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Group Title: Routledge's shilling toy books
Title: The Pet lamb
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027070/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Pet lamb
Series Title: Routledge's shilling toy books
Physical Description: 6 leaves : ill. ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: George Routledge & Sons
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [1873]
Copyright Date: 1873
 Subjects
Subject: Sheep -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1873   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1873
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Includes publisher's advertisement.
General Note: Date from inscription.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027070
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AJU0131
oclc - 28946056
alephbibnum - 001865630

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 2a
        Page 3
        Page 3a
        Page 3b
        Page 4
        Page 4a
        Page 5
        Page 5a
        Page 5b
        Page 6
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text
.ONE SHILLINg: OZ. COUNTED ON CLOTH. TWO SHILLINGS.


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|- ORGE ROTRmEDGE&SONS
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THE PET LAMB.






The dew was falling fast, the stars began to blink;
I heard a voice: it said, Drink, pretty creature,
drink !"
And, looking o'er the hedge, before me I espied
A snow-white mountain-lamb, with a Maiden at its
side.

No other sheep were near, the lamb was all alone,
And by a slender cord was tethered to a stone;
With one knee on the grass did the little Maiden
kneel,
While to that mountain-lamb, she gave its evening
meal.
The Baldwin Library
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2 The Pet Lamb.

The lamb, while from her hand he thus his supper
took,
Seemed to feast with head and ears; and his tail
with pleasure shook.
" Drink, pretty creature, drink," she said in such a
tone,
That I almost received her heart into my own.

'Twas little Barbara Lewthwaite, a child of beauty
rare!
I watched them with delight; they were a lovely pair.
Now with her empty can the Maiden turned away;
But ere ten yards were gone her footsteps did she
stay.

"Towards the lamb she looked ; and from that shady
place
I unobserved could see the workings of her face;
If Nature to her tongue could measured numbers
bring,
Thus, thought I, to her lamb that little Maid might
sing:



































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3 The Pet Lamb.

" What ails thee, young One? What? Why pull so
at thy cord ?
Is it not well with thee? Well both for bed and board?
Thy plot of grass is soft, and green as grass can be;
Rest, little young One, rest; what is't that aileth thee?

"What is it thou wouldst seek? What is wanting to
thy heart?
Thy limbs are they not strong? And beautiful thou
art:
This grass is tender grass; those flowers they have
no peers ;
And that green corn all day is rustling in thy ears!


"If the sun be shining hot, do but stretch thy
woollen chain,
This beech is standing by, its covert thou canst gain;
For rain and mountain storms, the like thou need'st
not fear,-
The rain and storm are things which scarcely can
come here.































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The Pet Lamb. 4

" Rest, little young One, rest; thou hast forgot the day
When my father found thee first in places far away:
Many flocks were on the hills, but thou wert owned
by none,
And thy mother from thy side for evermore was gone.


"He took thee in his arms, and in pity brought
thee home:
"A blessed day for thee! then whither wouldst thou
roam ?
"A faithful nurse thou hast; the dam that did thee
yean
Upon the mountain tops no kinder could have been.


"Thou know'st that twice a day I have brought
thee in this can
Fresh water from the brook, as clear as ever ran;
And twice in the day, when the ground is wet with
dew,
I bring thee draughts of milk, warm milk it is and
new.












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The Pet Lamb. 5

"Thy limbs will shortly be twice as stout as they
are now,
Then I'll yoke thee to my cart like a pony in the
plough;
My playmate thou shalt be; and when the wind is
cold
Our hearth shall be thy bed, our house shall be
thy fold.


"It will not, will not rest !-poor creature, can it be
That 'tis thy mother's heart which is working so in
thee ?
Things that I know not of belike to thee are dear,
And dreams of things which thou canst neither see
nor hear.

" Alas, the mountain-tops that look so green and fair!
I've heard of fearful winds and darkness that come
there;
The little brooks that seem all pastime and all play,
When they are angry, roar like lions for their prey



















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The Pet Lamb. 6

"'Here thou need'st not dread the raven in the sky;
Night and day thou art safe,-our cottage is hard by.
Why bleat so after me? Why pull so at thy chain?
Sleep-and at break of day I will come to thee again!"

As homeward through the lane I went with lazy feet,
This song to myself did I oftentimes repeat;
And it seemed, as I retraced the ballad line by line,
That but half of it was theirs, and one half of it
was mine.

Again, and once again, did I repeat the song;
" Nay," said I, "more than half to the damsel must
belong,
For she looked with such a look, and she spake
with such a tone,
That I almost received her heart into my own."












..SIL ING "OY OO IS




Xith large illustrations by H. S. MARKS, J. D. WATSON, H. ER.n -:EL
Printed In, Colours by KRONHEIM &CO., AND LEIGHTO RTER,"i

IN DEMY. 4To.9 STIFF WRAPPER, 1s. EACH; OR, MO)UNTEDONLE) mEA

i. NURSERY RHYMES 34-- JACK AND THEBA$AL
2. ALPHABET OF TRADE-S:.,, 35. THE LAUGHABLEA -
3. CINDEELA 36. WILD ANIMALSFrtSre,
4. ALPHABET OF PRETT AE 37. it
5. OLD TESrAMENT ALPHABET A8 Ditto TidSr
6.THE TURtE LITTLE KITTENS 39. TAME ANIMALSFisSee*
THIS LITTLE PIG WENT TO -MARKET 40- Ditto ScnSre
S. TOM TH'". B-S-ALPHABET: 4r. Ditto fidSre
9. NURSERY SONGS 4 Ditto Sre
so.NE TSTAMENT ALPHABET 3 I AML
1 OURt FARMYARD ALPHIABE T 44. MY MOTHER
13. THE HISTORY OF MOSES THE DOGS' DINNER,
: THE HISTORY OF JOSEPH 46. LITTLE DOG TRS*
15. THE ALPHABET OF. FLOWERS 47. THE WHITE CA
16. NUR&E RY kf-IYMES 5 DASH AND THE UKIO'
17. NURSFRY'GAMES -5i. REYNARD THEFY
7t,. THE LIFk OF OUR LORD :52, ALPHABET OFFARTLE
2 THE THREE BEARS 5 TITTUMS AND Tl(
:213' LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD 54.. ANN AND HERAM,,
24. 2NEW TALE OF A TUB* 55, THE CATT'TEAPRY
25. NURSERY TALES 0-. BABY
.26. OLD MOTHEI HUBBARD 57. HENNY PENNY
27. PICTURES FROM ENGLISH HISTORY- .58. THE PEACOCKATHM
2&-- Di Second Period 59. T1E SLEEPING
29., Ditto Third Period 6o. THE TOY PRIM d
3 Ditto Fourth Period 6r THE PET LAMB
31- PUSS IN BOOTS 6-1. TH I FAIR ON AITH HPGVE
p.TOM THUMB LOCKS
33. BABES IN THE WOOD 6,3. JACK- THE GTANT'KLF
THOSE MVARK-ED WITH AN ASTERISK ( ARE NOT KP NLNN



GEORGE ROUTLEIDGE & om8i:
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