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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Frontispiece
 Main
 Back Cover






Group Title: Little boy's & girl's library (New York, N.Y.)
Title: Spring flowers
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027069/00001
 Material Information
Title: Spring flowers
Series Title: Little boy's & girl's library (New York, N.Y.)
Physical Description: 64 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Howard, Justin H. ( Illustrator )
Hale, Sarah Josepha Buell, 1788-1879 ( Editor )
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher: McLoughlin Brothers
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1873?
Copyright Date: 1873
 Subjects
Subject: Spring -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Flowers -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1873   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1873   ( local )
Bldn -- 1873
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Illustrations are printed in colors and hand-colored.
Statement of Responsibility: illustrated by J.H. Howard ; edited by Mrs. Sarah Jane Hale.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027069
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - ALH1402
oclc - 60404827
alephbibnum - 002231034

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Main
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
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You ought to be happy, dear Dick, as a king,
With nothing to do but to eat. drink, and sing Page 6.


SPRING FLOWERS.
LITTLE MARY TO HER BIRD.
MY dear little Dicky, now tell me I pray,
Why you are so sad and so silent to-day ?
Not.a note, not a chirrup, the whole morning
long;
Come leave off this sulking, and give me a.
song.
You will not Then you are a sad naughty
bird;
And do not deserve, sir, another kind word.


I,
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6 SPRING FLOWERS.
You ought to be happy, dear Dick, as a king,
With nothing to do but to eat, drink, and
sing,
In that gilded cage hung with chickweed and
may,
Like a beautiful palace and garden so gay.
Perhaps you're not happy, perhaps you're not
well:
I wish you could speak, that your griefs you
might tell;
It vexes me quite, thus to see you in sorrow;
Good bye; and I hope you'll be better to-
* morrow.


SPRING FLOWERS. 7
THE BIRD'S REPLY TO LITTLE
MARY.
AH do not reproach me, dear mistress, I pray,
Nor think me ungrateful because I'm not gay,
I know you are kind to your poor little bird,
And it grieves him to hear you say one angry
word.
But ahl little lady, when sullen I seem,
I've causes for sorrow that you do not dream;
I have a dear mother who mourns for my lot,
For she does not know what a kind mistress
I've got;
And five little brothers were taken with me,
From our nest at the top of the tall apple-tree.
Poor fellows I I heard them all piteously cry;
I wonder if they are as happy as I.


8 SPRING FLOWERS.
Then think not, dear mistress, I mean to com-
plain;
Though I cannot help wishing to see them
again.
I love my fine house, and my nice garden too,
And, sweet little lady, I dearly love you;
Yet, sometimes amidst all my splendour, I
find
My heart still clings fondly to friends left be-
hind.
THE LESSON.
WHY, how is this, my little maid ?
You have been naughty, I'm afraid ?
Come here, and tell dear grand-papa
What you have done to vex mamma.


I.J
Which was the word ? here, let me see;
Now spell it once or twice to me. Page 11.


^* i
And gave her some cents and some bread,
The girl wept with joy at so welcome a sight. Page 14.


SPRING FLOWERS. 11
I think I can the reason guess,
Of all this silence and distress:
You did not know your lesson quite,
This morning; ah! I see I'm right.
There, go and get the book, and try
To say it better presently:
Which was the word ? here, let me see;
Now spell it once or twice to me.
That's right: now wipe away that tear;
You'll know it very soon, my dear;
Another word, love, very well;
You see how easy 'tis to spell.
Well done: I knew it would be so;
Now to mamma, my darling, go.
She will forgive you, if you say,
You'll take more pains another day.


12 SPRING FLOWERS.
REAL TROUBLES.
LITTLE Fanny had nurtured a beautiful flower,
A rose of a delicate white;
She ran to the garden ten times in an hour,
And watched it from morning till night.
And every day her young heart was delighted,
Some fresh opening blossom to see;
But one night came a storm, and the lightning
blighted
The roses that bloomed on the tree.
Next morning, poor Fanny beheld her sweet
flowers,
All withered and drooping, and dead:


SPRING FLOWERS. 13
The tears down her innocent cheeks fell in
showers,
While thus in sad accents she said:
"My dear little rose, that I nursed with such
care,
Through the frost, and the snow, and the
rain,
To die when 'twas covered with blossoms so
fair;
I shall never be happy again I"
Just then a poor child, to the garden-gate
came,
And begged for a morsel of bread.
-Her father, she said, was old, feeble, and lame,
And her mother had long since been dead.


14 SPRING FLOWERS.
Little Fanny forgetting the cause of her grief,
Wept no more o'er her rose's sad fate;
But went to her mother, to ask some relief
For the poor little girl at the gate.
She quickly returned with a smile of delight,
And gave her some cents and some bread.
The girl wept with joy at so welcome a sight,
While thus to herself Fanny said:
"Oh I how could I grieve for the loss of a rose
And be so unhappy, and cry?
I indeed should have reason for sorrow,
suppose
My father or mother should die.
"This poor little girl, who has nothing to eat
And no tender mother, like mine;


SPRING FLOWERS. 15
"With scarcely a morsel of shoe to her feet;
'Tis she that has cause to repine.
"Whenever I meet little troubles like this,
I'll never more murmur at fate;
But think of my lot, how much better it is,
Than the beggar's who came to the gate.'
THE FLY IN DANGER.
So now you are caught, little fly,
In that great spider's web, I declare;
To save you, I think I must try:
Poor fellow I how could you go there ?
Now, here comes the spider; how quick
SHe is running to seize on his prey:
But we will just play him a trick,
He shan't have his dinner to-day.


16 SPRING FLOWERS.
Ha, ha! Mr. Spider, in vain
You are looking about for your treat;
He is safe on the windows again,
And so you'll not have him to eat.
THE CHATTERBOX
THERE lived in a house by the side of a mill,
A little girl once who could never be still;
Her tongue was so long 'twas a difficult
matter,
To tell whether she or the mill made most
clatter.
Whether working, or eating, or sitting, or
walking,
She never was easy but when she was talking;
And though she was told of it every day,
"The unruly tongue would still chatter away.


SPRING FLOWERS. 17
Mamma had tried every method indeed,
To cure this failing, but could not succeed;
And much it distressed her to see her nice
child,
By one ugly habit, so totally spoiled.
But now I will tell you what happened one day;
Uncle Charles came to take the young folks
to the play,
All but Charlotte, he said, who must not take
it ill,
If he left her at home, as she could not be still.
Poor Charlotte now blushing with shame and
surprise,
Was instantly silent, while tears filled her eyes,
And as soon as her sisters were gone, she
exclaimed,
My dearest mamma, I am truly ashamed.


18 SPRING FLOWERS.
But this is a lesson I'll never forget:
Whenever I chatter, remind me of it:
Henceforth I will place a strict guard on my
tongue,
And perhaps I shall mend, as I still am so
young.
OUT IN THE COLD.
WHY, Tom, I'm ashamed, I declare,
A man, almost seven years old,
To stand pale and shivering there,
And cry, like a baby, with cold.
You want to go in doors, you say,
To warm your chilled hands by the fire I
No, no, my dear, stay here and play,
'Tis the worst thing that you could desire.


Pages
19- 20
Missing
From
Original


SPRING FLOWERS. 21
Jump, jump about, run to and fro,
Standing still will do you great harm;
'Tis not good to do so, keep out of the snow,
And with exercise keep yourself warm.
Take your skipping rope-that's the best plan,
To warm little fingers and toes,
There-now you are better, my man,
Your cheeks are as red as a rose.
THE FALSEHOOD DISCOVERED.
OH, fie! master Edward, how can you say so?
You are telling a story, you very well know;
You know that I saw you climb over the wall.
And I said, Master Edward, you'll certainly
fall.


22 SPRING FLOWERS.
" 'Tis she who tells stories, papa," Edward cried,
"I did not climb over-I only just tried,
Because I forgot it is what you forbid,
But as soon as she told me to come down I did."
Just then an old gentleman happened to call,
Who had seen master Edward climb over the
wall,
And he said-" Little boy, 'twas a dangerous
play,
I chanced to observe you engaged in to-day."
Then Edward looked guilty, indeed well he
might,
For he saw that the truth would now be
brought to light,
And he very well knew what disgrace is
incurred,
By every person who forfeits his word.


SPRING FLOWERS. 2"
THE WONDERS OF THE CREATION.
Is yon bright moon that moves along the sky
above my head,
A world like this in which we live ? as I have
oft heard said.
It looks just like a silver ball, so round, and
bright, and clear;
I wonder if the people there, are like the peo-
ple here.
I know it is a long way off, which makes it
look so small,
But yet I cannot think it is much bigger than
a ball;
I've heard that all the stars are worlds, and
full of people too,
That some are quite as large as this-papa,
can it be true ?


24 SPRING FLOWERS.
"My little boy, though wonderful these things
seem to you now,
You'll understand them all in time, and as you
older grow,
If you reflect on all you see, and knowledge
still desire,
You'll find fresh causes every day to wonder
and admire."
THE SWEEP.
THE wintry wind blew loud and cold,
The snow was very deep,
When a poor little voice was heard,
Crying, "Sweep! Sweep-0 Sweep l"
Then Richard in his nice soft bed,
With curtains drawn around,
Thought it was very hard to be
Awakened by the sound.


SPRING FLOWERS. 25
At breakfast to papa he said,
"I wish that nasty sweep
Would not come making such a noise,
To wake me from my sleep."
Ah, Richard," said his good papa,
" And do you then not see
What cause you have for gratitude.
In what you tell to me ?
While you lie snugly in your bed,
Covered so nice and warm,
This little suffering boy goes by
Half naked through the storm.
Now, when you heard his trembling voice,
I think you should have said,
'Poor sweep! I'm better off than you
In my warm downy bed.' "


26 SPRING FLOWERS.
THE SEASONS.
"MAMMA," said Charles, I do not like the
winter time at all,
It is so dark at four o'clock, I cannot play at
ball:
I wish there was no winter, it would be so nice
for me;
From morning until evening in the garden I
could be."
Spring soon arrived. But Charles was now
no happier than before;
He longed to see the fruit and flowers; he
wished the spring was o'er.
"Mamma, I wish there was no spring, then
summer would be here;
How I should like ripe gooseberries and cur-
rants all the year!


SPRING FLOWERS. 27
With summer came another grief,-Charles
could not races run:
" Oh, dear !" said he, how hot it is I we can't
have any fun;
I wish there was no. summer l" in impatient
tone he cries,
"I cannot bear to be so warm, the dust gets
in my eyes."
When autumn came, Charles did not like it
better than the rest;
For something happened every day, by which
he was distrest;
A wasp-sting, or a gnat-bite, or some other
trifling thing;
And he wished there were no autumn, the
gnats and wasps to bring.
"Why, Charles"-said his mamma-" it would
indeed be a strange thing.


28 SPRING FLOWERS.
If we had neither summer, winter, autumn,
nor the spring;
I am afraid you are a little discontented boy,
And never think at all upon the blessings you
enjoy.
In winter you have nice warm clothes, a com-
fortable fire,
A house to shelter you from cold, and all you
can desire;
In spring you have a garden to run in when
you please,
To hear the birds sing merrily, and watch the
budding trees;
In summer do you not d ght to see the new
made hay,
To walk about the pleasant fields, and watch
the lambs at play ?


This page contains no text.


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She is going to school, I have not the least doubt. Page381.


SPRING FLOWERS. 31
In autumn there's the harvest home. And so
my child, you see,
Since every season brings its joys, how happy
you should be."
THE GOOD EXAMPLE.
SEE, there is a nice little maid;
How neat and how pretty she looks!
She is going to school, I have not the least
doubt,
For you see she walks on without looking
about,
And her basket is quite full of books.
I think I can tell you her name,
And something about her as well;
She lives at that house where the steps are so
wliite,


32 SPRING FLOWERS.
The garden so clean, and the windows so
bright,
And her name is, I'm told, Susan Bell.
She never is idle they say,
But attentive to every duty;
She keeps things in order, mends all her own
clothes,
Is never untidy, for Susan Bell knows
That neatness is better than beauty.
If a string or a button comes off,
She does not go, day after day,
Like some little ladies, as I have heard said,
With a pin in its place till a great hole is made
But to sew it she does not delay.
In the morning she rises quite early,
That she may have time to get drest,


SPRING FLOWERS. 33
Look over her lessons, and fold up her clothes,
And put the room neat ere to breakfast she
goes;
A plan all young folks would find best.
Whenever she sits down to work,
Her things are all found in their place;
She has not to hunt for her needles or thread,
Her thimble and scissors are never mislaid;-
Which with all ladies is not the case.
1 wish my young friends would take heed,
To profit by what I now tell;
And whenever inclined to neglect and delay,
Will only just think of these verses, and say,
I will try to be like Susan Bell."


34 SPRING FLOWERS.
TO A BOY WHO WOULD NOT
LEARN.
LEARN your lesson, idle boy;
Must I ever have to scold you ?
Always playing with some toy,
Never doing what is told you I
You'll be a dunce, I sadly fear,
In spite of all the pains I'm taking;
It often causes me a tear,
To see so little progress making.
I do believe you read as well
A montll ago, as you do now:
A melancholy thing to tell
Of any boy, you must allow.


SPRING FLOWERS. 35
I wonder what papa will say,
When he the usual question asks,
If I'm obliged, like yesterday,
To say you have not learned your tasks ?
Did you not promise him, last night,
You would a different course pursue,-
And try to spell, and read, and write,
As well as other children do ?
Then why do you not keep your word.
Instead of loitering there all day ?
Your lessons then might all be heard,
And time enough still left for play.
Young folks their time should well employ,
And learn as quickly as they can;
I never knew an idle boy
Grow up a wise and clever man.


36 SPRING FLOWERS
THE ROSE AND THE BLUE BELL.
BESIDE a stream a rose-bush grew, and long
it flourished there;
While in the waters clear and bright its flow-
ers reflected were.
One full-blown rose above the rest upreared
its crimson head;
And, in the pride of beauty, thus unto herself
she said;
"There surely is no other flower that can
with me compare;
The violet is very sweet, the lily passing kfir;
But they have not each glowing charm that
me so richly graces;
Indeed, I wonder some are not ashamed to
show their faces.


SPRING FLOWERS. 37
" How pleasant 'tis to see myself reflected in
the brook;
What brilliant colours deck my cheek, how
beautiful I look!
There's no carnation half so bright, no myrtle
half so sweet;
How I disdain that poor blue bell, that's grow-
ing at my feet."
But, ah the sun shone hot that day, the rose's
beauty fled,
Her brilliant colours failed fast, she hung her
drooping head.
Next morning, all her withered leaves laid scat-
tered on the ground,
Where still the humble blue bell was in all
its freshness found.


38 SPRING FLOWERS.
And then that simple flow'ret unto itself did
say,
"Behold the proud, disdainful rose, that scorn-
ed me yesterday;
Where is her boasted beauty now, the charms
she so much prized?
Poor rose! she is no better now than those
she late despised."


I .- -
'I I,
See what grand-mamma gave me to-day,
'Tis a box full of animals, houses, and tree. Page 4.
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SPRING FLOWERS. 41
INDUSTRY AND IDLENESS.
TOM is nine, and Charles is seven,
So you will suppose, no doubt,
Tom must be the better scholar;
But, indeed, you are quite out.
Charles can read, and write, and cypher;
But, I am ashamed to tell,
(Although he is so much older,
Idle Tom can hardly spell.
Charles is always up quite early,
And with him it is a rule
To learn his lessons before breakfast,
So to be in time for school.
Tom lies sleeping in the morning,
Never down till half-past eight;


44 SPRING FLOWERS.
Then he has to get his breakfast,
And to look for books and slate.
Charles, when he comes home from school,
Puts his slate and books away,
That he may know where to find them,
Without losing time next day.
Charles is always gay and cheerful,
Ever seen with smiling face;
Tom is very seldom happy,
He's so often in disgrace.
Little boys I would advise you,
Tom's example to despise;
Copy Charles's better conduct,
Then you will grow good and wise.


SPRING FLOWERS. 13
THE PRESENT.
MAMMA, dear mamma, just come here, if you
please;
See what grand-mamma gave me to day;
'Tis a box full of animals, houses, and trees;
And she says I can set them up just as I
please:
Oh! will it not be a nice play ?
See, here is a stile, and a bridge, and a boat,
And plenty of horses and cows,
And here are some sheep, and a dog, and
a goat,
And here is a man in fine scarlet coat,
And here is a beautiful house.


14 SPRING FLOWERS.
How kind 'twas of grandma to give it to me;
But she told me one day that she would.
Can you tell me, mamma, what the reason
could be ?
"Yes, Jane, for your grand-mamma told it
to me:-
She rewards you because you are good."
WANT OF THOUGHT.
REALLY, Ann, I wish you'd be
A little careful,-there, you see;
You've turned your cup, and saucer o'er,
And spilled your milk upon the floor.
It is a pity, my dear child,
You are so thoughtless and so wild;
How very easy it would be
To eat your breakfast carefully.


SPRING FLOWERS. 45
Now, I declare, you're sitting down
Upon your aunt's new satin gown.
Indeed, I must with sorrow say
You grow more heedless every day.
Why, even now, while I am speaking,
That pretty little box you're breaking;
What can possess, you to destroy
Thus wantonly, a useful toy
"You did not think ?" And so you say,
A hundred times, Ann, every day:
And this, too, an excuse you call ?
My child, 'tis no excuse at all.
For why, do you suppose, kind Heaven
To you the gift of thought has given ?
Sure not to let it idle lie,
And useless be to you; oh, fie l


46 SPRING FLOWERS.
It is this very power, my love,
That raises us the brutes above;
And if we throw the gift away,
We are as senseless, dear as they.
The cat and dog can eat and drink,
But then, you know, they cannot think;
For if they could, they'd be as wise
As many little girls and boys.


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"We can gather wild hedge roses,
And watch home the busy bee. Page 50.


SPRING FLOWERS. 49
EDWARD'S INVITATION TO HIS
SISTER.
SISTER, come and play with me,
In the meadows green and gay;
We shall hear the cuckoo singing,
We will toss the new-made hay.
We can watch the setting sun,
And admire his glorious bed,
With its gold and crimson curtains
Drawn so brightly round his head.
We will see the fishes playing
In the pond beside the mill;
We will pick up pretty pebbles,
And run up and down the hill.


50 SPRING FLOWERS.
We can gather wild hedge roses,
Qnd watch home the busy bee;
We will pluck the sweet May blossoms:
Little sister, come with me.
THE BIRDS IN DANGER.
I'VE got a famous bow and arrows,
My uncle William gave to me,
And I will shoot the little sparrows
That perch upon the cherry-tree.
So, when you come to peck again
The fruit, you naughty little sparrows,
Remember now, 1 tell you plain,
I'll shoot you with my bow and arrows.


SPRING FLOWERS. 51
" Ah, cruel Edward 1" said mamma,
" What have the little sparrows done,
That you against them should wage war,
And kill them merely for your fun ?
I'm sure, if uncle William knew
That you could think of killing sparrows,
He never would have given you
That very handsome bow and arrows.
I'm sorry that my little boy
Should have so hard a heart, indeed,
That he can think it any joy
To see such pretty creatures bleed.
They come and peck the fruit, 'tis true;
But that is not a reason why
They should be shot: for they, like you,
Must eat and drink, or they would die."


52 SPRING FLOWERS.
Edward replied, "I quite forgot
That little birds had any feeling;
Indeed, mamma, I only thought
That I would punish them for stealing.
But, now I know 'tis cruel play,
I do not mean to hurt the sparrows;
So come, poor things! and eat away,
You need not fear my bow and arrows.
IDLENESS PUNISHED.
WELL, Ann, you have dressed your new doll,
I suppose;
Run, quickly, and bring her to me.
I'm longing to see how she looks in her
clothes,


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*'Wha hav th itesarwsdn? ae5


S-te -


SPRING FLOWERS. 55
And your aunt will be pleased, too, I'm sure,
when she knows
How industrious Anna can be.
Why, what makes you colour, and hang down
your head,
And why are your eyes filled with tears ?
There's something amiss, I'm sadly afraid,
Pehaps I was mistaken in what I have said,
The doll is not dressed, it appears.
I almost suspected that this was the case,
Yet more that a week is gone by
Since I gave you that muslin and beautiful
lace,
Such idleness really is quite a disgrace,
For which I must some punishment try.


56 SPRING FLOWERS.
Go, bring me your doll, I shall take her away
So your sobs and your tears are in vain,
She must be locked up till you truly can say,
"I have not been idle for many a day,"
And then you shall have her again.
So if you are sorry, I hope you intend
A different course to begin:
Indeed, my dear child, I should not be your
friend,
If I did not endeavour this fault to amend,
For idleness is a great sin.


SPRING FLOWERS. 57
THE FOX AND THE GOOSE.
"MRS. Goose, it is such lovely weather;
We ought to take a walk together."
FOX.
"Mr. Fox, I prefer to remain at home.
Just now 'twas so fine I was tempted to roam;
But since you've been standing near my door,
I don't think it so fine as it was before."
GOOSE.
The weather was fine enough, 'twas true,
The sun was shining, the sky was blue;
But the Goose, you must know was a little
afraid,
For she knew what tricks Master Fox had
played;
And had she consented with him to roam,
She would certainly never again come home.


SPRING FLOWERS.
THE GOOD COMRADE.
MY comrade there who's wounded
Was good as good could be,
He when the trumpet sounded,
Where peril most abounded,
Kept step and marched with me.
There came a bullet flying,-
Must I or he be slain ?
It struck him-there he's lying,
Close by my feet he's dying,
Upon the blood-stained plain.
Our lot that ball did sever;
Henceforth, where'er I be,
My hand may touch his never.
And so farewell for ever,
My comrade brave, to thee.


SPRING FLOWERS. 59
THE BUTTERFLY.
YoN Butterfly whose airy form
Flit's o'er the garden wall,
Was once a little crawling worm,
And could not fly at all.
The little worm was then enclosed
Within a shell-like case,
And there it quietly reposed
Until its change took place.
And now on red and purple wings
It roves, as free as air,
Visiting all the lovely things
That make the earth so fair.


60 SPRING FLOWERS.
And we-if humbly we behave,
And do the will of God,
And strive to follow, to our grave,
The paths that saints have trod-
Shall find a change more glorious far
Than that which came to light
When, bursting through its prison bar,
The butterfly took flight.
Through CHRIST, who reigns above the
skies,
To us it will be given
Aloft on angels' wings to rise
And taste the joys of Heaven.


SPRING FLOWERS. 61
THE ROSE.
How fair is the Rose! what a beautiful flower
The glory of April and May:
But the leaves are beginning to fade in an
hour,
And they wither and die in a day.
Yes the Rose has one powerful virtue to boast,
Above all the flowers of the field!
When its leaves are all dead and fine colors
are lost,
Still how sweet a perfume it will yield I


62 SPRING FLOWERS.
So frail is the youth and the beauty of man,
Though they bloom and look gay like the
Rose,
But all our fond care to preserve them is vain,
Time kills them as fast as he goes.
Then I'll not be proud of my youth and my
beauty,
Since both of them wither and fade;
But gain a good name by well doing my duty:
This will scent like a Rose when I'm dead.


SPRING FLOWERS. 63
INNOCENT PLAY.
Abroad in the meadows, to see the young
lambs
Run sporting about by the side of their dams,
With fleeces so clean and so white;
Or a nest of young doves in a large open
cage,
Whey they play all in love, without anger or
rage,
How much may we learn from the sight!
.4
If we had been ducks, we might dabble in
mud;
Or dogs, we might play till it ended in blood:
So foul and so fierce are their natures;


64 SPRING FLOWERS.
But Thomas and William, and such pretty
names,
Should be cleanly and harmless as doves or
as lambs,
Those lovely sweet innocent creatures.
Not a thing that we do, nor a word that we
"say,
Should injure another in jesting or play,
For he's still in earnest that's hurt:
How rude are the boys that throw pebbles
and mire;
There's none but a madman will fling about
fire,
And tell you "'Tis all but in sport!"


'1
K~csq


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