• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The alphabet of flowers
 The three bears
 Little Red Riding Hood
 Mother Hubbard and Cock Robin
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Routledge's nursery tales
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027066/00001
 Material Information
Title: Routledge's nursery tales
Uniform Title: Goldilocks and the three bears
Little Red Riding Hood
Cock Robin
Alternate Title: Nursery tales
Alphabet of flowers
Mother Hubbard
Physical Description: 1 v. (various pagings) : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Leighton Bros. (Printer) ( Lithographer )
Kronheim & Co ( Lithographer )
Publisher: George Routledge and Sons
Place of Publication: London ;
New York
Publication Date: [1873?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1873   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes -- 1873   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1873   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1873   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1873
Genre: Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with twenty-four pages of illustrations.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Illustrations chromolithographed by Leighton Brothers and by Kronheim and Co.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027066
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224607
notis - ALG4873
oclc - 60404821

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page 1
    The alphabet of flowers
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    The three bears
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Plate
        Plate
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Plate
        Page 6
        Plate
    Little Red Riding Hood
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page 1
        Plate
        Page 2
        Plate
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Plate
        Page 5
        Plate
        Page 6
        Plate
    Mother Hubbard and Cock Robin
        Page i
        Page 1
        Plate 1
        Page 2
        Plate 2
        Page 3
        Plate 3
        Plate 4
        Page 4
        Plate 5
        Page 5
        Plate 6
        Page 6
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text







































































































.. . . .




















r-----'--------"















The Baldwmin Library
Ui VRme IY




















Y~kLLL ~aid~,cL


















































Np1'




























A- '-7
ak .--t 4Y~dYlt, ~ .I









". 2



F-- ?- I. --I B~~~ L~~
.4 ... -I", fAl wXI ~ u.iIIFE.
C . -I.
.4..













ROUTLEDGE'S




NURSERY TALES.


CONTAINING


THE ALPHABET OF FLOWERS.
THE THREE BEARS.
LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.
MOTHER HUBBARD.
COCK ROBIN.

WITH

TWENTY-FOUR PAGES OF ILLUSTRATIONS.












LONDON:
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS,
THE BROADWAY, LUDGATE.
NEW YORK: 416, BROOME STREET.




























THE


ALPHABET OF FLOWERS.





A for Anemones, telling of Spring,
And the gladness and brightness that
gay colours bring.

B is the Blue-bell, that sparkles with
dew,
And carpets the ground with its
flowers of blue.

C for Convolvulus, children's delight,
Which opens in daytime, and shuts
up at night.

D is the Daisy that grows in the
lanes,
Of which Jessie and Sarah make rosy-
tipp'd chains.
































......



















a .-











































"ion















IV
xy li -







E is the Eglantine briar, so sweet,
Which Emily trains o'er the lattice-
work neat.

F is the Fox-glove, which Tom stays
to pop,
Though his mother has sent him for
bread to the shop.

G is the Grass which the sheep love
to eat,
And which makes for young Robert
so pleasant a seat.

H is the Heather, red, purple, and
grey,
Which reminds the poor Swiss of his
home far away.









I is the Ivy that gives the cool shade,
Where John eats the soup that his
daughter has made.
J is the Jonquil, that grows by the
brook,
At which Ellen and Caroline long-
ingly look.
K is the King-cup, as yellow as gold,
Which Katherine prizes as treasure
untold.
L is the Lily, with leaves of bright
green,
Which we'll wreathe round the head
of our sweet Birthday Queen.
M is for Mignonette, sweet-scented
weed,
Which Mary has raised in her garden
from seed.































1'.rr
I,
'.-:













l-I




F7
..v.




















































4,





-.< 44














*L '. .









-- -' r /- h
K-



















-ll
J





... ,.
5'"


-.5.. ..







1N for Nemophila, lovely of hue,
Like the sweet summer sky in its
delicate blue.

O Oleander, the Gardener's pride;
He thinks it the finest in all England
wide.

P is the Primrose which comes in the
Spring,
When blackbirds, and thrushes, and
goldfinches sing.

Q for Quince-blossom which naughty
young Ned
Pulls off, without minding what
Grandpapa said.




















44
1.-0









g.7






iS*
F;




-pnd














JA
Ui I
n~ k






''I







R is the Rose-bud, so cherished by
all,
The pride of the cottage, the joy of
the hall.
S is the Snow-drop, so drooping and
pale,
Which heeds not the snow-storm, but
bends to the gale.

T is the Tulip, which Eleanor fair,
Loving scarlet and orange, has placed
in her hair.
V stands for Violets, prized in the
Spring,
When the birds of the grove are first
heard to sing.





























































aai


































"1 5


















-rA Iiun






W Water- lilies, whereon Fairies
delight,
To dance in the Summer, when shines
the moon bright.

X for Exotics, which Grandmamma
sends,
That Fanny may garnish the room
for her friends.

Y Yellow-lily, which John, with a
crook,
Is trying to reach from the bank of
the brook.
Z is for Zinnia, which has carried
away
The prize at the Grand Show of
Flowers to-day.
























THE THREE BEARS.
































i 4I
0.- 1























Ar 'n'im .. C . ", n.
F11 11



T7,~

.. . ...
























"2 ------ : ; : ---= -- ... ... ....- _- --
















o- r. ... _. __ -_. : __-_-...












THE THREE BEARS.


A VERY long while ago, there was a bold, forward little
girl, who lived in a far-off country, and the village
people called her Silverlocks, because her curly hair was
so light and shiny. She was a sad romp, and so full of her
pranks, that her parents could never keep her quiet at
home. One day, when she had been forbidden to go out,
she started off into a wood, to string necklaces of cowslip
blossoms, to chase the bees, and to pull down the branches
of the wild rose-trees; and she ran about from place to
place, until at last she came to a lonely spot, where she saw
a pretty-looking small house. Finding the door a little
way open, and the parlour-window also, she peeped in, but
could see nobody, and slyly she laughed to think what
a nice frolic she would have before the good folks returned:
so she made up her mind to go boldly into the house and
look about her.
Now it happened that a family of Three Bears was
living in this house; the first was the GREAT PAPA,
called ROUGH BRUIN, from his thick shaggy coat; the
second was A MIDDLING-SIZED BEAR, called MRS. BRUIN,
and sometimes MAMMY MUFF, from her soft fur; the
third was a little funny brown Bear, their own precious
pet, called Tiny. The house was empty when little
Silverlocks found it out, because the Bears had gone out
together for a morning's walk. Before leaving home, the
GREAT BEAR had told MRS. BRUIN to rub down Tiny's
face, and make him tidy, while he was busy in brushing








2 The Three Bears.
his own hair, that all three might have a healthy walk by
the brook side, while the rich rabbit-soup they were to
have for dinner cooled upon the table in the parlour: when
they were all ready, they went out for their walk, leaving
both door and window a little open.
In the Bears' house there were only two rooms, a
parlour and a bedroom, and when that saucy puss,
Silverlocks, pushed open the door and went in, she found
there was a savoury smell, as if something nice had just
been cooked, and, on looking in the parlour, she saw three
jars of steaming soup lying on the table; dinner having
been prepared for the Three Bears by MRS. BRUIN. There
was a BIG BLACK JAR quite full of soup for ROUGH
BRUIN, a SMALLER WHITE JAR of soup for MAMMY MUFF,
and a little blue jar for Tiny, and with every jar there was
a deep wooden ladle. The little girl had a very good
appetite, and now that she was as hungry as she was full
of mischief, she felt quite delighted when she saw the
soup-jars on the table. It did not take her long to make
up her mind how to act: taste the nice-smelling soup she
would, and care for nobody. It would, she thought, be
such capital fun; she could then run home again and have
a fine tale to tell old Mike the gardener, one that would
make him laugh till Christmas; for that silly fellow, too,
liked mischief, and taught Silverlocks all sorts of foolish
tricks, and laughed at all her naughty ways, which was
certainly not the plan to correct her faults and make a good
child of her.
After looking outside to see that no one was coming,
she began first to taste the soup in ROUGH BRUIN'S
GREAT JAR, but it was so very hot with pepper that it
quite burned her mouth and throat; then she tried MAMMY
MUFF'S JAR, but the soup was too salt-there was no bread
in it either, and she did not like it at all; then she tried








The Three Bears. 3
Tiny's soup, and she found it was just to her taste, and
had nice bits of white bread in it, with plenty of sliced
vegetables, so that she would have, happen what would.
Now, before the little meddlesome child sat down to
eat up Master Tiny's soup, as she was tired, she looked
for a seat, and she noticed there were three chairs in the
room: one, a VERY LARGE OAK CHAIR, was the
GREAT BEAR'S SEAT; another, of a SMALLER SIZE,
WITH A VELVET CUSHION, was MRS. BRUIN'S CHAIR; and a
little chair with a rush bottom belonged to the little Bear,
Tiny. These chairs Silverlocks tried all in turn. She
could not sit at all comfortably in the VERY LARGE
CHAIR, it was so hard; she did not like the MIDDLING-
SIZED CHAIR, it was too soft; but the little rush-bottomed
chair she found to be very nice indeed, it was just the
thing; and so she sat down in it with the jar upon her
knees, and began to enjoy herself. She dipped and dipped
again, eating away until she had eaten up all the soup in the
little blue jar; not leaving one bit or drop of either bread,
meat, or soup for the poor little Bear, who at that very
minute was hurrying the old folks home to their dinners-
for indeed, all three were hungry enough after their walk.
Just as Silverlocks had taken the last spoonful of
soup, and replaced the empty jar on the table, such an
accident happened! The bottom of the little chair came
out-for this restless girl had an ugly way of rocking
herself on her seat-and then she tumbled on the floor;
but she was not hurt, and the little madcap jumped up
and danced round the broken chair, thinking it fine fun.
Silverlocks then began to wonder where the stairs
could lead to, so up she went into the bedroom, where
the Bears used to'sleep, and there she saw three beds,
side by side. Now one of these was a LARGE BED for
the BIG BEAR, there was also a MIDDLING-SIZED BED for
MRS. BRUIN, and a nice little bed for Master Tiny. Being












Mtt


KN
_g1
k:~

Ti M ai i





Olii
.........



I -.A-- .7






















IN 1. 1
I*' .: .k
!;::i.
rb lj

JI!I--~-Y; ~i~~

















q. 'i%,!;
:01 bil'w '_1A'" 46


.7 1

A; 1;5. idVVM
If I~



IbI
.$i gMA



a~ 9*I
REl

















/ ,j
J i





























,, F5",
-























q '








4 The Three Bears.
sleepy, she thought she would lie down and have a bit of
a nap; so, after taking off her shoes, she first jumped on to
the LARGEST BED, but it was made so high at the top,
that she could not lie comfortably upon it; she then tried the
NEXT BED, but that was too high at the feet; but she found
that the little Bear's bed suited her exactly, and so she got
snugly into it. She let her cheek rest gently on the soft
pillow, and watched the woodbine nodding in at the broken
window pane, and the blue-fly buzzing and blundering
about in the curtain, till she went fast asleep, and dreamed
about the same thing over and over again, often laughing
in her sleep, too, because the dream was all about her
breaking the little chair.

While she was dreaming away, the Bears came home
very tired and hungry, and went to look after their soup.
The BIG BEAR then cried out, in a loud, angry voice:

"WHO HAS MEDDLED WITH MY SOUP?"

MAMMY MUFF next said in a loud voice, too, but not
so gruffly as ROUGH BRUIN:

"WHO HAS MEDDLED WITH MY SOUP?"

But when the little Bear saw his jar lying empty on
the table, he bit his very paws for grief, and asked over
and over again, with his shrill little voice:

Who has meddled with my soup?"








The Three Bears. 5
Soon after, the BIG BEAR, with a voice like thunder, said:

"WHO HAS BEEN IN MY CHAIR, AND PUT
IT OUT OF ITS PLACE?"

And MRs. BRUIN grumbled out:

"WHO HAS BEEN SITTING IN MY CHAIR, AND PUT IT
OUT OF ITS PLACE?'

But poor Tiny was more angry than either of them,
and sadly sobbed as he cried;

Who has been sitting in my little chair, and broken it ?"

They now peered about below-stairs, feeling certain
that there was some one in the house, and then up-stairs
they all went, snuffing and grunting in a very bad humour.

Said the GREAT BEAR in a fury:

SOME ONE HAS BEEN ON MY BED, AND
RUMPLED IT!"

Then said MAMMY MUFF:

SOME ONE HAS BEEN ON MY BED, AND RUMPLED IT."










d1A;

































-; .---_._





..wW.
, ;... .
, -n .
















"",i






















C- .
























-. f', . :
C,.















C..,. ark.
N,







X w"








6 The Three Bears.
Tiny next mounted a stool, and jumped on to the foot
of his own small bed. In a moment he squeaked out:

"Some one has been to my bed-and here she is;
Oh! here she is."

And he opened his mouth and looked as fierce and as
wicked as could be at Silverlocks.
The little girl had not been roused from her sleep by
the loud voices of MR. and MRs. Bruin, but the shrill
piercing tones of Tiny's voice awoke her directly, and
frightened enough she was when she found herself nose
to nose with the angry little Bear; and she was still more
afraid when she saw also two great Bears in the room!
Now the GREAT BEAR had, luckily for her, opened the
window, so she quickly slid off the bed, and flew across
the room, took one jump at the open sash, and dropped
upon the turf below; she rolled over and over on coming
to the ground, but up again she soon got, for, on looking at
the open window, she saw the Three Bears staring wildly
at her and making a great noise.
When the little busybody safely reached home, she got
a severe scolding for her pains. She never forgot the
great fright which the sight of the Three Bears had given
her, and so she took good care, ever afterwards, to keep
away from places where she had no business to go, and also
to avoid meddling with things that.did not belong to her.

VV MIVIM I~LVVLlll6























































, 1
G Ib!

















































: '- I
























LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.





































44.

























Im
.wi.














-..


































*~-~-~ ,.












LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD,
AND

THE WICKED WOLF.


SNCE upon a time a nice little girl lived in
a country village, and she was the sweetest
creature that ever was seen; her mother loved
her with great fondness, and her grandmother
doted on her still more. A pretty red-coloured
hood had been made for the little girl, which so
much became her, that every one called her
Little Red Riding-Hood.
One day, her mother having made some cheese-
cakes, said to her:
"Go, my child, and see how your grandmother








































.41







I7 -










































iiR-









Little Red Riding-Hood. 2

does, for I hear she is ill; carry her some of
these cakes, and a little pot of butter."
Little Red Riding-Hood immediately set out,
with a basket filled with the cakes and the pot
of butter, for her grandmother's house, which was
in a village a little distant from her mother's.
As she was crossing a wood, which lay in
her road, she met a Wolf, who had a great
mind to eat her up, but dared not indulge his
wicked wish, because of some woodcutters who
were at work near them in the forest.
He ventured, however, to ask her whither she
was going.
The little girl, not knowing how dangerous it
was to talk to a wolf, replied:
"I am going to see my grandmamma, and
carry her these cakes and a pot of butter."




































1 411.





14
04 -



ilv




J -.. 7









3 Little Red Riding-Hood.

"Does she live far off?" said the Wolf.
"Oh, yes," answered Little Red Riding-Hood,
"beyond the mill you see yonder, at the first
house in the village."
"Well," said the Wolf, "I will go and see her
too; I will take this way, and you take that,
and let us see which will be there the soonest."
The Wolf set out, running as fast as he could,
and taking the nearest way; while the little girl
took the longest, and amused herself as she went,
with' gathering nuts, running after butterflies,
and making nosegays of such flowers as she
found within her reach.
The Wolf soon arrived at the dwelling of the
Grandmother, and knocked at the door.
"Who is there?" said the old woman.
"It is your grandchild, Little Red Riding-









Little Red Riding-Hood. 4

Hood," replied the Wolf, in the voice of the
little girl; "I have brought you some cheese-
cakes, and a little pot of butter, that mamma
has sent you."
The good old woman, who was ill in bed,
then called out,
"Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up."
The Wolf pulled the bobbin, and the door
opened. He sprung upon the poor old grand-
mother, and ate her up in a few minutes, for
it was three days since he had tasted any food.
The Wolf then shut the door, and laid him-
self down in the bed, and waited for little Red
Riding-Hood, who very soon after reached the
door.
Tap, tap!
"Who is there?"

































Al.








vw






- "-.. -.

































4,J,













14
.~4









5 Little Red Riding-Hood.

She was at first a little frightened at the
hoarse voice of the Wolf, but believing her grand-
mother had got a cold, she answered:
"It is your grandchild, Little Red Riding-
Hood. Mamma has sent you some cheesecakes,
and a little pot of butter."
The Wolf called out, softening his voice:
"Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up."
Little Red Riding-Hood pulled the bobbin, and
the door opened.
When she came into the room, the Wolf,
hiding himself under the bed-clothes, said to her,
trying all he could to speak in a feeble voice,
"Put the basket, my child, on the stool, take off
your clothes, and come into bed with me."
Little Red Riding-Hood accordingly undressed
herself, and stepped into bed; where, wondering









- I

















Nil
illlmL "~il











itit




tA
i''I'



I,


-. ...r' -.,. -,. ...
". .'
fr



I I* IirI
.. ..,,.












'I
-A








6 Little Red Riding-Hood.

to see how her grandmother looked in her night-
clothes, she said to her:
Grandmamma, what great arms you have
got!"
"The better to hug thee, my child."
"Grandmamma, what great ears you have
got!"
"The better to hear thee, my child."
"Grandmamma, what great eyes you have
got!"
"The better to see thee, my child."
"Grandmamma, what great teeth you have
got!"
"They are to eat thee up:" and, saying these
words, the wicked Wolf fell upon poor Little Red
Riding-Hood, and ate her up at a few mouthfuls.





























10
3 w -'i ".














st















-?;N7


















'c:~~N-1



























MOTHER HUBBARD
AND

COCK ROBIN.









OLD MOTHER HUBBARD

AND HER DOG.


OLD Mother Hubbard
Went to the cupboard,
To get her poor Dog a bone;
But when she came there
The cupboard was bare,
And so the poor Dog had none.
She went to the baker's
To buy him some bread,
But when she came back
The poor Dog was dead.
She went to the joiner's
To buy him a coffin,
But when she came back
The poor Dog was laughing.
She took a clean dish
To get him some tripe,
But when she came back
He was smoking a pipe.



































.4
.. Ji. .





":1,- -S



~ .- .S









1









She went to the tavern
For white wine and red,
But when she came back
The Dog stood on his head.


She went to the hatter's
To buy him a hat,
But when she came back
He was feeding the cat.


She went to the barber's
To buy him a wig,
But when she came back
He was dancing a jig.


She went to the fruiterer's
To buy him some fruit,
But when she came back
He was playing the flute.

















'IN













7i

II



















-.. .
---- -- - -









She went to the tailor's
To buy him a coat,
But when she came back
He was riding a goat.


She went to the cobbler's
To buy him some shoes,
But when she came back
He was reading the news.


She went to the hosier's
To buy him some hose,
But when she came back
He was dress'd in his clothes.


The Dame made a curtsey,
The Dog made a bow;
The Dame said, "Your servant,"
The Dog said, "Bow wow."
























Y 4i.









_ A- 7_,:-




Ii -






''I -~ I

.






j

















J

r
hP :l..
L- "-rrc; a ; -L 'i
i 1 .riiY* $:*'

S tpl

77 u;t ;
-'- 3s f -
.r
C:'

.E i;

I

"- --,



$ I= bl ,z y

U

, 2;
; a as ills r 1,
3a l
'Pr i
,Z
W -L -P t / q R Ec-
C





"i ":; -c'




















---
L' -
c I l s Sj PCI "f ' ,-z ,c s;, lv 4 1
1..' .- (.C



.r



















L l -L- -L iC hT 7 b I r s pt -
,,
Fiic r---- , r e s erea -- .
I .r i ;lr laar R ar'- B %I a I


`4i
p
^r*ep r -

-rs -
F*'


1 -







THE DEATH AND BURIAL
OF
POOR COCK ROBIN.

W EHO kil'd Cock Robin?
I, said the Sparrow,
With my bow and arrow,
I killed Cock Robin.
This is the Sparrow,
With his bow and arrow.
Who saw him die?
I, said the Fly,
With my little eye,
I saw him die.
This is the little Fly
Who saw Cock Robin die.
Who caught his blood?
I, said the Fish,
With my little dish,
I caught his blood.
This is the Fish,
That held the dish.
Who'll make his shroud?
I, said the Beetle,
With my thread and needle,
I'll make his shroud.
This is the Beetle,
With his thread and needle.




















-V


W _it

















--- _- "- -1































5w-
.... ."'-1," "~ ,..-
".- '. ..--'::-~ z ..



.... -"' t t








Who'll dig his grave?
I, said the Owl,
With my spade and show'l,
I'll dig his grave.
This is the Owl,
With his spade and show'l.

Who'll be the Parson ?
I, said the Rook,
With my little book,
I'll be the Parson.
This is the Rook,
Reading his book.

Who'll be the Clerk?
I, said the Lark,
If it's not in the dark,
I'll be the Clerk.
This is the Lark,
Saying "Amen" like a clerk.

Who'll carry him to the grave ?
I, said the Kite,
If it's not in the night,
I'll carry him to the grave.
This is the Kite,
About to take flight.






















II-!



.~

















L 1:,,7























'A,
". -
43 -;+s S ..r'







Who'll carry the link?
I, said the Linnet,
I'll fetch it in a minute,
I'll carry the link.
This is the Linnet,
And a link with fire in it.
Who'll be chief mourner ?
I, said the Dove,
For I mourn for my love,
I'll be chief mourner.
This is the Dove,
Who Cock Robin did love.
Who'll sing a psalm?
I, said the Thrush,
As she sat in a bush,
I'll sing a psalm.
This is the Thrush,
Singing psalms from a bush.
Who'll toll the bell?
I, said the Bull,
Because I can pull;
So, Cock Robin, farewell!
This is the Bull
Who the Bell-rope did pull.
All the birds of the air
Fell a-sighing and sobbing,
When they heard the bell toll
For Poor Cock Robin.







'.











University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs