• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Literature survey - Procedure
 Results
 Discussion
 Summary
 Acknowledgments
 Literature cited
 Appendix A. Mechanical analyse...
 Appendix B. Chemical analyses
 Appendix C. Spectrographic...
 Appendix D. Total potassium and...














Group Title: Bulletin University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station
Title: Physical, spectrographic and chemical analyses of some virgin Florida soils
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027110/00001
 Material Information
Title: Physical, spectrographic and chemical analyses of some virgin Florida soils
Series Title: Bulletin University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station
Physical Description: 130 p. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Gammon, Nathan
Publisher: University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1953
 Subjects
Subject: Soils -- Composition -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 32-33).
Statement of Responsibility: Nathan Gammon, Jr. ... et al..
General Note: Cover title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027110
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEN6701
oclc - 18270635
alephbibnum - 000926042

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Front Matter
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Table of Contents
        Page 4
    Introduction
        Page 5
    Literature survey - Procedure
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Results
        Page 15
    Discussion
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Summary
        Page 30
    Acknowledgments
        Page 31
    Literature cited
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Appendix A. Mechanical analyses
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
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        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Appendix B. Chemical analyses
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
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        Page 91
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        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
    Appendix C. Spectrographic analysis
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
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        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
    Appendix D. Total potassium and sodium in Alachua County soils
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
Full Text

Bulletin 524 August 1953


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS
WILLARD M. FIFIELD, Director
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA






Physical, Spectrographic and

Chemical Analyses of

Some Virgin Florida Soils



NATHAN GAMMON, JR., J. R. HENDERSON, R. A. CARRIGAN,
R. E. CALDWELL, R. G. LEIGHTY, and F. B. SMITH






TECHNICAL BULLETIN







Single copies free to Florida residents upon request to
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA










BOARD OF CONTROL EDITORIAL
J. Francis Cooper, M.S.A., Editor 3
Hollis Rinehart, Chairman, Miami Clyde Beale, A.B.J., Associate Editor
J. Lee Ballard, St. Petersburg J. N. Joiner, B.S.A., Assistant Editor
Fred H. Kent, Jacksonville William G. Mitchell, A.B.J., Assistant Editor
Wm. H. Dial, Orlando Samuel L. Burgess, A.B.J., Assistant Editor a
Mrs. Alfred I. duPont, Jacksonville
George W. English, Jr., Ft. Lauderdale ENTOMOLOGY
W. Glenn Miller, Monticello
W. F. Powers, Secretary, Tallahassee A. N. Tissot, Ph.D., Entomologist 1
L. C. Kuitert, Ph.D., Associate
EXECUTIVE STAFF H. E. Bratley, M.S.A., Assistant
F. A. Robinson, M.S., Asst. Apiculturist
J. Hillis Miller, Ph.D., President' R. E. Waites, Ph.D., Asst. Entomologist
J. Wayne Reitz, Ph.D., Provost for Agr.3
Willard M. Fifield, M.S., Director HOME ECONOMICS
J. R. Beckenbach, Ph.D., Asso. Director
L. 0. Gratz, Ph.D., Assistant Director Ouida D. Abbott, Ph.D., Home Econ.'
Rogers L. Bartley, B.S., Admin. Mgr.3 R. B. French, Ph.D., Biochemist
Geo. R. Freeman, B.S., Farm Superintendent HORTICULTURE

G. H. Blackmon, M.S.A., Horticulturist
MAIN STATION, GAINESVILLE F. S. Jamison, Ph.D., Horticulturist'
Albert P. Lorz, Ph.D., Horticulturist
R. K. Showalter, M.S., Asso. Hort.
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS R. A. Dennison, Ph.D., Asso. Hort.
H. G. Hamilton, Ph.D., Agr. Economist 13 R. H. Sharpe, M.S., Asso. Horticulturist
R. E. L. Greene, Ph.D., Agr. Economist V. F. Nettles, Ph.D., Asso. Horticulturist
M. A. Brooker, Ph.D., Agr. Economist a F. S. Lagasse, Ph.D., Horticulturist
Zach Savage, M.S.A., Associate R. D. Dickey, M.S.A., Asso. Hort.
A. H. Spurlock, M.S.A., Agr. Economist L. H. Halsey, M.S.A., Asst. Hort.
D. E. Alleger, M.S., Associate C. B. Hall, Ph.D., Asst. Horticulturist
D. L. Brooke, M.S.A., Associate Austin Griffiths, Jr., B.S., Asst. Hort.
M. R. Godwin, Ph.D., Associates S. E. McFadden, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Hort.
W. K. McPherson, M.S., Economist C. H. VanMiddelem, Ph.D., Asst. Biochemist
Eric Thor, M.S., Asso. Agr. Economist 3 Buford D. Thompson, M.S.A., Asst. Hort.
Cecil N. Smith, M.A., Asso. Agr. Economist M. W. Hoover, M.S.A., Asst. Hort.
Levi A. Powell, Sr., M.S.A., Assistant LIBRARY
Orlando, Florida (Cooperative USDA)
G. Norman Rose, B.S., Asso. Agri. Economist Ida Keeling Cresap, Librarian
J. C. Townsend, Jr., B.S.A., Agricultural
Statistician PLANT PATHOLOGY
J. B. Owens, B.S.A., Agr. Statistician W. B. Tisdale, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist '
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING Phares Decker, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist
Erdman West, M.S., Botanist & Mycologist '
Frazier Rogers, M.S.A., Agr. Engineer' 1 Robert W. Earhart, Ph.D., Plant Path.2
J. M. Myers, M.S.A., Asso. Agr. Engineer Howard N. Miller, Ph.D., Asso. Plant Path.
J. S. Norton, M.S., Asst. Agr. Engineer Lillian E. Arnold, M.S., Asso. Botanist
C. W. Anderson, Ph.D., Asst. Plant Path.
AGRONOMY
POULTRY HUSBANDRY
Fred H. Hull, Ph.D., Agronomist2 P
G. B. Killinger, Ph.D., Agronomist N. R. Mehrhof, M.Agr., Poultry Husb.'3
H. C. Harris, Ph.D., Agronomist J. C. Driggers, Ph.D., Asso. Poultry Husb.3
R. W. Bledsoe, Ph.D., Agronomist
W. A. Carver, Ph.D., Agronomist SOILS
Fred A. Clark, M.S., Associate'2
E. S. Horner, Ph.D., Assistant F. B. Smith, Ph.D., Microbiologis't1 3
A. T. Wallace, Ph.D., Assistant s Gaylord M. Volk, Ph.D., Soils Chemist
t. E. McCloud, Ph.D., Assistant 3 J. R. Neller, Ph.D., Soils Chemist
G. C. Nutter, Ph.D., Asst. Agronomist Nathan Gammon, Jr., Ph.D., Soils Chemist
Ralph G. Leighty, B.S., Asst. Soil Surveyor 2
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND NUTRITION G. D. Thornton, Ph.D., Microbiologist
C. F. Eno, Ph.D., Asst. Soils Microbiologist
T. J. Cunha, Ph.D., Animal Husbandman 3 H. W. Winsor, B.S.A., Assistant Chemist
G. K. Davis, Ph.D., Animal Nutritionist3 R. E. Caldwell, M.S.A., Asst. Chemist3
]i. L. Shirley, Ph.D., Biochemist V. W. Carlisle, B.S., Asst. Soil Surveyor
A. M. Pearson, Ph.D., Asso. An. Husb.3 J. H. Walker, M.S.A., Asst. Soil Surveyor
John P. Feaster, Ph.D., Asst. An. Nutri. William K. Robertson, Ph.D., Asst. Chemist
H. D. Wallace, Ph.D., Asst. An. Hush.3 0. E. Cruz, B.S.A., Asst. Soil Surveyor
M. Koger, Ph.D., An. Husbandman 3 W. G. Blue, Ph.D., Asst. Biochemist
J. F. Hentges, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. An. Husb. J. G. A. Fiskel, Ph.D., Asst. Biochemist a
L. R. Arrington, Ph.D., Asst. An. Hush. L. C. Hammond, Ph.D., Asst. Soil Physicist 3
H. L. Breland, Ph.D., Asst. Soils Chem.
DAIRY SCIENCE
VETERINARY SCIENCE
E. L. Fouts, Ph.D., Dairy Technologist VETERINARY SCIENCE
R. B. Becker, Ph.D., Dairy Husbandman 3 D. A. Sanders, D.V.M., Veterinarian 1
S. P. Marshall, Ph.D., Asso. Dairy Husb.3 M. W. Emmel, D.V.M., Veterinarian 3
W. A. Krienke, M.S., Asso. Dairy Tech.3 C. F. Simpson, D.V.M., Asso. Veterinarian
P. T. Dix Arnold, M.S.A., Asso. Dairy Husb. 3 L. E. Swanson, D.V.M., Parasitologist
Leon Mull, Ph.D., Asso. Dairy Tech.' W. R. Dennis, D.V.M., Asst. Parasitologist
H. H. Wilkowske, Ph.D., Asst. Dairy Tech.3 E. W. Swarthout, D.V.M.. Asso. Poultry
James M. Wing, Ph.D., Asst. Dairy Hush. Pathologist (Dade City)











BRANCH STATIONS F. T. Boyd, Ph.D., Asso. Agronomist
M. G. Hamilton, Ph.D., Asst. Horticulturist
NORTH FLORIDA STATION, QUINCY J. N. Simons, Ph.D., Asst. Virologist
D. N. Beardsley, M.S., Asst. Animal Hush.
W. C. Rhoades, M.S., Entomologist in Charge
R. R. Kincaid, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist SUB-TROPICAL STATION, HOMESTEAD
L. G. Thompson, Jr., Ph.D., Soils Chemist
W. H. Chapman, M.S., Agronomist Geo. D. Ruehle, Ph.D., Vice-Dir. in Charge
Frank S. Baker, Jr., B.S., Asst. An. Hush. D. 0. Wolfenbarger, Ph.D., Entomologist
Frank E. Guthrie, Ph.D., Asst. Entomologist Francis B. Lincoln, Ph.D., Horticulturist
Robert A. Conover, Ph.D.. Plant Path.
Mobile Unit, Monticello John L. Malcolm, Ph.D., Asso. Soils Chemist
R. W. Wallace, B.S., Associate Agronomist R. W. Harkness, Ph.D., Asst. Chemist
R. Bruce Ledin, Ph.D., Asst. Hort.
Mobile Unit, Marianna J. C. Noonan, M.S., Asst. Hort.
. W. Lipcom, M.S., Associate Agronomist M. H. Gallatin, B.S., Soil Conservationist 2
R. W. Lipscomb, M.S., Associate Agronomist
Mobile Unit, Pensacola WEST CENTRAL FLORIDA STATION,
R. L. Smith, M.S., Associate Agronomist BROOKSVILLE
Mobile Unit, Chipley Marian W. Hazen, M.S., Animal Husband-
J. B. White, B.S.A., Associate Agronomist man in Charge
RANGE CATTLE STATION, ONA
CITRUS STATION, LAKE ALFRED W. G. Kirk, Ph.D., Vice-Director in Charge
E. M. Hodges, Ph.D., Agronomist
A. F. Camp, Ph.D., Vice-Director in Charge D. Jones, M.S., Asst. Soil Technologist
W. L. Thompson, B.S., Entomologist
R. F. Suit, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist CENTRAL FLORIDA STATION, SANFORD
E. P. Ducharme, Ph.D., Asso. Plant Path.
C. R. Stearns, Jr., B.S.A., Asso. Chemist R. W. Ruprecht, Ph.D., Vice-Dir. in Charge
J. W. Sites, Ph.D., Horticulturist J. W. Wilson, ScD., Entomologist
H. 0. Sterling, B.S., Asst. Horticulturist P. J. Westgate, Ph.D., Asso. Hort.
H. J. Reitz, Ph.D., Horticulturist Ben F. Whitner, Jr., B.S.A., Asst. Hort.
Francine Fisher, M.S., Asst. Plant Path. Geo. Swank, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Plant Path.
I. W. Wander, Ph.D., Soils Chemist
J. W. Kesterson, M.S., Asso. Chemist WEST FLORIDA STATION, JAY
R. Hendrickson, B.S., Asst. Chemist
Ivan Stewart, Ph.D., Asst. Biochemist C. E. Hutton, Ph.D., Vice-Director in Charge
D. S. Prosser, Jr., B.S., Asat. Engineer H. W. Lundy, B.S.A., Associate Agronomist
R. W. Olsen, B.S., Biochemist
F. W .Wenel, Jr., Ph.D., Chemist SUWANNEE VALLEY STATION,
Alvin H. Rouse, M.S., Asso. Chemist LIVE OAK
H. W. Ford, Ph.D., Asst. Horticulturist
L. C. Knorr, Ph.D., Asso. Histologist G. E. Ritchey, M.S., Agronomist in Charge
R. M. Pratt, Ph.D., Asso. Ent.-Pathologist GULF COAST STATION, BRADENTON
W. A. Simanton, Ph.D., Entomologist GULF COAST STATION, BRADENTON
E. J. Deszyck, Ph.D., Asso. Horticulturist E. L. Spencer, Ph.D., Soils Chemist in Charge
C. D. Leonard, Ph.D., Asso. Horticulturist E. G. Kelsheimer, Ph.D., Entomologist
W. T. Long, M.S., Asst. Horticulturist David G. A. Kelbert, Asso. Horticulturist
M. H. Muma, Ph.D., Asso. Entomologist Robert O. Magie, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist
F. J. Reynolds, Ph.D., Asso. Hort. J. M. Walter, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist
W. F. Spencer, Ph.D., Asst. Chem. S. S. Woltz, Ph.D., Asst. Horticulturist
R. B. Johnson, Ph.D., Asst. Entomologist Donald S. Burgis, M.S.A., Asst. Hort.
W. F. Newhall, Ph.D., Asst. Biochemist C. M. Geraldson, Ph.D., Asst. Horticulturist
W. F. Grierson-Jackson, Ph.D., Asst. Chem.
Roger Patrick, Ph.D., Bacteriologist
Marion F. Oberbacher, Ph.D., Asst. Plant FIELD LABORATORIES
Physiologist
Evert J. Elvin, B.S., Asst. Horticulturist Watermelon, Grape, Pasture-Leesburg
R. C. J. Koo, Ph.D., Asst. Biochemist
J. R. Kuykendall, Ph.D., Asst. Horticulturist J. M. Crall, Ph.D., Associate Plant Path-
ologist Acting in Charge
C. C. Helms, Jr., B.S., Asst. Agronomist
EVERGLADES STATION, BELLE GLADE L. H. Stover, Assistant in Horticulture

W. T. Forsee, Jr., Ph.D., Chemist in Charge Strawberry-Plant City
R. V. Allison, Ph.D., Fiber Technologist A. N. Brooks, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist
Thomas Bregger, Ph.D., Physiologist
J. W. Randolph, M.S., Agricultural Engr. Vegetables-Hastings
R. W. Kidder, M.S., Asso. Animal Hush. A. H. Eddins, Ph.D., Plant Path. in Charge
C. C. Seale, Associate Agronomist E. N. McCubbin, Ph.D., Horticulturist
N. C. Hayslip, B.S.A. Asso. Entomologist T. M. Dobrovsky, Ph.D., Asst. Entomologist
E. A. Woll, M.S., Asst. Horticulturist
W. H. Thames, M.S., Asst. Entomologist Pecans-Monticello
W. G. Genung, M.S., Asst. Entomologist A. M. Phillips, B.S., Asso. Entomologist 2
Robert J. Allen, Ph.D., Asst. Agronomist John R. Large, M.S., Asso. Plant Path.
V. E. Green, Ph.D., Asst. Agronomist Frost
J. F. Darby, Ph.D., Asst. Plant Path. Frost Forecasting-Lakeland
V. L. Guzman, Ph.D., Asst. Hort. Warren O. Johnson, B.S., Meteorologist in
J. C. Stephens, B.S., Drainage Engineer 2 Charge
A. E. Kretschmer, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Soils
Chem. 1 Head of Department
Charles T. Ozaki, Ph.D., Asst. Chemist In cooperation with U. S.
Thomas L. Meade, Ph.D., Asst. An. Nutri. a Cooperative, other divisions, U. of F.
D. S. Harrison, M.S., Asst. Agri. Engr. On leave










CONTENTS
PAGE
INTRODUCTION --.......---..----..----.. -------.. ...... 5
LITERATURE SURVEY -............-.....- .. ...----- ........... .... 6
PROCEDURE ........-...--.-------.......------........... .. --------- 6
Mechanical Analysis ---..------....-.... ..--- --- ---..----.............. 7
Chemical Analysis ................. ..-...-----...--.....-....--- -- ----... 7
Spectrographic Analysis ....-----.........-- ..-.--.------ --..---- ..---- 8
Soil Types Sampled --..---...............-....------------ 9
Norfolk-Red Bay ........--. .- ..--..---- ...-..-------. -- - ----..... .. 9
Marlboro-Greenville -.--.--................ .... ........-..- -- -- 10
Arredondo-Kanapaha ......... ------------.- ------...-- 10
Lakeland-Blanton .-..........--------. -- --.......-..-..... 11
Lakewood-St. Lucie .--....---..-- -.. ----.---.......---- 11
Jonesville-Chiefland ...........----------...... ---------- 11
Hernando-Archer .......--.........------.---...... -------- 12
Rex .-....-..--.....---..--..- .---..........----------- 12
Scranton-Ona .-------........................---- -----. 12
Leon-St. Johns .--..............--.........---- ---.-------- ... 12
Plummer-Rutlege ....... .............--------- ----.............. 13
Bladen-Bayboro ......-..-....----.. ...---- ..........--.... -------.. 13
Broward-Bradenton-Parkwood-Sunniland ........-...---...............-...-- 13
Arzell-Felda-Manatee ........-..---..- ...-..----- ---- --... --...... .. 14
Ochopee-Tucker Marls .---..-..- -----.-----..-.-. -------.... --..-...-- 14
RESULTS ...----..-....-. ...................-----..---.----- .------. 15
DISCUSSION .... -............ .-----------------. ----... ----------- 16
Mechanical Analyses .............----- ...-- ...---. ------------........... 16
Chemical Analyses .......-----.... ----- ----------.. .- 19
Organic Matter ..........---..----.. ..-..-..------.. --.-... -----. 19
Moisture Equivalent .--.......-..--------------.. .. .. ... 20
Base Exchange Capacity ---..--.... ---.....--.--. ....... ...------.... 21
Exchangeable Bases and pH .....---.--... ------........--------....- 22
Exchangeable Magnesium .................--...----.. ----...-....---... 23
Exchangeable Potassium ..---..---- ----------............... ...---. 24
Total Nitrogen ... --.......--.......-----..- --.. --..--.. ----.... 24
Total Phosphorus .....--. ..-....-..--- ...---- -- ....-----..... ...---- .. 24
Total Potassium and Sodium in Alachua County Soils ..------......... 25
Spectrographic Analyses ....-----...... ... .-------........--- 25
Barium and Strontium .-....-- ..... -........-... ----------25
Boron ..............................--...-- .....-----.......------------ 26
Chromium ...........-.. ------ ----..--....--.....---.......-- ... --26
Cobalt ..-----........... .............---- -------........------ 27
Copper ..... -...........-----.....-----......... ------------ 27
Iron ..... ...........--- ........ .----. ----------........... .. 28
Lead --- ................. ..................... ...------..... ..... ---------- 28
Manganese .....--.........-.............--------.----- ... 28
Nickel .......-----.................. ------------------....... 28
Titanium and Zirconium -.--......--....---... -------...-..-- --------. 29
Vanadium ----.......... ...............-- ...-----..... ---------... 29
Zinc ..........-- ...................... ............--------..------ 29
Other Elements ......--...-..--....--..-...---...--.--........... .. 29
SUMMARY ..... .......... .......... ......... .....----- -------...-.. 30
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS .----..--. ................---..---.---...---.. ---------..... 31
LITERATURE CITED .......---... ....---..-....-....-- --.. -- -------------- ---.... .. 32
APPENDIX A, MECHANICAL ANALYSES .--.-..............----------------------.. 34
APPENDIX B, CHEMICAL ANALYSES ..--.-------.. ---------------.. .------. 74
APPENDIX C, SPECTROGRAPHIC ANALYSIS ............................ ..... ..----.....100
APPENDIX D, TOTAL POTASSIUM AND SODIUM IN ALACHUA COUNTY SOILS ..124









Physical, Spectrographic and Chemical

Analyses of Some Virgin Florida Soils

NATHAN GAMMON, JR., J. R. HENDERSON, R. A. CARRIGAN,
R. E. CALDWELL, R. G. LEIGHTY, and F. B. SMITH

INTRODUCTION
Physical and chemical analyses have long been used to evaluate
soils and soil components-not only for agronomic purposes
but also for such special purposes as the investigation of bear-
ing strength, the design of earth dams and road fills, and the
production of ceramics. Mapping of soils originally was based
largely on color and texture differences that were readily dis-
cernible by the soil surveyor in the field. It was soon recognized
that errors in judgment of soil texture in the field were of fre-
quent occurrence and that actual laboratory analyses for physi-
cal components were necessary to improve the accuracy of the
soil surveyor's work.
Later, as the differentiation of soil types became more exact-
ing, chemical differences were recognized that could not be
detected in the field without special tests. Differences in acidity,
or in content of calcium or phosphorus, may be sufficient to
distinguish between two soils that, on the basis of physical
appearance alone, would be referred to the same type. Virgin
soil samples have been collected from many representative soil
types of Florida in connection with the regular soil survey pro-
gram. The analyses of some of these samples are reported
here.
Mechanical analysis of soil samples is a regular part of the
soil survey program. This serves as a valuable check on the
surveyor in the field in his estimate of soil texture. Chemical
analyses are not always a routine part of soil survey proced-
ure, but are used to a limited extent in final confirmation of
identification of some soil types.
This study was made to obtain basic information on com-
position of Florida soils. The accumulation of data should be
of value, first as reference material for investigators and other
workers who need information on the composition and proper-
ties of representative Florida soils, second as a contribution
to systematic knowledge of principles of distribution of chemi-







6 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

cal and physical properties in soils, and third as a check on
significance and validity of soil-type identifications made by
soil surveyors.

LITERATURE SURVEY
The basic system for classification of the soils of Florida has
been outlined by Henderson (17). More recent concepts and
changes in this system which apply to the soils under study
will be discussed in a later section of this bulletin.1 Joffe and
and Conybeare (20) compiled and summarized analyses made
on Florida soils prior to 1938. Peech and Young (25) analyzed
a number of soils used for citrus production. They showed that
these soils varied widely in composition. Rogers et al. (26)
reported extensive chemical analyses on 89 cultivated and 43
virgin soils. Drosdoff (12) and Dyal and Drosdoff (14) made
many physical and chemical analyses on soils of northern and
western Florida in evaluating these soil types for production
of tung oil.
Wide differences in soil type, fertilizer treatment, location,
and season of growth caused variations in mineral, protein,
and vitamin content of vegetables, according to Sims and Volk
(31) and Janes (18, 19). Volk and Bell (37) showed that
lime requirements of some soils vary in accordance with their
organic matter content. Smith and Gall (32) reported dif-
ferences in microbiological populations with soil-type changes.
Volk et al. (38) found that high moisture equivalents were in-
versely correlated with yield during a season of unfavorable
rainfall.
Certain minor-element deficiencies have been correlated with
soil type or groups of soil types (11, 15). Since physical and
chemical differences are recognized as economic factors in
Florida soils, information on these differences that correlates
with present systems of soil classification or contributes to an
improved soil classification should be of considerable value.

PROCEDURE
Soils were sampled by horizons, separate horizons being
differentiated on the basis of a soil-color or texture change
that could be observed in the field. All samples were taken
from soil profiles which were considered representative of the

1 See Soil Types Sampled, page 9.







Different Analyses of Some Virgin Florida Soils 7

type. As far as could be determined, the samples were taken
from undisturbed areas that had not been previously farmed or
fertilized. Special precautions were observed in collecting and
preparing the samples to prevent contamination by traces of
metals. Air-dried samples were screened through an aluminum
sieve with 2 mm. openings and stored in either glass fruit jars
or waxed cardboard cartons prior to analysis.

MECHANICAL ANALYSIS
Particle-size distribution of the soil was determined by the
pipette method described by Olmstead, Alexander and Middle-
ton (24), with the modification recommended by Shaw and
Miles (30). Sodium metaphosphate was employed as the dis-
persing agent (35) instead of sodium oxalate, which was used
in the original procedure.

CHEMICAL ANALYSIS
Organic matter was determined by the chromic acid oxida-
tion procedure of Walkley and Black (13, 40). Total nitrogen
was determined by the regular A.O.A.C. method (1), except
that the ammonia was distilled into a 4% boric acid solution
and titrated with 0.1 N hydrochloric acid using a mixed indica-
tor of methyl red and methylene blue (21, 27). Total phos-
phorus was determined by the A.O.A.C. method (1) using mag-
nesium nitrate for destruction of organic matter. Moisture
equivalent was determined by use of a centrifuge with a special
head and speed regulator attachment, as outlined by Briggs
and McLane (5).
Base-exchange capacity was determined by an adaptation
of the procedure proposed by Schollenberger (28). Exchange-
able calcium, magnesium, and potassium were determined on
the neutral normal ammonium acetate extract obtained from
this procedure. Exchangeable calcium and magnesium were
determined by the A.O.A.C. procedures for soil extracts (1).
Exchangeable potassium was determined by the cobaltinitrite
method as outlined by Volk (39). Soil reaction (pH) was de-
termined by the potentiometric method using the glass elec-
trode, as described by Carrigan (8, 37) for Florida conditions.
Total potassium and sodium were determined in Alachua County
soils by Gammon's (16) flame-photometer adaptation of the J.
Lawrence Smith procedure.







8 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

SPECTROGRAPHIC ANALYSIS
Except for unimportant modifications, the procedure of spec-
trographic analysis was essentially that of Rogers et al. (26).
This procedure was designed to yield qualitative analyses with
only rough estimates of concentrations. To avoid creating a
false impression of precision, Rogers et al. reported each analyti-
cal result in the form of a range of values within which the
concentration of the given element was believed to lie. In the
present publication a single numerical value is used instead of
a range of values, though the data are no more precise than
those of Rogers et al.
Concentrations were estimated merely by visual compari-
son of spectrum-line densities with standard spectra on the
same photographic plate. No internal standards were used,
as would be the case if fully quantitative spectrographic pro-
cedures had been followed. Under these conditions analytical
results are but rough approximations; any given analytical
value may well be in error by a factor of three or more. The
use of an abbreviated method of this type permits rapid ac-
cumulation of a body of semi-quantitative information useful in
surveying the qualitative composition of a large number of
soils and in discerning certain broad trends.
Soil samples were prepared for the arc by igniting for about
three hours at 4500 to 5000C. and then grinding to an impalp-
able powder in agate or mullite mortars. All calculations of
spectrographic analyses are reported on the basis of the ignited
soil.
Certain metals forming oxides of exceptionally high boiling
point, notably titanium and zirconium, are liable to be lost
from the arc, owing to their failure to volatilize before the
crater wall of the lower, sample-containing electrode has burned
away. With these elements the estimates are likely to be low
and extremely erratic. Though more elaborate techniques can
overcome this difficulty, it was not thought worthwhile to take
the extra trouble, since these metals are not known to be
important soil fertility factors.
Correct interpretation of the data is dependent on an apprecia-
tion of the sensitivity of detection for the different elements.
Some elements were detected only occasionally, but this is
probably because of their occurrence at concentrations below
the threshold of detection in most of the samples. The approxi-
mate sensitivity limits are presented in Table 1.









Different Analyses of Some Virgin Florida Soils 9

TABLE 1.-SENSITIVITY LIMITS FOR THE VARIOUS ELEMENTS BY ROUGH
ESTIMATE SPECTROGRAPHIC ANALYSIS.

Element Approximate Lower Limit of Detectability
in Percent
Antimony ....... .................... 0.1
Arsenic .........---------............-- -- ..- > 0.1
Barium .............. ................. 0.001
Bismuth ........... .............- ..- 0.01
Boron ........... ...... ... .. 0.001
Cadmium ---- .-...... ........ | 0.01
Chromium .... .................. .. 0.0005
Cobalt ............. ....................... 0.0005
Copper .... -. ....... ..... ......... 0.0001
Iron .....-..--....-- ........-- ....------ -- ..... < 0.001
Lead ............ ................ .. ..... 0.001
Manganese ................... ........ 0.001
Molybdenum ........................ 0.001
N ickel .............. ---.. ...-.. .......- ..- .. 0.0005
Strontium -.......- ... ......... ..... ..... 0.001
Thallium ......................... ......... 0.01
Tin .----........--.. ...--- ................... 0.001
Titanium .................................. 0.001
Vanadium ................................ 0.001
Zinc ....----.... .......... ....- ........... 0.001
Zirconium .................................... 0.01


SOIL TYPES SAMPLED
Samples from two to nine horizons in each of the 143 soil
profiles examined were collected for the analyses reported in
this bulletin. These samples comprised 74 soil types dis-
tributed among 52 series. Many of the samples were collected
during the soil surveys of Alachua, Collier and Manatee counties.
Additional samples were taken from these counties and also
from several counties in northwestern Florida. The principal
characteristics of the soil series sampled are described within
the 15 soil groups which follow:
The Norfolk-Red Bay group consists of soils belonging to the
Norfolk, Ruston, Orangeburg, Red Bay, and Amite series. These
soils have been derived from marine deposits of non-calcareous
sands and clays. They have relatively deep loamy sand and
sandy loam surface and subsurface soils overlying friable sandy
clay loam or sandy clay subsoils at 14 to 30 inches. These soils
occur on nearly level to rolling relief in northwestern Florida
and are well drained.
Norfolk soil has a grayish-brown, gray, or dark gray surface
over yellow, yellowish-brown, or brownish-yellow subsoil. Rus-
ton soil consists of a grayish-brown to dark gray surface and








10 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

reddish-yellow, strong brown, or yellowish-red subsoil. Orange-
burg soil has a grayish-brown to dark gray surface overlying
red or reddish-brown subsoil. Red Bay has a brown to dark
reddish-brown surface and dark red or reddish-brown subsoil.
Amite soil is similar to Red Bay but occurs on the second bot-
toms along large streams.
The Marlboro-Greenville group contains the Marlboro, Tifton,
Faceville, Carnegie, Magnolia, Greenville, and Blakely soils.
These soils are similar to the Norfolk-Red Bay group, but are
distinguished by their shallower surface soils and higher con-
tent of fine-textured material (silt and clay) throughout the
profile. The sandy clay or sandy clay loam subsoils are en-
countered at 8 to 14 inches. The Marlboro-Greenville soils
occur on nearly level to undulating relief in northwestern Flor-
ida and are well drained.
Marlboro soil has a yellow, yellowish-brown, or brownish-
yellow subsoil similar to colors in Norfolk soils. Tifton soil
is similar to Marlboro, but it has a deeper surface soil and con-
tains large quantities of brown iron pebbles throughout the
profile. Faceville has a reddish-yellow, strong brown, or yellow-
ish-red subsoil similar to the colors in Ruston soils. Carnegie
is similar to Faceville but it contains brown iron pebbles
throughout the profile. Magnolia has a grayish-brown surface
overlying a bright red subsoil. Greenville has a brown to dark
reddish-brown surface overlying dark red or reddish-brown
subsoils similar to the colors in Red Bay. Blakely has a darker
reddish-brown surface and subsoil than Greenville soil.
The Arredondo-Kanapaha group consists of soils of the Arre-
dondo, Gainesville, Fort Meade, Kanapaha, Fellowship, and
Alachua series. Sands and loamy sands are the dominant
textures of these soils. They have been derived from a mixture
of sands and phosphatic materials. Often small phosphatic
pebbles are scattered on the surfaces and throughout the pro-
files. These soils occur on nearly level to rolling relief in central
and northern Florida and are dominantly well to moderately
well drained. The drainage of Fellowship is somewhat poor.
It has slow to rapid surface drainage and slow internal drain-
age through the clayey materials in the subsoil.
Arredondo soil has a dark gray to grayish-brown surface
overlying yellowish-brown, pale brown, or brownish-yellow sandy
lower layers. Gainesville has a dark grayish-brown to dark
brown surface over brown, strong brown, or reddish-brown









Different Analyses of Some Virgin Florida Soils 11

lower layers. Fort Meade has a black to dark grayish-brown
surface, 12 to 15 inches thick, over brown to pale brown lower
layers. Kanapaha has a grayish-brown to dark gray surface
over pale brown, light gray or pale yellow lower layers. Fel-
lowship has a very dark gray to grayish-brown surface over
gray, light gray, or light grayish-brown sandy clay or sandy
clay loam. Alachua soil occurs in depressional areas and its
colluvial-alluvial materials have colors similar to those of Fort
Meade soils.
The Lakeland-Blanton group consists of Lakeland, Blanton,
and Orlando soils which have been derived from moderately
thick beds of sands. These soils occur on nearly level to rolling
relief in central, northern, and northwestern Florida and are
well drained. Generally, the surface textnres ar sands.
Lakeland soil has a graish-brow t asura ek4 to
6 inches thick over vowylwish-- b --b -yel-
lowlower-laye-s. Blanton soil has grayish-brown to dark gray
surfaces over light gray or splotched light gray, white, and
pale yellow lower layers. Orlando soil has a very dark gray
to black surface, 9 to 15 inches thick, over yellowish-brown
to light gray lower layers.
The Lakewood-St. Lucie group contains soils of the Lakewood,
St. Lucie, and Pomello series. These soils have been derived
from thick beds of sands. They occur on nearly level to rolling
relief throughout Florida and are excessively to moderately well
drained. The surface soils are dominantly sands in texture.
Lakewood soil has nearly white sands to depths ranging from
10 to 24 inches and then brownish-yellow or yellow sands. St.
Lucie and Pomello soils have nearly white sands to depths
greater than 42 inches. The Pomello occurs on flatter relief
and retains more moisture for growing plants than the St.
Lucie soil. An organic stained layer may be encountered
slightly below the 42 inch depth in the Pomello soil.
Jonesville-Chiefland group soils have been derived from mod-
erately thick beds of sands overlying finer sediments which
rest on limestone. Small amounts of material weathered from
the limestone may be mixed with the overlying sand materials.
The sandy materials average more than 30 inches la depth.
These soils occur on nearly level to undulating relief in west-
central and northern Florida and are well to moderately well
drained. Jonesville soil has a grayish-brown to gray sandy
surface over yellow, pale yellow, or pale brown sands and Chief-








12 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

land has grayish-brown to gray surfaces underlain by light
gray to white sands.
Hernando-Archer group soils occur on nearly level to undu-
lating relief in west-central and northern Florida. They are
well to moderately well drained. These soils have been devel-
oped from thin beds of sands and loamy sands overlying finer
sediments within 30 inches of the surface, which rest on lime-
stone. The fine-textured materials over the limestone have
been derived partly or entirely from limestone residuum. Her-
nando soil has grayish-brown to dark gray sandy surface layers,
light yellowish-brown or yellowish-brown subsurface layers,
over yellowish-brown to brown sandy clay or sandy clay loam
and limestone. The subsoil of the Archer is redder; more mot-
tled with yellowish-brown, reddish-gray, reddish-brown and
light gray; slightly heavier in texture; and more firm in the
B horizon than is the Hernando soil.
Rex soils occur on nearly level relief in northern Florida and
are moderately well to somewhat poorly drained. These soils
have been formed from moderately thick beds of unconsolidated
acid sands and loamy sands, overlying sandy clays and sandy
clay loams. These soils have a very dark gray to gray sandy
surface overlying light yellowish-brown, pale yellow, or yellow
loamy sands on mottled pale yellow, yellowish-red, and gray
sandy clays and sandy clay loams.
Scranton and Ona soils occur on nearly level reliefs in central
and northern Florida and have somewhat poor drainage. These
soils have been derived from moderately thick beds of acid
sands and loamy sands. The surface soils are sands and loamy
sands in texture. Scranton has black or very dark gray sur-
faces, 10 to 15 inches thick, and pale yellow to light brownish-
gray lower layers. Ona has a dark gray to black surface, 8 to
12 inches thick, which is underlain within 14 inches of the sur-
face by a brown organic-stained layer, and which grades to
lighter-colored sands with increasing depths.
The Leon-St. Johns group consists of soils belonging to the
Leon, Immokalee, and St. Johns series. These soils occur on
nearly level relief in the flatwood sections throughout Florida.
They have been developed from dominantly thick beds of un-
consolidated sands under the influence of somewhat poor to
poor drainage conditions. These soils are characterized by
having black or dark brown organic hardpans beginning at 14
to 42-inch depths.








Different Analyses of Some Virgin Florida Soils 13

Leon soil has a gray to dark gray sandy surface, 2 to 6 inches
thick, overlying light gray sands which break abruptly into the
black or dark brown organic hardpan at 14 to 30 inches. Below
this layer, the sands grade to lighter colors with increasing
depths. Immokalee soil is very similar to the Leon, but it differs
by having the dark brown organic hardpan beginning at 30 to
42-inch depths. St. Johns soil has thicker and darker-colored
surface layers and is more poorly drained than Leon and Immoka-
lee soils.
Plummer-Rutlege soils occur on flat or depressional areas,
principally in the flatwood regions throughout the State. These
soils have poor or very poor drainage and may be covered with
water during a portion of the year. They have been derived
from moderately thick beds of acid sands. Plummer soil has
a gray to dark gray sandy surface, 2 to 6 inches thick, over-
lying light gray, light brownish-gray, or very pale brown lower
layers. Rutlege soil has a black or very dark gray fine sand,
mucky fine sand, or loamy fine sand surface, 8 to 15 inches thick,
over light gray, light brownish-gray or very pale brown lower
layers.
Bladen-Bayboro group soils occur on nearly flat relief in the
northern portion of the State. They have been formed from
thin beds of sands and loamy sands over non-calcareous clays.
These soils have somewhat poor to poor drainage. Their domi-
nant textures are sandy and loamy sands. Bladen soil has a
gray to dark gray surface, overlying mottled gray, yellow, and
yellowish-brown sandy clay loam or sandy clay lower layers.
Bayboro has very dark gray to black surfaces over gray or
mottled gray and yellowish-brown clayey materials.
Broward-Bradenton-Parkwood-Sunniland group includes soils
of the Broward, Matmon, Copeland, Bradenton, Keri, Parkwood,
Sunniland, and Ruskin series. These soils occur on level or
nearly level reliefs principally in central and southern Florida
and are somewhat poorly to poorly drained. They have been
derived from thin beds of sands and loamy sands over calcareous
materials. These soils have a gray or dark gray surface, 4 to 8
inches thick, except Copeland, which has a black or very dark
gray surface, 8 to 12 inches thick. The surface soils are sands
or loamy sands in texture.
Broward soil has its surface underlain by light gray to light
yellowish-brown sands over limestone. Matmon has yellowish-
brown or brown sands and loamy sands over limestone. The








14 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

dark surfaces of Copeland are underlain by light gray sands
and thin layers of clayey materials over limestone. Bradenton
has its surface underlain by light gray or gray sands over
grayish-brown sandy clays or sandy clay loams and then fine-
textured marl. Keri soil has a thin layer of marl, 6 to 12 inches
thick, sandwiched between sand layers within the 42-inch pro-
file. Parkwood has a thin mantle of sands over a thick layer
of marl. The surface of Sunniland soil is underlain by light
gray sands over mottled yellow, yellowish-brown, and light gray
sandy clay loams or sandy clays which frequently contain con-
cretions or fragments of limestone. Ruskin is somewhat similar
to Sunniland but it has yellow or yellowish-brown sandy clay
loam lower layers over shelly marl.
The Arzell-Felda-Manatee group includes soils belonging to
the Arzell, Charlotte, Delray, Pompano, Felda, and Manatee
series. These soils occur on flat or depressional areas in the
flatwoods areas, principally in central and southern Florida.
They are poorly to very poorly drained and may be covered with
water during a portion of the year. Arzell, Charlotte, Delray,
and Pompano soils have been formed from moderately thick
beds of sands over alkaline materials. Felda and Manatee soils
have been derived from a thin mantle of sands or loamy sands
overlying alkaline clayey materials which may rest on marl.
Arzell has thin, gray or light gray sand or fine sand surface
layers over nearly white sands. Charlotte has a gray or grayish-
brown sand or fine sand surface overlying light gray sands
which break abruptly to brownish-yellow or reddish-yellow sands
at 18 to 30 inches. Pompano has a gray to dark gray sand
or fine sand surface, 3 to 8 inches thick, overlying grayish-
brown to light gray sands to 30 inches or more. Felda has
colors similar to those in the Pompano soil, but it has gray or
light gray and yellowish-brown sandy clay loams or sandy clays
within 30 inches.
Delray has a black or very dark gray sand, fine sand or
loamy fine sand surface, 9 to 15 inches thick, overlying gray
or light gray sands to 30 inches or more. Manatee has a black
or very dark gray surface overlying within 30 inches gray or
light gray sandy clays or sandy clay loams which frequently
have fine-textured marl. The surface texture of Manatee soil
ranges from fine sand through fine sandy clay loam.
The Ochopee and Tucker marls occur principally in southern
Florida and have been formed from a mixture of sands and








Different Analyses of Some Virgin Florida Soils 15

finely divided calcareous sediments which dominantly overlie
limestone at shallow depths. These soils have poor to very poor
drainage and may be covered with water during a portion of
the year. They have dark grayish-brown to gray surfaces over-
lying light gray or very pale brown lower layers. Ochopee soils
have been derived from materials having fine sandy loam or
loamy fine sand texture and Tucker soils have materials with a
sandy clay loam or clay loam texture.
Soils of Norfolk-Red Bay, Marlboro-Greenville, Arredondo-
Kanapaha, Jonesville-Chiefland, Hernando-Archer, and Rex
groups are used principally for field crops and improved pas-
tures. Scanton-Ona, Plummer-Rutlege, Bladen-Bayboro, Brow-
ard-Bradenton-Parkwood-Sunniland, and Arzell-Felda-Manatee
soils are used mainly for vegetables and improved pastures.
Ochopee-Tucker and Rex soils are also used for vegetables.
Leon-St. Johns soils are used chiefly for range and improved
pastures and forest. Forest also exist on most uncleared areas
of all the soil groups with the exception of the Ochopee-Tucker
soils and on some areas of Arzell-Felda-Manatee and Plummer-
Rutlege soils.
Where climatic conditions are favorable, citrus is grown on
the well-drained Lakeland-Blanton and Arredondo-Kanapaha
soils. Watermelons are an important crop on Lakeland-Blanton
soils. Under favorable weather conditions and under good
management systems which include adequate water control,
fair to good citrus is grown on Arzell-Felda-Manatee and Brow-
ard-Bradenton-Parkwood-Sunniland soils. Lakewood and St.
Lucie soils are not recommended for cultivated crops or im-
proved pastures. Their natural vegetative cover gives poor
grazing and forest. Pomello soil is used for improved pastures
and produces fair growth of pine trees.

RESULTS
The limitation of the soil samples to representative or typical
soil profiles prevents obtaining results that would represent the
maximum variations within soil types as they are mapped. How-
ever, selection of typical profiles from different areas will show
some of the range of variation. Sectioning of the soil into
horizons is done on the basis of differences in texture and color
that are readily discernible in the field. The possibility of
"averaging" horizons that differ widely chemically but that








16 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

appear uniform to the eye in the field and are therefore sampled
as a single horizon must not be overlooked.
Since data presented here represent a compilation of the work
of a number of men over a period of several years, it is not
surprising that some determinations have been omitted on a few
samples. The most complete analyses are from Alachua and
Manatee counties; together they represent a high percentage
of the major soil types occurring in Florida. Present experi-
ences lead us to believe that analyses obtained on soil types in
these counties can be expected to be about the same as would be
found for the same soil types at other locations in the State.
For ease and ready reference the data are tabulated in
the appendix. Appendix A tabulates physical or mechanical
analyses, Appendix B. tabulates chemical analyses, Appendix C
spectrographic analyses, and Appendix D total potassium and
sodium analyses. Determinations of pH and moisture equiva-
lent are reported in both Appendix A and Appendix B for
convenient reference. Laboratory sample numbers are retained
for identification, since the exact location at which the soil
sample was taken can be found from the Florida Soil Survey
Records. In using the tables the reader is cautioned to remem-
ber the problems involved in selecting representative soil types,
in sampling by horizons, and the accuracy of the analytical
methods, especially in spectrographic analysis.

DISCUSSION
MECHANICAL ANALYSES (APPENDIX A)
Texture.-Soils formed primarily from decomposition of plant
and animal residues are organic soils; whereas, those derived
primarily from physical and chemical breakdown of rocks and
minerals are inorganic or mineral soils. Organic soils are usually
called mucks, peats, or peaty mucks, depending on their per-
centage of organic matter and its degree of decomposition.
Mineral soils are identified by soil class names or textural grade
names, depending on their relative percentages of sands, silts,
and clays. Mineral soils are of special concern in the following
discussion of soil texture.
In the field soils consist of mixtures of organic and mineral
particles of different sizes, ranging from large stones to the
smallest clay particles. Some of these are so small that they
are visible only under the highest powered electron microscope.








Different Analyses of Some Virgin Florida Soils 17

Since these various sized particles are quite different in respect
to their physical characteristics, the nature of mineral soils
is largely determined by the particular group that happens to
predominate. Thus, a soil made up largely of clay particles
possesses very different physical properties from one made up
mostly of sands or silts. Soil texture, therefore, refers to size
of individual soil particles.
The Bureau of Plant Industry, Soils and Agricultural Engi-
neering, USDA, classifies soil particles into eight textural groups,
called separates, as follows:
Diameter of Particles
Separate (in m.m.)
Very coarse sand ....-.....- ...-- ................ ...... .. 2.0 to 1.0
Coarse sand .....-..-- ....--- ..---- .....--- .............. .. 1.0 to 0.5
M edium sand .........- ...- ..-.... ..................... 0.5 to 0.25
Fine sand ................--.............-- ... ..-- .-- 0.25 to 0.10
Very fine sand .......-- ........---............. ........ 0.10 to 0.05
Coarse silt .. ..---.....-- ..----- ....... .....-- ...--- .. 0.05 to 0.005
Fine silt .--..---...-- ..-- ....--................. 0.005 to 0.002
Clay ........... -----..... ...... ...---- ...-..-- -.. Below 0.002

In addition to these separates, Appendix A also reports "Solu-
tion Loss," which represents organic matter destroyed by hydro-
gen peroxide and traces of soluble salts lost during mechanical
analyses. Solution loss is reported as percentage loss based
on oven-dry whole soil. The other soil separates are reported
as percentage of the oven-dry mineral soil after the organic
matter has been removed.
Particles larger than 2 millimeters in diameter are called
gravels, stones, or rocks and are not considered as soil particles
until they become broken down to the smaller sizes of one or
more of these separates.
Soil textural grades are based on the percentages of sand,
silt and clay present. Results of a mechanical analysis are
totaled as sand, silt, and clay fractions to determine the textural
grade name. The 12 major textural grades may be defined as
containing percentages of sands, silts, and clays as follows:
Sand-More than 85% sands, less than 15% silts, and less
than 10% clay.
Loamy Sand-70 to 90% sands, less than 30% silts, and less
than 15% clay.
Sandy Loam-43 to 85% sands, less than 50% silts, and less
than 20% clay.







18 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

Sandy Clay Loam-45 to 80% sands, less than 28% silts, and
20 to 35% clay.
Sandy Clay-45 to 65% sands, less than 20% silts, and 35 to
55% clay.
Loam-23 to 52% sands, 28 to 50% silts, and 7 to 27% clay.
Clay Loam-20 to 45% sands, 15 to 53% silts, and 27 to 40%
clay.
Silt Loam-Less than 50% sands, 50 to 88% silts, and less
than 27% clay.
Silt-Less than 20% sands, 80% or more silts, and less than
12% clay.
Silty Clay Loam-Less than 20% sands, 40 to 73% silts, and
27 to 40% clay.
Silty Clay-Less than 20% sands, 40 to 60% silts, and 40 to
60% clay.
Clay-Less than 45% sands, less than 40% silts, and 40% or
more clay.
The sand textural grades are often modified by the words
"coarse," "fine," or "very fine" to indicate the approximate
size range of the sand separates. More detailed discussion of
textural grades may be found elsewhere (33).
Soils are differentiated as to class on the basis of the average
texture of the surface 5 to 6 inches (plow depth). Most Flor-
ida soils will fall in one of the three classes: Sands, Loamy
Sands, or Sandy Loams. In general, the soils of peninsular
Florida have a surface texture of Sand to Loamy Sand, where-
as, the soils of northwestern Florida are predominantly Loamy
Sands and Sandy Loams. Exception to usual textures are
numerous, and areas of almost all textures are found scattered
about the State.
The fine-textured soils have better properties for retention of
fertilizer against leaching and of moisture retention and supply.
Under Florida conditions they are usually the most productive.
However, textures of the surface soils sometimes do not reflect
moisture conditions as well as those of the subsoil. A fine-
textured layer just under the surface may serve to impede
downward movement of water through the soil.
The Bladen soils are an example of soils with a heavy clay
layer near the surface that is resistant to downward water
movement. This condition promotes lateral water movement








Different Analyses of Some Virgin Florida Soils 19

and lends itself to surface ditch irrigation practices in vegetable
crop production. Other soils have layers that are too deep to
be of much benefit for vegetable crop production but which
are sufficiently near the surface to be of benefit to tree crops.
Norfolk soils, with a fine-textured layer at 14 to 30 inches, are
particularly useful for growing pecans. Still other soils have
no fine-textured layer or, if one has developed, it is too far below
the surface to benefit crops.

CHEMICAL ANALYSES (APPENDIX B)
Organic Matter.-Organic matter is virtually the life blood of
many sandy soils. It plays an important part in all Florida
soils (34), but many sandy soils would be useless without an
adequate supply of organic matter. Organic matter in sandy
soils increases moisture-holding capacity, thus reducing suscep-
tibility to drought. It also increases retention of plant nutri-
ents-1 percent of organic matter adding about 2 milliequiva-
lents of base-exchange capacity per 100 gms. of soil (25).
A soil with adequate organic matter will gradually release
nitrogen for crop growth as the organic matter is decomposed
by soil microorganisms. Soil organic matter also provides a
source of food for non-symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria, which
capture additional nitrogen from the air that may eventually be
utilized by crops (32).
\ Organic matter found in virgin soils represents an equilibrium
condition of all factors that have gone into development of the
soil profile. Some major factors include varieties of plant and
animal life occurring in the area, rate of growth (organic mat-
ter production), general fertility level, moisture supply and
drainage, temperature, soil acidity, and microbiological popula-
tion. The largest accumulation of organic matter is usually
found in the surface nearest to the point of original deposition.
Percentage of organic matter decreases very sharply with in-
creasing depth for most soils, although a few mild reversals can
be attributed to errors in sampling and analysis or to effects
of changes in soil texture. Keri fine sand has a heavy-textured
subsurface horizon that evidently serves as a filter in collecting
organic matter. This horizon has more than double the organic
matter found in the next horizon above and is marked by a large
increase in the clay and silt fractions.
Leon and Immokalee soils combine to form the biggest ex-
ception to the general rule. In these soils organic matter in







20 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

the easily recognized, coffe-brown hardpan or stained subsoil
layer often exceeds the percentage found in the surface horizon.
This layer has a slight accumulation of clay and other fine par-
ticles, but the percentage is usually only slightly more than the
percentage of organic matter accumulated. A high water table
persisting for long periods of time is generally believed to be the
cause of this unusual accumulation.
Excessively drained soils such as Lakewood and St. Lucie
and moderately well-drained Pomello have a very low organic
matter content, usually less than 1 percent in the surface
horizon. Well-drained soils such as Lakeland, Blanton, and
Jonesville have more organic matter, usually ranging from 11/2
to 4 percent in the surface horizon. Poorly drained soils such
as Rutlege, Delray, and Manatee may contain in excess of 20
percent organic matter in the surface layer. However, drainage
is only one of many factors influencing organic matter content.
Such well-drained soils as Arredondo, Gainesville, and Ft. Meade,
and imperfectly drained Fellowship may contain as much as 8
percent organic matter-probably because of their higher native
fertility-whereas poorly drained soils such as Charlotte and
Arzell may contain less than 1 percent organic matter, because
of lower fertility and conditions favorable for decomposition.
When these soils are brought under cultivation, decomposi-
tion of organic matter is often increased by stimulation of micro-
biological activity through draining, plowing, and the applica-
tion of lime and fertilizer. These new factors plus cropping
practices will determine the new equilibrium point for the
organic matter content of the soil under cultivation.
Moisture Equivalent.-Moisture equivalent is in reality a
physical rather than a chemical measurement. However, be-
cause of its close relationship with soil organic matter (36) and
base exchange capacity, it is conveniently reported in the same
table. This value represents the percent of water retained in
soil after it has been subjected to a pull 1,000 times the force
of gravity. Calculation is reported on the basis of oven-dried
soil. Since its conception by Briggs and McLane (5), it has
been used by a number of workers dealing with soil-moisture
problems (2).
Its particular use in Florida soils is in evaluation of soil tex-
ture. Most Florida soils, because of their low organic matter,
silt, and clay contents, are classified as "sands," "loamy sands,"
or "sandy loams." In moving from sands to loams to clays








Different Analyses of Some Virgin Florida Soils 21

there is an increase in silt and clay components. organic mat-
ter often occurs as a higher percentage of fine-texturec soils.
Usually soils containing larger quantities of organic matter,
silt, and clay are most productive.
Among soils classified as "sands" will be found some that are
almost devoid of these finer materials and some that are fairly
well supplied. Under most Florida conditions the better soils
will have the higher moisture equivalent value, which (other
conditions being equal) indicates a potentially higher produc-
tive capacity. In some cases very high moisture equivalent
values, in excess of 10 percent, may actually be associated with
reduced yields (38) because of unfavorable moisture or air
relationships. Moisture equivalent is perhaps the most effec-
tive single measure of potential productive capacity of Florida's
cultivated mineral soils.
Base Exchange Capacity.-Base exchange capacity, like mois-
ture equivalent, is a measure of potential productive capacity
of soil. The phenomenon of exchange is limited almost ex-
clusively to the active organic matter and clay fractions in the
soil. Higher base exchange capacities in these soils are closely
related to increased organic matter or clay content, or both.
Base exchange capacity is more directly a measure of the
soil's potential ability to retain such elements as calcium, mag-
nesium, and potassium against leaching. It is also an indicator
of lime requirement; i.e., with two soils of the same pH, but
of different exchange capacities, the soil with the higher ex-
change capacity will require more lime (37) to raise the pH
a single unit than the one with a low exchange capacity.
Peech (25) found 2 milliequivalents of exchange capacity per
100 grams of soil for each percent of organic matter in the
mineral soils of Florida. The data reported here confirm his
findings with a few exceptions. Most of the apparent excep-
tions are due to the presence of some clay mineral in the soil,
which may add to the exchange capacity, or to the presence of
some organic material not wholly decomposed and incorporated
into the soil. This latter may not be fully active in the exchange
complex and hence lead to lower exchange capacity values than
would be predicted from the organic matter content.
Exchange reactions, which help retain the bases against
leaching, are of greatest importance in the soil horizons that are
penetrated by plant roots. However, base exchange capacity
of clay minerals varies with the kind of mineral. For this








22 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

reason the determination of base exchange capacity on subsoils
is often useful in establishing the nature of clay accumulations
in the subsoil.
Exchangeable Bases and pH.-Calcium, potassium and mag-
nesium are the only exchangeable bases for which chemical
determinations were made. Found in smaller quantities in the
base exchange complex are sodium, manganese, and iron, while
traces of other metals also are present. Elements found in the
exchange complex are considered readily available for plant
growth. These exchangeable bases are more or less readily
exchanged for hydrogen ions; they are free to move into plant
roots without further change in the clay or soil organic matter.
This simple exchange makes rapid plant growth possible, since
release of nutrient elements from primary soil minerals is usually
much too slow to be adequate for plant growth.
The degree to which the exchange complex is saturated with
bases is called the percent base saturation. This value repre-
sents the total of all exchangeable bases (expressed as milli-
equivalents per 100 grams of soil) divided by the total base
exchange capacity expressed in the same units. Normally,
exchangeable calcium, potassium, and magnesium make up such
a large portion of the total bases that a correction for other
bases present is considered unnecessary. It is the percent base
saturation which determines soil reaction (pH); this factor
plus the total base exchange capacity determines the lime re-
quirement (37).
Soils developed under conditions of high rainfall such as
prevail in Florida may be expected to have a low percentage
of base saturation in the surface. This condition prevails for
most soils in that the trend is toward an increased pH with
increasing depth. An occasional soil is found where there is
a reversal of this trend in a lower horizon, but it is usually
associated with a decided change in soil texture.
The soils of phosphatic origin, such as those of the Arredondo
and Gainesville series, usually have a higher pH in the surface,
despite the fact that they are well drained. The generally high-
er fertility of these soils probably makes it possible for plants
to bring bases to the surface faster than they can be leached
away. Some of the heavier-textured soils of northwestern
Florida show a similar condition. Another exception is found
in surface soils containing unusually small amounts of clay
and organic matter. Such soils as Charlotte, Arzell, and Jones-








Different Analyses of Some Virgin Florida Soils 23

ville fine sands have such small amounts of clay and organic
matter in their surface that the pH values of the surface
horizons are usually higher than those of the subsoil.
Calcium, the most abundant of the exchangeable ions, is
3 to 25 times as abundant as magnesium under most soil
conditions. It is even more abundant relative to magnesium
in soil horizons where free calcium carbonate is present. The
amount of calcium follows total base exchange capacity and
soil pH. It usually accounts for one-half to one-sixth of the
total exchange capacity. However, differences in exchange
complexes make predictions of calcium content from pH and
base exchange capacity unreliable unless based on data from
the same soil type.
Some soil horizons with pH values of 6.5 to 8.0 contained
more calcium than would be present on a saturated exchange
complex as indicated by the total base exchange values ob-
tained. This suggests the possibility of some calcium being
linked to the exchange complex by a single valence or some
breakdown of the exchange complex or analytical error in the
use of ammonium acetate to determine total base exchange
capacity, since a well-aerated soil suspension containing free
calcium carbonate in equilibrium with the soil colloid should have
a pH of about 8.3 (4). This equilibrium condition would be
expected in a virgin soil, unless by sampling error horizons
containing no free calcium carbonate were mixed with horizons
containing free calcium carbonate.
Exchangeable Magnesium within any soil profile follows the
same pattern as texture and base exchange capacity. Most
soils show an appreciably higher magnesium content in the
surface horizon than in the subsoil. Soils of low organic matter
content, such as Lakeland, Blanton, Lakewood, St. Lucie, and
Pomello, are consistently low in exchangeable magnesium. Soils
with more organic matter and those of heavier texture are
usually well supplied with magnesium.
Flatwoods soils such as Leon and Immokalee appear to have
adequate magnesium in the surface horizon but the subsoil is
very poorly supplied, except for the hardpan or stained horizon.
Deficiency symptoms of magnesium have been recognized on
citrus (6, 25) and pecans (29) on well drained soils low in or-
ganic matter. These symptoms have been found also in vege-
table crops, but less commonly, since these crops are usually







24 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

grown on soils of higher organic matter content that are fairly
well supplied with magnesium.
Exchangeable Potassium.-The fact that almost all soils in
Florida respond to potash fertilization is substantiated by the
small quantities of exchangeable potassium found in these soils.
Variations in amounts of exchangeable potassium follow base
exchange capacity in much the same way that calcium and
magnesium do; but the quantities are usually much too low
to support a vigorous growth of economic crops. The surface
horizon of Bayboro loamy sand had the highest exchangeable
potassium content of the samples analyzed. Bladen soils that
are closely associated with Bayboro were above average in
their exchangeable potassium. The phosphatic soils of the Ar-
redondo and related series were consistently above average in
potassium content, highest values being noted in the Gaines-
ville and Fellowship series.
Total Nitrogen.-Total nitrogen values follow the percentage
of organic matter very consistently, although the ratio of
nitrogen to organic matter varies from less than 1 to 30
to more than 1 to 100. An average ratio would be about 1 to 50.
Attempts to classify the soils on the basis of nitrogen-organic
matter ratios from these data have been unsuccessful because
of the large variations noted within soil types and groups.
Total Phosphorus.-Total phosphorus determinations dem-
onstrate that most virgin Florida soils have a very low reserve
supply of phosphorus. The majority of soils analyzed contained
less than 0.1% phosphorus; some had less than 0.01%. Varia-
tions were great, but the general trend was towards less phos-
phorus in the more acid and lighter-textured soils. Soils of
the Arredondo and related series, which have developed from
phosphatic material, are consistently high in phosphorus as
would be expected.
The general trend in these phosphatic soils is for greater
concentration of phosphorus with increasing depth (exceeding
1.0% in one analysis), but with the Alachua series a colluvial
soil, the highest concentration of phosphorus is in the surface.
Five soils that were classified in the field as belonging to com-
paratively non-phosphatic soil groups actually proved to con-
tain amounts of phosphorous comparable to those found in soils
of the Arredondo-Kanapaha group. These were Hernando fine
sand, S1-46, two soils of the Manatee series, S41-19 and S41-2,







Different Analyses of Some Virgin Florida Soils 25

Bayboro loamy fine sand, S1-24, and Bradenton fine sand, S41-
17.
Total Potassium and Sodium in Alachua County Soils.-Total
potassium and sodium values in Appendix D are expressed as
milligrams per 100 grams, instead of milliequivalents. The
potassium value may be converted to milliequivalents by di-
viding by 39.1. Sodium values likewise may be converted
by dividing by 23. Except in the Arredondo-Kanapaha group,
total potassium in light-textured soils is low, indicating a very
limited reserve supply. In the surface soil it is usually about
10 times the exchangeable potassium. Total potassium is more
evenly distributed throughout the soil profile than exchangeable
potassium, since its presence in some lower horizons is depend-
ent on the presence of potash-bearing minerals rather than base
exchange capacity.
Although the total potassium is much higher in the Arre-
dondo-Kanapaha group the same approximate ratios of ex-
changeable to total potassium prevail. The heavy-textured
Bayboro loamy sand, S1-24, is high in total potash, with a
ratio of total to exchangeable potassium of 5 to 1 in the surface
soil and 25 to 1 in the subsoil. The previously mentioned highly
phosphatic Hernando fine sand, S1-46, also has a high total
potassium content, especially in the subsoil. Sodium data are
not complete, but it may be noted that analytical values tend
to parallel potassium levels at a lower figure. Gainesville,
Fellowship, Alachua, and Bayboro soils appear to have the
highest sodium reserve.

SPECTROGRAPHIC ANALYSES (APPENDIX C)
Barium and Strontium.-These two elements, being chemi-
cally similar, are appropriately discussed together. Barium
was detected much more frequently than strontium. This is
true despite the fact that strontium usually equalled or ex-
ceeded barium in abundance in those samples where both ele-
ments were found. The higher frequency of detecting barium
is probably attributable to greater sensitivity of detection in the
case of that element, which can be detected at 0.001 % or slightly
less.
Although some samples were estimated to contain concen-
trations of strontium approaching this low level, these cases
were probably the accidental results of unusually favorable
conditions during volatilization of samples in the arc or, con-







26 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

versely, of unfavorable conditions in arcing standard materials
with which the samples were compared. The spectrum of any
given portion of a standard material usually showed more sen-
sitivity for barium than for strontium. Obviously, conclusions
regarding relative abundance of the two elements should be
based entirely on samples that show both elements in detect-
able amounts.
The highest estimated concentration was 0.5% in the case
of strontium and 0.1% for barium. The large number of cases
of non-detection of both elements makes it impossible to assign
estimates of the ranges of variation, but these are probably at
least 100-fold.
Boron.-Owing to incompleteness of data, it is not possible
to generalize broadly regarding boron analyses. Boron was
found in practically all of the samples that were analyzed for
it. Most of these yielded values in the range from 0.001 to
0.005%, though many samples showed higher concentrations.
Occasionally a sample was encountered that gave a value that
seemed high by comparison with existing data in the literature
(41).
In this connection it must be remembered that the data were
obtained by an abbreviated procedure subject to large quan-
titative errors. That local concentrations of the boron-bearing
mineral tourmaline may account for some of the higher boron
levels is a possibility that cannot be discounted, especially
since it is well known that other resistant minerals such as
zircon, rutile and ilmenite are often locally concentrated in
Florida soil materials.
Chromium.-Chromium was found in a large number of the
samples, in concentrations ranging from 0.001% to 0.1%. Since
there were cases of non-detection, the range in concentrations
probably exceeded 100-fold.
Chromium is an element possessing probably at least as great
a capacity for entering into a variety of chemical reactions as
those minor elements now regarded as essential for plant and
animal life. It is not unreasonable to speculate that chromium
could play a biological role, even though not itself an essential
element, when it occurs in appreciable concentrations. From
this point of view it is interesting to compare chromium with
the minor elements commonly recognized as essential.
Though copper was more consistently detected than chrom-
ium, this is probably because of the greater sensitivity of de-







Different Analyses of Some Virgin Florida Soils 27

tection in the case of copper. In practically all cases where
both elements were found in the same sample chromium con-
tent exceeded that of copper, frequently by a very large factor.
In many samples chromium and manganese were found in simi-
lar concentrations, though chromium was often present in
much smaller amounts than manganese. The contents of boron
and zinc were also frequently comparable with the chromium
concentration. These facts may well indicate that chromium is
worthy of more serious study. Similar remarks might be made
for other elements not known to be essential, but which are
found in appreciable concentrations.
Cobalt.-Cobalt could be detected in only 33 of the samples.
Two of these were from heavy-textured horizons of soils in
Alachua County, while the remaining samples were from heavier
soils of the Norfolk-Red Bay and Marlboro-Greenville groups
in western Florida. That traces of this element are widely dis-
tributed, even in the lighter sands, is indicated by results of
analyses where cobalt was concentrated chemically prior to
spectographic analysis (3, 9).
Copper.-Copper appeared to be a constant constituent of
the soils studied. Failure to detect it in a few samples is prob-
ably acribable to its occurrence in concentrations slightly below
the threshold of detection, or to occasional weak exposures in
spectographic analysis. The consistency with which copper was
detected is closely dependent on the extreme sensitivity of de-
tection (about 0.0001%). If, for example, the threshold of
detection had been no lower than that for nickel (about 0.001%)
copper would not have been detected in most samples. This illus-
trates the importance of considering sensitivities for individual
elements (Table 1) in interpreting the data.
In many cases copper content of the sample was well below
that (0.001%) in the lowest reference standard used. Conse-
quently, all estimated copper concentrations falling much be-
low 0.0017% are derived from long extrapolations based on gen-
eral experience in reading spectra. These values are therefore
very crude approximations. They do afford the possibility of
recording definitely observable trends that might otherwise
escape notice.
Analytical values for copper were almost entirely within the
range from 0.0001% to 0.001%. There is apparently at least a
10-fold ratio between the highest and the lowest concentrations.







28 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

Iron.-Although iron is present in adequate supply in most
soils, its concentration in some very light-colored soils fell be-
low 0.1%. This is not surprising when it is considered that
some of these soils (Leon, for example) appear to be practically
white when the organic matter has been burned out. Though
iron is low in most of the very sandy soils of the peninsula,
there are nevertheless some very definite differences within
this group as a whole. Thus the yellow sands of the Lakeland
series, which occur widely in well-drained ridges, show signifi-
cantly higher levels of iron than the poorly-drained flatwoods
soils of the Leon series. It would not be surprising if these
differences might turn out to have important agricultural sig-
nificance, both from the standpoint of iron supply and also
because of a possible relation to the retention of phosphate ap-
plied fertilizers (7, 23).
The content of iron in the most concentrated reference stand-
ard was only 0.1%. Consequently, many iron values estimated
at higher than this level are of a very low order of accuracy.
Iron concentrations were estimated to range from about 0.01%
to much more than 1 percent. Thus the most ferruginous
horizons may contain at least 100 times as much iron as those
poorest in iron.
Lead.-Occasional samples showed traces of lead ranging
from less than 0.001% to as high as 0.01%. Lead is often ob-
served in soil samples from cultivated fields where it has ac-
cumulated as the residue from insecticides such as lead arsenate.
At present no special significance is attached to the occasional
appearance of lead in virgin soil samples.
Manganese.-Manganese was found in almost all samples. Its
occurrence is characterized by a very wide range of concentra-
tions. Samples lowest in manganese (except for those in which
it was not detected) were estimated to contain about 0.0005%,
whereas highest samples ranged up to about 0.5%. This fact
bears out the statement of Mitchell (22) that the content of
a given minor element may well vary over a thousand-fold
range within a group of soils.
Nickel.-Nickel was found in many samples in concentrations
ranging from less than 0.001% to about 0.01%. There were
numerous cases in which the nickel level was comparable with
the concentrations of the essential elements manganese, boron,
and zinc, though manganese was often considerably higher







Different Analyses of Some Virgin Florida Soils 29

than nickel. Nickel was not identified as frequently as copper;
however, if comparisons are restricted to samples in which both
metals were detected, nickel was considerably more abundant
than copper.
In view of the tendency for nickel and cobalt to be associated
in nature, it is of interest to compare their relative abundance
in soils. That nickel was detected far more frequently than
cobalt is undoubtedly the result of nickel contents that are gen-
erally higher than those of cobalt, since both metals are detect-
able with approximately the same sensitivity.
Titanium and Zirconium.-These elements often occur in asso-
ciation in nature and are conveniently discussed as a pair. They
are very difficultly volatilized from the arc; consequently they
tend to remain in the arc crater, along with aluminum, until
long after the remainder of the sample has disappeared. Owing
to burning away of the crater wall, the bead containing these
refractory elements was often lost. Special techniques that
might have prevented these losses were not employed. Conse-
quently, estimated concentrations for these elements are very
erratic and are often subject to large negative errors.
Titanium was found in all horizons in concentrations ranging
up to 1 percent or even higher. Zirconium was found in almost
all samples. Any estimation of range of variation is difficult be-
cause of the likelihood of errors where low estimates are re-
ported.
Vanadium.-Vanadium was found in many soils at concen-
trations varying from 0.001 ~, the lower limit of detection, to
approximately 0.05%.
Zinc.-The data for zinc are incomplete, but this element was
detected in all cases where analyses were made. Concentrations
ranged from less than 0.001% to about 0.05%. This repre-
sents at least a 50-fold range in concentration.
Other Elements.-Elements sought, but not found in any
sample, included arsenic, antimony, bismuth, cadmium, molyb-
denum, thallium, and tin. This does not necessarily mean that
these elements were not present, since all of them might have
been present in concentrations below the respective thresholds
of detection (Table 1).
Aluminum, like iron, is not usually considered a minor ele-
ment. It is a difficult element to volatilize in the arc, being
similar to titanium and zirconium in this respect. Since it is







30 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

the most abundant metal (10), it is not surprising that it was
detected in every sample. However, the unreliability of the
values from a quantitative standpoint justifies their omission
from these tables to avoid possible confusion and misinterpre-
tation. In addition to errors caused by irregular volatilization
in the arc, screening samples through an aluminum sieve could
have led to significant contamination.
The chemical behavior of aluminum in the soil is somewhat
similar to that of iron and, in general, the concentration of
aluminum in these soils often tends to parallel that of iron.
Since aluminum is an important constituent of clay minerals,
variations in aluminum content may be expected to run from
0.001% in thoroughly leached surface sands of the Jonesville-
Chiefland and Leon-St. Johns groups to well in excess of 5.0%
in soil horizons of high clay content. In soils containing much
clay the aluminum content may greatly exceed that of iron;
while in iron hardpan or stained layers, as are found in Leon
and Immokalee soils, iron tends to predominate.

SUMMARY
Extensive data on physical, spectographic and chemical
analysis of representative virgin Florida soils are reported. The
data show that wide variations in all three types of analyses
may exist within a given soil type. These differences between
soil samples of a given type are often as wide as or wider than
differences between soil types. Nevertheless, certain of these
analyses are of distinct value in the characterization and dif-
ferentiation of soils.
Mechanical analysis serves as a valuable check on the field
soil surveyor in his estimation of soil texture. The major com-
ponent of surface horizons of soils in peninsular Florida is
fine sand. Other sand separates plus the fine sand usually
make up 95% of the soil. Heavy lower horizons, where present,
may contain up to 40 or 50% clay, but the total of the silt com-
ponents rarely exceeds 5%. In the heavier soils of north-
western Florida, the sand separates may account for more than
50% of the soil, with fine sand separate usually the major com-
ponent. In these soils silts and clay combined make up from
20 to 45% of all horizons, but the ratio of these components
varies widely.
Moisture equivalent measurements correlate well with soil
texture, organic matter, and base exchange capacity. Moisture








Different Analyses of Some Virgin Florida Soils 31

equivalent determinations are useful in evaluating soil moist-
ure relationships and potential productivity.
Chemical analyses are helpful in making some distinctions
between soils. Organic matter increases with decreasing drain-
age and in the Leon Immokalee series shows a marked increase
in the hardpan layer. Exceptions are noted in the high or-
ganic matter of the fertile, well-drained soils of phosphatic
origin and the low organic matter content of the poorly drained
soils of the Arzell and Charlotte series. Total nitrogen values
follow organic matter. Base exchange capacity is closely re-
lated to organic matter and soil texture.
Determinations of exchangeable bases and pH indicate the
extent of leaching and point to those soil types where deficien-
cies of calcium, magnesium or potassium may develop. Total
phosphorus determinations confirm the phosphatic source of
soils of Arredondo and related series; they indicate that phos-
phatic deposits sometimes may be the parent material for other
soil types. Exchangeable potassium tends to parallel total po-
tassium. Broadly speaking, the exchangeable part of total
potassium is about 10 percent in surface soils and may be as low
as 1 percent in some subsoils. Higher potassium values were
found in soils of phosphatic origin and in heavier-textured soils.
In spectrographic analyses for many of the less abundant
elements, the limitation of sensitivity for some elements, rather
than their complete absence from the soil, is the most probable
reason for their non-detection. Light-textured soils are usually
lower in their content of these elements. The chemical reactions
of individual elements may determine their concentrations; as,
for example, iron concentrations are very low in the more acid
soils, and strontium and barium, whose chemistry is similar to
that of calcium, follow a similar concentration variation with
exchangeable calcium in the soil. The analyses establish the
presence of these elements in many Florida soils. However,
it must be remembered that these elements often occur in highly
insoluable minerals-their mere presence does not necessarily
indicate a solubility sufficient to influence crop growth.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The large number of analyses reported is the work of many members
of the Soils Department staff, all of whom cannot be recognized here.
However, special recognition is due to the late Dr. Charles E. Bell, who
performed most of the chemical analyses, and to Dr. L. H. Rogers and








32 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

Mr. T. C. Erwin for their part in the spectrographic analyses. To these
and all others on the Soils staff who have contributed to this bulletin,
the authors are deeply indebted.

LITERATURE CITED

1. ASSOCIATION OF OFFICIAL AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTS. Official and ten-
tative methods. 1935.
2. BAVER, L. D. Soil Physics. John Wiley and Sons. 1940.
3. BECKER, R. B., T. C. ERWIN and J. R. HENDERSON. Relation of soil
type and composition to the occurrence of nutritional anemia in
cattle. Soil Sci. 62: 383-392. 1946.
4. BRADFIELD, RICHARD, and W. BARLAN ALLISON. Criteria of base satura-
tion in soils. Trans. Second Comm. Int. Soc. Soil Sci. 63-79. 1933.
5. BRIGGS, L. J., and J. W. McLANE. The moisture equivalent of soils.
USDA Bur. Soils Bul. 45. 1907.
6. BRYAN, O. C., and E. F. DEBUSK. Citrus bronzing-a magnesium de-
ficiency. Florida Grower 44 (2) : 6, 24. 1936.
7. BURD, JOHN S. Chemistry of the phosphate ion in soil systems. Soil
Sci. 65: 227-247. 1948.
8. CARRIGAN, R. A. Methods of determination of soil pH. Soil Sci. Soc.
Fla. Proc. 2: 25-39. 1940.
9. CARRIGAN, R. A., and T. C. ERWIN. Cobalt determination in soil by
spectrographic analysis following chemical preconcentration. Soil
Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 1950, 15: 145-149. 1951.
10. CLARK, FRANK WIGGLESWORTH. The data of geochemistry. U. S. Geol.
Survey Bul. 770, 5th Ed. 1924.
11. DICKEY, R. D. Iron deficiency of tung in Florida. Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta.
Bul. 281. 1942.
12. DROSDOFF, MATTHEW. Suitability of various soils for tung production.
USDA Cir. 840. 1950.
13. DYAL, R. STANLEY, and M. DROSDOFF. Determining organic matter in
Florida soils. Proc. Soil Sci. Soc. Florida 3: 91-96. 1941.
14. DYAL, R. STANLEY, and MATTHEW DROSDOFF. Physical and chemical
properties of some important soils of the Southeast used for the
production of tung oil. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 8: 317-322. 1944.
15. FLORIDA STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. The "trace" or "micro"
elements in the service of Florida agriculture (a symposium). Bul.
115 (New Series). 1942.
16. GAMMON, NATHAN, JR. Flame photometer determination of total po-
tassium in sandy soils. Soil Sci. 71: 211-214. 1951.
17. HENDERSON, J. R. The soils of Florida. Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 334.
1939.
18. JANES, BYRON E. Composition of Florida-grown vegetables II. Univ.
of Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 455. 1949.
19. JANES, BYRON E. Composition of Florida-grown vegetables III. Fla.
Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 488. 1951.
20. JOFFE, J. S., and ADRIENNE B. CONYBEARE. Analyses of United States
Soils II: South Atlantic States. New Jersey Agr. Exp. Sta. 1943.
21. MA, T. S., and G. ZUAZAGA. Micro-kjeldahl determination of nitrogen.
Ind. Eng. Chem. Anal. Ed. 14: 280-282. 1942.








Different Analyses of Some Virgin Florida Soils 33

22. MITCHELL, R. L. Applications of spectrographic analysis to soil inves-
tigations. Analyst 71: 361-368. 1946.
23. NELLER, J. R. Mobility of phosphates in sandy soils. Soil Sci. Soc.
Am. Proc. 1946, 11: 227-230. 1947.
24. OLMSTEAD, L. B., L. T. ALEXANDER and H. E. MIDDLETON. A pipette
method of mechanical analysis of soils based on improved dispersion
procedure. USDA Tech. Bul. No. 170. 1930.
25. PEECH, MICHAEL, revised by T. W. YOUNG. Chemical studies on soils
from Florida citrus groves. Univ. of Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 448.
1948.
26. ROGERS, L. H., O. E. GALL, L. W. GADDUM and R. M. BARNETTE. Distri-
bution of macro and micro-elements in some soils of peninsula
Florida. Univ. of Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 341. 1939.
27. SCALER, F. M., and A. P. HARRISON. Boric acid modification of the
Kjeldahl method for crop and soil analysis. Ind. and Eng. Chem.
12: 350-352. 1920.
28. SCHOLLENBERGER, C. J., and F. R. DREIBELBIS. Analytical methods in
base exchange investigations of soils. Soil Sci. 30: 161-173. 1930.
29. SHARPE, RALPH H., and NATHAN GAMMON, JR. Magnesium deficiency
of pecans. Proc. SE Pecan Growers 44: 23-28. 1951.
30. SHAw, T. M., and E. F. MILES. Modification of the pipette method of
mechanical analysis. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 4: 368-369. 1939.
31. SIMS, G. T., and G. M. VOLK. Composition of Florida-grown vegetables
I. Univ. of Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 438. 1947.
32. SMITH, F. B., and OWEN E. GALL. Types and distribution of micro-
organisms in some Florida soils. Univ. of Fla. Agri. Exp. Sta. Bul.
396. 1939.
33. SOIL SURVEY MANUAL. (Soil Survey Staff, B.P.I., Soils and Agr. Eng.)
USDA Handbook No. 18. 1951.
34. THOMPSON, L. G., JR., and F. B. SMITH. Organic matter in Florida
soils. Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 433. 1947.
35. TYNER, EDWARD H. The use of sodium metaphosphate for dispersion
of soils for mechanical analysis. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. Proc. 4: 368-
369. 1939.
36. VOLK, G. M. The correlation of organic matter level with moisture
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37. VOLK, G. M., and C. E. Bell. Soil reaction (pH). Univ. of Fla. Agr.
Exp. Sta. Bul. 400. 1944.
38. VOLK, G. M., C. E. BELL and E. N. MCCUBBIN. The significance and
maintenance of nitrate nitrogen in Bladen fine sandy loam in the
production of cabbage. Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 430. 1947.
39. VOLK, N. J. The determination of small amounts of exchangeable
potassium in soils, employing the sodium cobaltinitrite procedure.
Jour. Am. Soc. Agron. 33: 684-689. 1941.
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Boron distribution in soils and related data. USDA Tech. Bul. 797.
1942.










APPENDIX A

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
'Horizon Moist- I i
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very I Coarsel Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
SInches talent Sand Sand I Sand I
Norfolk-Red Bay Group

Norfolk Holmes S30-3 0-4 5.35 9.50 2.5 2.7 12.9 17.8 26.3 19.5 15.0 0.6 5.1
loamy fine 4-8 5.57 8.31 1.3 2.2 13.2 18.4 25.7 18.7 15.6 1.0 5.0
sand, 8-15 5.59 10.29 0.9 2.8 12.6 16.9 24.9 19.2 14.8 1.8 7.0
15-24 5.32 11.89 0.7 2.6 11.5 14.5 22.7 18.2 13.7 1.0 15.7
24-42 5.05 15.58 0.2 3.0 10.7 12.8 21.1 17.0 12.5 1.4 21.4
42-54 4.95 18.63 0.2 2.9 9.0 12.4 19.6 16.2 13.2 1.3 25.3
54-60 4.90 20.09 0.2 1.9 8.5 10.9 18.6 16.6 13.0 1.4 29.0
Norfolk Washing- S67-2 0-3 5.33 6.95 1.4 1.6 11.2 18.2 31.3 20.3 9.4 2.2 5.6
loamy fine ton 3-7 5.25 6.39 1.2 2.0 11.7 19.0 30.3 18.9 9.7 1.1 7.2
sand 7-13 5.25 6.90 0.8 2.4 12.1 18.5 29.5 17.1 9.6 1.3 9.2
13-17 5.38 9.11 0.5 1.6 9.6 16.6 29.0 17.8 9.4 1.4 14.4
17-36 5.23 13.30 0.3 3.3 9.7 14.7 25.3 15.7 8.0 0.9 22.2
36-48 5.03 19.47 0.1 1.5 7.5 12.0 21.2 14.4 5.6 1.2 36.4
48-60 4.80 21.79 0.1 1.4 6.9 11.0 19.2 14.0 5.7 0.7 41.0

Norfolk Jackson S32-7 0-6 5.10 10.99 3.0 2.2 10.6 16.4 26.8 20.9 12.0 0.5 10.4
fine sandy 6-10 4.92 9.08 1.2 2.3 9.5 15.6 27.6 21.1 11.3 0.9 11.7
loam 10-15 4.92 5.20 0.3 2.2 8.5 14.4 27.6 21.4 11.2 1.1 13.5
15-27 4.95 7.71 0.0 3.0 9.7 14.5 24.1 18.1 10.6 1.1 18.7
27-36 4.97 9.12 0.0 2.4 10.8 16.5 22.5 15.6 9.3 1.0 21.8
36-48 4.97 11.66 0.0 3.0 9.6 15.0 21.8 14.2 8.6 1.5 26.2
48-60 4.95 13.18 0.8 2.9 9.5 14.7 21.0 13.6 9.5 1.1 27.6







APPENDIX A (Continued)
MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
Horizon I Moist- i I
Location Lab. Depth ure I Soln. I Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine |
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss | Coarse Sand diumI Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
I _______ Inches j talent I __Sand Sand Sand I
Norfolk-Red Bay Group-Continued

Norfolk Walton S66-4 0-6 5.00 11.73 2.9 1.3 8.5 15.0 26.5 22.2 20.1 0.8 5.5
fine sandy 6-11 4.92 8.62 0.9 1.3 7.7 14.1 25.8 22.8 21.2 0.8 6.3
loam 11-17 4.93 8.87 0.2 1.7 7.9 14.7 26.3 21.2 20.0 0.3 7.8
17-24 4.97 9.27 0.0 1.4 7.3 13.0 21.2 26.4 21.2 0.7 8.6
24-36 4.98 11.41 0.0 1.4 7.0 12.5 22.1 23.6 21.1 0.6 11.7
S36-50 4.90 14.63 0.0 1.3 6.4 11.3 19.9 22.6 20.7 0.7 17.0
50-60 4.87 15.50 0.0 0.6 4.2 6.3 15.6 33.0 20.0 0.6 19.6

Ruston Jackson S32-6 0-5 5.80 10.32 3.0 5.3 18.6 24.2 23.0 9.7 10.5 0.5 8.1
loamy sand 5-11 5.79 8.36 0.7 4.6 15.9 22.2 24.4 10.6 10.5 0.4 11.2
11-14 5.67 13.70 0.3 4.0 15.2 19.0 18.9 8.6 8.3 0.4 25.4
14-30 5.35 16.69 0.1 5.2 11.6 15.8 18.1 9.2 7.2 0.4 32.3
30-54 5.20 18.50 0.0 4.6 11.8 16.0 17.3 8.3 6.4 0.4 35.1
54-60 5.10 21.36 0.0 4.0 11.5 15.4 16.2 8.1 8.0 0.4 36.2
Ruston Walton S66-3 0-5 5.30 9.44 2.3 1.4 9.5 26.0 27.2 11.0 17.9 1.2 5.8
fine sandy 5-11 5.40 8.42 1.2 1.1 8.7 25.2 26.2 11.5 17.6 1.3 8.0
loam 11-17 5.32 11.37 0.3 2.0 7.4 21.9 24.6 11.2 17.1 1.3 14.5
17-24 5.42 14.45 0.1 2.1 7.3 19.2 21.7 10.0 16.3 1.0 22.4
24-36 5.15 16.93 0.0 1.7 7.2 18.8 19.5 8.7 14.0 0.6 29.4
36-52 4.90 17.33 0.0 1 2.2 6.6 21.5 17.8 7.5 11.6 0.5 30.3
I1~











APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
Horizon I Moist-
Location Lab. Depth Iure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt I Silt Clay
I Inches alent SSand Sand Sand I
Norfolk-Red Bay Group-Continued

Orangeburg Okaloosa S46-3 0-3 5.23 10.15 1.8 1.7 13.6 18.1 31.7 15.8 11.0 0.8 6.0
loamy fine 3-6 5.23 8.48 0.7 1.3 10.4 20.4 27.9 19.0 12.9 1.3 6.8
sand 6/2-17 5.33 8.15 0.2 1.9 10.0 19.4 26.8 18.9 31.1 1.3 8.6
17-24 5.22 8.60 0.0 2.4 9.8 18.0 26.9 18.4 12.9 1.5 10.0
24-28 5.12 10.35 0.0 2.0 9.7 16.3 25.7 18.1 11.7 1.4 15.1
28-42 5.18 15.35 0.0 3.1 9.6 15.3 20.9 14.9 8.4 0.4 27.2
42-58 5.03 16.10 0.0 2.6 10.1 15.5 20.4 13.5 7.2 0.2 30.4

Orangeburg Holmes S30-1 0-5 5.28 11.46 2.2 0.9 9.4 23.2 34.2 9.2 13.4 2.0 7.6
fine sandy 5-8 5.50 9.18 0.9 1.0 10.2 23.7 33.7 8.1 11.3 2.7 8.7
loam 8-13 5.49 9.73 0.5 1.1 8.7 23.1 32.7 9.0 11.2 2.3 12.1
13-20 5.23 9.65 0.2 0.9 8.0 19.8 32.2 9.3 13.9 2.0 13.9
20-30 5.15 10.89 0.3 1.0 8.7 21.0 33.2 9.3 7.5 1.8 17.4
30-45 5.08 12.56 0.3 0.8 8.2 19.8 31.2 8.5 8.7 1.8 21.0
45-60 4.98 14.75 0.1 1.1 8.4 19.8 29.2 7.6 7.6 1.4 24.7

Red Bay Jackson S32-4 0-21% 6.79 13.86 4.3 4.1 17.0 20.1 21.6 15.2 9.8 1.3 10.8
sandy loam 2%h-9 7.11 8.53 1.1 3.8 19.4 20.8 19.3 13.3 8.3 1.1 13.9
9-17 7.23 11.79 0.6 3.5 12.7 18.6 16.9 13.5 8.5 0.7 25.4
17-24 7.19 12.95 0.0 5.5 13.9 14.9 17.0 11.8 7.3 0.7 28.7
24-42 4.98 12.89 0.0 5.3 16.9 17.6 16.7 11.1 5.4 0.9 26.1
_______________________________________1 __________________________






APPENDIX A (Continued)
MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
Horizon I Moist- I
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH ] Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
__ __Inches I alent Sand Sand Sand
Norfolk-Red Bay Group-Continued

Amite Jackson S32-1 0-4 6.74 12.12 4.2 4.9 17.7 18.4 21.1 15.2 9.0 1.3 12.4
sandy loam 4-8 6.29 10.53 2.0 7.4 20.8 18.3 18.9 12.7 7.1 1.0 13.8
8-22 5.05 9.28 0.7 3.5 16.6 18.7 20.5 14.8 7.1 1.2 17.1
22-33 5.05 11.62 0.3 5.4 17.3 11.7 18.4 12.7 6.1 2.2 21.1
33-42 5.18 12.77 0.1 6.2 15.5 16.0 18.8 12.9 5.3 1.0 24.3
42-60 5.25 10.77 0.2 5.4 14.5 17.1 21.1 14.6 5.0 0.9 21.4
60-70 5.33 9.99 0.0 5.1 17.8 18.7 20.3 14.0 5.0 0.8 18.3
SMarlboro-Greenville Group

Marlboro Washing- S67-3 0-3 5.47 11.64 4.9 1.8 11.1 18.9 29.2 17.1 10.2 2.4 9.3
fine sandy ton 3-6 5.56 9.66 2.3 1.7 11.0 18.2 29.0 17.0 11.0 2.0 10.1
loam 6-10 5.58 10.82 1.0 2.1 8.4 15.9 28.2 16.0 10.6 1.9 16.8
10-13 5.53 13.98 0.4 2.1 8.4 14.1 22.8 15.6 9.8 1.5 28.7
13-42 5.17 17.94 0.2 2.0 7.0 12.5 22.4 12.8 9.6 0.5 33.0
42-54 4.95 19.83 0.1 2.1 7.3 12.2 21.4 11.7 7.5 0.6 37.0
54-60 4.92 21.65 0.1 2.0 7.1 12.1 20.3 11.1 7.7 0.5 39.1
Tifton Holmes S30-2 0-3Y 5.45 11.83 3.8 5.4 16.9 21.0 23.2 11.7 10.3 1.5 9.9
sandy loam 312-7 5.45 11.32 2.4 4.8 15.9 19.6 21.7 11.9 10.3 2.4 13.4
7-10 5.38 13.97 1.6 4.0 12.9 17.1 20.5 11.8 9.6 1.6 22.4
10-15 5.37 18.07 0.9 3.7 12.4 14.7 17.1 9.8 9.2 1.0 32.0
15-36 5.07 19.85 0.6 4.0 11.1 13.1 14.3 8.0 8.0 1.0 40.5
36-48 4.98 18.35 0.1 6.9 13.7 13.3 9.4 4.9 9.6 1.3 40.7
48-60 4.95 22.89 0.1 7.8 16.5 17.3 10.3 4.5 5.6 1.2 36.8











APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
I Horizon I Moist- Me i Coare Fi
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very oarse Me- Fine Very CoarseFine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
Inches alent Sand SandSand
Marlboro-Greenville Group-Continued

Tifton Okaloosa S46-2 0-31/2 5.12 12.43 2.2 0.4 5.0 11.1 29.5 27.8 17.5 1.3 7.3
fine sandy 312-9 5.15 11.44 0.8 0.3 4.1 9.7 28.2 28.6 17.9 1.1 9.9
loam 9-17 4.90 14.64 0.4 0.7 3.7 8.2 23.1 26.0 17.5 0.2 20.6
17-24 5.03 15.28 0.0 0.4 3.8 8.2 23.0 24.3 14.9 1.0 24.2
24-36 5.02 16.20 0.0 0.6 4.3 8.7 24.0 23.6 12.3 0.6 25.7
36-45 4.98 18.26 0.0 0.7 4.3 8.9 22.5 21.5 11.7 1.0 29.3
Tifton Walton S66-1 0-3 5.03 13.19 2.7 0.5 5.0 11.9 29.9 21.9 18.3 1.2 11.4
fine sandy 31/2-7 4.95 12.74 1.4 0.5 4.5 11.4 29.7 21.4. 17.9 1.5 13.1
loam 7-11 5.03 12.84 0.8 0.8 4.4 10.9 29.0 20.6 16.3 2.5 15.4
11-17 5.07 13.81 0.3 0.8 3.6 9.6 27.8 21.0 18.1 1.6 17.4
17-36 5.07 16.47 0.2 0.6 3.5 9.6 25.9 18.9 17.5 0.2 23.7
36-50 4.95 18.45 0.1 1.1 3.7 10.0 25.7 18.4 14.6 0.2 26.3
Faceville Washing- S67-1 0-3 5.30 8.93 3.8 4.1 12.0 18.2 30.6 20.2 6.4 0.8 7.7
loamy fine ton 3-6 5.40 6.02 1.4 2.7 8.8 16.6 31.7 22.9 7.9 1.0 8.4
sand 6-10 5.50 8.24 0.9 1.9 8.4 15.8 30.2 20.0 7.4 0.4 15.8
10-12 5.37 14.15 0.5 1.9 7.3 13.4 21.7 19.6 6.6 0.3 29.2
12-30 5.17 17.80 0.0 2.1 7.4 12.9 12.8 21.6 5.6 0.6 37.0
30-42 4.95 17.35 0.0 1.8 8.1 14.3 17.0 18.7 4.9 1.2 33.9
42-54 4.92 17.13 0.0 2.6 9.9 15.7 20.0 15.6 3.8 0.2 32.0
54-60 13.83 0.0 2.3 9.9 16.7 23.8 17.2 4.0 0.5 25.6
___________________ _____ ______ _____ -_____A_____ __________ _I___-_____-_____ ____ I__________







APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.

S Horizon I Moist- I I
Location Lab. IDepth I ure Soln. Very Coarsel Me- Fine Very I Coarsel Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt I Silt Clay
Inches alent Sand Sand Sand
Marlboro-Greenville Group-Continued

Faceville Walton S66-2 0-31/2 5.52 12.96 3.7 2.2 11.3 19.1 28.0 12.1 15.7 0.6 11.0
fine sandy 3-71/2 5.23 10.97 1.6 1.8 9.2 16.9 28.0 13.4 16.0 1.0 13.6
loam 71/2-12 5.08 11.25 0.7 1.7 9.8 16.9 27.3 12.4 15.0 1.2 15.7
12-20 5.22 13.06 0.2 1.4 9.9 16.3 24.6 11.4 14.7 0.9 20.6
20-25 5.15 15.30 0.0 1.8 9.0 14.2 23.3 11.0 14.4 1.5 24.8
25-36 5.02 16.86 0.1 2.3 9.8 14.2 21.7 10.0 12.5 1.1 28.4
"36-48 4.97 17.60 0.2 1.4 8.4 14.2 22.1 9.9 11.8 0.9 31.2
48-60 4.95 17.28 0.0 2.5 9.4 14.8 22.4 10.4 10.6 1.1 28.8

Faceville Holmes S30-4 0-6 5.53 13.60 4.7 4.1 14.4 17.2 25.0 15.6 8.8 1.0 13.9
fine sandy 6-10 5.48 12.00 2.7 3.5 11.6 15.8 25.8 17.0 8.6 1.0 16.7
loam 10-15 5.27 14.91 1.4 3.1 10.9 14.9 22.3 14.6 7.1 1.2 25.8
15-30 5.28 19.39 0.6 2.9 10.6 13.3 18.0 11.2 6.8 1.3 35.9
30-54 5.10 20.34 0.2 2.9 10.3 12.2 15.0 8.6 6.1 1.7 43.1
54-60 4.90 17.29 0.0 3.8 13.9 15.9 19.6 11.1 4.2 0.7 30.8

Carnegie Jackson S32-8 0-4 5.47 5.25 2.7 3.1 14.1 22.3 29.6 13.6 7.9 1.4 7.8
loamy fine 4-6 5.47 4.14 1.5 3.3 13.8 21.4 28.6 14.5 8.2 1.0 9.1
sand 6-10 5.32 5.33 0.9 2.3 10.1 18.5 29.5 15.5 9.0 0.5 14.4
10-13 5.20 15.00 0.8 2.0 8.2 15.8 23.4 11.2 7.7 0.2 31.3
13-36 5.10 21.37 0.2 2.0 7.1 12.5 16.7 8.8 5.6 0.4 46.7
36-60 5.05 21.96 0.0 1.8 8.2 14.4 17.6 7.0 4.9 0.7 45.2










APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
Horizon Moist-
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse! Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt j Clay
Inches alent Sand Sand Sand |
Marlboro-Greenville Group-Continued

Magnolia Jackson S32-5 0-2% 5.03 12.96 4.9 2.1 10.8 13.8 22.2 27.6 14.3 1.2 7.8
fine sandy 2-5 5.35 9.63 1.1 2.6 10.9 13.0 20.4 27.5 13.8 2.5 9.1
loam 5-9 5.33 9.20 0.7 2.2 8.8 12.0 20.0 28.1 14.1 2.4 12.2
9-18 5.42 14.64 0.4 1.7 6.8 9.4 16.6 23.7 12.2 1.4 28.1
18-50 5.28 16.18 0.0 1.7 6.5 8.6 15.5 21.7 10.4 1.3 34.2
50-80 5.23 17.92 0.0 1.5 6.7 8.3 16.2 20.8 9.8 1.1 36.4

Magnolia Okaloosa S46-1 0-4 5.13 12.24 2.2 1.3 7.9 16.0 26.0 19.9 17.0 1.5 10.2
fine sandy 4-8 5.03 12.93 1.1 0.8 6.7 14.2 24.7 18.8 16.1 1.4 17.1
loam 8-14 5.00 17.14 0.8 1.0 6.2 12.0 18.9 15.2 15.3 0.6 30.7
14-22 5.15 19.20 0.1 1.4 6.7 11.8 17.8 13.2 11.9 1.3 35.7
22-34 5.10 16.98 0.0 1.1 7.0 12.7 19.5 13.7 1.5 0.9 33.5
34-46 4.95 16.89 0.0 1.3 7.8 13.5 19.9 14.3 11.3 0.8 30.9
46-60 4.82 17.40 0.0 1.5 8.5 13.9 20.2 13.8 9.0 0.4 32.5
60-72 4.77 19.70 0.0 1.3 8.4 14.5 22.1 14.3 8.7 0.2 30.3
Greenville Jackson S32-2 0-3 5.84 15.33 3.0 1.4 7.3 12.5 23.8 19.6 16.3 2.2 16.9
fine sandy 3-6 5.67 14.96 1.4 1.4 6.9 12.1 22.0 18.5 15.1 2.6 21.3
loam 6-10 5.49 17.49 0.9 0.5 4.6 9.9 19.4 17.1 12.7 1.5 34.2
10-20 5.45 20.43 0.6 1.3 4.9 9.2 17.3 14.9 10.2 1.1 41.0
20-30 5.38 20.74 0.4 1.9 5.0 8.8 17.1 15.0 8.9 0.8 42.5
30-45 5.35 20.62 0.3 1.5 5.3 10.1 18.0 15.3 7.2 0.8 41.7
45-54 5.07 25.42 0.2 1.1 5.4 8.5 15.0 12.5 7.7 0.8 49.0
54-60 5.02 29.99 0.2 1.4 4.9 6.7 11.7 11.0 10.0 1.1 53.1







APPENDIX A (Continued)
MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
Loca io 'Horizon I Moist- ] ---
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse' Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
IInches talent Sand I Sand Sand __
Marlboro-Greenville Group-Continued

Blakely Jackson S32-3 0-21/2 6.86 25.18 5.3 2.0 9.5 13.7 19.5 10.5 11.1 1.6 32.0
fine sandy 2Y2-6 6.26 20.03 2.2 2.3 8.1 12.3 19.8 10.2 10.7 1.4 35.2
clay loam 6-14 6.21 19.88 1.3 2.0 7.4 12.4 18.6 9.8 9.7 1.8 38.3
14-36 6.11 21.00 0.6 1.3 6.2 11.3 17.8 9.6 8.4 1.0 44.4
36-60 5.99 22.12 0.3 2.3 6.9 10.8 17.6 9.5 5.3 0.3 47.1

Arredondo-Kanapaha Group

Arredondo Alachua S1-15 0-3 5.33 6.22 3.3 0.9 10.2 39.5 35.4 2.0 8.2 1.1 2.5
sand 3-7 5.33 3.86 1.6 1.0 10.6 37.2 36.3 2.7 8.1 0.9 2.9
7-20 5.33 2.97 0.7 0.6 7.3 34.3 39.7 5.7 7.8 1.2 3.4
20-36 5.61 2.67 0.3 0.5 9.5 35.8 37.8 3.6 8.0 1.1 3.6
36-40 5.28 9.48 0.3 0.9 8.0 29.1 34.3 0.7 10.0 1.3 15.5
40-56 4.95 14.41 0.2 0.4 6.0 26.7 32.4 0.2 9.7 1.3 23.1
Arredondo Alachua 81-20 0-4 5.17 13.69 5.8 0.3 7.6 26.8 44.7 6.0 2.8 2.8 9.0
fine sand 4-9 5.61 9.60 2.0 0.2 7.0 25.4 46.9 6.4 3.5 2.4 8.1
9-22 5.70 7.34 0.8 0.2 7.2 26.7 45.8 6.0 3.7 1.8 8.5
22-42 5.59 6.38 0.2 0.4 6.6 25.9 46.1 6.3 2.6 1.7 10.3
42-54 5.71 6.47 0.1 0.1 5.6 23.7 48.0 7.0 2.5 1.2 11.3
54-72 5.39 6.70 0.1 0.2 6.1 24.9 47.4 6.1 1.7 1.1 12.4
_ I











APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
SHorizon I Moist- I i
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarsel Me- Fine I Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand I dium Sand I Fine Silt Silt Clay
I________ I___Inches talent _Sand I Sand I Sand
Arredondo-Kanapaha Group-Continued

Arredondo Alachua S1-45 0-3 5.93 11.11 5.2 0.6 8.0 27.7 40.9 11.3 4.2 1.0 6.2
fine sand 3-8 5.94 6.75 1.7 0.4 8.4 28.4 41.1 11.0 4.0 0.9 5.7
8-18 5.82 5.72 0.8 0.4 7.7 27.7 41.9 11.8 3.7 0.8 6.0
18-33 5.65 4.87 0.4 0.7 8.7 29.4 40.5 10.3 3.0 1.3 6.1
33-54 5.85 4.60 0.2 0.6 6.6 26.8 43.1 12.1 3.0 0.9 6.8
; 54-70 6.04 4.95 0.2 0.6 7.7 27.8 41.8 11.8 3.3 1.3 5.6
70-80 6.04 5.98 0.2 0.7 7.2 25.6 41.8 12.7 3.6 1.3 7.0
Arredondo Madison S40-3 0-3 5.58 10.45 4.5 2.7 15.0 31.3 22.1 8.8 5.5 1.0 6.4
loamy sand 3-8 5.73 7.57 2.2 2.9 14.4 30.8 28.7 8.7 6.8 1.5 6.3
8-20 5.60 6.43 0.9 3.1 14.5 32.5 29.7 7.5 3.0 2.3 7.4
20-36 5.53 4.15 0.1 1.9 11.5 28.2 33.3 11.5 3.1 2.6 7.9
36-54 5.53 3.60 0.0 2.8 14.8 28.1 32.8 9.3 2.2 2.2 7.7
54-66 5.58 2.91 0.0 2.8 11.8 24.6 37.3 13.5 1.9 2.1 5.8
66-72 5.60 1.90 0.0 3.6 13.4 27.7 36.3 12.3 1.2 2.1 3.4

Arredondo Suwannee S61-1 0-7 6.20 8.85 3.1 0.9 4.4 17.6 44.5 19.9 4.2 0.9 7.6
loamy fine 7-20 6.00 7.40 1.1 0.7 4.7 18.9 44.0 18.5 4.5 0.8 7.8
sand 20-27 5.87 6.80 0.8 0.8 4.5 17.4 42.6 18.9 6.9 1.3 7.6
27-40 5.82 6.08 0.2 1.6 4.9 18.0 45.9 19.8 1.0 0.8 7.9
40-60 5.68 5.40 0.0 0.6 3.7 17.2 44.9 20.7 3.7 1.2 8.0








APPENDIX A (Continued)
MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
Horizon Moist-u ] F ry
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarsel Me- Fine Very I Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv-I Loss Coarse Sand I dium Sand | Fine I Silt Silt Clay
Inches alent Sand | Sand __Sand |
Arredondo-Kanapaha Group-Continued

Arredondo Madison S40-1 0-4 5.80 8.23 3.0 1.3 8.5 14.1 46.0 16.5 5.0 1.2 7.4
loamy fine 4-8 5.97 6.50 1.0 1.2 5.9 11.7 47.9 18.5 5.5 1.4 7.9
sand 8-15 6.03 6.28 0.7 1.3 7.5 12.9 45.7 17.1 5.9 1.4 8.2
shallow 15-25 5.97 5.88 0.3 1.0 7.2 13.6 46.7 16.9 4.7 1.4 8.5
phase 25-30 5.80 8.62 0.0 1.0 7.1 11.1 43.9 16.8 4.8 1.4 13.9
w 30-50 5.45 15.00 0.0 1.3 6.4 10.0 35.6 13.4 3.1 1.1 29.5
50-60 5.32 13.50 0.0 0.8 6.3 10.7 40.7 14.8 3.3 0.9 22.5
Gainesville Madison S40-5 0-3 5.68 9.62 3.6 2.9 20.4 25.2 26.6 10.4 4.2 1.0 9.1
loamy sand 3-10 5.82 8.14 1.4 2.9 19.2 23.7 26.7 11.2 4.9 0.8 10.5
10-18 5.67 7.00 0.8 2.9 17.3 22.7 28.7 11.8 4.4 1.0 11.2
18-30 5.47 6.10 0.1 3.2 18.2 22.2 27.8 11.8 3.7 1.1 12.1
30-48 5.42 7.47 0.1 3.6 17.2 19.4 27.5 11.4 4.2 0.4 16.2
48-72 5.42 7.48 0.1 3.7 18.1 20.7 27.6 10.9 2.9 0.5 15.6
Gainesville Alachua S1-36 0-4 6.37 13.17 4.7 0.2 2.9 20.2 48.9 15.0 3.7 1.6 7.5
loamy fine 4-12 5.87 8.32 1.3 0.2 2.8 18.8 50.5 15.8 3.2 1.3 7.3
sand 12-27 5.64 7.16 0.7 0.3 2.3 18.7 50.3 16.6 3.3 1.4 7.1
27-45 5.60 6.11 0.4 0.1 2.1 16.9 51.2 17.7 3.1 1.4 7.4
45-60 5.53 5.44 0.3 0.3 2.8 19.1 50.7 15.5 2.3 1.0 8.2
60-72+ 5.53 5.22 0.2 0.1 2.3 17.2 52.3 17.0 1.9 1.2 8.0












APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
Horizon Moist-
Location Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County I Lab. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
SNo. | Inches alent Sand Sand Sand
Arredondo-Kanapaha Group-Continued

Gainesville Alachua S1-37 0-4 6.43 11.77 3.9 0.3 5.6 24.1 43.8 14.5 3.7 0.4 7.6
loamy fine 4-12 6.24 8.23 1.2 0.2 4.7 23.2 45.2 15.7 3.7 1.1 6.2
sand 12-27 5.92 7.62 0.8 0.2 4.6 22.9 45.4 15.9 3.5 1.0 6.5
27-45 6.01 6.97 0.5 0.2 4.8 23.2 45.1 15.7 3.0 1.4 6.6
45-60+ 6.07 5.38 0.2 0.2 4.4 21.7 45.9 16.4 2.9 1.5 7.0
Gainesville Alachua S1-2 0-3 6.45 15.08 5.5 0.2 6.3 20.6 37.0 17.4 6.6 1.4 10.3
loamy fine 3-9 6.37 9.69 1.7 0.1 5.5 18.8 39.0 18.3 5.6 1.6 11.0
sand 9-21 6.15 8.30 0.5 0.1 4.7 17.3 39.0 19.9 5.7 1.5 11.5
21-36 5.97 9.17 0.3 0.1 5.2 18.7 38.5 18.4 5.2 0.9 12.7
36-60 5.65 10.88 0.2 0.2 5.1 18.6 38.4 18.3 4.9 0.7 13.5
60-78 5.67 10.52 0.0 0.2 5.6 18.8 36.3 19.0 4.3 0.3 15.4
Gainesville Alachua S1-22 0-2 6.43 11.31 3.4 0.3 3.2 16.6 48.4 17.3 0.6 5.1 8.5
loamy fine 2-7 6.38 7.02 0.7 0.2 2.9 15.6 49.0 17.9 4.5 0.5 9.3
sand 7-16 6.38 7.43 0.3 0.2 2.9 14.6 47.8 18.2 4.7 1.1 10.7
16-36 5.94 8.27 0.1 0.2 3.0 16.0 47.0 16.0 4.0 0.7 13.0
36-54 5.75 9.46 0.1 0.1 2.3 13.0 45.1 19.5 4.0 1.2 14.8
54-72 5.92 8.13 0.1 0.3 3.2 17.1 45.9 16.4 3.2 1.2 12.6







APPENDIX A (Continued)
MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
Horizon I Moist- I I
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
Inches alent Sand- Sand I Sand ___
Arredondo-Kanapaha Group-Continued

Gainesville Madison S40-2 0-2 5.80 12.80 5.9 0.4 5.1 18.9 47.6 10.9 4.4 1.4 11.4
loamy fine 2-10 5.87 9.00 1.4 0.5 4.2 15.6 45.3 11.7 9.9 1.0 11.9
sand 10-19 6.00 10.24 0.4 0.6 4.0 15.6 46.4 13.2 4.0 1.0 15.2
shallow 19-27 5.90 14.83 0.2 0.6 4.3 12.9 38.1 10.4 4.5 1.3 27.8
phase 27-36 5.77 16.08 0.0 1.2 5.0 13.6 35.1 9.2 4.0 0.8 31.1
36-48 5.53 17.80 0.0 0.5 4.2 13.7 35.8 8.4 4.0 0.6 32.7
S48-60 5.33 20.30 0.0 0.5 3.9 12.7 35.6 8.1 4.2 0.4 34.7
Ft. Meade Alachua S1-19 0-5 5.97 10.91 4.5 0.2 5.5 25.7 50.2 8.9 2.7 1.1 5.7
fine sand 5-12 6.26 13.12 2.0 0.3 5.2 26.4 50.9 8.4 2.3 1.0 5.5
12-19 6.19 7.81 1.7 0.0 5.6 28.0 49.4 8.2 2.3 0.9 5.4
19-36 5.90 6.61 1.1 0.1 5.3 27.4 51.0 7.9 2.1 0.9 5.3
36-54 5.77 5.26 0.3 0.1 4.5 24.1 52.5 9.9 2.2 0.9 5.6
54-72+ 5.71 4.73 0.2 0.1 5.9 26.4 51.7 7.8 1.7 1.1 5.3
Ft. Meade Madison S40-4 0-7 5.65 14.41 5.9 1.9 11.4 25.3 35.8 8.0 4.3 2.7 10.5
loamy fine 7-13 5.70 12.34 3.2 1.7 11.4 26.7 35.2 8.2 4.1 3.3 9.4
sand 13-22 5.65 11.23 2.0 1.1 10.2 25.6 36.5 9.2 5.0 2.6 9.8
22-30 5.72 9.88 1.2 1.1 10.7 24.9 36.7 9.0 5.4 1.2 10.9
30-48 5.87 7.92 0.2 1.1 10.2 25.0 35.8 9.5 5.1 1.9 10.7
48-66 5.82 7.49 0.0 1.7 10.5 24.6 37.7 9.1 4.9 1.0 10.7
66-78 5.73 6.42 0.0 1.5 10.0 24.6 39.2 10.2 3.3 1.0 10.2











APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
[ J Horizon I Moist- I I I
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine I
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
____ I Inchesalent Sand I Sand Sand I
Arredondo-Kanapaha Group-Continued

Ft. Meade Suwannee S61-2 0-8 5.77 11.75 3.1 1.3 6.7 18.3 39.0 20.5 4.5 1.5 8.1
loamy fine 8-16 5.73 10.72 2.4 1.1 6.8 19.5 39.1 19.3 5.5 0.1 8.6
sand 16-24 5.80 9.46 1.6 1.1 7.3 19.8 38.0 19.3 5.4 0.3 8.7
24-36 5.80 8.54 0.8 0.8 6.6 19.3 38.5 19.7 4.7 0.8 9.5
36-48 5.65 6.78 0.2 1.5 7.8 19.0 37.7 19.7 4.3 0.8 9.1
48-54 5.70 6.05 0.0 1.3 8.7 21.4 38.8 15.7 4.2 1.9 7.9
S54-66 5.90 4.43 0.2 0.6 5.6 23.6 52.6 7.4 3.3 1.2 5.7
66-78 5.42 12.88 0.0 0.0 0.7 13.2 53.4 9.2 2.5 0.2 20.8

Kanapaha Alachua S1-13 0-2 5.86 7.20 3.3 0.2 7.2 36.6 40.1 10.3 4.0 0.4 1.0
fine sand 2-7 5.78 2.35 0.5 0.2 8.8 39.3 38.4 8.3 3.8 0.2 1.0
7-15 5.40 1.52 0.2 0.5 8.5 39.4 38.6 3.1 8.5 0.3 1.1
15-35 5.07 1.73 0.2 0.3 8.6 36.7 39.2 8.0 4.6 0.3 2.1
35-40 4.98 9.99 0.6 0.4 7.3 30.0 32.3 5.2 5.5 1.7 17.6
40-50 4.82 19.36 0.6 0.3 6.5 27.8 24.4 2.7 2.1 0.0 36.1

Kanapaha Alachua S1-12 0-4 6.46 6.29 2.4 0.2 6.8 30.5 45.5 11.4 3.6 0.2 1.7
fine sand 4-8 6.21 1.73 0.2 0.2 8.3 34.1 43.3 9.7 2.6 0.5 1.2
8-24 5.35 2.10 0.3 0.2 8.3 33.2 43.5 9.6 2.5 0.3 2.3
24-36 5.23 2.60 0.2 0.3 7.5 30.8 44.8 10.7 2.7 0.4 2.6
36-39 5.40 8.86 0.3 0.4 6.9 25.8 41.1 11.0 2.9 1.0 10.7
39-54 5.32 26.45 0.4 0.4 4.5 20.6 28.6 8.9 4.8 1.1 31.1







APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
SHorizon Moist- I I
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse] Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
___Inches alent Sand Sand Sand
Arredondo-Kanapaha Group-Continued

Fellowship Alachua S1-1 0-2 6.23 10.95 3.7 0.3 8.1 31.7 31.3 16.8 6.7 0.5 4.4
fine sand 2-7 5.85 5.25 1.2 0.7 9.0 29.7 31.9 18.4 5.5 0.8 3.6
thick surface 7-18 5.42 6.63 0.5 0.4 8.5 29.3 32.1 16.7 5.6 0.7 6.5
phase 18-30 5.08 20.20 0.4 0.3 5.7 21.6 24.2 13.9 6.0 0.7 27.3
30-42 5.03 21.28 0.2 0.3 4.8 21.6 24.9 15.2 10.7 0.4 22.2

" Fellowship Alachua S1-14 0-3 6.53 18.09 7.5 0.6 9.5 21.3 41.7 10.6 8.5 0.7 7.1
loamy fine 3-8 6.31 6.91 1.4 1.0 9.4 30.2 32.1 11.9 8.6 1.1 5.5
sand 8-27 5.17 42.61 1.2 0.2 2.5 11.1 13.6 0.4 17.4 6.8 48.0
27-42 5.22 41.68 0.4 0.2 1.8 10.7 21.8 0.4 13.4 4.5 47.2
Fellowship Alachua 81-38 0-5 6.27 9.27 3.1 0.3 5.8 20.6 35.1 25.4 7.3 0.5 5.0
loamy fine 5-11 5.48 6.29 1.0 0.3 6.4 22.2 34.6 23.3 7.3 0.3 5.5
sand 11-15 5.07 15.42 0.9 0.3 5.3 19.6 28.4 18.8 6.1 0.9 20.5
15-33 5.17 20.85 1.0 0.1 4.7 17.3 24.5 16.9 6.8 0.7 29.0
33-45+ 5.17 22.37 0.6 0.3 4.4 17.0 22.2 16.0 12.5 1.7 25.9
Fellowship Alachua 81-41 0-5 5.53 9.79 3.4 0.5 9.1 24.2 34.1 18.0 6.7 1.0 6.4
loamy fine 5-10 5.42 8.32 1.9 0.4 7.4 21.7 34.9 19.6 7.3 0.9 7.8
sand, gravelly 10-14 5.30 10.13 1.3 0.3 7.8 21.5 32.9 18.1 6.9 0.1 12.4
phase 14-23 5.08 17.04 0.7 0.6 6.4 17.6 29.7 16.9 7.6 0.7 20.5
23-27+ 5.07 20.08 0.6 0.6 7.5 18.7 27.1 14.8 6.7 0.7 23.9










APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURl EQUIVALENT.
.Horizon Moist-I I I I I
Location Lab. Depth ure ISoln. Very oarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County i No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
]Inches I alent I Sand Sand Sand
Arredondo-Kanapaha Group-Continued

Alachua Alachua S1-40 0-2 6.19 48.15 15.7 0.1 1.6 4.4 9.6 7.6 33.4 10.6 32.7
clay loam 2-5 6.01 28.60 9.1 0.1 3.5 14.1 24.1 8.7 17.8 5.6 26.0
5-8 6.04 8.18 1.0 0.1 6.6 22.4 39.6 13.7 7.1 1.0 9.4
8-18 5.97 7.02 0.5 0.2 5.7 21.7 41.1 14.5 7.2 0.3 9.2
18-30 5.33 6.38 0.2 0.1 5.3 21.8 41.5 14.8 6.3 0.6 9.5
30-50 5.37 8.97 0.0 0.0 4.5 18.5 40.6 14.8 5.9 0.6 15.0
4 50-66+ 5.23 13.07 0.0 0.1 5.5 18.1 34.8 12.0' 4.7 0.9 23.8

Lakeland-Blanton Group

Lakeland Alachua S1-8 0-2 4.88 2.96 1.7 0.3 8.5 34.9 44.1 8.2 1.9 0.3 1.6
fine sand 2-3 4.96 2.08 0.7 0.4 9.1 32.6 44.3 8.2 3.1 0.2 2.0
3-8 5.39 1.75 0.4 0.3 8.0 32.4 45.9 8.8 2.0 0.2 2.2
8-26 5.45 1.42 0.1 0.4 6.4 31.4 47.7 9.4 2.1 1.2 1.4
26-42 5.52 1.17 0.1 0.3 5.6 29.0 49.5 10.9 2.6 0.4 1.5
42-66 5.18 1.71 0.0 0.7 7.5 30.3 48.5 8.5 1.9 0.5 1.9
Lakeland Alachua S1-23 0-3 5.59 2.74 1.0 0.5 4.2 11.6 39.4 40.2 2.1 1.3 0.6
fine sand 3-9 5.46 2.17 0.4 0.5 4.2 12.0 40.1 39.7 1.4 0.7 1.3
9-21 5.66 2.04 0.2 0.4 4.9 13.5 40.5 37.4 1.6 0.4 1.3
21-42 5.66 1.50 0.1 0.4 4.1 12.3 40.2 39.6 1.5 0.4 1.4
42-72 5.68 1.34 0.0 0.5 4.0 12.1 40.8 39.8 1.5 0.5 0.8
_ __ I ___. ... .







APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
~ ~ Horizon) Moist- I I --
Location Lab. Depth j ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
Inches alent Sand Sand Sand
Lakeland-Blanton Group-Continued
_ _ __ __ _-- _-- -
Lakeland Alachua S1-21 0-1 6.26 9.27 3.6 0.2 4.6 18.9 48.2 16.7 5.3 1.4 4.7
fine sand 1-3 5.75 5.09 1.3 0.2 4.4 18.5 48.8 18.2 4.6 1.1 4.1
3-6 5.63 3.78 0.6 0.2 4.7 18.2 49.9 18.3 4.5 1.4 2.8
6-42 5.70 3.18 0.2 0.2 4.6 18.3 49.1 18.9 4.5 0.6 3.8
42-54 5.70 3.14 0.1 0.2 4.3 17.7 49.7 18.3 4.0 0.7 5.1
4 54-66 5.85 3.14 0.1 0.2 5.0 17.5 44.4 15.2 3.0 0.8 13.9
Lakeland Alachua S1-10 0-4 5.62 3.07 1.1 0.1 0.4 24.1 64.9 8.2 0.7 0.1 1.5
fine sand, 4-7 5.48 2.42 0.7 0.0 0.4 24.8 64.0 8.8 0.2 0.3 1.4
deep phase 7-18 5.55 1.65 0.3 0.0 0.3 22.5 65.8 9.2 0.0 0.3 1.9
18-42 5.60 1.40 0.1 0.0 0.3 22.2 66.4 9.1 0.1 0.0 1.8
42-72 5.67 1.09 0.0 0.0 0.4 20.1 66.6 10.6 0.0 0.0 2.1
Lakeland Manatee S41-34 0-3 5.59 3.92 1.5 0.2 3.7 12.1 51.3 29.5 1.3 0.6 1.3
fine sand, 3-6 5.69 2.92 0.7 0.3 3.9 12.0 50.9 29.3 1.4 0.4 1.8
deep phase 6-42+ 5.86 2.12 0.3 0.2 3.1 11.4 52.0 29.8 1.4 0.6 1.5
Blanton Alachua S1-42 0-3 5.33 5.31 2.0 1.7 23.9 36.1 21.1 10.5 2.9 0.7 3.1
sand 3-7 5.42 4.08 1.1 2.0 23.8 35.2 21.8 11.1 3.0 0.3 2.7
7-13 5.50 3.37 0.7 1.1 21.4 36.9 23.0 11.4 3.0 0.6 2.6
13-20 5.53 2.92 0.4 1.8 26.6 35.7 20.5 9.6 2.6 0.7 2.4
20-36 5.62 2.21 0.1 1.1 21.4 35.2 23.3 12.6 3.1 0.7 2.6
36-45+ 5.62 3.19 0.0 1.2 19.8 32.5 25.6 15.0 3.1 0.6 2.2










APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
I | Horizon Moist-
SLocation Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very I Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
_Inches alent Sand I Sand Sand I
Lakeland-Blanton Group-Continued

Blanton Alachua S1-9 0-3 5.29 5.75 3.0 0.3 9.5 33.8 40.8 10.3 3.0 0.6 1.7
fine sand 3-6 5.29 2.88 1.1 0.3 8.6 29.2 43.3 12.7 3.1 0.8 1.8
6-20 5.59 2.17 0.5 0.4 7.7 29.2 33.1 13.1 2.8 0.8 1.9
20-33 5.51 1.71 0.2 0.4 7.4 28.4 45.4 13.2 2.9 0.6 1.7
33-45 5.42 0.99 0.1 0.5 7.4 25.0 47.4 15.1 3.0 0.2 1.3
S45-60 5.39 1.50 0.1 0.2 5.9 22.8 48.8 17.4 3.1 0.2 1.5
Blanton Alachua S1-44 0-3 5.28 3.95 1.2 0.2 7.5 28.9 42.9 15.3 3.1 0.9 1.2
fine sand 3-7 5.40 3.09 0.7 0.3 10.4 32.2 39.7 12.1 2.8 0.7 1.7
7-15 5.60 2.36 0.3 0.3 8.8 32.0 41.7 12.4 2.5 0.7 1.5
15-27 5.69 1.67 0.2 0.2 9.1 31.9 41.3 12.8 2.4 0.8 1.4
27-36 5.72 1.63 0.1 0.3 9.0 30.6 42.2 13.2 2.6 0.7 1.4
36-45+ 5.55 1.92 0.0 0.4 9.3 30.0 42.3 13.1 2.4 0.6 1.8
Blanton Manatee S41-35 0-4 4.83 4.83 2.9 0.5 6.0 17.1 48.0 25.2 1.5 0.5 1.1
fine sand 4-12 5.52 3.16 1.4 0.6 5.4 16.6 47.9 26.2 1.0 1.7 0.6
12-26 5.79 2.22 0.8 0.5 5.2 16.0 47.6 27.3 1.2 1.2 0.9
26-42+ 6.16 2.03 0.2 0.6 5.0 15.5 47.2 28.1 1.2 1.1 1.2
Blanton Manatee S41-36 0-4 5.00 4.04 2.0 0.5 5.2 16.5 48.3 26.7 0.9 0.7 1.2
fine sand 4-12 5.59 3.05 1.2 0.4 5.3 16.1 47.8 27.2 1.0 0.9 1.3
12-24 6.23 2.21 0.5 0.4 5.4 16.7 48.1 26.2 1.3 0.7 1.1
24-42+ 6.38 1.84 0.3 0.7 5.2 16.3 47.4 27.2 1.5 0.5 1.1
___ __ _____ __ __ t__I_ __ __ __ _







APPENDIX A (Continued)
MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
-__ r_-- I I Horizon MSoist-- i
I Location Lab. I Depth ure Soln. Very lCoarsel Me- Fine Very [Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. Iin pH Equiv- Loss Coarse] Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
SInches talent Sand I S Sand Sand __
Lakeland-Blanton Group-Continued

Blanton Manatee S41-46 0-5 5.32 3.65 1.5 0.7 4.6 14.7 63.9 12.4 2.2 0.5 0.9
fine sand 5-9 5.87 3.53 0.9 0.6 4.6 13.9 64.1 12.7 2.5 0.6 0.9
9-24 6.04 3.23 0.6 0.9 4.8 14.5 63.5 12.2 2.5 0.6 1.0
24-42+ 6.19 2.22 0.2 0.7 4.4 12.7 65.2 13.0 3.0 0.7 0.2

Blanton Manatee S41-7 0-3 4.78 5.04 2.4 0.1 0.4 2.2 62.3 31.4 2.6 0.6 0.3
fine sand, 3-14 5.38 2.25 0.1 0.0 0.6 2.6 59.8 35.3 1.1 0.3 0.2
Brown layer 14-17 5.48 2.99 9.1 0.0 0.5 2.2 56.4 37.4 1.7 0.6 1.2
phase 17-42 5.75 1.68 0.1 0.0 0.5 2.5 61.1 33.4 1.2 0.4 0.9
Orlando Alachua S1-25 0-3 5.36 7.24 4.3 0.3 7.6 39.1 39.4 7.9 1.9 0.7 3.0
fine sand 3-10 5.56 4.44 2.2 0.3 6.6 37.1 41.6 8.6 1.9 0.5 3.4
10-15 5.50 3.42 1.1 0.2 6.2 37.0 41.1 8.9 2.1 0.2 4.3
15-26 5.41 3.57 0.7 0.3 6.6 37.0 41.0 8.7 1.6 0.9 3.8
26-57 5.28 2.40 0.3 0.2 6.4 35.5 42.3 9.0 1.7 1.0 3.9
57-70 5.21 2.46 0.1 0.2 5.3 32.4 45.2 9.8 1.6 0.4 5.0

Orlando Manatee S41-18 0-12 5.02 9.23 5.9 0.6 3.9 12.1 64.0 13.3 2.4 0.9 2.7
fine sand 12-15 5.38 5.82 1.3 0.6 3.9 11.3 63.3 13.4 3.4 0.5 3.6
15-42+ 5.42 3.52 0.3 0.6 3.5 10.8 64.1 13.8 3.1 0.6 3.4

Orlando Manatee S41-44 0-12 5.69 2.37 4.0 0.1 5.5 33.9 43.7 10.9 2.7 0.9 2.2
fine sand 12-17 6.09 5.40 1.4 0.2 5.0 31.0 44.2 12.6 3.4 1.3 2.3
17-42+ 6.11 2.85









APPENDIX A (Continued)
MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
SHorizon Moist- I I
Location Lab. Depth ure I Soln. Very ICoarse Me- Fine Very oarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
Inches alent Sand ) Sand Sand
Lakewood-St. Lucie Group
Lakewood Manatee S41-25 0-2 5.79 2.08 0.6 0.6 5.5 16.5 73.1 3.4 0.2 0.6 0.1
fine sand 2-24 6.26 1.56 0.0 1.0 6.4 16.6 72.3 3.1 0.3 0.2 0.0
24-42+ 6.04 1.90 0.2 1.0 5.4 15.1 73.0 3.2 0.9 0.9 0.9
St. Lucie Manatee S41-24 0-2 5.81 1.82 0.6 0.2 3.2 14.2 77.4 4.4 0.2 0.3 0.1
fine sand 2-24+ 0.0 0.1 3.3 11.6 79.5 4.9 0.4 0.0 0.2
Pomello Manatee S41-8 0-5 5.08 2.41 0.6 0.2 7.6 28.5 51.8 10.7 0.6 0.1 0.4
C fine sand 5-42 5.42 1.83 0.0 0.5 8.5 28.3 50.5 10.9 0.6 0.1 0.5

Jonesville-Chiefland Group
Jonesville Alachua S1-17 0-3 5.93 6.16 1.5 0.1 3.5 18.6 55.9 14.6 2.1 0.7 4.3
fine sand 3-6 6.15 4.04 0.8 0.1 3.4 17.9 57.0 14.7 1.9 0.8 4.2
6-12 6.19 3.56 0.4 0.1 3.2 18.0 57.3 14.7 2.0 0.7 4.0
12-36 6.15 7.16 0.1 0.1 3.1 18.0 57.8 15.0 1.7 0.7 3.6
36-48 6.02 1.79 0.0 0.0 3.0 17.3 59.3 15.6 1.4 0.8 2.6
48-60 6.09 1.69 0.0 0.1 3.4 17.6 58.3 16.3 0.9 0.4 2.8
60+ 5.76 9.22 0.0 0.1 3.2 15.8 49.5 13.0 1.9 0.3 16.2
Jonesville Alachua S1-32 0-21/2 5.72 3.95 1.6 0.1 3.0 25.1 43.8 20.5 2.4 0.3 1.8
fine sand 2Y2-5 5.42 3.02 1.2 0.1 3.0 25.0 44.7 19.9 5.4 0.7 1.9
5-17 5.64 2.67 0.5 0.1 2.6 24.2 44.3 21.6 4.6 0.9 1.6
17-36 5.75 2.33 0.2 0.1 3.0 25.2 44.6 20.0 4.7 0.6 1.5
36-58 5.74 1.75 0.1 0.1 3.3 24.9 45.2 20.4 5.0 0.6 1.2
58-72 5.70 1.63 0.0 0.1 3.3 24.3 45.2 21.0 4.3 0.6 0.8
____________________________________ ________________ ___ __ __ __ ____








APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
| Horizon I Moist- I
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarsel Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
S Inches alent Sand __ Sand Sand
Jonesville-Chiefland Group-Continued

Jonesville Alachua S1-33 0-3 5.79 4.65 1.9 0.1 4.4 30.0 50.3 9.6 2.2 0.5 2.9
fine sand 3-7 5.69 4.13 1.2 0.1 4.3 28.7 50.0 10.0 3.0 0.9 3.0
7-18 5.72 3.26 0.7 0.1 4.8 31.3 48.9 8.9 2.2 0.5 3.3
18-30 5.74 3.26 0.3 0.1 4.3 29.4 49.9 10.2 2.3 0.6 3.2
30-40 5.84 2.54 0.2 0.1 5.2 31.1 49.9 8.4 2.0 0.4 2.8
W 40-60+ 5.15 14.46 0.1 0.1 3.7 23.9 38.9 6.5 1.1 0.5 25.2
Chiefland Alachua S1-4 0-2 5.77 5.36 2.1 0.1 1.7 11.3 55.7 25.6 3.1 1.2 1.2
fine sand 2-6 5.90 2.87 0.5 0.0 1.6 10.5 56.9 26.6 2.3 0.4 1.5
6-16 5.93 2.15 0.3 0.1 1.6 12.1 58.1 24.1 2.0 0.4 1.5
16-30 6.00 1.79 0.1 0.1 1.4 10.3 57.8 26.4 2.1 0.4 1.2
30-48 6.27 1.78 0.1 0.0 1.5 11.1 58.1 25.9 1.8 0.1 1.4
48-54 7.19 11.56 0.2 0.0 1.3 9.8 50.7 21.4 2.0 0.0 14.7
54-60 8.52 16.58

Chiefland Suwannee S61-5 0-4 5.93 5.21 2.3 0.1 2.9 14.8 55.8 20.5 4.4 0.7 0.9
fine sand 4-12 6.00 2.43 0.5 0.1 2.6 14.7 54.3 22.7 3.2 0.5 1.8
12-30 6.12 2.01 0.1 0.1 2.4 13.0 54.7 24.1 3.6 0.3 1.8
30-36 6.12 1.98 0.0 0.1 2.4 13.2 53.8 25.2 2.5 0.8 2.0
36-45 5.73 12.89 0.0 0.1 2.3 11.6 44.9 19.7 1.5 4.8 15.0
45-54 6.74 16.79 0.0 0.1 2.0 10.7 44.6 18.1 6.6 8.7 9.1
54-60 7.80 15.56 0.0 0.1 2.0 11.7 43.5 19.2 10.4 8.1 5.6









APPENDIX A (Continued)
MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
Horizon Moist-
Location i Lab. Depth ure Soln. Ve Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
SInches alent Sand Sand Sand__
Jonesville-Chiefland Group-Continued

Chiefland Alachua S1-5 0-3 6.10 4.53 2.2 0.0 2.1 13.0 54.0 26.1 2.6 0.6 1.6
fine sand, 3-6 5.90 2.98 0.8 0.1 1.8 12.0 55.1 26.0 2.6 0.7 1.7
deep phase 6-16 5.98 2.51 0.5 0.0 1.8 11.6 53.6 27.5 3.0 0.4 1.8
16-26 5.93 1.89 0.2 0.0 1.9 12.4 53.2 27.4 2.7 1.2 1.0
26-48 5.95 1.78 0.1 0.1 2.3 13.5 54.6 25.3 2.3 0.3 1.6
48-70 6.08 1.92 0.0 0.1 1.9 12.1 55.0 27.7 1.9 0.2 0.9
70-80 5.48 14.23 0.0 0.0 1.8 10.1 41.3 21.6 2.2 0.3 22.6
Chiefland Suwannee S61-4 0-3 5.80 4.53 1.9 0.4 4.8 17.8 42.1 28.0 5.9 0.3 0.7
fine sand, 3-15 5.93 2.65 0.4 0.4 4.8 17.1 41.7 28.5 4.4 1.0 2.1
deep phase 15-27 5.97 2.28 0.2 0.5 4.5 16.4 42.1 28.9 4.8 0.6 2.1
27-39 5.97 1.87 0.1 0.4 5.2 18.0 42.2 27.4 4.4 0.6 1.2
39-60 6.03 1.38 0.0 0.4 4.9 17.4 43.1 28.0 4.4 0.4 1.3
60-84 6.13 1.27 0.0 0.5 5.0 17.9 43.0 27.7 4.7 0.4 0.8
84-88 5.68 9.24 0.0 0.4 4.2 14.0 34.7 27.2 5.4 4.7 9.5

Hernando-Archer Group

Hernando Alachua S1-3 0-5 5.78 4.61 0.9 0.1 1.8 9.6 60.8 20.4 2.8 0.6 3.9
fine sand 5-12 5.67 4.32 0.5 0.1 1.5 8.9 58.9 21.7 4.0 0.5 4.1
12-28 5.80 5.03 0.3 0.1 1.8 10.1 58.9 20.3 3.4 0.8 4.3
28-34 5.27 16.79 0.5 0.1 1.5 7.0 44.9 14.9 4.3 0.7 26.5
34-42 5.10 22.77 0.2 0.1 1.4 8.2 39.6 9.6 2.6 0.2 38.2
42-60 4.90 18.88 0.0 0.0 1.8 9.7 41.2 8.0 3.1 0.1 37.0
[88 .









APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
Location Horizon I Moist- -
Location 1 Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
S IInches talent Sand Sand Sand
Hernando-Archer Group-Continued

Hernando Alachua S1-34 0-21/2 5.94 5.13 1.6 0.1 3.7 17.6 50.0 20.0 2.7 1.9 4.0
fine sand 21/-6 5.89 4.08 0.9 0.0 3.5 17.1 50.6 20.1 3.9 0.6 4.2
6-13 5.85 3.82 0.5 0.1 3.5 18.1 51.1 18.7 3.2 0.9 4.4
13-18 5.82 4.78 0.3 0.0 2.9 15.7 49.5 20.2 3.9 0.1 7.6
01 18-21 5.64 11.71 0.4 0.1 3.7 14.5 41.0 17.4 4.0 0.3 18.9
S21-42+ 5.38 19.56 0.1 0.2 2.7 12.5 32.1 12.4 2.5 0.5 37.0
Hernando Alachua S1-46 0-3 5.67 7.02 2.2 0.1 1.9 18.9 54.5 15.1 4.1 0.4 4.9
fine sand 3-6 5.89 5.57 1.4 0.0 2.2 18.1 54.0 15.3 3.7 0.9 5.7
6-12 5.84 5.49 0.9 0.1 2.0 18.1 53.8 14.9 3.6 1.0 6.4
12-18 5.80 7.71 0.6 0.1 2.3 16.4 52.7 14.1 3.6 0.3 10.4
18-27 5.03 21.13 0.6 0.0 1.4 12.0 37.5 9.3 2.2 0.7 36.9
27-33 5.32 23.89 0.3 0.0 1.2 12.1 35.2 6.6 1.4 0.5 42.9
33-45+ 5.37 25.22 0.2 10.1 1.2 11.1 35.7 5.4 0.9 0.6 45.0
Archer Alachua S1-11 0-3 5.85 4.62 1.9 0.2 3.7 17.5 34.3 34.8 6.5 0.2 2.6
fine sand 3-7 5.85 3.54 0.9 0.2 3.8 16.9 33.7 35.7 6.6 0.3 2.6
7-17 5.70 3.43 0.6 0.2 3.3 16.1 31.8 37.3 7.6 0.1 3.6
17-22 5.47 3.82 0.4 0.1 3.5 16.1 32.1 35.9 7.2 0.4 4.6
22-45 4.93 14.99 0.1 0.2 4.1 16.2 25.8 23.3 6.9 0.0 23.5
45-60 4.98 17.76 0.1 0.2 4.1 18.5 22.6 14.2 9.9 0.3 29.9









APPENDIX A (Continued)
MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
Horizon I |Moist-1 I
Location Lab. Depth ure I Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand P Fine Silt Silt Clay
Inches ) alent Sand Sand | Sand
Hernando-Archer Group-Continued

Archer Suwannee S61-3 0-3 5.83 3.58 1.1 0.1 2.3 16.2 57.1 18.1 2.4 1.7 1.9
fine sand 3-8 5.88 2.90 0.5 0.1 2.4 16.1 56.4 18.0 2.8 1.8 2.4
8-14 5.95 2.50 0.2 0.1 2.1 15.9 56.5 19.3 2.8 1.0 2.3
14-22 5.95 2.29 0.1 0.1 2.1 15.9 26.7 18.5 2.6 1.2 3.0
22-31 6.07 3.22 0.4 0.1 2.2 16.5 55.7 16.9 2.3 2.0 4.1
31-36 5.15 14.20 0.0 0.1 2.0 12.7 45.7 13.6 3.5 0.4 22.0
36-42 4.92 20.12 0.0 0.1 1.1 11.5 42.8 8.3 2.1 0.5 33.7
42-54 4.70 21.84 0.0 0.1 0.8 9.8 42.4 5.6 1.6 0.5 39.2

Rex Group

Rex Alachua S1-29 0-2 5.33 6.11 2.2 0.2 3.5 12.3 40.6 33.6 4.5 1.4 3.8
fine sand 2-6 5.35 5.22 1.5 0.2 3.4 12.4 41.3 32.6 4.6 1.4 4.0
6-12 5.30 4.43 0.9 0.2 3.4 12.4 41.1 32.4 5.1 1.5 3.9
12-18 5.00 5.04 0.5 0.2 2.9 11.1 39.7 33.4 5.0 0.6 7.0
18-24 4.82 12.76 0.3 0.1 3.0 10.1 34.4 28.3 4.8 0.1 19.4
24-32 4.85 20.31 0.4 0.1 2.1 7.8 26.6 24.7 4.2 1.2 33.3
32-42 4.77 22.37 0.1 0.0 1.7 6.3 23.8 24.6 3.8 1.0 38.8
Rex Alachua S1-30 0-3 5.15 6.02 2.4 0.1 1.2 6.9 46.4 35.8 6.0 1.1 2.4
fine sand 3-8 5.28 5.26 1.6 0.1 1.3 7.2 45.8 35.7 6.2 1.3 2.4
8-13 5.21 4.47 0.8 0.2 1.3 7.0 46.4 35.2 5.9 1.5 2.5
13-20 5.21 2.63 0.1 0.1 1.2 6.6 46.3 37.2 5.5 2.0 1.2
20-28 4.88 12.97 0.1 0.0 1.1 5.2 35.5 30.9 5.7 1.5 20.0
28-36 4.88 18.71 0.1 0.0 0.6 3.9 29.4 25.0 4.0 1.2 35.8
36-44+ 4.92 23.03 0.1 0.0 0.5 2.8 28.4 23.0 2.0 1.3 41.9







APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
Horizon Moist- I I
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
Inches alent Sand Sand Sand
Scranton-Ona Group

Scranton Alachua S1-6 0-6 4.81 8.97 3.9 0.4 11.5 36.3 32.4 8.1 4.4 0.7 6.1
sand 6-14 5.06 5.89 1.4 0.5 12.2 35.0 32.5 8.4 4.2 1.3 5.7
14-28 5.25 4.40 0.2 0.6 12.2 36.5 32.2 7.8 3.7 1.2 5.6
28-42 5.10 4.08 0.0 0.6 11.9 36.5 32.0 8.2 4.2 1.2 5.3
42-54 4.98 3.38 0.0 0.5 17.2 41.4 27.6 4.9 3.4 0.7 4.1

2 Scranton Alachua S1-28 0-5 5.00 6.56 3.4 0.9 15.8 38.8 30.2 7.6 3.1 1.0 2.6
"sand 5-10 5.25 5.26 2.2 0.9 13.8 37.2 31.6 8.6 3.6 1.3 2.9
10-15 5.40 4.08 1.2 0.8 12.4 35.8 32.9 9.8 4.2 1.1 3.0
15-24 5.40 2.67 0.3 1.2 13.1 35.7 33.2 9.5 3.5 1.0 2.7
24-42 5.26 2.71 0.1 0.8 12.5 35.4 33.2 10.3 3.4 1.3 3.1
Scranton Alachua S1-35 0-5 5.38 11.86 3.1 0.8 14.8 31.9 34.1 8.9 4.8 0.5 4.1
sand 5-12 5.60 5.22 1.3 0.6 14.7 32.2 34.6 8.4 4.8 0.6 4.0
12-17 5.47 4.25 0.7 0.5 11.0 28.1 38.7 11.0 5.6 0.6 4.4
17-24 5.13 3.56 0.3 0.6 13.1 29.7 36.4 10.0 5.1 0.9 4.2
24-34 5.15 3.31 0.2 0.6 12.8 29.4 37.0 9.6 4.3 1.2 5.0
34-60 5.05 4.91 0.2 0.3 10.5 29.0 37.8 9.3 3.7 1.4 8.0
60-72+ 4.98 5.75 0.3 0.4 13.0 31.3 36.7 7.8 5.1 1.4 4.3
Scranton Manatee S41-13 0-14 5.93 7.24 4.8 0.3 2.6 13.1 69.2 9.1 1.4 1.1 3.1
fine sand 14-20 5.68 5.15 1.9 0.2 2.3 11.8 70.2 9.3 2.6 1.0 2.6
20-30 5.51 4.18 0.5 0.3 2.6 12.9 68.6 8.7 2.6 1.3 3.0
30+ 4.95 4.60 0.2 0.4 2.5 13.6 68.8 8.3 2.6 1.8 1.9










APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
I Horizon I Moist- Very I
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine I Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv-I Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
____Inches talent I I Sand Sand Sand
Scranton-Ona Group-Continued

Scranton Manatee S41-42 0-16 5.55 5.75 2.7 0.2 4.3 30.3 40.8 18.8 3.7 1.1 0.8
fine sand 16-22 5.25 4.43 1.0 0.2 5.1 31.5 39.8 16.4 4.6 1.3 1.1
22-30 5.69 3.34 0.4 0.2 5.2 31.5 39.8 16.5 4.0 0.9 1.8
30-42 5.65 2.78 0.1 0.4 5.9 32.4 38.9 15.5 3.6 1.4 1.9
Scranton Manatee S41-43 0-12 5.38 8.27 4.7 0.1 5.4 34.4 43.1 11.6 3.2 1.1 1.1
5 fine sand 12-16 5.74 4.16 0.9 0.2 4.7 32.9 40.0 11.7 3.4 0.8 2.3
16-42+ 5.86 2.68 0.1 0.1 4.2 30.8 46.4 12.9 2.9 0.6 2.0
Scranton Alachua S1-16 0-3 5.12 8.92 4.3 0.2 2.0 4.7 42.8 41.3 3.0 2.8 3.0
fine sand, 3-9 5.27 5.80 2.1 0.2 2.2 4.6 43.0 41.6 3.7 2.0 2.6
shallow 9-15 5.63 4.04 0.7 0.4 2.1 4.4 43.1 41.7 4.4 0.8 2.9
phase 15-21 5.68 3.14 0.3 0.3 1.7 3.8 44.1 42.2 4.4 0.8 2.7
21-28 5.68 2.21 0.0 0.4 2.4 4.1 44.5 41.8 4.1 0.6 2.0
28-33 5.34 1.83 0.0 0.3 2.4 4.3 45.4 41.9 3.7 0.4 1.5
33-42 5.05 14.57 0.0 0.1 1.8 3.1 32.7 35.0 2.9 0.5 23.9
42-54 5.05 17.32 0.0 0.2 1.2 2.4 30.9 35.7 1.5 1.0 27.2
54-60 5.08 18.65 0.0 0.0 0.6 1.1 29.7 39.0 0.5 0.0 29.0
Ona Manatee S41-6 0-6 4.72 6.78 4.2 0.5 7.4 17.0 60.0 11.3 1 1.9 0.6 1.3
fine sand 6-10 5.22 8.81 4.4 0.9 7.0 15.3 59.6 11.6 3.3 0.6 1.7
10-18 5.45 3.32 0.6 1.1 7.2 15.5 60.0 11.3 2.5 0.7 1.7
18-42 5.18 2.15 0.2 0.8 7.2 15.7 60.5 11.7 1.8 0.4 1.8
SI I~ *






APPENDIX A (Continued)
MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
"Horizon Moist- V o Me-
Lo n L. Depth ure I Soln. Very rse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
___ Inches talent Lo Sand I Sand Sand ________
Scranton-Ona Group--Continued

Ona Manatee S41-30 0-8 4.98 6.52 3.4 0.4 10.1 22.9 48.2 14.2 2.2 0.9 1.0
fine sand 8-12 5.55 7.89 3.8 0.5 10.2 22.3 48.1 14.0 2.7 0.4 1.8
12-24 5.76 5.21 1.9 0.6 8.6 21.0 49.1 14.6 3.7 0.6 1.8
24-42+ 6.03 2.27 0.1 0.4 9.3 21.9 50.0 14.3 1.7 0.8 1.5
Ona Manatee S41-38 0-6 5.08 5.15 1.2 0.9 3.9 6.6 62.6 21.7 2.4 0.9 0.9
fine sand 6-12 5.50 8.28 3.7 1.3 4.5 6.7 62.4 20.1 2.0 1.1 1.8
12-42+ 5.87 3.00 0.3 1.0 3.6 6.1 66.4 19.2 1.5 1.2 1.0
Ona Manatee S41-41 0-8 4.78 6.02 3.5 0.3 5.3 32.0 39.4 17.8 3.0 1.2 1.0
fine sand 8-12 5.69 5.89 2.8 0.2 5.1 30.7 39.6 19.2 3.7 1.0 0.5
12-14 5.99 4.38 1.1 0.1 4.2 27.3 40.8 20.7 4.9 1.3 0.7
14-36 5.89 2.55 0.1 0.3 5.9 32.1 39.4 17.2 3.0 1.0 1.2
36-42 5.32 2.85 0.0 0.3 5.2 28.6 40.3 19.4 3.0 1.5 1.7

Leon-St. Johns Group

Leon sand Alachua 81-7 0-3 4.27 5.20 2.5 0.3 11.5 39.8 37.1 6.8 3.4 0.2 0.9
3-5 4.54 1.75 0.5 0.2 10.6 38.4 40.0 7.2 2.9 0.2 0.5
5-14 4.69 1.40 0.3 0.3 9.2 36.7 40.9 7.9 3.7 0.1 1.1
14-16 4.39 8.12 4.4 1.0 10.8 32.6 38.4 6.9 4.4 1.9 3.8
16-22 4.61 7.59 2.0 0.3 10.2 34.5 39.6 7.5 3.3 1.2 3.2
22-30 5.00 7.02 0.5 0.4 9.1 33.4 42.5 8.7 3.0 0.7 2.1
30-42 4.83 3.73 0.4 0.5 11.5 33.6 37.2 7.0 3.7 1.4 5.1
42-48 4.69 4.19 0.3 0.5 8.5 30.9 40.6 7.9 2.9 1.0 7.6
_______________________ ________ ~










APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
JHorizon Moist-
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
Inches alent I Sand I Sand Sand __
Leon-St. Johns Group-Continued

Leon sand Alachua S1-43 0-4 5.53 4.91 2.1 0.2 11.1 41.8 34.5 7.0 3.8 0.7 0.9
4-12 5.20 2.59 0.3 0.4 11.9 40.6 34.2 6.8 3.9 0.8 1.3
12-16 4.76 8.55 4.0 0.5 10.7 37.2 34.3 7.4 4.6 1.4 3.9
16-20 5.07 6.07 1.5 0.5 11.1 37.1 34.9 7.9 4.3 1.3 2.9
20-28 5.11 4.25 0.5 0.3 9.9 36.8 36.4 8.3 4.2 1.6 2.5
28-36 4.96 6.34 0.3 0.5 10.2 35.0 33.2 7.0 4.1 1.7 8.2
36-45+ 4.96 7.20 0.3 0.4 9.0 33.2 33.5 7.6 4.7 1.8 9.8
01
Leon Alachua S1-18 0-2 4.64 8.32 3.3 0.1 2.1 8.5 55.7 27.4 4.7 0.4 1.0
fine sand 2-6 4.72 3.82 1.0 0.1 2.6 8.5 56.5 26.8 4.3 0.3 0.8
6-12 5.08 2.59 0.3 0.2 3.0 8.4 55.5 26.8 4.1 0.9 0.9
12-14 4.64 8.74 4.8 0.2 3.0 9.4 55.1 25.6 4.6 1.0 1.0
14-19 4.86 9.46 2.6 0.2 2.5 7.4 47.7 28.0 2.6 2.7 2.9
19-27 5.05 6.00 1.2 0.3 2.8 7.5 53.4 29.4 4.1 0.9 1.7
27-33 5.15 2.79 0.3 0.3 2.9 7.4 52.1 31.7 3.9 0.3 1.4
33-45+ 5.06 7.57 0.2 0.3 2.4 5.9 47.1 30.7 3.4 0.5 9.7
Leon Collier S11-2 0-4 4.85 4.77 1.9 0.1 6.5 38.2 43.1 10.1 1.2 0.1 0.7
fine sand 4-8 5.28 1.69 0.5 0.1 6.8 38.1 43.6 9.4 1.3 0.3 0.4
8-20 5.80 1.50 0.1 0.1 5.7 36.5 43.6 11.0 1.6 0.5 1.0
20-22 4.78 9.81 6.9 0.1 6.3 37.2 42.6 8.5 2.8 0.7 1.7
22-27 5.56 4.57 1.3 0.1 6.2 38.1 42.9 8.5 1.8 0.4 2.0
27-32 5.90 2.78 0.8 0.1 5.3 34.1 45.6 8.9 1.6 1.0 3.4
32-48 5.91 0.3 0.2 7.2 43.0 40.3 6.7 1.2 0.1 1.1







APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTUREu EQUIVALENT.
Horizon Moist-
Location Lab. I Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
Inches alent Sand Sand Sand
Leon-St. Johns Group-Continued

Leon Manatee S41-10 0-2 5.75 4.66 2.6 0.3 8.1 23.9 53.7 11.1 1.4 0.9 0.5
fine sand 2-30 5.32 1.63 0.1 0.6 10.1 24.7 53.5 9.6 0.4 0.7 0.3
30-33 4.78 6.67 2.8 0.6 7.9 20.2 53.6 12.1 2.2 0.3 3.0
33-40 5.12 4.06 1.1 0.5 8.3 21.4 54.2 11.6 1.4 0.4 2.2
40-50 5.32 1.68 0.2 0.6 7.8 20.4 56.1 12.2 0.9 0.5 1.3

Leon Manatee S41-37 0-4 4.71 6.61 3.8 0.1 2.4 11.1 66.0 18.2 0.8 0.6 0.8
fine sand 4-16 5.49 2.51 0.5 0.1 2.4 9.9 65.0 19.2 2.7 0.1 0.4
16-24 6.36 2.01 0.1 0.1 2.6 10.9 65.2 19.2 1.2 0.5 0.2
24-30 4.91 6.54 3.2 0.1 2.4 10.3 64.9 19.1 1.5 0.3 1.2
30-42 5.28 3.47 0.7 0.1 2.4 10.3 65.6 18.6 1.6 0.2 1.2

Leon Manatee S41-9 0-8 4.53 5.33 3.3 0.2 4.1 19.7 63.5 8.5 2.4 0.8 0.8
fine sand, 8-22 5.78 1.53 0.1 0.2 3.4 14.3 65.9 14.1 0.8 0.7 0.4
heavy sub- 22-26 5.68 3.69 1.1 0.4 3.6 12.8 64.6 14.6 1.6 1.1 1.1
stratum phase 26-28 6.11 1.23 0.1 0.5 4.1 13.2 65.8 14.8 0.9 0.4 0.4
28+ 6.61 17.51 0.3 0.3 3.4 11.2 52.9 12.6 1.8 0.4 17.4

Leon Manatee S41-11 0-8 4.32 5.33 3.2 0.3 2.7 11.7 68.8 11.7 2.6 0.8 1.3
fine sand, 8-24 5.00 1.68 0.3 0.4 2.7 12.3 71.0 11.3 0.9 0.6 0.8
heavy sub- 24-36 4.82 7.70 3.0 0.3 2.7 10.7 67.0 11.8 1.2 0.5 5.8
stratum phase 36-42 5.12 12.61 0.6 0.2 2.2 9.6 58.4 10.7 1.4 0.1 17.4









APPENDIX A (Continued)
MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
Horizon i Moist-
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
Inches talent I I Sand I Sand Sand
Leon-St. Johns Group-Continued

Immokalee Collier S11-3 0-3 4.80 5.73 4.1 0.2 5.9 25.9 54.9 8.8 1.2 0.7 2.5
fine sand 3-8 5.45 2.20 0.6 0.2 6.2 21.4 57.8 12.1 1.4 0.1 0.8
8-18 5.21 1.81 0.2 0.1 5.0 19.1 60.6 13.4 0.6 0.2 1.0
18-32 6.61 1.79 0.1 0.1 5.1 20.6 59.4 13.2 0.9 0.4 0.2
32-37 4.92 6.28 2.9 0.2 5.6 21.5 58.2 10.2 2.2 0.8 1.2
37-45 5.33 2.21 0.9 0.2 5.4 20.3 59.9 12.3 0.9 0.4 0.6
Immokalee Manatee S41-40 0-4 4.81 5.54 3.0 0.1 4.1 40.1 47.5 5.4 1.6 0.3 0.9
Sfine sand 4-14 5.49 1.98 0.4 0.1 3.3 32.7 55.1 7.1 1.0 0.2 0.5
14-36 6.80 1.70 0.0 0.1 3.1 26.6 59.0 9.4 1.3 0.4 0.1
36-42+ 4.68 7.92 3.4 0.1 3.3 26.9 54.3 8.5 4.8 1.3 0.8
St. Johns Manatee S41-39 0-6 4.90 5.83 3.1 0.0 4.4 28.9 40.0 21.1 3.8 0.5 1.3
fine sand 6-16 5.12 2.14 0.6 0.2 4.8 29.3 39.1 21.7 3.5 0.2 1.2
16-22 5.94 1.43 0.1 0.2 5.4 31.8 39.0 20.2 2.6 0.3 0.4
22-26 5.25 3.33 0.6 0.2 5.4 30.4 39.4 19.8 2.9 1.0 0.9
26-30 5.91 1.66 0.2 0.3 5.0 28.2 40.6 22.0 2.7 0.4 0.8
30-32+ 6.04 1.63 0.1 0.4 5.2 28.4 40.4 21.3 3.2 0.1 1.0

Plummer-Rutlege Group
-------------^ ----------- Ir--^--------.---------------
Plummer Manatee S41-31 0-8 5.08 3.07 1.3 0.2 2.9 11.2 68.9 14.3 0.8 0.8 0.7
fine sand 8-18 5.59 1.94 0.2 0.2 3.6 11.7 68.0 14.3 0.8 0.8 0.6
18-42+ 7.05 2.11 0.0 00.8 68.7 15.8 0.4 0.3 0.4
.4__________________






APPENDIX A (Continued)
MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
SI _H orizo n 1 M o ist- I I o
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarsel Me- Fine iVery Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss lCoarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
| I Inches alent Sand Sand Sand __
Plummer-Rutlege Group-Continued

Rutlege Manatee S41-15 0-8 4.75 7.41 6.2 0.5 4.7 17.3 68.7 6.4 1.3 0.4 0.7
fine sand 8-12 5.45 2.04 0.6 0.6 4.4 16.3 69.3 7.6 0.9 0.6 0.2
12-40 5.68 1.27 0.3 0.5 3.9 15.7 70.0 8.0 0.9 0.3 0.5

Bladen-Bayboro Group

Bladen Alachua S1-27 0-2 5.28 8.40 4.0 0.1 7.8 31.7 34.5 13.8 7.5 1.0 3.6
2 fine sand 2-5 5.36 3.69 1.0 0.2 9.7 33.3 33.5 13.0 6.6 1.5 2.1
5-9 5.58 2.75 0.3 0.5 10.9 32.4 33.5 14.0 5.4 1.3 1.9
9-13 5.73 2.42 0.2 0.7 12.1 31.7 32.1 13.8 5.6 1.5 2.4
13-18 4.97 24.38 0.9 0.4 7.3 19.4 17.8 7.1 4.5 2.5 41.1
18-33+ 4.53 34.88 0.5 0.2 4.9 13.7 13.7 5.6 2.8 2.5 56.5
Bladen Alachua S1-31 0-1 5.38 8.37 4.3 0.2 6.4 33.0 35.2 17.9 4.6 1.3 1.3
fine sand 1-8 4.92 3.09 0.6 0.1 7.0 34.7 40.5 11.6 4.0 0.9 1.1
8-22 5.40 2.12 0.3 0.2 7.5 34.0 40.0 11.4 3.7 1.1 2.1
22-27 5.21 5.62 0.2 0.4 8.0 31.0 36.8 10.5 4.0 1.0 8.2
27-36+ 5.00 20.08 0.3 0.2 5.0 22.4 28.3 8.4 2.4 0.0 33.3
Bayboro Alachua S1-24 0-2 5.28 26.39 11.9 0.4 7.6 33.7 30.6 8.9 9.7 1.9 7.2
loamy sand 2-5 5.33 16.55 6.8 0.2 8.8 36.4 28.9 7.3 8.9 3.2 6.2
5-10 5.51 10.37 2.5 0.2 10.5 37.4 28.1 7.0 9.2 1.5 6.0
10-17 5.96 2.25 0.2 0.2 9.1 41.8 34.6 7.9 3.8 0.7 1.8
17-30 5.51 18.13 0.0 0.2 6.8 29.6 25.9 6.2 2.5 0.7 28.1
30-52 5.38 17.09 0.0 0.5 5.2 25.7 29.4 8.9 4.0 1.2 25.2
____________________ ___ J __________ __ __ __ ___ __ __ __











APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
Horizon I Moist-
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
_______ Inches I alent Sand Sand Sand
Broward-Bradenton-Parkwood-Sunniland Group

Broward Collier S11-11 0-2 6.81 7.54 2.8 0.2 5.8 19.5 64.2 6.5 2.1 0.4 1.2
fine sand 2-5 7.06 3.12 0.9 0.6 5.0 19.8 65.7 6.7 1.8 0.2 0.2
5-10 7.46 2.27 0.5 0.1 6.0 24.9 62.3 4.9 1.3 0.2 0.3
10-15 7.96 2.03 0.4 0.1 5.5 22.3 64.9 5.7 0.9 0.4 0.2
15-18 8.29 1.93 0.3 0.1 5.9 23.2 63.3 5.4 1.2 0.3 0.5
Broward Collier S11-12 0-4 6.10 6.13 2.1 0.1 3.3 18.3 67.7 6.7 2.1 1.0 0.8
fine sand 4-8 6.51 3.03 0.8 0.2 3.2 18.0 66.4 8.5 1.3 0.3 1.9
8-14 7.01 2.5 0.4 0.2 3.4 17.1 67.0 8.7 1.3 0.1 2.2
14-18 7.26 15.64 0.9 0.1 3.0 14.3 54.0 7.1 1.3 0.8 19.4
Broward Manatee S41-23 0-3 6.67 10.19 5.2 0.3 2.0 9.6 71.4 9.2 4.5 0.8 2.1
fine sand 3-14 6.36 2.00 0.4 0.6 3.1 10.9 74.6 8.9 0.3 0.7 0.9
14-26 6.01 1.88 0.7 0.5 4.1 12.2 72.2 8.5 1.0 1.3 0.2
26-28 6.18 7.99 1.0 0.7 3.7 11.5 66.8 7.1 1.1 0.1 8.9
28-30+ 8.47 13.82 0.7 2.4 9.5 12.1 50.8 7.0 6.0 1.1 11.1
Matmom Collier Sl1-13 0-3 6.26 10.56 4.2 0.6 1.8 10.1 67.3 11.7 4.6 0.2 3.7
fine sand 3-6 6.23 1.5 0.2 0.2 1.7 9.7 67.2 12.0 3.4 1.1 4.6
6-9 7.21 13.65 1.2 0.1 1.7 9.3 59.4 11.2 3.8 0.6 13.9
9-15 7.88 19.05 0.9 0.4 1.9 9.2 52.1 10.2 3.0 5.2 18.0








APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
"Horizon Moist- I
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse' Me- Fine Very jCoarse; Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt I Silt I Clay
SInches alent Sand Sand I Sand _
Broward-Bradenton-Parkwood-Sunniiand Group-Continued

Copeland Collier Sl-14 0-4 5.95 10.78 4.5 0.2 3.2 26.8 49.7 15.3 3.0 0.2 1.4
fine sand 4-10 6.58 3.16 1.0 0.1 3.6 28.9 48.8 14.5 2.0 1.1 1.0
10-17 7.74 2.69 0.5 0.1 3.5 28.5 48.9 15.1 1.7 1.1 1.0
17-22 8.34 20.85 1.2 0.2 2.5 18.1 37.6 13.7 2.3 1.2 24.1
E Bradenton Manatee S41-16 0-4 5.95 4.49 2.1 0.2 3.0 13.8 66.9 12.6 2.1 0.1 1.2
fine sand 4-8 5.95 1.94 0.2 0.4 2.5 12.0 68.9 13.1 2.2 0.2 0.5
8-24 6.08 1.94 0.2 0.2 3.2 13.0 67.3 12.3 2.4 0.2 0.9
24-30 5.48 11.48 0.5 0.3 2.4 11.9 58.0 10.( 1.6 0.3 14.9
30+ 8.24 13.57 0.4 2.8 5.9 12.8 44.4 11.0 6.4 2.8 13.9
Bradenton Manatee S41-17 0-4 7.39 9.41 3.7 0.4 2.9 17.0 62.9 10.0 3.8 0.5 2.5
fine sand 4-12 6.63 2.62 0.6 0.8 3.2 16.8 64.8 10.2 2.0 0.5 1.5
12-20 6.37 5.04 0.6 2.3 3.5 15.7 61.5 10.3 1.7 0.5 4.4
20-30 5.91 14.03 0.8 1.4 3.1 14.0 55.2 9.1 1.8 0.5 14.8
30+ 8.38 10.19 0.3 1.5 3.3 14.5 54.4 9.1 3.8 1.4 12.0
Bradenton Manatee S41-4 0-8 5.58 5.28 2.4 0.2 2.8 11.9 60.9 18.2 3.8 0.5 1.6
fine sand, 8-20 5.71 1.83 0.1 0.6 3.2 11.5 62.1 18.3 2.8 0.7 0.8
deep phase 20-30 5.95 15.07 0.7 0.3 2.3 9.6 53.4 16.5 2.5 1.0 14.4
30-34 7.54 16.40 0.2 0.4 3.0 10.3 51.9 14.5 2.2 0.5 17.1
_____________________________________ _____________________[ .. ___________________










APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
I riorzon IMoist- I I
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarser Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
Inches alent Sand Sand Sand
Broward-Bradenton-Parkwood-Sunniland Group-Continued

Bradenton Manatee S41-26 0-4 5.00 4.84 2.2 0.1 1.6 12.0 51.7 31.2 1.1 1.0 1.2
fine sand, 4-7 5.22 2.45 0.8 0.2 1.9 11.0 50.4 32.7 2.3 0.2 1.2
deep phase 7-18 5.12 2.64 0.3 0.4 2.5 13.2 50.5 29.0 2.2 0.5 1.7
18-22 5.35 5.72 0.0 0.2 2.5 14.1 47.8 26.7 2.3 1.1 5.3
22-32 5.59 16.29 0.1 0.3 2.1 11.5 42.6 24.3 2.5 0.5 16.2
32-42+ 7.00 14.94 0.2 0.2 1.8 10.7 42.7 25.5 3.0 0.9 15.0

SBradenton Manatee S41-22 0-2 4.85 9.53 4.6 0.1 1.0 8.1 71.4 15.7 1.2 0.9 1.5
fine sand, 2-6 5.37 2.46 0.5 0.1 1.1 8.1 71.9 16.2 0.7 0.4 1.4
thick surface 6-20 6.11 1.42 0.4 0.3 1.7 7.9 71.9 16.1 0.6 0.4 1.0
phase 20-31 6.83 1.21 0.2 0.1 1.7 8.6 71.4 16.0 0.4 0.7 1.0
31-35 8.79 5.43 0.2 0.1 1.4 7.7 67.6 14.9 1.5 0.8 5.9
35-42 8.69 13.07 0.2 0.2 1.7 7.8 60.6 13.3 0.9 0.5 15.0

Bradenton Manatee S41-29 0-2 4.44 10.22 5.1 0.4 5.1 18.2 43.7 25.9 2.4 0.5 3.8
fine sand, 2-24 5.23 3.95 1.0 0.3 6.5 20.5 43.4 24.1 1.8 0.6 2.8
thick surface 24-32 7.95 7.25 0.5 0.6 7.2 20.7 40.6 21.7 1.9 0.1 7.2
phase 32-42 8.25 11.36 0.4 2.1 7.3 18.2 36.9 20.0 2.8 1.3 11.4
Bradenton Manatee S41-27 0-3 4.41 6.05 3.3 0.3 1.1 6.9 46.8 41.5 2.0 0.3 1.0
fine sand, 3-7 4.91 2.22 0.7 0.1 1.8 10.6 48.5 36.5 1.5 0.3 0.6
thick surface 7-12 5.28 1.91 0.3 0.2 2.0 9.4 47.4 38.3 1.1 0.2 1.3
deep phase 12-34 6.03 2.04 0.1 0.1 2.3 11.4 48.3 34.8 0.8 0.3 1.9
34-42 8.06 13.04 0.1 0.1 1.8 9.6 41.0 32.3 1.6 0.1 13.5
__________________________1 _______________ (_______________ ___ ___







APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
S nlorzon Vl MosI- i
Location Lab. Depth ure [ Soln. Very Coarse1 Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand I dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
Inches talent Sand Sand Sand
Broward-Bradenton-Parkwood-Sunniland Group-Continued

Keri Collier S11-15 0-2 6.68 23.43 9.6 0.1 3.3 18.5 61.0 10.0 3.2 2.1 1.7
fine sand 2-5 7.61 3.55 1.1 0.1 3.0 17.9 66.8 10.8 0.9 0.2 0.2
5-9 8.49 1.87 0.4 0.1 3.1 16.5 68.1 11.0 0.6 0.3 0.2
9-14 8.69 19.43 1.0 0.2 3.9 17.1 53.2 8.2 12.8 3.7 0.8
14-24 9.15 5.11 0.3 0.1 3.1 16.1 66.2 11.6 1.1 0.8 1.1
24-30 8.89 1.73 0.0 0.1 3.1 16.3 66.6 11.9 0.9 0.4 0.6
S30-36 8.71 1.68 0.0 0.1 2.7 16.0 67.6 12.2 0.8 0.3 0.3

Keri Manatee S41-48 0-3 4.96 5.44 2.8 0.1 2.2 15.1 68.5 11.5 2.1 0.1 0.4
fine sand 3-16 5.84 2.21 0.5 0.3 3.3 17.3 67.4 10.1 1.4 0.1 0.0
16-22 7.09 1.76 0.6 0.6 4.3 16.4 66.0 11.0 1.6 0.0 0.0
22-30 8.43 20.35 1.1 1.3 6.8 17.8 54.7 6.7 5.0 1.6 6.0
30-42 8.65 6.35 0.5 0.8 4.2 1 16.0 63.7 11.0 2.4 0.2 1.7

Parkwood Manatee S41-51 0-4 7.09 11.03 3.6 0.7 4.2 15.8 59.2 12.0 2.4 0.3 5.4
fine sand 4-12 8.28 7.89 1.3 1.3 4.1 15.2 57.6 12.6 2.8 0.2 6.2
12-24 8.72 12.50 0.7 2.3 4.8 14.9 51.0 10.7 3.0 0.7 12.6
24- 8.79 12.18 0.5 2.6 6.3 15.0 47.4 10.7 4.5 0.7 12.8

Parkwood Manatee S41-52 0-2 5.47 12.46 7.3 0.4 3.7 16.5 60.5 12.6 3.0 0.4 2.8
fine sand 2-10 5.37 3.80 1.9 1.0 3.6 16.8 62.1 12.9 1.6 0.8 1.2
10-22 6.47 1.90 1.4 1.3 5.1 17.3 61.3 12.7 1.0 0.3 1.0
22-24 8.14 5.67 0.7 1.0 5.1 18.2 57.1 11.2 1.9 0.3 5.2
24-42 8.55 16.17 0.3 4.4 7.9 15.9 43.7 9.7 4.6 1.3 12.5









APPENDIX A (Continued)
MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
S-Horizon- I Moist-l I
Location Lab. Depth iure Soln. Very Coarsel Me- Fine Very Coarsel Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand I dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
Tnches alent Sand Sand S nd
Broward-Bradenton-Parkwood-Sunniland Group-Continued

Parkwood Manatee S41-56 0-5 5.88 4.32 1.9 0.2 4.2 20.9 61.7 9.6 0.2 1.0 2.2
fine sand 5-24 7.33 1.56 0.3 1.0 7.8 23.3 58.0 8.1 0.0 0.5 1.3
24- 7.20 21.18 0.7 2.0 8.1 19.3 41.8 7.3 8.6 3.0 9.9
Sunniland Collier Sll-7 0-4 5.02 13.23 6.2 0.1 3.1 19.7 41.8 29.4 3.8 1.4 0.5
fine sand 4-9 5.83 2.83 0.8 0.1 3.1 19.2 42.0 31.4 3.3 0.1 0.7
9-13 6.13 2.01 0.1 0.1 3.5 18.9 41.6 31.9 3.3 0.2 0.5
13-17 6.33 1.90 0.0 0.1 3.1 17.2 40.7 30.9 5.9 0.3 1.7
17-27 8.09 20.12 0.8 0.7 3.4 16.5 35.0 23.6 5.8 0.6 14.3
27-45 8.26 13.20 0.2 0.2 2.6 16.0 39.7 27.7 3.6 0.6 9.6
Sunniland Collier S11-9 0-2 4.87 11.18 10.5 0.1 4.2 24.7 54.0 12.8 2.8 0.3 1.1
fine sand 2-7 4.93 4.29 2.0 0.1 5.0 23.9 53.8 14.5 1.8 0.2 0.7
7-13 5.75 2.30 0.5 0.1 5.3 23.7 52.7 16.0 1.6 0.1 0.5
13-18 5.90 1.89 1.1 0.2 5.0 20.4 53.4 19.0 1.4 0.1 0.5
18-27 8.78 5.11 0.5 0.2 5.1 20.8 51.1 18.0 2.6 0.7 1.5
27-42 8.64 18.53 0.2 0.2 3.9 16.8 40.7 14.6 5.1 1.9 16.8
42-52 8.61 17.62 0.3 0.2 4.0 17.7 41.5 13.9 4.8 1.8 16.1
Ruskin Manatee S41-21 0-4 5.15 6.27 3.6 0.0 1.5 12.7 56.0 24.9 2.9 1.0 1.0
fine sand 4-8 5.55 2.72 0.6 0.1 4.1 21.7 53.9 17.9 1.2 0.9 0.2
8-12 6.00 1.89 0.6 0.2 4.6 19.0 54.5 19.0 1.6 0.3 0.8
12-15 6.31 2.25 0.3 0.2 4.6 20.5 53.5 18.1 1.4 0.5 1.2
15-27 7.53 7.93 0.3 0.1 3.5 17.7 50.6 17.6 1.7 1.0 7.7
27+ 6.56 11.60 0.4 1.9 5.5 16.1 42.1 15.4 5.2 2.1 11.7







APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
Horizon I Moist- I
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
___ Inches talent I Sand Sand Sand _
Arzell-Felda-Manatee Group

Arzell Collier S11-6 0-4 7.33 2.30 0.7 0.1 5.7 24.1 63.6 5.3 0.4 0.4 0.4
fine sand 4-10 6.81 1.81 0.2 0.1 6.0 23.5 63.4 6.1 0.4 0.1 0.5
10-36 7.61 1.79 0.1 0.1 6.4 28.1 59.9 4.5 0.4 0.1 0.4
36-42 6.26 1.45 0.3 0.1 5.2 23.2 64.8 5.6 0.8 0.4 0.1

Arzell Manatee S41-32 0-3 8.89 2.37 0.4 0.7 5.1 10.2 74.4 8.3 0.3 0.2 0.8
Fine sand 3-24 8.96 1.81 0.0 0.7 5.0 10.7 74.6 8.0 0.0 0.3 0.6
24-34 8.85 1.38 0.0 0.7 5.3 10.8 73.9 7.4 0.4 0.6 0.8
34-42+ 7.95 5.92 0.2 0.6 5.6 10.5 69.5 6.7 0.2 0.8 6.1

Charlotte Collier S11-5 0-3 7.94 3.34 1.7 0.3 6.8 31.0 54.3 4.7 0.8 0.6 1.4
fine sand 3-11 8.39 2.05 0.4 0.3 9.0 32.2 52.7 4.1 0.4 0.1 1.2
11-18 8.58 4.06 1.1 0.4 11.5 34.6 45.7 3.1 1.1 1.7 2.1
18-23 8.44 3.64 0.8 0.5 10.2 33.5 48.7 3.3 1.3 1.8 0.6
23-30 8.23 2.53 0.2 0.3 8.6 33.2 51.3 3.9 0.9 1.2 0.6
30-36 7.53 1.54 0.1 0.3 8.8 27.5 56.8 5.1 0.5 0.8 0.2

Pompano Manatee S41-12 0-6 5.51 5.60 2.3 1 0.3 3.7 16.5 65.8 11.6 0.6 0.1 1.4
fine sand 6-18 5.38 2.67 0.7 0.4 4.9 17.5 64.4 11.2 0.2 0.3 1.1
18-22 5.05 5.10 0.2 0.4 4.0 15.8 62.1 10.5 1.0 0.5 5.6
22-38 7.44 6.89 0.1 0.6 4.4 15.5 60.3 9.7 0.7 0.8 8.0
38-42 8.11 9.89 0.2 1.2 5.2 25.7 41.5 8.3 4.0 2.4 11.6











APPENDIX A (Continued)
MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
I Horizon Moist- I I
Location Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
I___nches alent Sand Sand Sand__
Arzell-Felda-Manatee Group-Continued

Pompano Manatee S41-53 0-2 5.71 6.68 2.9 0.2 3.8 19.8 58.4 12.7 3.0 0.9 1.2
fine sand 2-10 6.37 2.19 0.5 1.3 5.3 19.2 59.7 12.1 1.4 0.4 0.6
10-30 6.99 1.32 0.0 1.8 5.4 18.1 60.8 12.4 1.0 0.0 0.5
30-42 7.04 1.39 0.0 1.7 5.8 18.6 60.6 11.6 0.9 0.4 0.4
SPompano Manatee S41-57 0-4 5.80 4.05 1.3 0.3 1.8 10.3 74.8 8.5 1.9 0.4 2.0
fine sand 4-16 5.95 2.52 0.5 0.5 2.3 10.4 74.8 8.1 2.7 0.1 1.1
16-36 6.73 1.60 0.0 0.9 3.3 10.4 75.8 7.8 0.9 0.0 0.8
36-38 6.86 2.28 0.2 1.1 3.4 10.7 73.7 7.1 1.7 0.2 2.1
38-42 6.81 8.91 0.2 0.6 3.1 9.4 68.0 7.0 1.8 0.0 10.1
Felda Collier Sl1-10 0-7 6.40 6.61 2.5 0.2 4.2 22.7 52.9 16.2 1.2 0.5 1.9
fine sand 7-15 6.71 4.05 1.0 0.1 5.0 23.1 52.0 15.5 2.1 0.7 1.5
15-24 6.88 3.95 0.7 0.1 4.4 22.0 52.1 16.5 2.0 0.4 2.5
24-30 7.33 7.31 0.4 0.1 4.3 21.3 49.8 14.6 2.0 0.5 7.4
30-40 8.28 14.19 0.8 0.1 3.3 19.1 40.3 11.3 0.2 0.4 16.3
40-50 8.51 11.89 0.4 1.5 6.2 17.7 36.9 12.1 12.2 0.9 12.5
Delray Manatee S41-28 0-6 4.15 18.85 12.9 0.3 6.6 17.9 40.2 26.4 3.0 1.5 4.0
fine sand 6-36 5.08 8.39 3.4 0.4 5.5 16.9 41.0 27.0 1.8 1.2 6.1
36-42+ 5.77 8.37 1.9 0.3 5.7 17.5 38.8 26.8 2.2 0.6 8.0








APPENDIX A (Continued)
MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
1 Horizon I Moist-I I I Ii I
Location I Lab. Depth ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very ICoarsel Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
Inches talent Sand SandI ___ Sand a _
Arzell-Felda-Manatee Group-Continued

Delray Manatee S41-33 0-14 5.62 9.27 4.7 0.4 3.3 12.8 67.2 12.2 1.7 0.3 2.0
fine sand 14-24 5.45 3.57 1.4 0.3 3.0 13.6 67.9 11.3 1.3 0.4 2.2
24-32 6.51 5.34 0.3 0.3 3.3 13.3 66.7 10.7 0.7 0.2 4.8
32-42+ 6.92 10.82 0.4 0.4 3.5 12.0 62.6 10.5 0.7 0.3 10.0
Delray Manatee S41-49 0-16 7.16 11.88 5.9 0.4 3.4 15.4 64.6 10.9 1.8 0.2 3.3
Sfine sand 16-28 6.27 3.48 0.9 0.4 3.0 15.5 66.6 11.0 0.7 0.1 2.8
28-42 5.33 5.06 0.5 0.4 3.1 14.7 64.3 12.0 0.9 0.2 4.3
Delray Manatee S41-47 0-10 5.23 14.26 5.2 0.8 4.4 13.3 49.5 16.3 7.4 1.7 6.6
loamy fine 10-30 6.32 14.36 0.7 0.6 4.2 12.8 48.4 15.7 5.6 1.4 11.3
sand 30-42 5.77 8.84 0.4 1.0 6.0 16.9 52.3 12.6 3.2 0.0 8.0
Manatee Manatee S41-2 0-10 5.22 7.53 3.6 0.6 4.0 12.1 56.4 18.5 4.4 0.5 3.5
fine sand 10-18 5.48 6.95 1.0 1.8 5.0 12.0 54.1 17.9 2.9 0.7 5.6
18-24 5.91 14.14 1.0 1.9 4.5 10.4 48.8 16.3 2.7 0.4 15.0
24-30 7.51 11.11 0.3 1.0 4.4 11.1 51.5 17.0 3.0 0.6 11.4
30+ 8.84 13.82 0.3 2.1 5.1 10.6 47.7 15.0 5.1 0.5 13.9
Manatee Manatee S41-55 0-10 6.49 6.81 2.5 1.5 4.2 13.9 60.1 13.9 1.6 0.5 4.3
fine sand 10-18 6.94 6.03 0.5 1.9 4.9 14.6 58.1 12.7 1.4 0.2 6.1
18-34 8.31 9.87 0.5 1.7 4.2 13.5 55.2 12.8 2.4 0.5 9.9
34-42 8.41 17.41 0.4 2.0 4.9 10.5 34.5 8.4 7.1 11.0 21.5











APPENDIX A (Continued)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
I I Horizon I Moist- 1 I I
Location Lab. I Depth ure Soln. Very Coarsel Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
Inches alent Sand Sand [ Sand _
Arzell-Felda-Manatee Group-Continued

Manatee Collier S11-16 2-0 5.80 137.12 Leaf Mold
fine sand, 0-6 7.84 19.12 11.5 0.2 6.0 22.4 55.9 4.7 3.0 1.9 5.8
shallow phase 6-11 7.91 34.98 2.4 0.3 5.0 15.4 35.9 3.4 4.4 6.2 29.4
11-17 8.06 30.96 1.5 2.6 10.0 21.4 38.1 5.3 6.0 9.5 7.1
17-28 8.66 3.16 0.2 0.2 7.3 24.3 61.0 4.6 0.8 0.5 1.2
28-40 8.46 2.05 0.1 0.2 6.7 26.0 61.8 4.2 0.3 0.3 0.5
Manatee Manatee S41-1 0-10 5.05 38.70 27.3 0.6 7.1 16.4 55.3 11.0 6.4 1.0 2.2
mucky fine 10-16 5.38 12.92 12.8 0.7 7.3 20.2 58.1 10.9 1.5 0.2 1.0
sand 16-22 5.91 2.15 0.2 0.2 3.8 11.1 64.9 18.5 0.9 0.4 0.2
22-24 3.47 8.64 1.2 0.5 4.2 11.8 58.0 16.1 1.5 0.5 7.3
24-38 4.22 11.79 0.6 0.7 4.4 11.8 55.7 14.5 1.2 0.4 11.3
38+ 7.94 6.10 0.4 0.4 3.6 11.0 58.2 17.3 2.9 0.2 6.3
Manatee Manatee S41-50 0-12 5.64 12.65 3.8 0.8 2.0 7.5 63.3 14.8 3.6 1.1 6.9
loamy fine 12-22 7.64 17.22 0.6 1.5 3.0 8.8 56.3 12.6 3.1 0.5 14.2
sand 22-26 8.41 18.88 0.6 2.0 5.6 9.1 49.4 11.4 5.1 1.2 16.1
26-42 8.65 20.47 0.4 3.0 7.6 10.3 39.8 10.6 7.4 1.1 20.2
Manatee Manatee S41-54 0-10 6.64 51.92 16.9 0.5 2.3 11.5 51.7 5.3 3.9 4.8 20.0
fine sandy 10-16 7.36 16.17 4.9 0.4 3.1 14.8 60.7 5.1 2.8 0.7 12.4
loam 16-24 8.04 16.98 1.7 0.3 2.2 8.3 36.8 9.1 5.1 3.5 34.8
24+ 8.41 24.75 1.2 0.4 j 2.5 12.5 57.5 5.5 1.8 1.6 18.2









APPENDIX A (Concluded)

MECHANICAL ANALYSES, PH AND MOISTURE EQUIVALENT.
~i I Horizon j Moist- I
Location Lab. Depth i ure Soln. Very Coarse Me- Fine Very Coarse Fine
Soil Type County No. in pH Equiv- Loss Coarse Sand dium Sand Fine Silt Silt Clay
Inches alent Sand Sand Sand
Arzell-Felda-Manatee Group-Continued

Manatee Manatee S41-19 0-12 6.51 31.58 8.3 0.1 0.9 5.8 39.7 12. 6 9.2 2.4 29.3
fine sandy 12-24 6.31 29.37 1.7 0.3 2.2 8.3 36.8 9.1 5.1 3.5 34.8
S clay loam 24+ 6.11 27.88 0.6 1.5 3.1 9.3 36.0 7.5 7.4 3.9 31.3

Ochopee-Tucker Group

Ochopee Collier Sl1-17 0-2 8.08 41.00 5.9 1.7 8.9 16.8 18.6 0.7 9.6 18.4 25.2
marl, deep 2-10 8.33 31.89 3.2 0.8 9.1 16.7 27.6 1.2 11.9 18.5 13.7
phase 10-24 8.56 21.74 1.2 0.7 9.3 18.2 32.1 1.9 28.5 8.6 0.7
24-30 8.74 8.78 0.5 1.1 14.3 27.8 40.2 1.7 5.2 8.5 1.1
30-42 8.84 1.79 0.1 1.2 10.5 25.5 56.8 4.8 0.1 0.4 0.7
42-60 8.88 1.76 0.1 0.8 10.9 27.7 55.9 3.5 0.1 0.1 0.9

Tucker Collier S11-18 0-3 8.28 47.27 7.9 0.2 1.0 4.0 22.9 3.5 15.7 21.9 31.0
marl 3-7 8.48 37.91 2.8 0.3 1.5 4.9 22.7 7.4 24.3 15.1 23.9
7-11 8.48 26.78 1.4 0.6 2.2 6.4 33.2 7.2 17.8 11.4 21.2











APPENDIX B

CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
Base Exmhe./
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m m.e. me./ m.e./ pH
SInches % % % 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm.
Arredondo-Kanapaha Group

Arredondo Alachua 81-15 0-3 3.32 .030 .032 6.23 2.55 .082 .53 5.33
sand 3-7 1.19 .010 .042 3.85 5.8 .62 .021 .27 5.33
7-20 .61 .012 .039 2.97 3.9 .40 .021 .34 5.33
20-36 .27 .001 .032 2.67 2.8 .56 .015 .34 5.61
36-40 .17 .020 .167 9.48 9.3 2.17 .039 1.29 5.28
40-56 .20 .032 .337 14.42 15.8 2.47 .071 1.22 4
Arredondo Alachua S1-20 0-4 4.67 .126 .288 13.69 11.68 1.13 .124 .41 5.17
fine sand 4-9 1.98 .044 .296 9.60 6.37 .58 .089 .30" 5.61
9-22 .80 .121 .275 7.34 4.13 .35 .065 .32 5.70
22-42 .36 .009 .262 6.38 3.55 .36 .068 .42 5.59
42-54 .17 .008 .253 6.47 3.42 .74 .065 .42 5.71
54-72 .13 .008 .275 6.70 3.64 .83 .065 .30 5.39

Arredondo Alachua S1-45 0-3 4.57 .125 .147 11.11 10.98 3.82 .239 1.08 5.92
fine sand 3-8 1.47 .034 .156 6.75 4.18 .82 .094 .28 5.94
8-18 .75 .021 .030 5.72 2.54 .27 .038 .15 5.82
18-33 .39 .011 .028 4.87 2.05 .19 .026 .17 5.65
33-54 .17 .005 .222 4.60 1.85 .32 .045 .27 5.85
54-70 .21 .006 .168 4.95 1.90 .39 .050 .20 6.04
70-80 .21 .005 .200 5.98 2.06 .36 .103 .14 6.04

A blank space indicates no analysis.








APPENDIX B (Continued)

CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
Base I
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
Inches % % I% 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm.
Arredondo-Kanapaha Group-Continued
-------i---- I I
Gainesville Alachua S1-36 0-4 4.22 .102 .228 13.17 12.60 6.02 .312 2.26 6.37
loamy fine 4-12 1.15 .028 .223 8.32 5.40 .90 .183 .39 5.87
sand 12-27 .58 .016 .206 7.16 3.87 .65 .075 .31 5.64
27-45 .38 .011 .196 6.11 3.30 .62 .047 .27 5.60
1 45-60 .24 .010 .224 5.44 3.39 .79 .048 .30 5.53
60-72+ .17 .009 .222 5.22 3.13 .65 .053 .45 5.53

Gainesville Alachua S1-37 0-4 3.79 .093 .397 11.77 10.54 5.38 .202 1.82 6.43
loamy fine 4-12 1.20 .025 .365 8.23 4.23 1.01 .105 .33 6.24
sand 12-27 .85 .014 .379 7.62 3.51 .53 .064 .16 5.92
27-45 .57 .011 .361 6.97 3.26 .37 .064 .17 6.01
45-66+ .28 .007 .381 5.38 2.89 .63 .073 .15 6.07

Gainesville Alachua S1-2 0-3 4.88 .123 .237 15.08 15.1 9.01 .348 2.89 6.30
loamy fine 3-9 1.54 .041 .224 9.69 8.1 3.73 .144 2.10 6.28
sand 9-21 1.48 .016 .222 8.30 5.8 2.08 .081 1.95 6.15
21-36 .29 .012 .226 9.17 5.6 1.96 .050 2.09 6.03
36-60 .17 .012 .252 10.88 5.6 2.14 .055 1.97 5.67
60-78 .10 .010 .318 10.52 6.2 2.23 .057 2.01 5.72











APPENDIX B (Continued)

CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
Toa Base
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ ] m.e./ m.e./ pH
Inches % % _% 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. 100m.

Arredondo-Kanapaha Group-Continued

Gainesville Alachua S1-22 0-2 2 3.90 .083 .207 11.31 11.3 7.92 .242 1.32 6.43
loamy fine 2-7 .94 .031 .227 7.02 5.4 2.67 .138 .68 6.38
sand 7-16 .50 .016 .248 7.43 4.5 2.16 .128 .50 6.38
.1 16-36 .18 .010 .284 8.27 5.3 2.21 .118 .64 5.94
36-54 .18 .013 .352 9.46 6.4 2.62 .145 .11 5.75
54-72 .16 .011 .354 8.13 5.8 2.41 .124 .04 5.92
Fort Meade Alachua S1-19 0-5 4.30 .085 .267 10.91 10.6 3.58 .087 .78 5.97
fine sand 5-12 2.23 .032 .278 13.12 6.1 1.69 .063 .66 6.26
12-19 1.50 .021 .266 7.81 5.1 .67 .083 .35 6.19
19-36 .98 .015 .259 6.61 3.8 .24 .045 .17 5.90
36-54 1.27 .009 .257 5.26 2.8 .18 .060 .12 5.77
54-72 .22 .007 .276 4.73 2.5 .17 .050 .11 5.71
Kanapaha Alachua S1-13 0-2 : 3.18 .114 .017 7.21 7.6 4.63 .084 1.03 5.86
fine sand 2-7 .47 .022 .013 2.36 1.7 .61 .009 .12 5.78
7-15 .30 .010 .017 1.52 1.6 .38 .003 .14 5.40
15-35 .14 .002 .014 1.73 1.4 .22 .009 .10 5.07
35-40 .50 .025 .188 9.90 10.2 2.33 .023 .57 4.98
40-50 .59 .030 .065 19.36 17.6 5.48 .078 1.21 4.82






APPENDIX B (Continued)
CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
Lab. "Base -
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases "
Soil Type Location I Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ m./ pH
Inches % 1. % 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm.
Arredondo-Kanapaha Group-Continued

Kanapaha Alachua S1-12 0-4 2.63 .096 .016 6.29 4.8 3.89 .079 .69 6.46
fine sand 4-8 .25 .011 .020 1.72 .8 .38 .027 .12 6.21
8-24 .34 .013 .029 2.10 1.6 .38 .023 .09 5.35
24-36 .22 .009 .037 2.06 1.7 .34 .022 .20 5.23
36-39 .27 .018 .194 8.87 9.0 4.07 .167 1.34 5.40
39-54 .44 .028 .297 26.46 34.0 14.74 .468 3.42 5.32
Fellowship Alachua S1-1 0-2 D 3.80 .081 .080 10.95 10.0 6.01 .177 2.02 6.01
fine sand, 2-7 1.09 .027 .068 5.25 4.5 1.46 .065 1.89 5.74
thick surface 7-18 .51 .022 .104 6.63 5.4 1.50 .055 1.98 5.83
phase 18-30 .50 .046 .713 20.20 21.0 4.58 .182 2.39 5.08
30-42 .40 .044 1.036 21.28 21.0 5.42 .145 2.37 5.06
Fellowship Alachua S1-14 0-3 8.15 .333 .168 18.09 25.6 19.12 .390 2.84 6.53
loamy fine 3-8 1.46 .027 .184 6.91 8.9 4.36 .331 1.18 6.31
sand 8-27 .91 .029 .369 42.61 61.2 21.78 .376 13.11 5.17
27-42 .52 .024 .411 41.68 54.1 21.67 .191 12.98 5.22
Fellowship Alachua S1-38 0-5 3.10 .085 .225 9.27 9.69 6.15 .291 1.29 6.27
loamy fine 5-11 .82 .025 .183 6.29 5.26 1.34 .153 .72 5.48
sand 11-15 .76 .034 .464 15.42 16.28 4.23 .273 1.91 5.07
15-33 .76 .032 .360 20.85 23.28 5.81 .183 2.54 5.17
33-45- 1.61 .036 .982 22.37 26.80 6.85 .028 2.61 5.17
___________________ ________________________










APPENDIX B (Continued)

CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
I Base Eb
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
SInches % % % 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm.l 100 gm. _
Arredondo-Kanapaha Group-Continued

Fellowship Alachua S1-41 0-5 3.07 .079 .119 9.79 8.74 2.73 .084 1.14 5.53
loamy fine 5-10 1.74 .044 .125 8.32 6.75 1.65 .046 .88 5.42
sand, gravelly 10-14 L 1.13 .038 .175 10.13 8.36 1.63 .073 1.19 5.30
phase 14-23 .53 .029 .646 17.04 15.90 1.75 .097 1.82 5.08
23-27+ .51 .032 .716 20.08 18.16 1.37 .116 1.54 5.07
0 Alachua Alachua S1-40 0-2 18.79 .441 .497 48.15 50.50 26.82 .419 6.45 6.19
clay loam 2-5 7.60 .194 .373 28.60 27.91 13.85 .171 3.44 6.01
5-8 .94 .034 .097 8.18 4.67 1.96 .056 .85 6.04
8-18 .47 .019 .092 7.02 3.48 1.25 .067 .88 5.97
18-30 .16 .009 .082 6.38 2.73 .61 .046 .48 5.33
30-50 .12 .008 .110 8.97 1 4.21 1.36 .088 .90 5.37
50-68+ .14 .015 .180 13.07 7.77 1.99 .084 1.73 5.23

Lakeland-Blanton Group

Lakeland Alachua S1-8 0-2 1.48 .032 .010 2.97 3.6 .44 .042 .16 4.88
fine sand 2-3 .69 .019 .012 2.09 2.1 .14 .024 .12 4.96
3-8 .42 .011 .012 1.75 1.5 .14 .023 .10 5.39
8-26 .13 .006 .009 1.42 1.2 .16 .015 .10 5.45
26-42 .13 .009 .006 1.17 1.2 .15 .013 .12 5.52
42-66 .03 .009 .007 1.71 1.8 .13 .019 .10 5.18
_ _________________________________________________________i






APPENDIX B (Continued)
CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
Base
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
Inches % % % 1100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm.i 100 gm.
Lakeland-Blanton Group-Continued

Lakeland Alachua S1-23 0-3 3.09 .025 .018 2.75 2.5 .53 .044 .04 5.59
fine sand 3-9 .47 .012 .017 2.17 1.6 .12 .036 .05 5.46
9-21 .27 .007 .016 2.04 1.3 .12 .018 .04 5.66
21-42 .15 .006 .013 1.50 1.4 .10 .010 .06 5.66
42-72+ .04 .001 .009 1.34 1.2 .08 .023 .04 5.68
Lakeland Alachua S1-21 0-1 3.63 .0914 .055 9.27 9.09 4.52 .216 1.30 6.26
fine sand 1-3 1.05 .0258 .043 5.09 3.53 .82 .086 .34 5.75
3-6 .55 .0162 .042 3.78 2.36 .34 .069 .21 5.63
6-42 .17 .0063 .035 3.18 1.71 .31 .033 .22 5.70
42-54 .08 .0049 .033 3.14 1.76 .51 .054 .28 5.70
54-66+ .13 .0093 .066 3.14 3.97 1.62 .072 .73 5.85
Lakeland Alachua S1-10 0-4 1.19 .039 .017 3.08 2.2 .35 .061 .14 5.62
fine sand, 4-7 .81 .026 .019 2.42 1.5 .14 .064 .08 5.48
deep phase 7-18 .39 .020 .011 1.65 .7 .08 .054 .08 5.55
18-42 .18 .008 .011 1.40 .6 .06 .047 .06 5.60
42-72 .05 .010 .013 1.09 .6 .05 .027 .06 5.67
Lakeland Manatee S41-34 0-3 1.76 .037 .012 3.92 2.59 .72 .078 .21 5.59
fine sand, 3-6 .73 .015 .009 2.92 1.03 .12 .042 .06 5.69
deep phase 6-42 .34 .009 .007 2.12 .48 .13 .051 .06 5.86
_ _-_ _-_ _ _-_ I_ __- _










APPENDIX B (Continued)
CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
Base
Horizon Or- Total Total MoistureExchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
Inches % % % 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. I
Lakeland-Blanton Group-Continued

Blanton Alachua S1-42 0-3 ; 1.76 .035 .024 5.31 3.41 .21 .040 .06 5.33
sand 3-7 4 1.04 .019 .022 4.08 2.09 .15 .017 .06 5.42
7-13Z .50 .011 .017 3.37 1.26 .09 .009 .03 5.50
13-20 .25 .007 .014 2.92 .83 .09 .010 .04 5.53
20-36 .13 .003 .012 2.21 .55 .09 .015 .05 5.62
36-45+ .07 .003 .011 3.19 .50 .09 .010 .05 5.62
00 Blanton Alachua S1-9 0-3 3.04 .080 .022 5.76 7.9 1.47 .077 .36 5.29
Fine sand 3-6 .97 .036 .022 2.88 3.9 .30 .038 .12 5.29
6-20- .50 .021 .013 2.17 1.4 .17 .023 .10 5.59
20-33'; .24 .014 .035 1.71 2.2 .13 .023 .10 5.51
33-45 .05 .012 .025 .99 2.1 .11 .026 .09 5.42
45-60 .05 .010 .007 1.50 1.1 .11 .013 .08 5.39
Blanton Alachua S1-44 0-3 1.23 .034 .009 3.95 1.76 .29 .033 .07 5.28
fine sand 3-7 .72 .019 .008 3.09 1.08 .12 .021 .03 5.40
7-15 .43 .010 .008 2.36 .63 .11 .014 .02 5.60
15-27 .24 .006 .005 1.67 .43 .09 .008 .03 5.69
27-36 .10 .002 .005 1.63 .30 .07 .010 .04 5.72
36-45+ .07 .002 .006 1.92 .30 .06 .004 .04 5.55
Blanton Manatee S41-35 0-4 2.53 .050 .019 4.83 5.26 .22 .054 .09 4.83
fine sand 4-12 1.13 .025 .025 3.16 2.36 .10 0.50 .07 5.52
12-26 .66 .015 .013 2.22 1.03 .08 .050 .03 5.79
26-42+ .19 .006 .012 2.03 .45 .07 .049 .04 6.16








APPENDIX B (Continued)

CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
Base
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
Inches % % l / % 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm.
Lakeland-Blanton Group-Continued

Blanton Manatee S41-36 0-4 1.79 .035 .014 4.04 3.59 .29 .049 .10 5.00
fine sand 4-12 1.12 .022 .022 3.05 2.39 .20 .045 .05 5.59
12-24 .51 .012 .014 2.21 .73 .08 .046 .03 6.23
24-42+ .39 .009 .011 1.84 .50 .07 .046 .04 6.38
0 Blanton Manatee S41-46 0-5 1.51 .041 .022 3.65 2.59 .15 .067 .08 5.32
fine sand 5-9 .76 .027 .047 3.53 1.38 .08 .053 .03 5.87
9-24 .61 .019 .059 3.23 .95 .08 .054 .06 6.04
24-42+ .27 .008 .031 2.22 .45 .06 .050 .03 6.19
Blanton Manatee S41-7 0-3 2.53 .047 .009 5.04 4.72 1.12 .045 .02 4.78-
fine sand, 3-14 .16 .006 .005 2.25 0.20 .12 .012 .02 5.38
brown layer 14-17 1.00 .029 .023 2.99 2.01 .12 .027 .04 5.48
phase 17-42 I .26 .008 .011 1.68 0.30 .07 .013 .03 5.75
Orlando Alachua S1-25 0-3 4.29 .093 .046 7.24 7.58 1.57 .16 .69 5.36
fine sand 3-10 1.96 .042 .045 4.44 4.63 .77 .12 .29 5.56
10-15 .94 .018 .045 3.42 2.82 .17 .05 .20 5.50
15-26 .66 .011 .036 3.57 2.11 .10 .03 .15 5.41
26-57 .21 .005 .046 2.40 1.60 .09 .03 .13 5.28
I 57-78+ .08 .004 .034 2.46 1.51 .09 .04 .15 5.21
____________________ .____________ _________ __ _____











APPENDIX B (Continued)

CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
Base
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
Inches % % % 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm.
Lakeland-Blanton Group-Continued

Orlando Manatee S41-18 0-12 5.39 .111 .078 9.23 11.12 1.61 .047 .24 5.02
fine sand 12-15 1.38 .034 .115 5.82 3.24 .18 .018 .07 5.38
15-42+ .34 .012 .072 3.52 1.21 .18 .077 .10 5.42
SOrlando Manatee S41-44 0-12 3.15 .072 .076 2.37 6.53 1.00 .107 .28 5.69
fine sand 12-17 1.44 .032 .062 5.40 2.32 .12 .063 .04 6.09
17-42+ .39 .011 .024 2.85 .55 .08 .058 .03 6.11

Lakewood-St. Lucie Group

Lakewood Manatee S41-25 0-2 .65 .023 .004 2.08 1.00 .04 .068 .14 5.79
fine sand 2-24 .07 .003 .003 1.56 .20 .08 .027 .07 6.26
24-42+ .27 .010 .080 1 1.90 .70 .10 .076 .10 6.04
St. Lucie Manatee S41-24 0-2 .62 .018 .004 1.82 1.00 .41 .022 .13 5.81
fine sand 2-42 .07 .004 .003 .10 .07 .010 .06 6.58
Pomello Manatee S41-8 0-5 I .67 .021 .006 2.41 .80 .24 .019 .06 5.08
fine sand 5-42+ .08 .004 .004 1.83 .10 .07 .009 .03 5.42








APPENDIX B (Continued)

CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
Base
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases I
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K I Mg Reaction
County I No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ I m.e./ m.e./ pH
Inches_ % % % 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm.
Jonesville-Chiefland Group
--
Jonesville Alachua S1-17 0-3 2.27 .057 .055 6.16 6.7 2.71 .051 .57 5.93
fine sand 3-6 1.05 .023 .059 4.04 3.5 1.07 .003 .28 6.15
6-12 .71 .015 .056 3.56 2.7 .57 none .24 6.19
12-36 .23 .006 .044 7.16 1.7 .25 none .13 6.15
o 36-48 .08 .004 .025 1.79 1.0 .13 none .10 6.02
48-60 .03 .003 .020 1.69 .9 .14 none .09 6.09
.60+ 0.8 .011 .253 9.22 4.7 1.79 .018 .71 5.76
Jonesville Alachua S1-32 0-2 1.39 .030 .015 3.95 2.46 .69 .049 .27 5.72
fine sand 2%-5 .93 .018 .015 3.02 1.89 .19 .017 .10 5.42
5-17 .50 .011 .013 2.67 .88 .13 .008 .08 5.64
17-36' .26 .005 .011 2.33 .55 .12 .012 .05 5.75
36-58 .08 .000 .007 1.75 .30 .11 .001 .07 5.74
58-72 .03 .000 .007 1.63 .18 .08 .009 .02 5.70

Jonesville Alachua S1-33 0-3 1.61 .030 .030 4.65 3.27 .73 .063 .25 5.79
fine sand 3-7 1.09 .017 .034 4.13 2.17 .30 .020 .13 5.69
7-18 .59 .011 .028 3.26 1.49 .23 .020 .11 5.72
18-30 .28 .006 .022 3.26 .90 .17 .019 .11 5.74
30-40 .18 .004 .020 2.54 .70 .17 .005 .11 5.84
40-60 .19 .009 .069 14.46 3.57 .26 .026 .44 5.15









APPENDIX B (Continued)
CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
I: I e Base I
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchangel Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
Inches % I % % 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm.i
Jonesville-Chiefland Group-Continued

Chiefland Alachua S1-4 0-2 2.08 .047 .015 5.36 5.0 2.34 .074 1.88 5.66
fine sand 2-6 .57 .012 .019 2.89 1.7 .63 .010 1.79 5.76
6-16 .24 .007 .016 2.15 .9 .43 .008 1.80 5.84
16-30 .14 .004 .053 1.79 .8 .32 .008 1.78 6.01
30-48 .09 .002 .004 1.78 .7 .34 .003 1.77 6.35
48-54 .24 .012 .063 11.56 5.5 5.42 .028 .20 7.43
00 54-60 16.58 8.52
Chiefland Alachua S1-5 0-3 : 1.53 .034 .021 4.53 3.6 1.82 .040 .45 5.91
fine sand, 3-6 .66 .015 .026 2.98 1.7 .59 .013 .14 5.81
deep phase 6-16 .47 .010 .028 2.51 1.2 .45 .008 .13 5.89
16-26 .19 .006 .026 1.89 ,8 .26 .008 .08 5.91
26-48 .04 .003 .019 1.78 .5 .21 .006 .09 5.74
48-70 .02 .001 .016 1.92 .3 .18 .006 .07 6.40
70-80 .07 .007 .049 14.23 5.2 3.62 .033 .44 5.61

Hernando-Archer Group

Hernando Alachua S1-3 0-5 r 1.18 .033 .037 4.61 3.8 1.16 .018 1.83 5.62
fine sand 5-12 .78 .020 .047 4.32 2.7 .66 .008 1.84 5.50
12-28 .32 .012 .043 5.03 1.8 .52 .043 1.82 5.74
28-34 .55 .023 .230 16.79 5.7 1.73 .023 2.00 5.10
34-42 .37 .019 .028 22.77 7.0 1.69 .026 2.00 5.05
42-60 .15 .018 .075 18.88 6.4 .61 .023 1.89 4.93
_______________________ ___________________________________ ________ _______ ____________ ^_______








APPENDIX B (Continued)

CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
H Or- ase -- Base
IHorizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
SInches % % 100 gmi. 1100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. i
Hernando-Archer Group-Continued

Hernando Alachua S1-34 0-2% 1.46 .035 .054 5.13 3.81 1.91 .042 .49 5.94
fine sand 21/2-6 .83 .022 .056 4.08 2.15 1.16 .019 .29 5.89
6-13 .45 .014 .057 3.82 2.28 1.01 .017 .27 5.85
13-18 .31 .011 .083 4.78 2.63 1.27 .017 .31 5.82
oo 18-21 .43 .020 .263 11.71 6.48 3.27 .036 .71 5.64
21-42 .25 .019 .483 19.56 11.27 4.24 .058 .51 5.38
Hernando Alachua S1-46 0-3 2.33 .049 .137 7.02 5.58 2.17 .068 .45 5.67
fine sand 3-6 1.22 .026 .152 5.57 4.12 1.58 .025 .42 5.89
6-12 .71 .062 .166 5.49 3.48 1.29 .017 .45 5.84
12-18 .64 .014 .240 7.71 4.13 1.76 .026 .65 5.80
18-27 .58 .021 .752 21.13 12.68 4.78 .092 1.44 5.03
27-33 .27 .012 .854 23.89 15.12 4.93 .125 1.03 5.32
33-45 .18 .009 .853 25.22 15.81 6.84 .148 .75 5.37

Archer Alachua S1-11 0-3 1.88 .046 .015 4.62 3.6 .90 .086 .30 5.85
fine sand 3-7 .82 .023 .012 3.54 1.9 .35 .058 .17 5.85
7-17 .49 .012 .012 3.43 1.4 .20 .023 .17 5.70
17-22 .37 .009 .015 3.82 1.5 .18 .023 .23 5.47
22-45 .30 .013 .091 14.99 5.1 .22 .033 .45 4.98
45-60 .12 .007 .014 17.76 7.7 .09 .043 .50 4.98









APPENDIX B (Continued)

CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
Base
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
__Inches % % % __ 100 gm. 100 gm. 100gm. 100 gm.i
Rex Group

Rex Alachua S1-29 0-2 1.94 .050 .012 6.11 3.70 1.02 .110 .33 5.33
fine sand 2-6 1.20 .035 .010 5.22 2.73 .35 .050 .11 5.35
6-12 .71 .020 .009 4.43 1.83 .18 .060 .10 5.30
12-18 .39 .013 .012 5.04 1.42 .15 .040 .16 5.00
18-24 .38 .018 .006 12.76 2.42 .25 .040 .31 4.82
24-32 .43 .019 .010 20.31 3.90 .26 .050 .47 4.85
00 32-42+ .11 .009 .010 22.37 4.78 .16 .080 .56 4.77
Rex Alachua S1-30 0-3 2.28 .055 .018 6.02 3.95 .41 .060 .20 5.15
fine sand 3-8 1.40 .033 .016 5.26 2.44 .09 .060 .07 5.28
8-13 .73 .019 .010 4.47 1.20 .16 .060 .08 5.21
13-20 .15 .005 .011 2.63 .35 .07 .040 .06 5.21
20-28 .14 .012 .005 12.97 3.14 .09 .050 .65 4.88
28-36 .19 .015 .009 18.71 5.19 .09 .070 1.36 4.88
36-44+ .57 .012 .005 23.03 6.30 .14 .050 1.72 4.92

Scranton-Ona Group

Scranton Alachua S1-6 0-6 3.68 .074 .074 8.98 11.5 .21 .077 .14 4.81
sand 6-14 1.40 .029 .078 5.89 5.1 .13 .038 .10 5.06
14-28 .42 .014 .081 4.41 3.4 .13 .035 .12 5.25
28-42 .05 .006 .079 4.08 2.6 .13 .018 .10 5.10
42-54 .07 .006 .081 3.39 | 2.3 .14 .018 .08 4.98
______ ____ ____ __ ______I ____ _____







APPENDIX B (Continued)

CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
Base -
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ Im.e./ pH
Inches % % % 100 gm.( 100 gm. 100 gm.1 100 gm. _
Scranton-Ona Group-Continued

Scranton Alachua S1-28 0-5' 3.16 .061 .020 6.56 5.81 .58 .050 .28 5.00
sand 5-10 1.88 .039 .017 5.26 3.38 .08 .040 .07 5.25
10-15 1.18 .021 .013 4.08 1.92 .07 .030 .04 5.40
15-24 .31 .009 .017 2.67 .79 .06 .040 .05 5.40
24-42+ .10 .004 .013 2.71 .48 .07 .030 .04 5.26

"Scranton Alachua S1-35 0-5 2.59 .067 .045 11.86 5.47 .69 .053 .29 5.38
sand 5-12 1.15 .027 .036 5.22 2.51 .19 .021 .14 5.60
12-17 .68 .017 .031 4.25 1.66 .08 .018 .08 5.47
17-24 .33 .012 .027 3.56 1.08 .07 .015 .08 5.13
24-34 .17 .008 .030 3.31 1.08 .06 .018 .12 5.15
34-60 .18 .011 .066 4.91 2.28 .07 .026 .15 5.05
60-72 + .18 .008 .205 5.75 3.52 .11 .024 .07 4.98

Scranton Manatee S41-13 0-14 4.22 .107 .082 7.24 7.72 1.34 .095 .49 5.93
fine sand 14-20 1.83 .034 .086 5.15 3.74 .49 .035 .14 5.68
20-30 .48 .011 .115 4.18 1.71 .16 .036 .06 5.51
30+ .14 .009 .102 4.60 1.11 .15 .039 .13 4.95

Scranton Manatee S41-42 0-16 2.51 .050 .016 5.75 3.93 .19 .068 .05 5.55
fine sand 16-22 1.02 .023 .031 4.43 1.96 .07 .069 .06 5.25
22-30 .52 .013 .032 3.34 1.00 .08 .067 .03 5.69
30-42+ .16 .007 .023 2.78 .78 .07 .040 .05 5.65










APPENDIX B (Continued)
CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
Base
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
SInches % i% % _100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm.
Scranton-Ona Group-Continued

Scranton Manatee S41-43 0-12 4.49 .093 .014 8.27 6.27 .59 .104 .20 5.38
fine sand 12-16 .99 .023 .017 4.16 1.41 .09 .041 .01 5.74
16-42-+ .18 .008 .013 2.68 .42 .07 .032 .03 5.86
Scranton Alachua S1-16 0-3 4.71 .038 .011 8.92 7.4 .92 .070 .16 5.12
fine sand, 3-9 1.01 .043 .008 5.80 4.1 .13 .028 .10 5.27
Sshallow phase 9-15 .82 .016 .010 4.04 1.7 .07 .038 .08 5.63
15-21 .31 .009 .007 3.14 1.4 .07 .013 .09 5.68
21-28 .10 .005 .005 2.21 1.1 .07 .013 .09 5.68
28-33 .02 .004 .002 1.83 .9 .08 None .06 5.34
33-42 .14 .004 .010 14.57 3.8 .05 .023 .38 5.05
42-54 .08 .010 .009 17.32 3.6 .07 .046 .56 5.05
54-60 .03 .008 .010 18.65 3.4 .06 .031 .82 5.08
Ona Manatee S41-6 0-6 4.47 .108 .019 6.78 7.97 .59 .068 .47 4.72
fine sand 6-10 4.03 .089 .017 8.81 7.07 .12 .027 .08 5.22
10-18 .72 .021 .017 3.32 1.11 .06 .015 .03 5.45
18-42-, .20 .009 .033 2.15 0.60 .06 .006 .04 5.18

Ona Manatee S41-30 0-8 .074 .006 6.52 6.14 .70 .090 .27 4.98
fine sand 8-12 3.33 .074 .008 7.89 5.26 .22 .604 .12 5.55
12-24 1.88 .046 .009 5.21 2.11 .26 .056 .05 5.76
24-42+ .14 .007 .004 2.27 .30 .11 .041 .05 6.03
--- I_ __ __ +1 _-_ -_ _ _-_ _








APPENDIX B (Continued)

CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
__o 1 MB a se E c a g a l B se
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location I Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
___Inches % % % ___ 100 gm0 g00 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. 1
Scranton-Ona Group-Continued

Ona Manatee S41-38 0-6 2.60 .052 .009 5.15 4.46 .61 .074 .25 5.08
fine sand 6-12 3.62 .088 .022 8.28 5.89 .17 .096 .03 5.50
12-24+ .42 .014 .023 3.00 .55 .10 .067 .04 5.87
Ona Manatee S41-41 0-8 3.65 .076 .010 6.02 6.13 .59 .122 .23 4.78
1 fine sand 8-12 2.61 .054 .010 5.89 3.93 .17 .087 .08 5.69
12-14 1.09 .028 .020 4.38 1.44 .08 .067 .05 5.99
14-36 .20 .008 .015 2.55 .43 .09 .041 .04 5.89
36-42+ .09 .004 .010 2.85 .40 .10 .047 .05 5.32

Leon-St. Johns Group
__-------____ _
Leon Alachua S1-7 0-3 3.08 .059 .007 5.20 6.8 .83 .087 .28 4.27
sand 3-5 .64 .016 .005 1.75 1.6 .26 .038 .12 4.54
5-14 .34 .001 .005 1.40 .9 .18 .024 .10 4.69
14-16 4.54 .075 .048 8.12 14.6 .16 .071 .15 4.39
16-22 1.63 .028 .018 7.59 8.5 .12 .086 .08 4.61
22-30 .59 .011 .007 7.02 2.5 .11 .031 .08 5.00
30-42 .20 .007 .017 3.74 2.4 .13 .024 .08 4.83
42-48 .15 .001 .029 4.19 4.3 .13 .038 .11 4.69










APPENDIX B (Continued)

CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
r T Base I
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ .e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
__Inches % % % C100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm.
Leon-St. Johns Group-Continued

Leon Alachua S1-43 0-4 2.26 .043 .009 4.91 4.05 2.16 .044 .23 5.53
sand 4-12 .36 .008 .011 2.59 .53 .06 .014 .01 5.20
12-16 3.37 .051 .043 8.55 9.29 .04 .030 .00 4.76
16-20 1.45 .027 .019 6.07 3.26 .04 .013 .00 5.07
20-28 .47 .011 .016 4.25 1.05 .05 .009 .02 5.11
28-36 .32 .011 .013 6.34 2.37 .05 .014 .02 4.96
36-45+ .30 .014 .100 7.20 3.03 .05 .016 .07 4.96

Leon Alachua S1-18 0-2 3.55 .081 .017 8.32 6.3 1.22 .091 .49 4.64
fine sand 2-6 1.20 .026 .010 3.82 2.4 .27 .041 .19 4.72
6-12 .43 .011 .009 2.59 1.4 .13 .021 .09 5.08
12-14 5.01 .093 .011 8.74 10.7 .07 .013 .38 4.64
14-19 2.90 .046 .009 9.46 8.0 .07 .051 .10 4.86
19-27 1.19 .019 .006 6.00 4.1 .06 .026 .06 5.05
27-33 .24 .006 .005 2.79 1.2 .07 .013 .08 5.15
33-45 .27 .015 .006 7.57 1.8 .07 .018 .25 5.06

Leon Manatee S41-10 0-2 2.40 .047 .010 4.66 5.83 1.77 .035 .39 5.75
fine sand 2-30 .10 .004 .004 1.63 .20 .10 .013 .03 5.32
30-33 3.43 .043 .119 6.67 12.86 .10 .012 .03 4.78
33-40 1.52 .029 .026 4.06 3.73 .08 .018 .03 5.12
40-50+ .34 .008 .022 1.68 .80 .08 .015 .08 5.32






APPENDIX B (Continued)
CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
I Base
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
Inches % % % 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 100 gm.
Leon-St. Johns Group-Continued

Leon Manatee S41-37 0-4 2.14 .082 .007 6.61 6.35 1.16 .113 .33 4.71
fine sand 4-16' .60 .029 .004 2.51 .70 .15 .062 .14 5.49
16-24 .17 .004 .005 2.01 .23 .11 .041 .06 6.36
24-30 3.51 .062 .006 6.54 7.55 .14 .083 .13 4.91
30-42+ 1.03 .015 .011 3.47 2.06 .07 .047 .04 5.28
Leon Manatee S41-9 0-8 4.32 .088 .009 5.33 6.44 1.39 .044 .96 4.53
fine sand, 8-22 .15 .004 .004 1.53 .40 .18 .008 .08 5.78
S heavy sub- 22-262 1.24 .024 .015 3.69 3.51 1.04 .014 .37 5.68
stratum phase 26-28 .16 .005 .011 1.23 .61 .52 .010 .13 6.11
28+ .29 .017 .115 17.51 14.59 9.54 .041 5.06 6.61
Leon Manatee S41-11 0-8 3.68 .069 .011 5.33 6.43 1.14 .049 .53 4.32
fine sand, 8-24 .32 .008 .007 1.68 .50 .12 .014 .05 5.00
heavy sub- 24-34 2.53 .041 .041 7.70 10.00 .48 .013 .27 4.82
stratum phase 34+ .69 .018 .092 12.61 13.20 3.50 .038 1.49 5.12
Immokalee Manatee S41-40 0-4 3.20 .065 .008 5.54 4.69 .53 .114 .34 4.81
fine sand 4-14 .45 .014 .004 1.98 .68 .13 .050 .13 5.49
14-36' .04 .002 .005 1.70 .10 .09 .028 .05 6.80
36-42+ 3.92 .048 .006 7.92 8.65 .34 .069 .28 4.68
St. Johns Manatee S41-39 0-6 3.46 .133 .025 5.83 5.48 2.63 .098 .09 4.90
fine sand 6-16 .49 .018 .005 2.14 1.45 .17 .057 .04 5.12
16-22 .14 .004 .005 1.43 .28 .10 .044 .05 5.94
22-26 .37 .016 .008 3.33 1.53 .15 .044 .04 5.25
26-32 .14 .007 .009 1.66 .50 .08 .035 .04 5.91
32-42+ .13 .004 .009 1.63 .33 .09 .036 .05 6.04










APPENDIX B (Continued)

CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
SBase
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
Inches % % % 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gi. 100 gm.
Plummer-Rutlege Group

Plummer Manatee S41-31 0-8 1.53 .043 .003 3.07 2.70 .37 .065 .10 5.08
fine sand 8-18' .34 .011 .003 1.94 .71 .13 .047 .05 5.59
18-42+ .01 .002 .003 2.11 .10 .10 .036 .04 7.05

Rutlege Manatee S41-15 0-8 5.34 .153 .016 7.41 8.16 1.24 .059 .48 4.75
Fine sand 8-12 .71 .015 .011 2.04 1.00 .19 .014 .05 5.45
o 12-42k .26 .009 .008 1.27 .70 .11 .014 .04 5.68

Bladen-Bayboro Group

Bladen Alachua S1-27 0-2 1 4.15 .118 .019 8.40 8.30 3.72 .160 .96 5.28
fine sand 2-5 .95 .032 .013 3.69 2.53 .73 .040 .26 5.36
5-9 .47 .016 .010 2.75 1.51 .59 .030 .18 5.58
9-13 .21 .009 .010 2.42 1.38 .77 .040 .32 5.73
13-18 .60 .041 .019 24.38 21.40 9.84 .160 3.47 4.97
18-33 .60 .038 .023 34.88 32.24 13.17 .100 3.89 4.53
Bladen Alachua S1-31 0-1 4.07 .138 .036 8.37 5.68 3.37 .220 1.17 5.38
fine sand 1-8 .56 .204 .004 3.09 .80 .22 .060 .11 4.92
8-22 .33 .011 .011 2.12 1.06 .23 .040 .08 5.40
22-27 .17 .015 .036 5.62 3.06 .72 .050 .21 5.21
27-36+ .37 .049 .091 20.08 14.22 4.01 .130 .66 5.00
___________ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ _______ ______- .30 66 .0








APPENDIX B (Continued)
CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
F | Base
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca IK Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.em.e m.e./ pH
__Inches % % % 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm.
Bladen-Bayboro Group-Continued

Bayboro Alachua S1-24 0-2- 11.24 .627 .114 26.39 20.87 8.18 .460 1.71 5.28
loamy sand 2-5 6.74 .363 .082 16.55 12.64 4.11 .130 .84 5.33
5-10 2.41 .149 .052 10.37 6.33 1.77 .100 .41 5.51
10-17 .17 .015 .019 2.25 1.00 .45 .030 .13 5.96
17-30-' .10 .037 .533 18.13 17.54 10.13 .130 3.45 5.51
30-42+ .13 .017 .584 17.09 17.62 10.50 .130 3.57 5.38

Broward-Bradenton-Parkwood Group

Broward Manatee S41-23 0-3 5.92 .139 .010 10.19 12.56 13.27 .132 .74 6.67
fine sand 3-14' .49 .014 .004 2.00 .40 .80 .019 .08 6.36
14-26 .63 .019 .005 1.88 2.20 .90 .068 .10 6.01
26-28 .94 .027 .010 7.99 7.61 6.64 .090 .43 6.16
28-30 .75 .027 .008 13.82 4.25 33.77 .083 .39 8.47
Bradenton Manatee S41-16 0-4 1.81 .077 .019 4.49 4.52 3.86 .076 .49 5.95
fine sand 4-8 .23 .013 .016 1.94 1.10 .91 .024 .17 5.95
8-24 .21 .008 .013 1.94 1.20 .96 .023 .18 6.08
24-30 .39 .027 .103 11.48 14.84 10.06 .088 1.08 5.48
30+ .30 .009 .092 13.57 3.92 52.16 .032 1.25 8.24









APPENDIX B (Continued)

CHEMICAL ANALYSES.

Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
Inches % % % r 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm.__
Broward-Bradenton-Parkwood Group-Continued

Bradenton Manatee S41-17 0-4 4.95 .160 .054 9.41 12.54 18.91 .055 .96 7.39
fine sand 4-12 .59 .020 .029 2.62 2.10 2.50 .013 .22 6.63
12-20 .59 .025 .237 5.04 5.85 1.81 .028 .183 6.37
20-30 .69 .034 .373 14.03 16.34 9.38 .032 5.24 5.91
30+ .28 .010 .663 10.19 8.64 23.68 .028 5.57 8.38

SBradenton Manatee S41-4 0-8 2.23 .093 .013 5.24 6.04 4.23 .037 1.07 5.58
fine sand, 8-20 .11 .009 .009 1.83 0.71 0.61 .012 .17 5.71
deep phase 20-30 .61 .033 .053 15.07 15.07 10.15 .037 4.45 5.95
30-44 .23 .013 .215 16.40 15.68 12.80 .067 6.89 7.54

Bradenton Manatee S41-26 0-4 2.20 .093 .011 4.84 4.32 1.97 .165 .51 5.00
fine sand, 4-7 .79 .038 .010 2.45 2.00 1.00 .099 .30 5.22
deep phase 7-18 .34 .018 .008 2.64 2.57 .96 .080 .40 5.12
18-22- .16 .010 .008 5.72 5.44 3.52 .116 1.15 5.35
22-32 .21 .017 .014 16.29 14.00 12.19 .012 1.72 5.59
32-42+ .16 .016 .016 14.94 12.70 33.87 .101 2.03 7.00

Bradenton Manatee S41-22 0-2 4.24 .140 .022 9.53 9.01 2.81 1.97 .74 4.85
fine sand, 2-6 .66 .023 .011 2.46 .90 .25 .063 .12 5.37
thick surface 6-20 .44 .016 1.42 .60 .12 .059 .06 6.11
phase 20-31 .21 .014 .023 1.21 .80 .69 .060 .10 6.83
31-35 .10 .007 .020 5.43 3.42 23.44 .076 2.38 8.79
35-42+ .10 .009 13.07 10.71 32.95 .120 5.57 8.69








APPENDIX B (Continued)

CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
SBase
SHorizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchangel Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type ILocation Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
Inches % % % 100 gm. J100 g. 100 gm. 100 gm.
Broward-Bradenton-Parkwood Group-Continued

Bradenton Manatee S41-29 0-2 5.03 5.52 .029 10.22 10.52 1.94 .235 1.25 4.44
fine sand, 2-24 1.09 .042 .014 3.95 3.37 1.09 .062 .78 5.23
thick surface 24-32 .50 .025 .022 7.25 6.61 5.71 .064 2.44 7.95
phase 32-42+ .31 .018 .026 11.36 6.95 30.68 .071 5.12 8.25
' Bradenton Manatee S41-27 0-3 2.98 .119 .010 6.05 5.63 .94 .132 .51 4.41
fine sand, sur- 3-7 .60 .026 .006 2.22 1.11 .22 .075 .11 4.91
face deep 7-12 .30 .014 .005 1.91 .95 .17 .090 .16 5.28
phase (thick) 12-34: .07 .005 .003 2.04 1.15 .70 .059 .33 6.03
34-42+ .14 .009 .024 13.02 10.00 6.94 .092 2.67 8.06
Keri Manatee S41-48 0-3 3.36 5.44 3.92 1.34 .1026 4.96
fine sand 3-16 .57 1 2.21 .73 .20 .0667 5.84
16-22 .64 1.76 .75 1.37 .0564 7.09
22-30 1.23 26.35 1.20 .1205 8.43
30-42 .16 6.35 1.00 .0449 8.65
Parkwood Manatee S41-51 0-4 4.17 11.03 14.55 .146 7.09
fine sand 4-12 1.04 7.89 7.40 .067 8.28
12-24 .68 12.50 4.30 .085 8.72
24- .40 I 12.18 4.20 .077 8.79









APPENDIX B (Continued)
CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
Base
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
___ _Inches I % % % 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm.
Broward-Bradenton-Parkwood Group-Continued

Parkwood Manatee S41-52 0-2 7.86 12.46 17.80 .228 5.47
fine sand 2-10 2.07 3.80 5.35 2.87 .087 5.37
10-22 .39 1.90 1.80 1.52 .067 6.47
22-24 .69 5.67 ] 5.35 .077 8.14
24-42 .33 16.17 9.90 13.48 .090 8.55
o Parkwood Manatee S41-56 0-5 2.02 4.32 3.25 2.52 .115 5.88
Sfine sand 5-24 .37 1.56 1.10 1.52 .092 7.33
24- .73 21.18 .40 .095 7.20
Ruskin Manatee S41-21 0-4 3.97 .099 .018 6.27 5.62 1.91 .081 .60 5.15
fine sand 4-8 .69 .021 .007 2.72 1.30 .63 .024 .18 5.55
8-12 .61 .021 .016 1.89 1.20 .84 .018 .20 6.00
12-15 .37 .014 .015 2.25 1.50 1.36 .013 .40 6.31
15-27 .41 .017 .013 7.93 7.91 7.97 .024 1.65 7.53
27+ .27 .006 .012 11.60 6.61 33.26 .030 3.61 6.56

Arzell-Felda-Manatee Group

Arzell Manatee S41-32 0-3 .27 .015 .005 2.37 .20 11.21 .069 .25 8.89
fine sand 3-24 .02 .002 .003 1.81 .15 .30 .040 .05 8.96
24-34 .05 .002 .003 1.38 .20 .27 .035 .05 8.85
34-42+ .17 .007 .006 5.42 3.87 3.53 .072 .56 7.95
I jil








APPENDIX B (Continued)

CHEMICAL ANALYSES.

Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type I Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K IMg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
__ Inches % % % 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm. I

Arzell-Felda-Manatee Group-Continued

Pompano Manatee S41-12 0-6 2.33 .093 .013 5.60 3.72 2.57 .051 .40 5.51
fine sand 6-18 .56 .039 .012 2.67 1.20 1.76 .021 .11 5.38
18-22 .21 .016 .016 5.10 4.84 4.45 .022 .91 5.05
22-38 .10 .008 .015 6.89 5.96 5.46 .024 1.00 7.44
S38+ .32 .008 .022 9.89 5.06 56.22 .054 1.19 8.11
Pompano Manatee S41-53 0-2 3.12 6.68 3.55 1.76 .106 5.71
fine sand 2-10 .47 2.19 1.05 .94 .054 6.37
10-30 .03 1.32 .20 .28 .054 6.99
30-42 .02 1.39 .20 .20 .039 7.04

Pompano Manatee S41-57 0-4 1.30 4.05 2.30 1.51 .103 5.80
fine sand 4-16 .56 2.52 1.28 1.00 .085 5.95
16-36 .08 1.60 .28 .26 .067 6.73
36-38 .21 2.28 1.75 1.79 .080 6.86
38-42 .18 8.91 6.40 5.70 .077 6.81
Delray Manatee S41-28 0-6 10.60 .652 .064 18.85 23.13 4.91 .209 .57 4.15
fine sand 6-36' 3.13 .172 .040 8.39 10.72 4.35 .123 .85 5.08
36-42+ 1.50 .108 .038 8.37 9.81 6.17 .087 1.74 5.77
_____ ___[___ __________ ________________________ _______-_____ ___________











APPENDIX B (Continued)

CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
I j I j Base
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type Location Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
County No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ .e./ m.e./ pH
I Inches % % % ___ 100 gm. 100 gm. gm. 100 gm. 100 gm.
Arzell-Felda-Manatee Group-Continued

Delray Manatee S41-33 0-14 5.49 .179 .056 9.27 9.95 6.41 .095 .61 5.62
fine sand 14-24 1.47 .040 .008 3.57 3.82 1.90 .053 .60 5.45
24-32 .28 .012 .007 5.34 4.78 3.51 .056 1.48 6.51
32-42+ .48 .015 .018 10.82 9.62 6.79 .064 3.23 6.92

o Delray Manatee S41-49 0-16 6.38 11.88 13.45 .236 7.16
00 fine sand 16-28 1.11 3.48 4.00 4.39 .113 6.27
28-42 .56 5.06 4.65 5.09 .090 5.33

Delray Manatee S41-47 0-10 I 5.07 14.26 12.49 5.89 .124 5.23
loamy fine 10-30 .72 14.36 9.20 6.44 .071 6.32
sand 30-42 .42 8.84 7.10 4.62 .089 5.77
Manatee Manatee S41-2 0-10 3.64 .128 .032 7.53 9.51 4.45 .115 1.42 5.22
fine sand 10-18 .92 .045 .083 6.95 7.89 4.66 .033 2.17 5.48
18-24 1.07 .057 .126 14.14 17.62 12.48 .028 3.33 5.91
24-30 .38 .01 .172 11.11 12.03 12.64 .038 3.26 7.51
30+ .17 .011 .196 13.82 11.92 54.64 .022 7.53 8.48

Manatee Manatee S41-55 0-10 2.99 6.81 9.05 .121 6.49
fine sand 10-18 .71 6.03 7.15 .062 6.94
18-34 .40 9.87 10.70 .069 8.31
34-42 .43 17.41 5.40 .069 8.41










APPENDIX B (Concluded)
CHEMICAL ANALYSES.
SBase
Horizon Or- Total Total Moisture Exchange Exchangeable Bases
Soil Type County Lab. Depth ganic Nitro- Phos- Equiva- Capacity Ca K Mg Reaction
Location No. in Matter gen phorus lent m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ m.e./ pH
Inches % % % 100 gm. 100 gm. 100 gm.i 100 gm.
Arzell-Felda-Manatee Group-Continued

Manatee Manatee S41-1 0-10 29.44 .968 .090 38.70 50.41 32.04 .191 5.64 5.05
mucky fine 10-16 13.83 .479 .017 12.92 17.76 13.28 .065 2.18 5.38
sand 16-22 .24 .008 .007 2.15 .40 .80 .012 .16 5.91
22-24 .78 .023 .009 8.64 8.03 7.52 .040 1.81 3.47
24-38 .35 .016 .019 11.79 10.85 9.03 .037 2.71 4.22
38+ .15 .010 .014 6.10 4.13 23.08 .021 1.73 7.94
Manatee Manatee S41-50 0-12 4.37 12.65 16.10 8.44 .136 5.64
loamy fine 12-22 1.08 17.22 16.75 .083 7.64
sand 22-26 .62 18.88 13.10 .077 8.41
26-42 .41 20.47 12.90 .074 8.65
Manatee Manatee S41-54 0-10 19.80 51.86 1.80 .439 6.64
fine sandy 10-16 5.04 16.17 23.45 .115 7.36
loam 16-24 1.81 16.98 17.10 .118 8.04
24- .97 24.75 3.90 .087 8.41











APPENDIX C

TOTAL ROUGH ESTIMATE SPECTROGRAPHIC ANALYSIS (VALUES EXPRESSED AS PERCENT) OF ASHED SOIL.

-- I ILab. I Depth I 1 I
Soil Type County No. (Inches) Sr Ba I Fe V I Cr Mn Ni Zr Cu Ti Co I Pb B Zn
Norfolk-Red Bay Group

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Norfolk Holmes S30-3 0-4 .01 .5 .002 .02 <.001 >.1 .0005 > .1 .001 .003 .003
fine sand 4-8 .005 .5 .002 .02 .005 >.1 .0005 > .1 .001 .003 .001
8-15 .01 1 .005 .01 .001 .08 .0005 > .1 .003 .003
15-24 .005 >1 .01 .01 .01 .005 .1 .0005 > .1 .003 .005
24-42 .002 >1 .01 .01 .01 .008 .1 .001 > .1 .003 .005
42-54 .005 >1 .01 .01 .01 .001 .1 .001 > .1 .005 .01
54-60 .01 >1 .01 .01 .005 <.001 .1 .001 > .1 .005 .01

6 Norfolk Washing- S67-2 0-3 .005 1 .002 .05 <.001 >.1 .0005 > .1 .001 .001
0 loamy fine ton 3-7 .002 1 .002 .05 .005 >.1 .0005 > .1 .001 .003
sand 7-13 .002 1 .002 .02 <.001 >.1 .0005 > .1 .001 .005 .005
13-17 .002 >1 .005 .01 .001 >.1 .001 > .1 .001 .003 .005
17-36 .002 >1 .01 .01 .01 .005 >.1 .001 > .1 .005 .008
36-48 .002 >1 .01 .01 .005 .008 >.1 .001 > .1 .001 .003 .008
48-60 .005 >1 .01 .01 .01 .005 >.1 .001 > .1 .001 <.001 .003 .008

Norfolk Jackson S32-7 0-6 .002 >1 .005 .01 .005 >.1 .001 > .1 .01 .003
fine sandy 6-10 .005 >1 .01 .01 .005 .005 >.1 .001 > .1 .003 .005
loam 10-15 .005 >1 .01 .01 .01 .003 >.1 .001 > .1 .003 .005
15-27 .002 >1 .02 .01 .005 <.001 >.1 .0005 > .1 .003 .005
27-36 .005 >1 .01 .01 .005 <.001 >.1 .0005 > .1 .003 .008
36-48 .005 >1 .01 .01 .005 .003 >.1 .0005 > .1 .001 .003 .01
48-60 .005 >1 .02 .01 .005 .005 >.1 .001 > .1 .003 .01

Elements sought but not detected Be and Mo.
A line indicates element sought but not detected.
Blank space indicates element not determined.





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