhagen Market
Early Jersey Wakefield
(North Fla.)
Early Winnigstadt
Glory of Enkhuizen
Large Late Copenhagen Market
Red Acre
Red Rock


America
American Drumhead Savoy
Cannon Ball
Dark Green Copenhagen
Market
Golden Acre
Green Acre
Marion Market
Resistant Detroit


All Head Select Penn State Ballhead
All Seasons Wisconsin Hollander
Baby Head Wisconsin No. 8
Danish Ballhead
Early Round Dutch
Globe
Hollander
Louisiana Copenhagen Market
Louisiana Winter
Midseason Market
Oakview Ballhead


Crop


Kentucky Wonder
McCaslan


Cabbage


~~


COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION.









TABLE 1.-RECOMMENDATIONS REGARDING VEGETABLE VARIETIES FOR COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION.-(Continued)

Crop Recommended Promising Not Recommended


Cantaloupe Crop not generally recommended Hale's Best Banana Hale's Best No. 36
Honey Rock Bender Surprise Hearts of Gold
Smith's Perfect Bottomly Honey Dew
Cuban Castilian
Green Fleshed Rocky Dew

Carrot Danvers Half Long Red Cored Chantenay Chantenay
Imperator Streamliner Long Orange
Morse Bunching Tendersweet
Nantes or Coreless

Cauliflower Extra Early No. 27 Ama Dry Weather
Perfected Snowball Burpeeana Early American Snowball
Snowball A. Danamerica Extra Early Erfurt
Snowball X Early Purple Head Fordhook
Early Snowball (All varieties of Broccoli-Cauliflower)
Snowdrift
_________________________________Super Snowball__________

Celery Golden Plume Cornell 19 Cornell 6 Cornell 10-10
Golden Self Blanching Easy Blanching Pascal Cornell 9 Utah
Summer or Florida Pascal


Corn,
Roasting Ear


Improved White Dent
(Central and North Fla.)
Oklahoma Silvermine
Snowflake
Trucker Favorite
(North Fla. only)
White Tuxpan
(South Fla. only)


Improved White Dent
(South Fla.)
Nassau
(South Fla. only)
Sure Cropper
U. S. No. 34
Yellow Tuxpan








Recommended


Corn, Sweet






Cucumber




Eggplant




Lettuce





Onion


Promising


Country Gentleman
Stowell Evergreen


Golden Cross Bantam (Hybrid)
loana (Hybrid)
Stowell Evergreen
(North Fla. only)




Colorado
Early Fortune
Stays Green (Long Type)


Fort Myers Market




Iceberg Type
Imperial 44
Imperial 847
White Boston (Butterhead)



Creole, Red or White
Early Grano


Crop


-----~~,-----------~-~


Straight 8









Great Lakes
No. 339
No. 456




Crystal Wax
Yellow Bermuda


Not Recommended


Extra Early Bantam Gold Bond
Gold Rush Narcross
Golden Bantam Seneca 60
Golden Colonel Silver Cross
Louisiana No. 1 Bantam No. 1
Louisiana No. 2
Tendergold Whipple Early Yellow

Black Diamond
Davis Perfect
Giant Long China
Sunnybrook

Black Beauty
Florida Highbush
Long Purple
New Hampshire Hybrid
New York Improved Purple

Columbia No. 1
Cosberg
Imperial No. 152
Imperial No. 615
Imperial No. 850
New York No. 12

All Globe Varieties
Sweet Spanish


--









TABLE 1.-RECOMMENDATIONS REGARDING VEGETABLE VARIETIES FOR COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION.-(Continued)

Crop Recommended Promising Not Recommended
Crop


Little Marvel


Blight-Resistant Worldbeater
California Wonder
Calwonder
Hungarian Yellow Wax (hot)
Neapolitan
Worldbeater, Blight-Resistant


Bliss Triumph (Dade Co., Ever-
glades, West Coast and West
Florida sections)
Katahdin (Hastings and LaCrosse
sections)
Sn-t b


Hundredfold
Laxtonian
Laxton's Progress




Giant Cayenne (hot)
Heifer Horn (hot)
Roumanian


Chippewa (Dade Co.)
Pontiac (Dade Co.)
Sequoia (Hastings and
LaCrosse sections)


Alderman
Giant Stride
Improved Dwarf Telephone
Morse Market
Thomas Laxton
World Record

Colossal
Early Giant
Fordhook
IKing of the North
Oshkosh
Sunnybrook
Windsor A


Earlaine
Houma
Irish Cobbler
Mesaba
Red Warba
Russet Burbank


Spaulding Rose
Warba
White House


___ __ __ __ I _

Squash Cocozelle Improved Black Zucchini Benning White Bush Scallop
Early Prolific Straightneck Yankee Hybrid Connecticut Straightneck
Early White Bush or Mammoth Early Yellow Bush Scallop
White Bush Scallop Giant Yellow Summer Crookneck
Early Yellow Summer Straightneck
Giant Yellow Summer Straightneck
Table Queen or Acorn
Wood's Early Prolific
The different varieties have proved to be adapted to those sections of the State indicated in this table.


Pepper






Potato*


I -







Recommended


Grothen's Globe (except spring in
South Fla.)
Marglobe (North Fla. only)
Pritchard or Scarlet Topper
Rutgers (except early fall plant-
ings)


Blacklee
Cannon Ball
Dixie Queen
Tom Watson


Promising


Cleo
Colco Globe
Michigan State Forcing
Pan America
Stokesdale
Valiant (early fall only)
Wasatch Beauty
(Dade Co. only)


Crop


Tomato**


Dude Creek


** Tomatoes are not recommended for growing as a commercial crop on muck soils.


-------


Watermelon


Not Recommended


Acme Glovel
Avon Early Greater
Bison Gulf St
Bloomsdale Marglol
Bonny Best John Ba
Bounty June Pi
Break O'Day Landret
Brown's Special Louisiai
Bryan Self Topper Marglol
Buist Globe North
Burbank Matchle
Cardinal New X
Clark's Early N. Y. S
Earliana Pearson
Early Baltimore Penn S1
Early Detroit Potenta
Early Shipper Red Ca]
Early Stone Red He
Firesteel Red Ro
Fisher San Di
Fletcher's Special Santa C
Floriglobe Scarlet
Globe
Valiant (except early fall)
Victor


Baltimore
ate Market
be
ler
nk
h
la Red
e (except
Fla.)
ss

tate

tate
te
P
art
ck
ego Stone
lara Carmen
Dawn


c







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


from commercial seedsmen but will not be available from the
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, the United States De-
partment of Agriculture or other experiment stations who sup-
plied certain samples of seed for these trials.

DESCRIPTION OF RECOMMENDED AND PROMISING
VARIETIES
BEAN, SNAP BUSH
BOUNTIFUL is characterized by light green pods that are
very long, flat, stringless, slightly fibrous and of good quality.
Plants are large and prolific.
FLORIDA BELLE (FES),4 Fig. 1, has pods that are light
green in color, long, slightly oval or semi-flat, straight, stringless
and of good quality. Plants are resistant to some forms of rust
and mildew, resistant to common bean mosaic, tolerant of heat
and drought, and more productive than Stringless Black Valen-
tine and Tendergreen. Seed color is a vinaceous buff splashed
with purple. Florida Belle is a selection from a cross between
Stringless Black Valentine and a close relative of U. S. No. 5
Refugee, backcrossed subsequently with Stringless Black Valen-
tine. It is a new variety released to seedsmen in the spring of
1943 by Dr. G. R. Townsend of the Florida Agricultural Experi-
ment Station and Dr. B. L. Wade of the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture.
PLENTIFUL pods are light green, exceptionally long, flat,
straight, stringless, and of good quality. Plants are similar to
those of Bountiful, high, large and prolific. Speckling on pods
under some growing conditions may be a disadvantage.
STRINGLESS BLACK VALENTINE has pods which are
silvery-green, long, straight, oval to almost round, stringless
and of good quality.
STRINGLESS GREENPOD produces pods that are medium
green, long, almost round, stringless and of good quality. Plants
are large and prolific.
TENDERGREEN produces pods which are dark green, long,
round, nearly straight, meaty, stringless and without fiber, and
of excellent quality. Canners prefer it over all other varieties
in Florida.

SRefers to source of seed used in these trials. Reference to seed source
occurs only when the variety described is new or uncommon.






Commercial Vegetable Varieties for Florida


Fig. 2.-Florida White Wax beans.


BEAN, WAX
FLORIDA WHITE WAX (FES), Fig. 2, has pods that are
almost white, except for a pale yellow line along both sutures.
Pods are medium long, slightly oval or semi-flat, straight, string-
less and of good quality. Plants are resistant to some forms of
rust and mildew, resistant to common bean mosaic, tolerant of
heat and drought, and fairly productive. Seed color is a shiny
dark chestnut brown. Florida White Wax is a selection from
a cross between Brittle Wax and a close relative of U. S. No. 5
Refugee. It is a new variety released to seedsmen in the spring
of 1943 by Dr. G. R. Townsend of the Florida Agricultural Ex-
periment Station and Dr. B. L. Wade of the United States De-
partment of Agriculture.
IMPROVED KIDNEY WAX has oval pods of light yellow that
are fleshy, stringless and of excellent quality. Plants are large
and erect.
PENCIL POD BLACK WAX has round pods, slightly curved,
fleshy, deep yellow, stringless and without fiber, of excellent
quality. Plants large and prolific.
SURECROP WAX has pods that are deep yellow, long, thick,
semi-flat, stringless but little fiber, and of good quality. Plants
large, sturdy and prolific.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


BEAN, POLE
KENTUCKY WONDER. Strong, vigorous vine, remaining
productive over a long period. Produces long pods, curved and
slightly twisted, almost round, brittle, almost without fiber and
with a distinct flavor.
McCASLAN. Excellent for dry shelled as well as for snap
beans. Vine vigorous, productive, produces large pods, medium
green, stringless when young and of good quality.
/ BEAN, BUSH LIMA
/ BABY FORDHOOK. Plants small but vigorous and prolific.
Pods shorter and thicker than those of Henderson Bush. Seed
thick, of high quality. Will produce satisfactorily in most areas
where Henderson Bush is grown.
FORDHOOK produces a large, erect plant. Pods, 4 inches
long, are straight and contain 3 or 4 and sometimes 5 thick
beans of high quality.
HENDERSON BUSH. Plants medium large, productive under
much wider cultural conditions than Fordhook. Pods small,
contain 3 or 4 seeds of baby lima type.
JACKSON WONDER. Large vine inclined to spread, pods
about 3 to 31/2 inches long, contain 4 to 5 moderately thick seeds.
Seeds are mottled with purplish-red markings. Produces satis-
factorily at relatively high temperatures.
BEET
CROSBY EGYPTIAN. This old variety produces a flat globe-
or turnip-shaped root of good color. Tops are good for bunching.
It has a tendency to zoning or formation of light colored rings
developing in roots, particularly during warm weather.
DETROIT DARK RED has deep ox-blood red, globular roots
and medium sized dark green tops tinged with red. Color of top
and root will tend to be lighter when grown during warm weather.
EARLY WONDER. Medium sized tops of good green color.
Roots round to semi-globular in shape and of good red color
and of excellent quality.
BROCCOLI, GREEN SPROUTING
ITALIAN GREEN SPROUTING, EARLY STRAIN, has a
tall branching plant which forms a compact head of bluish-
green flower buds. After the main head has been removed side
shoots with small heads or sprouts continue to develop.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


BEAN, POLE
KENTUCKY WONDER. Strong, vigorous vine, remaining
productive over a long period. Produces long pods, curved and
slightly twisted, almost round, brittle, almost without fiber and
with a distinct flavor.
McCASLAN. Excellent for dry shelled as well as for snap
beans. Vine vigorous, productive, produces large pods, medium
green, stringless when young and of good quality.
/ BEAN, BUSH LIMA
/ BABY FORDHOOK. Plants small but vigorous and prolific.
Pods shorter and thicker than those of Henderson Bush. Seed
thick, of high quality. Will produce satisfactorily in most areas
where Henderson Bush is grown.
FORDHOOK produces a large, erect plant. Pods, 4 inches
long, are straight and contain 3 or 4 and sometimes 5 thick
beans of high quality.
HENDERSON BUSH. Plants medium large, productive under
much wider cultural conditions than Fordhook. Pods small,
contain 3 or 4 seeds of baby lima type.
JACKSON WONDER. Large vine inclined to spread, pods
about 3 to 31/2 inches long, contain 4 to 5 moderately thick seeds.
Seeds are mottled with purplish-red markings. Produces satis-
factorily at relatively high temperatures.
BEET
CROSBY EGYPTIAN. This old variety produces a flat globe-
or turnip-shaped root of good color. Tops are good for bunching.
It has a tendency to zoning or formation of light colored rings
developing in roots, particularly during warm weather.
DETROIT DARK RED has deep ox-blood red, globular roots
and medium sized dark green tops tinged with red. Color of top
and root will tend to be lighter when grown during warm weather.
EARLY WONDER. Medium sized tops of good green color.
Roots round to semi-globular in shape and of good red color
and of excellent quality.
BROCCOLI, GREEN SPROUTING
ITALIAN GREEN SPROUTING, EARLY STRAIN, has a
tall branching plant which forms a compact head of bluish-
green flower buds. After the main head has been removed side
shoots with small heads or sprouts continue to develop.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


BEAN, POLE
KENTUCKY WONDER. Strong, vigorous vine, remaining
productive over a long period. Produces long pods, curved and
slightly twisted, almost round, brittle, almost without fiber and
with a distinct flavor.
McCASLAN. Excellent for dry shelled as well as for snap
beans. Vine vigorous, productive, produces large pods, medium
green, stringless when young and of good quality.
/ BEAN, BUSH LIMA
/ BABY FORDHOOK. Plants small but vigorous and prolific.
Pods shorter and thicker than those of Henderson Bush. Seed
thick, of high quality. Will produce satisfactorily in most areas
where Henderson Bush is grown.
FORDHOOK produces a large, erect plant. Pods, 4 inches
long, are straight and contain 3 or 4 and sometimes 5 thick
beans of high quality.
HENDERSON BUSH. Plants medium large, productive under
much wider cultural conditions than Fordhook. Pods small,
contain 3 or 4 seeds of baby lima type.
JACKSON WONDER. Large vine inclined to spread, pods
about 3 to 31/2 inches long, contain 4 to 5 moderately thick seeds.
Seeds are mottled with purplish-red markings. Produces satis-
factorily at relatively high temperatures.
BEET
CROSBY EGYPTIAN. This old variety produces a flat globe-
or turnip-shaped root of good color. Tops are good for bunching.
It has a tendency to zoning or formation of light colored rings
developing in roots, particularly during warm weather.
DETROIT DARK RED has deep ox-blood red, globular roots
and medium sized dark green tops tinged with red. Color of top
and root will tend to be lighter when grown during warm weather.
EARLY WONDER. Medium sized tops of good green color.
Roots round to semi-globular in shape and of good red color
and of excellent quality.
BROCCOLI, GREEN SPROUTING
ITALIAN GREEN SPROUTING, EARLY STRAIN, has a
tall branching plant which forms a compact head of bluish-
green flower buds. After the main head has been removed side
shoots with small heads or sprouts continue to develop.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


BEAN, POLE
KENTUCKY WONDER. Strong, vigorous vine, remaining
productive over a long period. Produces long pods, curved and
slightly twisted, almost round, brittle, almost without fiber and
with a distinct flavor.
McCASLAN. Excellent for dry shelled as well as for snap
beans. Vine vigorous, productive, produces large pods, medium
green, stringless when young and of good quality.
/ BEAN, BUSH LIMA
/ BABY FORDHOOK. Plants small but vigorous and prolific.
Pods shorter and thicker than those of Henderson Bush. Seed
thick, of high quality. Will produce satisfactorily in most areas
where Henderson Bush is grown.
FORDHOOK produces a large, erect plant. Pods, 4 inches
long, are straight and contain 3 or 4 and sometimes 5 thick
beans of high quality.
HENDERSON BUSH. Plants medium large, productive under
much wider cultural conditions than Fordhook. Pods small,
contain 3 or 4 seeds of baby lima type.
JACKSON WONDER. Large vine inclined to spread, pods
about 3 to 31/2 inches long, contain 4 to 5 moderately thick seeds.
Seeds are mottled with purplish-red markings. Produces satis-
factorily at relatively high temperatures.
BEET
CROSBY EGYPTIAN. This old variety produces a flat globe-
or turnip-shaped root of good color. Tops are good for bunching.
It has a tendency to zoning or formation of light colored rings
developing in roots, particularly during warm weather.
DETROIT DARK RED has deep ox-blood red, globular roots
and medium sized dark green tops tinged with red. Color of top
and root will tend to be lighter when grown during warm weather.
EARLY WONDER. Medium sized tops of good green color.
Roots round to semi-globular in shape and of good red color
and of excellent quality.
BROCCOLI, GREEN SPROUTING
ITALIAN GREEN SPROUTING, EARLY STRAIN, has a
tall branching plant which forms a compact head of bluish-
green flower buds. After the main head has been removed side
shoots with small heads or sprouts continue to develop.







Commercial Vegetable Varieties for Florida


ITALIAN GREEN SPROUTING, MEDIUM STRAIN, is simi-
lar to the Early Strain but 1 to 2 weeks later than Early Strain.

CABBAGE
AMERICA (Kil.) is similar to Early Copenhagen Market.
AMERICAN DRUMHEAD SAVOY. Plants medium sized,
leaves broad, closely and uniformly savoyed. Heads medium
to large in size and late in maturing. Heads of Savoy cabbage
will not become as firm as those of most other varieties and the
variety should be grown only for established markets.
CANNON BALL (Con.) is similar to Early Copenhagen Mar-
ket and -possibly more uniform in maturity than many Early
Copenhagen Market strains.
DARK GREEN COPENHAGEN MARKET (FM) is a selection
of Copenhagen Market. It is round-headed and as early, prolific
and uniform in maturing as Early Copenhagen Market. The
foliage leaves and heads of this variety are deeper green in color
than those of Early Copenhagen Market, which should make it
more attractive on the markets.
EARLY COPENHAGEN MARKET is the leading variety in
Florida. Plants of this variety are relatively small, very uniform
in heading and produce prominent, more or less globular heads
at maturity.
EARLY JERSEY WAKEFIELD is an early-maturing variety
that produces small, compact, pointed heads of good quality.
Small plants allow for close plantings. Variety is more resistant
to cold injury than most varieties.
EARLY WINNIGSTADT (FM) is a second early or midseason
variety that forms small heart-shaped heads with the leaves
having a distinct twist at the point of the head.
GLORY OF ENKHUISEN is a second-early or midseason va-
riety grown extensively in some sections of the state. The plants
are vigorous, relatively large and produce yields which are
usually higher than those of Early Copenhagen Market. It
attains marketable maturity 10 days to 2 weeks later than Early
Copenhagen Market and the heads continue to increase in size
and solidity for 2 to 3 weeks after marketable maturity without
cracking open. It fails, however, to mature as uniformly as
Early Copenhagen Market.
GOLDEN ACRE is an extra early, high-yielding variety of
the Early Copenhagen Market type. Heads are round with the







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


interior having a yellow to slightly golden color. CAUTION:
-YIELD and QUALITY ARE EXCELLENT, BUT IT MUST BE
HARVESTED AT MARKETABLE MATURITY TO PREVENT
LOSS FROM BURST HEADS.
GREEN ACRE (Asgr., Kil.) is a selection from Golden Acre.
It is notable for its dark-green color and somewhat elongated
head.
LARGE LATE COPENHAGEN MARKET is offered by some
seedsmen and preferred by some growers. The plants of this
variety are non-uniform in heading and they produce non-promi-
nent, more or less globular heads at maturity. It is 10 days to
2 weeks later than Early Copenhagen Market. Some seedsmen
have not clearly indicated the difference between the "Early"
and the "Large Late" type of Copenhagen Market. The 2 types
have been used interchangeably simply as Copenhagen Market.
This has led to much confusion and, disappointment with the
variety. Every effort should be made by seedsmen and growers
to keep the 2 types of Copenhagen Market separated.
MARION MARKET (FM) is a yellows-resistant strain of
Large Late Copenhagen Market. It lacks uniformity.
RED ACRE is an early, small deep red, round-headed variety,
maturity slightly later than Early Copenhagen Market.
RED ROCK produces hard, small to medium, deep purplish
red, round heads.
RESISTANT DETROIT (FM) is a yellows-resistant strain
of Golden Acre.
CANTALOUPE
HALE'S BEST produces a uniformly shaped fruit that is com-
pletely netted. Fruits are round, well-netted, with ribs, and
average about 3 pounds in weight. Flesh thick, deep salmon in
color and of excellent quality. This is the best variety if canta-
Topes are to be shipped.
HONEY ROCK. This variety is satisfactory for home use
and local markets. It is an early variety producing fruit weigh-
ing 2 to 3 pounds. Melon has thick orange flesh of good quality.
SMITH'S PERFECT. The vines of this variety are apparently
immune to downy mildew. The fruit varies considerably in ap-
pearance and quality. Usually the melon will average 4 pounds
in weight. The flesh is thick, orange in color and of good quality,
even during rainy weather. The rind is greenish-yellow in
color without ribs and only partially netted.







Commercial Vegetable Varieties for Florida


CARROT
DANVERS HALF LONG has bright orange, tapered, blunt
ended roots. Tops are large.
' IMPERATOR is of the long bunching type. Roots are bright
range to center, long tapered and blunt ended. Tops are large.
MORSE BUNCHING is of the long bunching type. Roots are
bright orange, long tapered and blunt ended. Tops are large.
NANTES OR CORELESS has bright orange roots which are
cylindrical, blunt ended, and contain an inconspicuous core. The
quality of root is extremely good but the tops are small and
poorly attached to root, making it undesirable for shipping.'
RED CORED CHANTENAY is an improved type of Chante-
nay. The roots are medium long, slightly tapered and the in-
terior of good color and quality.
STREAMLINER (FM) is of the long bunching type. Roots
are bright orange, long tapered and blunt ended. Tops are large.

\ CAULIFLOWER
AMA (Asgr.) produces good quality, medium sized heads
that are well covered by inner leaves which help in blanching
and as cold protection.
BURPEEANA (Bur.) is a very uniform variety which has
produced a high percentage cut of medium sized, high quality
heads.
DANAMERICA produces medium sized heads.
EARLY SNOWBALL (Bur.) produces medium to large heads,
similar to those of Perfected Snowball.
EARLY PURPLE HEAD (Har.) is a very promising high
quality variety with a purple tinged tall curd, in a large, well
protected head. The plant is very large.
EXTRA EARLY NO. 27 (Kil.) produces heads of medium
size. Seed was imported, however, and probably will not be
available in America for the duration of the war.
PERFECTED SNOWBALL (Har.) is a promising large-headed
variety not quite as uniform as Burpeeana.
SNOWBALL A (FM) is a variety somewhat similar to Burpee-
ana, but less uniform. Size of heads seemed somewhat smaller
than for Snowball X, but percentage cut was larger than for
Snowball X.







Commercial Vegetable Varieties for Florida


CARROT
DANVERS HALF LONG has bright orange, tapered, blunt
ended roots. Tops are large.
' IMPERATOR is of the long bunching type. Roots are bright
range to center, long tapered and blunt ended. Tops are large.
MORSE BUNCHING is of the long bunching type. Roots are
bright orange, long tapered and blunt ended. Tops are large.
NANTES OR CORELESS has bright orange roots which are
cylindrical, blunt ended, and contain an inconspicuous core. The
quality of root is extremely good but the tops are small and
poorly attached to root, making it undesirable for shipping.'
RED CORED CHANTENAY is an improved type of Chante-
nay. The roots are medium long, slightly tapered and the in-
terior of good color and quality.
STREAMLINER (FM) is of the long bunching type. Roots
are bright orange, long tapered and blunt ended. Tops are large.

\ CAULIFLOWER
AMA (Asgr.) produces good quality, medium sized heads
that are well covered by inner leaves which help in blanching
and as cold protection.
BURPEEANA (Bur.) is a very uniform variety which has
produced a high percentage cut of medium sized, high quality
heads.
DANAMERICA produces medium sized heads.
EARLY SNOWBALL (Bur.) produces medium to large heads,
similar to those of Perfected Snowball.
EARLY PURPLE HEAD (Har.) is a very promising high
quality variety with a purple tinged tall curd, in a large, well
protected head. The plant is very large.
EXTRA EARLY NO. 27 (Kil.) produces heads of medium
size. Seed was imported, however, and probably will not be
available in America for the duration of the war.
PERFECTED SNOWBALL (Har.) is a promising large-headed
variety not quite as uniform as Burpeeana.
SNOWBALL A (FM) is a variety somewhat similar to Burpee-
ana, but less uniform. Size of heads seemed somewhat smaller
than for Snowball X, but percentage cut was larger than for
Snowball X.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


SNOWBALL X (FM) is similar to Snowball A, but possibly
heads are larger and the plants less uniform.
SNOWDRIFT (Asgr., Kil.) produces large heads similar to
those of Perfected Snowball.
SUPER SNOWBALL (Asgr., Kil.) is a very uniform variety
which has produced a high percentage cut of medium sized, high
quality heads. It is similar to Burpeeana but not the same
strain.
CELERY
CORNELL NO. 19 (CU). This variety represents a distinct
new type. The petioles are thick, fleshy, nearly stringless and
in general have the quality of Summer Pascal, yet the plant is
easily blanched to an attractive creamy white color.
GOLDEN PLUME is often called Special by Florida growers.
Strains of this variety vary considerably in plant characteristics.
In general, the variety has relatively broad, fairly thick petioles
which are short below the first branches, although this latter
characteristic varies greatly with the different strains. The ribs
are broad and widely separated. Strains of Golden Plume are
early and thus better suited for early winter and spring culture.
GOLDEN SELF-BLANCHING, sometimes called Old Golden,
is probably the most important variety grown. The petioles are
slender and fairly long below the first branches, ribs are nar-
rower than those of Golden Plume and are relatively close to-
gether.
SUMMER PASCAL is a green celery of high quality. The
plant is dark green in color, has exceedingly thick semi-round
petioles with relatively few strings. Strains or closely related
varieties vary in length of petioles, in the number of petioles
and ribs and size of heart developed.
CORN, ROASTING EAR
IMPROVED WHITE DENT is an early white, very heavy
husked roasting-ear corn when harvested at the proper stage.
Ears are 10 to 12 inches long with 16 to 18 rows of kernels.
NASSAU (Wo). A recently introduced variety producing
large ears that are relatively resistant to worm injury. The
variety appears particularly adapted to growing on muck.
OKLAHOMA SILVERMINE produces large well filled ears.
The ears have 14 to 18 rows of kernels and under good growing
conditions will be more than 10 inches long.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


SNOWBALL X (FM) is similar to Snowball A, but possibly
heads are larger and the plants less uniform.
SNOWDRIFT (Asgr., Kil.) produces large heads similar to
those of Perfected Snowball.
SUPER SNOWBALL (Asgr., Kil.) is a very uniform variety
which has produced a high percentage cut of medium sized, high
quality heads. It is similar to Burpeeana but not the same
strain.
CELERY
CORNELL NO. 19 (CU). This variety represents a distinct
new type. The petioles are thick, fleshy, nearly stringless and
in general have the quality of Summer Pascal, yet the plant is
easily blanched to an attractive creamy white color.
GOLDEN PLUME is often called Special by Florida growers.
Strains of this variety vary considerably in plant characteristics.
In general, the variety has relatively broad, fairly thick petioles
which are short below the first branches, although this latter
characteristic varies greatly with the different strains. The ribs
are broad and widely separated. Strains of Golden Plume are
early and thus better suited for early winter and spring culture.
GOLDEN SELF-BLANCHING, sometimes called Old Golden,
is probably the most important variety grown. The petioles are
slender and fairly long below the first branches, ribs are nar-
rower than those of Golden Plume and are relatively close to-
gether.
SUMMER PASCAL is a green celery of high quality. The
plant is dark green in color, has exceedingly thick semi-round
petioles with relatively few strings. Strains or closely related
varieties vary in length of petioles, in the number of petioles
and ribs and size of heart developed.
CORN, ROASTING EAR
IMPROVED WHITE DENT is an early white, very heavy
husked roasting-ear corn when harvested at the proper stage.
Ears are 10 to 12 inches long with 16 to 18 rows of kernels.
NASSAU (Wo). A recently introduced variety producing
large ears that are relatively resistant to worm injury. The
variety appears particularly adapted to growing on muck.
OKLAHOMA SILVERMINE produces large well filled ears.
The ears have 14 to 18 rows of kernels and under good growing
conditions will be more than 10 inches long.







Commercial Vegetable Varieties for Florida


SNOWFLAKE is similar to Improved White Dent, but has
pointed kernels and a tighter husk which protects the ears
somewhat from worm injury.
SURECROPPER (TES) is a new roasting ear variety de-
veloped by Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, similar to
Snowflake but has perhaps slightly sweeter kernels.
TRUCKER'S FAVORITE is a splendid variety. While it does
not have the quality of many of the sweet corns, it is decidedly
better than most of the field corn varieties grown for roasting
ears. It is more vigorous than most of the sweet corns. The
ears have 12 to 14 rows of kernels and will average approxi-
mately 10 inches in length.
U. S. NO. 34 (USDA), a roasting ear type with exceptionally
heavy husks which make it earworm-resistant, has great possi-
bilities. It was developed by the Puerto Rico Agricultural Ex-
periment Station.
WHITE TUXPAN is a white, heavy husked, very large roast-
ing-ear corn with large ears, large kernels and a large plant.
YELLOW TUXPAN is similar to White Tuxpan, but has
yellow kernels.
CORN, SWEET
GOLDEN CROSS BANTAM is a hybrid sweet corn which will
produce satisfactorily in Florida. The ears have 10 to 14 rows
of light yellow kernels. The stalk is vigorous and will usually
produce 2 ears. The ears are small compared to roasting ear
corn but the high quality makes this a valuable variety to grow
for special markets.
COUNTRY GENTLEMAN is quite often called "Shoe Peg"
corn because the kernels are long, deep and are not arranged
in rows. The flavor is good but lack of vigor and susceptibility
to ear-worm damage limit its use as a commercial variety.
IOANA (Mar.) is a hybrid sweet corn quite similar to Golden
Cross Bantam. Ears are slightly larger and later in maturing,
while the plant is more vigorous.
STOWELL'S EVERGREEN is a standard variety of sweet
corn that produces ears 8 to 10 inches in length having 14 to 20
rows of white kernels of good quality. The plants are vigorous
and productive. Where large ears of sweet corn are desired,
this is an excellent variety.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


CUCUMBER
COLORADO produces dark green, cylindrically shaped fruits
that hold the color well after harvesting. The fruits are slightly
tapered at each end, will usually be 8 inches or more in length.
The vine is strong and vigorous.
EARLY FORTUNE is an old variety that compares favorably
with many of the newer varieties. It produces fruit approxi-
mately the same size as Colorado but the color may be a shade
lighter and the fruit slightly more tapering at the flower end.
STAYS GREEN, LONG TYPE, produces dark green fruits
slightly shorter than Colorado or Early Fortune. It is a few
days earlier than Colorado and produces many uniformly shaped
fruits.
STRAIGHT-8 fruits are remarkably uniform in shape, slightly
shorter than Colorado. Fruit color is medium green. Plants are
usually not as large as those of other varieties and the rows may
be closer when this variety is planted.
EGGPLANT
FT. MYERS MARKET (sometimes called MANATEE
SPECIAL) has strong, productive vines. Its fruits are a glossy,
purplish black color, roughly cylindrical in shape, but slightly
larger at the blossom end than at the stem end. Well grown
fruits are about 10 inches long and 5 to 6 inches in diameter
at marketable maturity. Its disadvantages are that it is slow
to come into production and is susceptible to Phomopsis blight.
LETTUCE, CRISP HEAD OR ICEBERG TYPE
IMPERIAL 44 has a medium sized, slightly flattened, short
stemmed, compact head. It has high resistance to bolting and
medium resistance to tipburn.
IMPERIAL 847 is similar to Imperial 44 but is slightly larger
under some conditions and not as sure-heading under most con-
ditions. It has medium resistance to bolting and tipburn.
GREAT LAKES (MSC) is a new variety introduced by Michi-
gan State College. It is a selection made at Michigan State Col-
lege out of selection No. 1478M of a Brittle Ice-Imperial 152
cross made by the late I. C. Jagger of the U. S. Department of
Agriculture. It will head in warmer weather than Imperial 44
and has a firmer, crisper, glossier, darker green head than Im-
perial 44. Furthermore, it is very resistant to tipburn and bolt-







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


CUCUMBER
COLORADO produces dark green, cylindrically shaped fruits
that hold the color well after harvesting. The fruits are slightly
tapered at each end, will usually be 8 inches or more in length.
The vine is strong and vigorous.
EARLY FORTUNE is an old variety that compares favorably
with many of the newer varieties. It produces fruit approxi-
mately the same size as Colorado but the color may be a shade
lighter and the fruit slightly more tapering at the flower end.
STAYS GREEN, LONG TYPE, produces dark green fruits
slightly shorter than Colorado or Early Fortune. It is a few
days earlier than Colorado and produces many uniformly shaped
fruits.
STRAIGHT-8 fruits are remarkably uniform in shape, slightly
shorter than Colorado. Fruit color is medium green. Plants are
usually not as large as those of other varieties and the rows may
be closer when this variety is planted.
EGGPLANT
FT. MYERS MARKET (sometimes called MANATEE
SPECIAL) has strong, productive vines. Its fruits are a glossy,
purplish black color, roughly cylindrical in shape, but slightly
larger at the blossom end than at the stem end. Well grown
fruits are about 10 inches long and 5 to 6 inches in diameter
at marketable maturity. Its disadvantages are that it is slow
to come into production and is susceptible to Phomopsis blight.
LETTUCE, CRISP HEAD OR ICEBERG TYPE
IMPERIAL 44 has a medium sized, slightly flattened, short
stemmed, compact head. It has high resistance to bolting and
medium resistance to tipburn.
IMPERIAL 847 is similar to Imperial 44 but is slightly larger
under some conditions and not as sure-heading under most con-
ditions. It has medium resistance to bolting and tipburn.
GREAT LAKES (MSC) is a new variety introduced by Michi-
gan State College. It is a selection made at Michigan State Col-
lege out of selection No. 1478M of a Brittle Ice-Imperial 152
cross made by the late I. C. Jagger of the U. S. Department of
Agriculture. It will head in warmer weather than Imperial 44
and has a firmer, crisper, glossier, darker green head than Im-
perial 44. Furthermore, it is very resistant to tipburn and bolt-







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


CUCUMBER
COLORADO produces dark green, cylindrically shaped fruits
that hold the color well after harvesting. The fruits are slightly
tapered at each end, will usually be 8 inches or more in length.
The vine is strong and vigorous.
EARLY FORTUNE is an old variety that compares favorably
with many of the newer varieties. It produces fruit approxi-
mately the same size as Colorado but the color may be a shade
lighter and the fruit slightly more tapering at the flower end.
STAYS GREEN, LONG TYPE, produces dark green fruits
slightly shorter than Colorado or Early Fortune. It is a few
days earlier than Colorado and produces many uniformly shaped
fruits.
STRAIGHT-8 fruits are remarkably uniform in shape, slightly
shorter than Colorado. Fruit color is medium green. Plants are
usually not as large as those of other varieties and the rows may
be closer when this variety is planted.
EGGPLANT
FT. MYERS MARKET (sometimes called MANATEE
SPECIAL) has strong, productive vines. Its fruits are a glossy,
purplish black color, roughly cylindrical in shape, but slightly
larger at the blossom end than at the stem end. Well grown
fruits are about 10 inches long and 5 to 6 inches in diameter
at marketable maturity. Its disadvantages are that it is slow
to come into production and is susceptible to Phomopsis blight.
LETTUCE, CRISP HEAD OR ICEBERG TYPE
IMPERIAL 44 has a medium sized, slightly flattened, short
stemmed, compact head. It has high resistance to bolting and
medium resistance to tipburn.
IMPERIAL 847 is similar to Imperial 44 but is slightly larger
under some conditions and not as sure-heading under most con-
ditions. It has medium resistance to bolting and tipburn.
GREAT LAKES (MSC) is a new variety introduced by Michi-
gan State College. It is a selection made at Michigan State Col-
lege out of selection No. 1478M of a Brittle Ice-Imperial 152
cross made by the late I. C. Jagger of the U. S. Department of
Agriculture. It will head in warmer weather than Imperial 44
and has a firmer, crisper, glossier, darker green head than Im-
perial 44. Furthermore, it is very resistant to tipburn and bolt-







Commercial Vegetable Varieties for Florida


ing. It is more ribbed and heads are much less uniform than
Imperial 44, however.
NO. 339 (CU) is a Cornell University introduction from Jagger
selection No. 8355M of a Brittle Ice-Imperial 152 cross. This
variety is quite similar to No. 456.
NO. 456 (CU) is a selection made at Cornell University from
Jagger selection No. 10890M, of a Brittle Ice-Imperial 152 cross;
it is similar to Great Lakes but lighter green in leaf color.
LETTUCE, BIG BOSTON (BUTTERHEAD)
WHITE BOSTON produces a light green head of the butter-
head type. Where Big Boston type lettuce is desired, this is
an excellent variety.
ONION
BERMUDA. The Bermuda varieties are all quite similar ex-
cept for the color of the bulb. Red, yellow or white varieties
are all fairly satisfactory. The bulbs are flat, of good size and
quite mild. This type of onion is a poor keeper and should
not be stored for any length of time. Early Grano is superior
to the Bermuda type for Florida growing.
CRYSTAL WAX is a white variety of Bermuda (see Ber-
muda).
CREOLE is a small or medium sized onion. The bulb is semi-
globe shaped, of very dense flesh. The flavor is quite strong
but the onion is an exceptionally fine keeper. Either red or
white varieties may be grown.
EARLY GRANO is early maturing, of the Sweet Spanish type.
Bulbs are medium to very large size, round to top-shaped, and
have thin to medium-thick, pale yellow skins. This variety of
onion will mature earlier in the spring than any other variety
thus far tried. The variety, if properly harvested and stored,
will keep in good condition much longer than the Bermuda type
onion.
YELLOW BERMUDA (see Bermuda).
PEA, ENGLISH
HUNDREDFOLD produces a pod nearly 4 inches long in vines
18 to 20 inches in height. It is of approximately the same
season as Little Marvel. The pods will not fill as completely as
Little Marvel, but, under some growing conditions, the yield
will be higher.







Commercial Vegetable Varieties for Florida


ing. It is more ribbed and heads are much less uniform than
Imperial 44, however.
NO. 339 (CU) is a Cornell University introduction from Jagger
selection No. 8355M of a Brittle Ice-Imperial 152 cross. This
variety is quite similar to No. 456.
NO. 456 (CU) is a selection made at Cornell University from
Jagger selection No. 10890M, of a Brittle Ice-Imperial 152 cross;
it is similar to Great Lakes but lighter green in leaf color.
LETTUCE, BIG BOSTON (BUTTERHEAD)
WHITE BOSTON produces a light green head of the butter-
head type. Where Big Boston type lettuce is desired, this is
an excellent variety.
ONION
BERMUDA. The Bermuda varieties are all quite similar ex-
cept for the color of the bulb. Red, yellow or white varieties
are all fairly satisfactory. The bulbs are flat, of good size and
quite mild. This type of onion is a poor keeper and should
not be stored for any length of time. Early Grano is superior
to the Bermuda type for Florida growing.
CRYSTAL WAX is a white variety of Bermuda (see Ber-
muda).
CREOLE is a small or medium sized onion. The bulb is semi-
globe shaped, of very dense flesh. The flavor is quite strong
but the onion is an exceptionally fine keeper. Either red or
white varieties may be grown.
EARLY GRANO is early maturing, of the Sweet Spanish type.
Bulbs are medium to very large size, round to top-shaped, and
have thin to medium-thick, pale yellow skins. This variety of
onion will mature earlier in the spring than any other variety
thus far tried. The variety, if properly harvested and stored,
will keep in good condition much longer than the Bermuda type
onion.
YELLOW BERMUDA (see Bermuda).
PEA, ENGLISH
HUNDREDFOLD produces a pod nearly 4 inches long in vines
18 to 20 inches in height. It is of approximately the same
season as Little Marvel. The pods will not fill as completely as
Little Marvel, but, under some growing conditions, the yield
will be higher.







Commercial Vegetable Varieties for Florida


ing. It is more ribbed and heads are much less uniform than
Imperial 44, however.
NO. 339 (CU) is a Cornell University introduction from Jagger
selection No. 8355M of a Brittle Ice-Imperial 152 cross. This
variety is quite similar to No. 456.
NO. 456 (CU) is a selection made at Cornell University from
Jagger selection No. 10890M, of a Brittle Ice-Imperial 152 cross;
it is similar to Great Lakes but lighter green in leaf color.
LETTUCE, BIG BOSTON (BUTTERHEAD)
WHITE BOSTON produces a light green head of the butter-
head type. Where Big Boston type lettuce is desired, this is
an excellent variety.
ONION
BERMUDA. The Bermuda varieties are all quite similar ex-
cept for the color of the bulb. Red, yellow or white varieties
are all fairly satisfactory. The bulbs are flat, of good size and
quite mild. This type of onion is a poor keeper and should
not be stored for any length of time. Early Grano is superior
to the Bermuda type for Florida growing.
CRYSTAL WAX is a white variety of Bermuda (see Ber-
muda).
CREOLE is a small or medium sized onion. The bulb is semi-
globe shaped, of very dense flesh. The flavor is quite strong
but the onion is an exceptionally fine keeper. Either red or
white varieties may be grown.
EARLY GRANO is early maturing, of the Sweet Spanish type.
Bulbs are medium to very large size, round to top-shaped, and
have thin to medium-thick, pale yellow skins. This variety of
onion will mature earlier in the spring than any other variety
thus far tried. The variety, if properly harvested and stored,
will keep in good condition much longer than the Bermuda type
onion.
YELLOW BERMUDA (see Bermuda).
PEA, ENGLISH
HUNDREDFOLD produces a pod nearly 4 inches long in vines
18 to 20 inches in height. It is of approximately the same
season as Little Marvel. The pods will not fill as completely as
Little Marvel, but, under some growing conditions, the yield
will be higher.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


LAXTONIAN has longer pods than Little Marvel and quality
of peas is excellent. Will usually mature a few days earlier than
Little Marvel. Pods will not fill as well as Little Marvel.
LAXTON'S PROGRESS has long pods 4 inches in length on
dwarf dark green vines. This variety will produce a large yield
of pods that are fairly well filled.
LITTLE MARVEL produces thrifty, dark green, small dwarf
vines; small, straight, plump, dark green pods; medium sized,
squarish, wrinkled seeds. The important characteristic of this
variety is that the pods are usually well-filled.
PEPPER
CALIFORNIA WONDER is a medium late, short, thick-fleshed
bell pepper which is resistant to blossom-end rot but not to
sunscald in seasons when sunscald is a factor.
CALWONDER OR EARLY CALWONDER is an early, short,
thick fleshed bell pepper of the California Wonder type. It is
similar to California Wonder but somewhat earlier. It has
smaller vines and is less productive.
GIANT CAYENNE is a large, long, green, cayenne type, hot
pepper.
HEIFER HORN (Har.) is a long green Cayenne type hot
pepper, larger than Giant Cayenne.
HUNGARIAN YELLOW WAX is exceedingly prolific, bearing
a large number of medium slender, tapering, smooth fruits. The
color is a clear waxy yellow changing to bright crimson at ma-
turity. The fruits are pungent in flavor.
NEAPOLITAN is an early, medium large, prolific variety.
The flesh is exceedingly sweet, yellowish green in color.
ROUMANIAN is a sweet yellow pepper 4 to 6 inches long
and 2 inches in diameter. The fruits are quite similar to those
of Hungarian Yellow Wax except that they are sweet instead
of pungent. The plant is highly prolific.
WORLD BEATER, BLIGHT-RESISTANT, is a medium early,
bacterial blight-resistant strain of World Beater. It has longer
fruit than Florida Giant and most World Beater strains.
POTATO

BLISS TRIUMPH (NDES, S) is an early variety. The tubers
are red in color and roundish to roundish-flattened in shape.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


LAXTONIAN has longer pods than Little Marvel and quality
of peas is excellent. Will usually mature a few days earlier than
Little Marvel. Pods will not fill as well as Little Marvel.
LAXTON'S PROGRESS has long pods 4 inches in length on
dwarf dark green vines. This variety will produce a large yield
of pods that are fairly well filled.
LITTLE MARVEL produces thrifty, dark green, small dwarf
vines; small, straight, plump, dark green pods; medium sized,
squarish, wrinkled seeds. The important characteristic of this
variety is that the pods are usually well-filled.
PEPPER
CALIFORNIA WONDER is a medium late, short, thick-fleshed
bell pepper which is resistant to blossom-end rot but not to
sunscald in seasons when sunscald is a factor.
CALWONDER OR EARLY CALWONDER is an early, short,
thick fleshed bell pepper of the California Wonder type. It is
similar to California Wonder but somewhat earlier. It has
smaller vines and is less productive.
GIANT CAYENNE is a large, long, green, cayenne type, hot
pepper.
HEIFER HORN (Har.) is a long green Cayenne type hot
pepper, larger than Giant Cayenne.
HUNGARIAN YELLOW WAX is exceedingly prolific, bearing
a large number of medium slender, tapering, smooth fruits. The
color is a clear waxy yellow changing to bright crimson at ma-
turity. The fruits are pungent in flavor.
NEAPOLITAN is an early, medium large, prolific variety.
The flesh is exceedingly sweet, yellowish green in color.
ROUMANIAN is a sweet yellow pepper 4 to 6 inches long
and 2 inches in diameter. The fruits are quite similar to those
of Hungarian Yellow Wax except that they are sweet instead
of pungent. The plant is highly prolific.
WORLD BEATER, BLIGHT-RESISTANT, is a medium early,
bacterial blight-resistant strain of World Beater. It has longer
fruit than Florida Giant and most World Beater strains.
POTATO

BLISS TRIUMPH (NDES, S) is an early variety. The tubers
are red in color and roundish to roundish-flattened in shape.






Commercial Vegetable Varieties for Florida


They have an attractive appearance, although the eyes are a
little deep and numerous.
CHIPPEWA (NDES), a USDA introduction, is medium late.
The tubers are white and smooth with very shallow eyes. It is
resistant to mild mosaic but is subject to leaf-roll and spindle-
tuber.
KATAHDIN (CEH), a USDA introduction, is a late white


Al


C U
Fig. 3.-Tubers of 4 new varieties of potato. A, Katahdin; B, Sebago;
C, Sequoia; and D, Pontiac.







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


variety. It is resistant to mild mosaic and brown rot, makes
good recovery after the plants have been severely damaged by
freezing temperatures in the early stages of growth, and can
withstand considerable dry weather. It produces a high per-
centage of marketable tubers of excellent quality (Fig. 3, A).
PONTIAC (NDES), a Michigan Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion introduction, is a red variety and requires about as long a
growing season as the Katahdin to produce a crop. The plants
are similar to those of the Bliss Triumph in appearance, but the
tubers are slightly longer, eyes shallower, and the color is lighter
than in Bliss Triumph (Fig. 3, D).
SEBAGO (CEH) is a late variety developed by the USDA. It
is about 2 weeks later in maturity than the Katahdin and has
replaced the latter as the leading variety in the Hastings and
LaCrosse sections of Northeastern Florida. The plants are large
and erect and the tubers are elliptical to round-elliptical, medium
thick, white and smooth, with a few shallow eyes (Fig. 3, B).
SEQUOIA (FMC) is a late white variety originated by the
North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station from a Green
Mountain-Katahdin cross. It is resistant to brown rot and makes
a good recovery from freezing injury. Tubers are of good
quality but are not as attractive as those of Katahdin, owing
to russet skin (Fig. 3, C). It is superior to Katahdin and Sebago
in yield.
SQUASH
COCOZELLE, Italian Marrow type, produces a long dark green
fruit which has light green longitudinal stripes. The fruit is
about 10 to 12 inches by 1 to 3 inches in size. Exceedingly pro-
lific, the large bush vine requires double the row space needed by
Early Yellow Summer Crookneck. Its disadvantages are that
fruits are easy to overlook in picking because of their green
color and are hard to pack for shipment because of their irregu-
lar shape.
EARLY PROLIFIC STRAIGHTNECK is a small, prolific, light
yellow squash. Fruits are uniform in shape, smooth, and of an
excellent color throughout the season. It is somewhat later
maturing than Yankee Hybrid.
EARLY WHITE BUSH or MAMMOTH WHITE BUSH SCAL-
LOP (Asgr., Cor., Kil.) is very prolific. Fruits are scalloped,
flat, tinged with green when young but white when mature.







Commercial Vegetable Varieties for Florida


EARLY YELLOW SUMMER CROOKNECK comprises most
of the acreage in Florida because of its local adaptability and
its popularity in Southern markets. Fruits are early, light yel-
low, small, with a curved neck. Low yield, small size and conse-
quent high picking costs are its disadvantages.
GIANT YELLOW SUMMER STRAIGHTNECK produces
large, thick-necked fruits that are lemon yellow in color. The
straight neck makes the fruits easy to pack.
IMPROVED BLACK ZUCCHINI, Italian Marrow type, has
uniform, cylindrical, very dark green fruit about 6 to 8 inches
long and 1 to 2 inches in diameter, with greenish white flesh.
It is gaining in popularity. Unfortunately, the fruits are easy
to overlook in picking because of their green color.
TABLE QUEEN or ACORN produces fruits 4 to 7 inches long,
4 to 6 inches in diameter, weighing approximately 1 pound, on
a running vine. The fruit is deeply ribbed and of acorn shape.
It is an excellent keeper and shipper and the fruits are seldom
injured by the pickle worm. Excellent for baking.
WOODS' EARLY PROLIFIC, Patty Pan or White Bush Scal-
lop type, is a very early prolific summer squash having fruits
with very shallow scallops. Fruits are tinged with green when
young but are white at marketable maturity.
YANKEE HYBRID (Bur., Har.), an excellent, extremely
early, prolific hybrid variety developed by Connecticut Agricul-
tural Experiment Station, is of the Early Yellow Prolific Straight-
neck type. Fruits are smooth and uniform in shape, yellow with
faint longitudinal light yellow stripes.

TOMATO
CLEO (Kil.) is a midseason red-fruited variety having a large,
spreading vine. It produces high yields but is rather susceptible
to Fusarium wilt and blossom-end rot.
COLCO GLOBE (Kil.), pink-fruited, is a prolific, fine quality
variety having a large, spreading vine.
GROTHEN'S GLOBE (GROTHEN'S RED GLOBE), red-
fruited when ripe, has an early fruiting, sprawling, open vine.
It produces high yields of generally large size fruit of desirable
type and shape. It has some resistance to Fusarium wilt but is
susceptible to blossom-end rot and puffiness when seasonal con-
ditions favor the development of these faults. It is widely used







Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


in earliest plantings and on ground that is too moist for the
Rutgers variety. It will not stand "wet feet", however.
MARGLOBE, red-fruited, is a fine quality variety having a
medium dense, large spreading vine.
MICHIGAN STATE FORCING (FM) has rather late, red
fruit, of desirable shape and type, but fruit is inclined to be
small except in seasons when sizes of all varieties run generally
large. Yields have been very high in trial plantings. It is
highly resistant to Fusarium wilt and is not affected appreciably
by blossom-end rot.
PAN AMERICA (Ga., Har.) produces midseason red fruits
of desirable type and shape. It is resistant to blossom-end rot
and very highly resistant to Fusarium wilt. Its weakness is
that its yields have been relatively low under most Florida con-
ditions.
PRITCHARD or SCARLET TOPPER, red-fruited, is a pro-
lific fine quality variety, having a medium dense, compact, erect,
self-topping vine.
RUTGERS fruit is red when ripe. It is 1 or 2 weeks later
in fruiting than Grothen's Globe. The plant is darker green,
heavier and more compact than Grothen's Globe. It produces
high yields of generally large fruit of desirable type and shape
under most conditions but does not set fruit in wet, cloudy
weather. It is resistant to Fusarium wilt and most strains are
fairly resistant to blossom-end rot. It is widely planted in south-
ern Florida during the mid-winter portion of the season.
STOKESDALE (Kil., Stok.), red-fruited, is a very prolific,
fine quality variety with a vigorous, compact vine. The fruit
is inclined to be small except in seasons when sizes of all va-
rieties run generally large. It has some resistance to Fusarium
wilt.
VALIANT (Stok.) is early and has red fruit of desirable type
and shape.
WASATCH BEAUTY (Gill.) red-fruited, is a prolific, fine
quality variety having a medium sized, compact, self-topping
vine. It was developed in Oregon.
WATERMELON
BLACKLEE (FES) is a new wilt-resistant variety developed
by Dr. M. N. Walker of the Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station. The variety is highly resistant to wilt, the vine is ex-







Commercial Vegetable Varieties for Florida


ceptionally vigorous, the melon is oval in shape with quite blocky
ends, the skin is dark green in color, the rind is quite thin but
exceedingly tough, the flesh is bright red in color and of ex-
cellent quality, and the seed are small and black. The melon
is of medium size but, due to thin rind, exceptionally heavy for
its size. The melon will average 2 pounds lighter than Tom
Watson. An outstanding variety for shipping, local markets
or home use.
CANNON BALL is an early, nearly round melon producing
good quality melons only under favorable growing conditions.
The skin is dark green in color, the rind thick and firm, the
flesh red, coarse-grained, fibrous but sweet. Early production
of large fruit makes this a profitable variety for shipping.
DIXIE QUEEN is one of the standard varieties produced in
the State. The oval to round fruits are of medium size, the
flesh is bright red, of good quality, seed are small and white in
color. The rind is thin and tough. The outside skin is light
green in color with dark green blotched stripes.
DUDE CREEK, sometimes called Garrison or Gandy. Large
melons are the outstanding characteristic of this variety. Fruit
are cylindrical in shape and many of the fruits will weigh 45
pounds. The skin is white and green striped, flesh is of good
quality. The rind is brittle, thus the melon is not a particularly
good shipper.
TOM WATSON is the most popular shipping variety. It is
medium green in color, cylindrical in shape, with rounded ends,
the rind is fairly thick and tough, flesh is red and of good quality,
seed is brown.
TABLE 2.-SOURCES OF SEED USED IN THESE TRIALS.
*Asgr.-Associated Seed Growers, New Haven, Connecticut
AC-Abbott and Cobb Seed Co., 4655-61 Paul St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Bur.-W. Atlee Burpee & Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Bu.-D. V. Burrell Seed Growers Company, Rocky Ford, Colorado
CEH-Charles E. Hussey & Sons, Presque Isle, Maine
Con.-Condon Brothers, Rockford, Illinois
Cor.-Corneli Seed Company, 230 Biddle Street, St. Louis, Missouri
CU-Dept. of Vegetable Crops, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York
DeG.-DeGiorgi Brothers, Council Bluffs, Iowa
Dre.-Henry A. Dreer Company, 1306 Spring Garden St., Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania
Fa.-Farmers Seed & Nursery Company, Fairbault, Minnesota
FES-University of Florida, Agricultural Experiment Station
FM-Ferry-Morse Seed Co., Detroit, Michigan
FMC-Fred M. Colvard, Jefferson, North Carolina
These key letters correspond to the ones in the variety lists of this Bulletin.








30 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

For.-Alexander Forbes & Company, 487 Washington St., Newark, New
Jersey
FWK.-F. W. Krueger, Stacy, Minnesota
Ger.-Germain Seed and Plant Company, Los Angeles, California
Ga.-J. T. Gaunt, Inc., Ochopee, Florida
Gill-Gill Brothers Seed Company, Portland, Oregon
Gl.-Glick Seed Farms, Lancaster, Pennsylvania
Hr.-J. R. Hardy, Dennison, Texas
Har.-Joseph Harris Co., Inc., Moreton Farm, Rochester, New York
Has.-H. G. Hastings Company, Atlanta, Georgia
Hen.-Peter Henderson & Company, 35-37 Cortlandt Street, New York,
New York
J-Dr. J. E. Judson, West Virginia Wesleyan College, Buckhannon, West
Virginia
Jack.-Jackson Grain Company, Tampa, Florida
Kil.-Kilgore Seed Company, Plant City, Florida
Land.-D. Landreth Seed Company, Bristol, Pennsylvania
LES-Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station, Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Liv.-Livingston Seed Company, 32-36 East Spring Street, Columbus, Ohio
Mitc.-Mitchell Seed Company, 518 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pennsyl-
vania
Me.-Maine Department of Agriculture, Caribou, Maine
Mar.-E. A. Martin Seed Company, Jacksonville, Florida
Mich.-Michigan Potato Growers' Exchange, Cadillac, Michigan
ML-Michael-Leonard Seed Company, Sioux City, Iowa
Mei.-Adolph Meisch, 122 Glenwood Ave., Jersey City, New Jersey
MSC-Michigan State College, East Lansing, Michigan
Neb.-Nebraska Certified Potato Growers, Alliance, Nebraska
NDES-North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station, Fargo, North
Dakota
NDS-North Dakota Seed Department, Fargo, North Dakota
NHES-New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, Durham, New
Hampshire
Olds-L. L. Olds Seed Company, Madison, Wisconsin
Per.-Perry Seed Company, 12 Faneuil Hall Square, Boston, Massachusetts
Rob.-Robson Seed Farms, Hall, New York
Reu.-Reuter Seed Company, Inc., New Orleans, Louisiana
Ro.-Rocky Ford Seed Breeders Association, Rocky Ford, Colorado
S-Southern Seed Company, Inc., 2147 N. W. 12th Avenue, Miami, Florida
Sk.-Stockoff Seed Company, Plainfield, New Jersey
Stok.-Francis C. Stokes Company, Vincentown, New Jersey
Tenn.-Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station, Knoxville, Tennessee
Ta.-George Tait and Sons, Norfolk, Virginia
TES-Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, College Station, Texas
Tw.-Otis S. Twilley, Salisbury, Maryland
USDA-United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Indus-
try, Washington, D. C.
Vau.-Vaughan's Seed Store, 601 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago, Illinois
Vo.-Peter P. Volante, 391 Dedham Street, Newton Center, Massachusetts
W-Oscar H. Will & Company, Bismarck, North Dakota
Wo.-T. W. Wood and Sons, Richmond, Virginia
WS-F. H. Woodruff & Sons, Milford, Connecticut
Zur.-M. Zurheide, 1516 Patterson Plank Road, Secaucus, New Jersey
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors gratefully acknowledge the aid of individuals who supplied
certain information, of those seed companies who contributed seeds, and
of growers who cooperated by growing some of the trial plantings on their
farms. In particular, the authors are indebted to Mr. W. M. Fifield, Dr. F.
S. Andrews and Dr. J. C. Hoffman, of the Station staff, who supplied in-
formation on varieties tested by them.




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