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Title: Pig feeding with cassava and sweet potatoes
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Title: Pig feeding with cassava and sweet potatoes
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Conner, C. M.
Publisher: University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Publication Date: 1907
Copyright Date: 1907
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Bibliographic ID: UF00027113
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aen2262 - LTUF
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HISTORIC NOTE



The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida








BULLETIN NO. 90 SEPTEMBER, 1907




Florida

Agricultural Experiment Station.






PIG FEEDING
WITH
CASSAVA AND SWEET POTATOES.






C. M. CONNER, B. S.





The bulletins of this Station will be sent free to any address in
Florida upon application to the Director of the Experiment Station,
Gainesville, Florida.



Record Co. St. Augustine, Fla.


















BOARD OF CONTROL.
N. P. BRYAN, Chairman, Jacksonville, Fla.
P. K. YONGE, Pensacola, Fla.
T. B. KING, Arcadia, Fla.
J. C. BAISDEN, Live Oak, Fla.
E. L. WARrMANN, Citra, Fla.



STATION STAFF.
P. H. ROLFS, M. S., Director.
A. W. BLAIR, A. M., Chemist.
JOHN M. ScoTT, B. S., Animal Industrialist.
E. W. BERGER, PH. D., Entomologist.
H. S. FAwcETT, B. S., Assistant Plant Pathologist.
E. J. MACY, B; S., Assistant Chemist.
B. F. FLOYD, A. B., A. M., Assistant Plant Physiologist.
R. Y. WINTERS, B. S., Assistant in Botany.
JOHN BELLING, B. S., Assistant in Horticulture.
MRS. E. W. IERGER, Librarian.
K. H. GRAHAM, Auditor and Bookkeeper.
R. D. ALGEE, Stenographer.
M. CREWS, Farm Foreman.
WILLIAM HESS, Gardener.































CONTENTS.

PAGE.
Introduction ......................................................... 5
Cassava with Shorts, and Sweet Potatoes with Shorts............... 5
Discussion of the Experiment ...................................... 6
Cassava, Sweet Potatoes and Corn; Fed to Young Pigs.............. 7
Cassava, Sweet Potatoes and Corn; Fed to Larger Pigs............. 7
Sweet Potatoes with Rape, and Corn with and without Rape......... 8
Cassava with Cotton-seed Meal, and with Rape ....................... 8























a*














Pig Feeding with Cassava and

Sweet Potatoes.


BY C. M. CONNER, B. S.


During the past four years numerous experiments have been
conducted to ascertain the feeding value of cassava and sweet
potatoes, two of the leading sources of carbohydrates in this
State. The first attempt was with native steers, but the results
were so discouraging that the figures were not published. The
steers made no gain and in a number of cases they lost weight.
When corn or cotton seed meal was offered with the cassava
slight gains were made, but not enough to pay for the food con-
sumed. This was the case in two trials of 90 days each. The
trouble seemed to be due mainly to the fact that cassava is un-
palatable to the animals at first. Milch cows, when fed small
quantities each year, acquire a taste for it and consume it with
relish for a short time, but soon tire.
Several trials were made with pigs, which are reported below.
EXPERIMENT No. 1.
During the winter of 1902-3, an experiment was undertaken
with pigs to determine the value of cassava and sweet potatoes
for pork production. Six Duroc Jerseys were weighed and
divided into two lots, weight and sex being considered. These
pigs were nearly full-grown, and were in fair condition when
the experiment started. The gain then consisted mainly of fat.
Owing to the fact that cassava and sweet potatoes are both highly
carbonaceous, a small quantity of shorts (as is shown in the
table) was given each day to partially balance the ration. A
period of one week was allowed for the pigs to become accus-
tomed to the ration.. Each lot was fed twenty-eight days as
follows: Lot No. 1, sweet potatoes and shorts; lot No. 2, cassava









6 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station.

and shorts. The feed was then changed, allowing one week
for the animals to get accustomed to the new ration. During
the second period lot No. 1 received cassava and shorts, and
lot No. 2 received sweet potatoes and shorts.
TABLE I.
Showing results of first and second periods of feeding.

FIRST PERIOD

Initial Average Feed Consumed
Lot Days Weight Gain in IGan per in----
Fed of ot Pounds Head Shorts Cassava Sweet
per Day Pounds Pounds Pounds
No. 1 28 442 159 1.89 191 ........ .. 1127
No. 2 28 425 102 1.21 191 572 ...........
SECOND PERIOD
No. 1 28 624 107 1.27 224 795 ....
No. 2 28 569 148 1.76 224 ........... 1214

The shorts used cost $20.00 per ton. If we value fhe gain
at 5 cents per pound, which is a reasonable valuation, then the
gain of lot No. 1 would be worth $7.95. Subtracting the value
of the shorts fed, we would have $6.04 for the 1127 pounds of
sweet potatoes, which is equal to $10.70 per ton. The gain of
lot No. 2 would be worth $5.10. Subtracting the value of the
shorts used, there would be left $3.99 for 672 pounds of cassava,
which is equal to $11.86 per ton. This seems to show that cas-
sava has a higher feeding value than sweet potatoes; but it
should also be noticed that the pigs consumed little more than
half as much cassava as sweet potatoes. The pigs fed on cassava
gained rapidly at first, but toward the end of the four weeks
the gain was very slow. This was noticeable, not only in the
first period, but also in the second. The daily records would
be of little interest, since they only state in detail the above
summary. Cassava in the raw state does not seem to be palat-
able even to the hog, as will be seen by the gains made by the
lots during the second period. The gain of lot No. 1 during
the second period would be worth $5.35, and subtracting the
value of the shorts would leave $3.11 for 795 pounds of cassava,
which is equal to $7.82 per ton. The gain of lot No. 2 during
the second period would be worth $7.40. Subtracting the value



I









Bulletin No. 9o. 7

of the shorts, there would be left $5.16 for 1214 pounds of
sweet potatoes, which is equal to $8.50 per ton.

EXPERIMENT No. 2.

Many statements have been made as to the value of cassava
and sweet potatoes when fed alone. In order to test the value
of these crops for growing pigs, four pens of four pigs each
were selected from a bunch of native or razor-back pigs, which
had been purchased from a neighboring farmer. The pigs were
small, as can be seen from the initial weight. One week was
allowed for the pigs to get accustomed to the ration.
The pigs of each lot were fed as follows: No. 1, sweet po-
tatoes; No. 2, cassava; No. 3, sweet potatoes and cassava (equal
parts by weight); No. 4, corn. These lots of pigs were fed for
forty-two days without change.

TABLE II.

Initial Gain or Average Feed Consumed
eGain or
Lot Days eight o Lo ossi r Swe 8 Potatos
Lot Fed of Lot serl Lossr et Cassava C t orn
FeI It L0te Per ""vtP I andCasa Pounds
Pounds pounds Head per Potatoeundds Eq pts.lbs,
SDay Pounds PoundsEq. pts.bs nd
| Loss Loss
No. 1 42 89 31 .020 427
Loss Loss
No. 2 42 85 5 .029 408
Loss Loss 378
No. 3 42 87 i .003
Gain Gain
No.4 42 87 60 .357 300
No comment on these results is necessary.

EXPERIMENT No. 3.

During the winter of 1904-5, the above experiments were
repeated with larger pigs. Four lots of four pigs each were
selected and fed as outlined above for 46 days with the follow-
ing results:
TABLE III.

Initial Average Feed Consumed
Wnitia Gain Gain per -
Lot Days Weigh per Lot Head per Sweet Coasva Corn
SFed f Lot Cassava Corn
Fed of Lot Pounds Day Potatoes Pounds Pound,
Pounds Pounds Pounds
No. 1 46 430 93 .505 3073 ......
No. 2 46 487 43 .233 ...... 1639
No. 3 46 479 33 .179 955 955 ......
No. 4 46 461 212 1.152 ...... ...... 1228









8 Florida Agricultural Experimenf Station.

It will be seen from the above table that the results are a
little more favorable than the preceding ones,' yet the proposition
does not seem to be a paying one, when cassava and sweet
potatoes are fed alone. When fed alone sweet potatoes are
worth $3.00 per ton, cassava is worth $2.60 per ton, and when
fed mixed they have a value of $1.72 per ton. Corn fed under
the same conditions is worth $17.92 per ton.

SWEET POTATOES, RAPE AND CORN.
Since cassava and sweet potatoes are both rather unpalatable,
a preliminary experiment extending over 32 days was con-
ducted, to see if rape fed with sweet potatoes would add to the
palatability. At this season the cassava had given out, hence
only sweet potatoes were used in this test. Three pens of four
each were fed: Pen No. 1 on sweet potatoes and rape, pen
No. 2 on corn and rape, and pen No. 3 on corn. The results
may be stated here without giving a tabular statement.
The lot fed on sweet potatoes and rape made an average
gain of 0.4 pounds per head per day; the lot receiving corn and
rape made an average gain of 0.9 pounds per head per day;
while the lot fed on corn alone made an average gain of 0.8
pounds per head per day. The average weight of the pigs was
84 pounds.
EXPERIMENT NO. 4.
In January, 1906, a more extended test was made to try the
effect of feeding rape and cotton seed meal with cassava. Three
pens of four each were selected and fed as follows (with a pre-
liminary period of ten days):
Lot No. 1, cassava.
Lot No. 2, cassava and cotton seed meal. The cotton seed
meal was made into a slop and allowed to sour before feeding.
One-half pound per head per day was given.
Lot No. 3, cassava and rape, equal parts by weight.
The cassava in all cases was fed as it was dug, i. e., without
any preparation. These pigs were fed for a period of 35 days,
with the following results:









Bulletin No. po. 9

TABLE IV.

Initial Gain Average Feed Consumed
Lot F8a Weight L Gain per ttRn
Lot d of Lot peul Head per Cassava ape
Pounds Pounds Day Pounds eonds" Pounds
Loss Loss
No. 1 35 221 1 .007 489 ......
No. 2 35 229 56 .400 533 70
No. 3 35 221 20 .142 466 ...... 466

It seems that when the cotton seed meal was used the ani-
mals made the best gains; but even then the gain per day was
only 0.4 pounds per head per day.
The feed was then changed. Lot No. 1 was given cassava
and 4 lb. of cotton seed meal and lot No. 2 was given cassava
and rape (equal parts by weight), and /4 lb. per head per day
of cotton seed meal. The meal was fed in the form of sour
slops as before. This period lasted 35 days and gave the fol-
lowing results:
TABLE V.

Initial Gn Average Feed Consumed
L t i, Initial Gain Gain per Cotton________
Lot Dder Weight per Lot aCotton
L Dys Weight per Lot Head per Cassava Rape Cotton
Pounds Pounds Day Pounds P SeedMeal
SPounds o s Pounds
No. 1 35 236 80 1.685 494 ...... 105
No. 2 35 265 109 1.892 I 497 497 105

In this test it is rather remarkable that the amount of cassava
consumed was only slightly greater and the gain was over one-
fourth greater when the rape was fed with it than when fed
alone. This was noticeable all through the experiment.












BULLETINS

OF THE

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION

The following Bulletins and Reports may be obtained on request.

TITLE. AUTHOR. DATE.

11 Corn Experiments ..................................... Jas. P. DePass ...... 1890
Irish Potato Experiments ............................... Jas. P. DePass ....
Fertilizers .............................................. Jas. P. DePass
Analyses of Some Florida Weeds and Grasses.............. M. Pickell ...
12 Tobacco ............................................... as. P. DePass ...... 1891
Long or Black Seed Cotton, Rice, Sorghum............... as. P. DePass ......
Ashes as a Fertilizer .................................. Jas. P. DePass ..
Miscellaneous Ash Analyses .............................. J. Earle .........
18 General Information .................................... Jas. P. DePass ...... 1891
Irish Potatoes ..................................... .... aas. P. DePass ......
Rye ....................................... Jas. P. DePass ......
Soft Marl Phosphate as a Fertilizer ................... J. M. Pickell and J. J.
Earle ...........
Comparative Value of Raw Finely Powdered Phosphate, and
of Acidulated Phosphate as a Fertilizer................. JM. Pickell and J. J.
Earle ...........
Superphosphate from a Low Grade Rock Containing Much
Alumina ......................................... .J. M. Pickell and J. J.
Earle ........
Muck, Chemical Analyses of .............................. J. M. Pickell and J. J.
Earle ...........
16 Corn, Hay Weevil, Ensilage, Rice, Cane, Texas Blue Grass
and Cotton ...................................... Jas. P. DePass ...... 1892
17 Analyses of the Orange ................................. J. M. Pickell and J. J.
Earle ............ 1892
Horn Fly ............................................. P. H. Rolfs ........
Questions Concerning Stock Diseases .................... A. W. Bitting.......
19 Tobacco ................................................ Jas. P. DePass ...... 1892
Analyses of Station and Cuban Tobacco Soil and Cuban To-
bacco ................................... ....... .. J Earle .........
22 Fertilizers ............................... ........... A. A. Persons ...... 1893
25 Leeches or Leeching .................................. A. W Bitting ....... 1894
26 Big-head ..................................... ..... A. W Bitting ....... 1894
27 Pineapple ............................................ L. C. W ashburn .... 1894
28 Liver Fluke .................................... ......A. W. Bitting ....... 1894
30 Culture of Tobacco ...................................... F. B. Moodie ........ 1895
33 Present Condition and Treatment of Orange Groves........ M. S. Moremen ..... 1896
The Greater and Lesser Freezes in Florida for a Century... G. R. Fairbanks ...
34 Insect Enemies of Truck and Garden Crops............... A. L. Quaintance ... 1896
36 Insects Injurious to Stored Grain and Cereal Products..... A. L. Quaintance .... 1896
37 Pineapple at Myers ............................. ..... 0. Clute and W. A.
Marsh ............ 1896
38 Tobacco in Florida ..................................... F. B. Moodie ....... 1897
39 Strawberry Culture .................................... S. Powers .......... 1897
40 The Fall Army Worm, Southern Grass Worm.............. A. L. Quaintance .... 1897
41 A Fungus Disease-of San Jose Scale..................... P. H. Rolfs ......... 1897
42 Strawberry Insects .. ............. ....... ... A. L. Quaintance ... 1897
43 A Chemical Study of Some Typical Florida Soils...........A. A. Persons ....... 1897
45 Three Injurious Insects ............................... A. L. Quaintance ... 1898
51 Some Common Florida Scales ........................... H. A. Gossard ...... 1900
52 Baking Powders ....................................... K. Miller ........ 1900
55 Feeding With Florida Feed Stuffs ........................ H. E. Stockbridge ... 1900
56 The Cottony Cushion Scale ............................. H. A. Gossard ..... 1901
59 Cauliflower ............................................. H. Harold Hume .... 1901
60 Velvet Beans ............................... ....... ... H. K. M iller ........ 1902
61 Two Peach Scales ..................................... H. A. Gossard ...... 1902
62 The Peen-to Peach Group ................................ H. Harold Hume .... 1902
68 Packing Citrus Fruits ........................... ...... H. Harold Hume .... 1902
65 The Kumquats ......................................... H. Harold Hume .... 1902
66 The Mandarin Orange Group ............................ H. Harold Hume .... 1908
73 The Honey Peach Group ...............................F. C. Reimer ....... 1904
74 Anthracnose of the Pomelo .............................. H. Harold Hume .... 1904
75 Potato Diseases ....................................... H. Harold Hume .... 1904
76 Insecticides and Fungicides .............................. H. A.. Gossard and H.
H. Hume ......... 1904











Bulletin No. 90. 11


z TITLE. AUTHOR. DATE.


77 Equine Glanders and Its Eradication ..................... C. F. Dawson ....... 1905
78 Forage Crops: The Silo .................................C. M. Conner ....... 1905
80 The Composition of Some of the Concentrated Feeding-stuffs
on Sale in Florida ................................... A. W Blair ........ 1905
82 A Preliminary Report on Growing Irish Potatoes .......... C. M. Conner ....... 1905
83 Pineapple Culture III; Fertilizer Experiments............... K. Miller and A.
W. Blair ......... 1906
84 Pineapple Culture IV; Handling the Crop ................H. Harold Hume .... 1906
86 Salt Sick (Bovine Uncinariasis) ........................... C. F. Dawson ....... 1906
87 Soil Studies I ................ ........................ A. W. Blair ........ 1906
88 Whitefly Conditions in 1906 ............................... E. W. Berger ....... 1907
89 Occurrence and Use of Artesian and Other Underground
Water ................................ .............. E. H. Sellards ...... 1907
90 Pig Feeding With Cassava and Sweet Potatoes............C. CM. Conner ....... 1907

PRESS BULLETINS.

6 TITLE. AUTHOR. DATE.


1 Directions for Preparation of Bordeaux Mixture ............ H. Harold Hume .... 1901
2 Lime and Its Relation to Agriculture.................... H. K. Miller ........ 1901
3 Seed Testing ........................................... H. Harold Hume .... 1901
4 The W hitefly ............................................ H. A. Gossard ...... 1901
6 Nursery Inspection (Part I.) ............................. H. A. Gossard ...... 1901
7 Nursery Inspection (Part II.) ............................ H. A. Gossard ...... 1901
8 Care of Irish Potatoes Harvested in the Spring and Held for'
Fall Planting .. ... ...... ................. ..... J. F. Mitchell ....... 1901
10 Plants Affected by Root Knot ........................... H. Harold Hume .... 1901
11 Vinegar ........ ... ............. A. Blair ........ 1901
12 Seed Beds and Their Management ......................... Jno. H. Jefferies .... 1901
13 Treatment for San Jose Scale ............................. H. A. Gossard ..... 1901
14 Beef from Velvet Beans and Cassava ..................... H. E. Stockbridge ... ,1901
17 Preservatives in Canned Goods ............. ....... .. A. W. Blair ........ 1902
18 Cantaloupe Blight .................................. .. H. Harold Hume .... 1902
19 Cut W orms ......................................... ... H. A. Gossard ..... 1902
22 Nitrogen as a Fertilizer .................................. H. K. M iller ........ 1902
23 Protection Against Drought ...........................H. E. Stockbridge ... 1902
24 Orange Mites ........................................... H. A. Gossard ..... 1902
26 Lumpy Jaw .......................................... Chas. F. Dawson .... 1902
27 Cover Crops .................. ..... ................ H. Harold Hume .... 1902
28 Moon Blindness Chas. F. Dawson 1902
28 Moon Blindness ........................................ Chas. F. Dawson .... 1902
29 Food Adulteration .................................. .. A. W Blair ........ 1902
30 Dehorning Cattle ....................................... Chas. F. Dawson .. 1902
31 Food Adulteration: Coffee ............................. A. W Blair ........ 1902
32 Foot and Mouth Disease ................................. Chas. F. Dawson .... 1902
33 The Red Soldier Bug, or Cotton Stainer ................. H. A. Gossard ...... 1903
34 Ox W arbles ........................................... Chas. F. Dawson . . 1903
35 Food Adulteration: Butter ............................... A. W Blair ........ 1903
36 Hook Worms in Cattle ................................. Chas. F. Dawson .... 1903
37 The Velvet Bean ........................................ C. M Conner ....... 1903
38 Practical Results of the Texas Fever Inoculations.......... Chas. F. Dawson .... 1903
39 Lung Worms in Swine ................................. Chas. F. Dawson .... 1903

40 and 41. Glanders ...................................... Chas. F. Dawson .... I 103
42 Food Adulteration: Spices and Condiments .............. A. W. Blair ........ 1903
43 How to Feed a Horse .................................. C. Conner ....... 1903
44 Planting Trees ......................................... F. C. Reimer ....... 1901
45 The Sugar Cane Borer .................................. H. A. Gossard ...... 1903
46 Selecting Seed Corn .................................... C. M Conner ....... ]90
47 The Rabid Dog ........................................ Chase F. TDwson .... 1904
48 Food Adulteration: Adulterated Drugs and Chemicals....... A. W. Blair ........ 1904
49 Saw Palmetto Ashes ..................................... H. K. M iller ........ 1904
50 Insect Pests to Live Stock ................................ Chas. F. Dawson .... 1904
51 W ormy Fowls ........................................... Chas. F. Dawson .. 1904
53 Hog Cholera and Swine Plague ........................... Chas. F. Dawson .... 1904
54 Seed Potatoes .......................................... . M Rolfs ........ 1904
55 Potato Blight and Its Remedy .......................... . M. Rolfs ........ 1In5i
57 Proposed Experiments on Fertilization of the Orange....... E. R. Flint ......... 1905
58 Forage Poisoning ............... ... ..... Chas. F. Dawson .... 1905
59 The Manatee Snail, (Bulimulus Dormani) ................. .E. H. Sellards ......1 1006
60 "all Drooping of Citrus Fruit .......................... P. H. Rolfs ...... .I 190o
611Tomato Seed-beds-Soraving of ...................... H. S. Fawcett ...... 1906











12 Florida Agricultural Experiment Station.

PRESS BULLETINS.-Continued.

TItLE. AUTHOR. DATE.


62 Some Suggestions About Whitefly ......................... W. Berger ....... 1997
63 "Black Root," or Wilt Disease of Cotton................... H. P. Stuckey ...... 1907
64 Rape for Hogs ......................................... John M. Scott ...... 1907
65 Rape for Dairy Cows ................................... John M. Scott ...... 1907
66 Alfalfa ..............................................P. H. Rolfs ....... .1907
67 Saving, Storing, and Testing Seeds........................ John Belling ........1907
68 A New Whitefly Fungus................................. H. S. Fawcett .... 1907
69 Roselle Mildew ........................................ H. S. Fawcett ...... 1907
70 Feeding the Dairy Herd.................................. John M. Scott .... 1907
71 Sweet Potatoes for Hogs................................. John M. Scott ...... 1907

FARMERS' INSTITUTE BULLETINS.*

No. 1.-1903.

Sugar Production in Florida ...................................R. E. Rose.
Culture of Sugar Cane, and Syrup Making.....................C. K. McQuarrie.
The W hitefly ............................. .............. .. A. Gossard.
Plant Diseases and Their Control................................H. Harold Hume.
Some Questions on Fertilizers Answered ......................... O. Painter.
Growing Potatoes at Hastings .................................. C. G. W hite.
Some Suggestions as to Farming ..............................Jno. H. Stephens.
Successful Dairying in Florida ................................H. A. Barrows.
Japanese Cane and Sweet Potatoes ............................N. H. Fogg.
Hay M making .. ............................... ............ T. H. Johnson.
H ogs ...................................... ............... . W M Gist.
Stock Raising in Florida .................................... S. H. Gaitskill.
Pineapple Culture ............................................C. T. McCarty.
Fertilizing Material and Home Mixtures ...................... E. S. Hubbard.
Farming in Florida ...........................................G. A. Danley.
A Talk on Commercial Fertilizers .................. ...... H. K. Miller.

No. 2.-1904.

Growing and Feeding Beef Cattle in Florida .................... Chas. M. Conner.
Fertilizers ............................................. ..... E. Rose.
Address of W. E. Embry, of Dade City, Fla., at Farmers' Insti-
tute, at Brooksville, Fla.
W. E. Embry, of Dade City, in an Address Before the Farmers
of Citrus County, Crystal River, Fla.
Prof. H. A. Gossard Addresses Farmers' Institute on Insects.
Cane Growing and Shgar Making .............................. C. K. McQuarrie.
Live Stock .................................................. A. W. Stewart.
Alfalfa ................ ....... .............................. Chas. M Conner.
Butter and Its Adulteration ...................................A. W Blair.
The Necessity for a Pure Food Law for Florida ................A. W. Blair.
Some Common Diseases of Stock ..............................Chas. F. Dawson.
Agriculture at the University of Florida ......................... C. M. Conner.
*These do not come under the law permitting them to be franked. The Director,
therefore, requests that a 3-cent stamp be enclosed with request for each of these
bulletins.

ANNUAL REPORTS.

Report for fiscal year ending June 30, 1888.
Report for fiscal year ending June 30, 1894.
Report for fiscal year ending June 30, 1895.
Report for fiscal year ending June 30, 1896.
Report for fiscal year ending April, 1897.
Report for fiscal year ending June 30, 1897-98.
Report for fiscal year ending June 30, 1902.
Report for fiscal year ending June 30, 1903.
Report for fiscal year ending June 30, 1904.
Report for fiscal year ending June 30, 1905.
R-port for fiscal year ending June 30, 1906.





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