• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Prince Arthur; or, the four...
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Group Title: Prince Arthur, or, The four trials : a fairy tale
Title: Prince Arthur, or, The four trials a fairy tale
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027039/00001
 Material Information
Title: Prince Arthur, or, The four trials a fairy tale
Alternate Title: Four trials
Physical Description: 124 p., 1 leaf of plates : col. ill. ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Stirling, Catherine Mary
Templer, Caroline B
James Hogg and Son ( Publisher )
Camden Press ( Printer )
Dalziel Brothers ( Engraver )
Publisher: James Hogg and Son
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Camden Press
Publication Date: 1874?
Copyright Date: 1874
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Temptation -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Flowers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Allegories -- 1874   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1874   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1874   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1874   ( local )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1874   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1874
Genre: Allegories   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Hand-colored illustration engraved by Dalziel.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility: by Catherine Mary Stirling. Tales by the flowers / by Caroline B. Templer.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027039
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - ALH8351
oclc - 60404833
alephbibnum - 002237858

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
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    Table of Contents
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    Prince Arthur; or, the four trials
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    Advertising
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    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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As tie fresh Rose-bud needs the silvery shower,
The golden sunshine, and the pearly dew,
The joyous day with all its changes new,
Ere it can bloom into the perfect flower ;
So with the human rose-bud; from sweet airs
Of heaven will fragrant purity be caught,
And influences benign of tender thought
Inform the soul, like angels, unawares.

AiKR iHownUsT


































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Children Gatherin Forget me-Not." P. 107.

Tales by the Flower .








PRINCE ARTHUR;

OR,

THE FOUR TRIALS


o gairg tale.


BY
CATHERINE MARY STIRLING.





TALES BY THE FLOWERS.


BY
CAROLINE B. TEMPLE.



-----------



LONDON:
JAMES HOGG AND SON,
XORK STREET, COVENT GARDEN.














CONTENTS.



PRINCE ARTHUR; OR, THE FOUR TRIALS.
FAGE
CHAPTER I.--THE BIRTH OF PINCE ARTHUR,
AND HIS FIRST LESSON OF OBEDIENCE . 7
CHAP. II.-CHARITY AND HUMILITY . . 15
CHAP. III.-PRESENCE OF MIND A MORAL
COURAG . . . . . . 20
CHAP. IV.-SEL-SUFFICIENCY AND ITS CON-
SEQUENCES. . . . . . 27
CHAP. V.--EPENTANCE, AMENDMENT, AND
VIcTOY ............ 35




TALES BY THE FLOWERS.
THE INVITATION 55
THE HOLLY TREE'S TALE-ChriStmas 59
THE SNOWDROP'S STORY-The Newo Year. 63
THE ROSE-Holy )eeds .65
THE THISTLE-Corae 67
THE SHAMROCK-The Teaching of St. Patrick 69
CowsLP BELLS-Joyfln 71







6 CONTENTS.

PAGE
LINNAEUS AND THE GoRsE-Thankfulness .73
LENT LILIES-Trust in God .77
THE CELANDINE-Humility 79
THE WILD BROOM-Constancy .81
PRIMROSES-The Blessings of the Spirit 83
THE TUFT OF Moss-Faith 87.
THE RINGING OF THE BLUE-BELLS-Hope 95
THE WILD BRIER-LOve 93
THE DAISY-Looking Up .95
THE NETTLE AND THE FLOWERS-Kindness and
Unkindness 97
THE LILY BELL'S CHIME-Contentment 101
THE PARSLEY WREATH 105
THE SUN-FLOWER'S TALE-Living upon Light 107
THE TALE OF THE OAK LEAVES-The Babes in
the Wood 109
FERS LEAVES-The Forest Fountain 111
TUE EAR OF CoRN-The Resurection 103
TAsso--Told by the Bay Leaves 115
THE FORGET-ME-NOT- entemories of Childhood 119
ITEARTSEASE-Thoughts of Peace 121
THE MISLETOE-A Missionary Tale 123







PRINCE ARTHUR;
O.,

THE FOUR TRIALS.



CHAPTER I.

THE BIRTH OF PRINCE ARTHUR, AND HIS
FIRST LESSON OF OBEDIENCE.

ONCE upon a time an old King and
Queen had a son born unto them; and,
as they had no other child, his birth
was a cause of great rejoicing through-
out the land. The infant was very
pretty, and when he was named, all the
good Fairies attended to present him
with various gifts. One Fairy of a higher
rank condescended to become Sponsor
for him; and, after the ceremony, she
spoke thus to the Queen:-






8 PRINCE ARTHUR; OR,

"I now consider the young Prince as
my child, and will watch over him as
such. Every fifth anniversary of his
birthday he must undergo a temptation,
or trial, from which I cannot save him,
and on resisting which will depend his
ruling this kingdom. The two first
trials will be through my agency, but
the two last will occur through the
power of evil spirits. I will help Arthur
by my precepts and advice; but, except
on each anniversary, I have not permis-
sion to come to him, unless calledfor;
and you must teach him these lines, to
summon me as often as he likes:
"By the magic hazel wand,
O'er ihe sea and o'er the land,
Fairy, come at my command."
The Queen thanked the good Fairy for
her kindness, and promised that her son






THE FOUR TRIALS. 9

should often avail himself of her good
counsels.
Five years soon passed, and Prince
Arthur was a beautiful and a good child.
When his birthday came, lie was of
course loaded with gifts ; the King and
Queen thought nothing too good for him;
but the latter was not a little anxious
and curious to know the -il!., t of his
first trial. lie had frequently summoned
his Fairy ?.[ r.!., who showed the great-
est kindness towards him, and he now
awaited her voluntary appearance. She
came, and brought in her hand a cage,
covered over on three sides with a thick
stuff; the fourth side being of wood,
with a little door in it. "Arthur," said
the Fairy, I commit this cage to your
care; you are not to look into it, or to
open the door before you go to bed; and






10 PRINCE ARTHUR; OR,

if you obey me, the cage shall be yours
to-morrow." She then disappeared.
Arthur walked round and round the
cage, and looked at it in every point of
view; he was very curious about the
contents, and wondered greatly why he
might not look in; but, fortunately, a
walk, and then a good dinner, served to
divert his thoughts. After dinner, how-
ever, having examined all his new toys
over and over again, he returned to the
cage, and re-considered it very atten-
tively.
Gradually he ventured to touch the
covering, and tried to lift it up, that he
might peep in, but it was too well fast-
ened down; he then half turned the
latch of the door, and thought it turned
very easily! At length, as bed-time
approached, he allowed his curiosity to






THE FOUR TRIALS. 11

overpower his general habits of obe-
dience, and boldly opening the door, he
looked into the cage. Alas! he saw
nothing there but a pretty little egg
lying broken in the bottom. It had
been so fastened by a thread to the
door that he could not disobey the Fairy
without being betrayed by the breaking
of the egg; and thus was frustrated his
hope that he might manage to peep in
without being detected.
While he yet held the door in his
hand, and looked very shamefaced, the
Fairy appeared, and said, So, Arthur,
you have broken my commands. I
know quite well all your reasoning, and
that you tried to believe I should never
know of your disobedience; but now
the cage is useless, for the little egg, if
left till to-morrow, would have become






12 PRINCE ARTHUR; OR,

a beautiful canary, and would have sung
for you, and belonged to you. Let this
trial be a lesson to you of the necessity
of OBEDIENCE, without any questioning
or reasoning upon your part. Your
duty is simply to obey the commands
given you, however strange they may
appear."
Then the Fairy and cage both vanished,
leaving poor Arthur drowned in tears.
Next day the Queen proposed that he
should summon the Fairy, and petition
her to try him again.
He did so, and the Fairy replied, "I
do not know whether another trial will
be allowed you, for time and opportunity
once lost can never be regained. I only
act under higher authority, and will now
carry your request to the good King of
the Genii."






THE FOUR TRIALS. 13

She disappeared, and soon returned
carrying a large oblong wooden box,
which she placed on the table, and
Arthur observed that it had two doors
at the side, and a piece of glass let in
at the top. My child," said his god-
mother, the good King permits me to
try you once more, but as cach time you
fail the next trial becomes harder to resist,
so this one will be more difficult than
the first. I leave this box in your care
for one year, and I forbid you to open
the doors, or to look through the glass,
nor is the box to be removed from your
sight."
The year passed away sooner than
Arthur expected; and though he was
often tempted to gratify his curiosity, he
resisted the temptation; and when his
sixth birthday arrived, and the Fairy







14 PRINCE ARTHUR: OR.

came, she found the box untouched and
unopened. Taking Arthur by the hand,
she bid him look into the box as the
reward of his good conduct; and you
may imagine his pleasure when he be-
held two beautiful white rabbits, with
long ears, and pink eyes, and six little,
little rabbits, all pure white. What an
exclamation of delight he gave when the
fairy presented the box to him as his
own property, while she read him a long
lecture on the benefit as well as the pro-
priety of obedience; which, however, I
will not repeat to my young friends, as I
hope none will require it.






THE FOUR TRIALS. 1 5






CHAPTER II.

CHARITY AND HUMILITY.

THE Prince was now old enough to
have governors and tutors, and the next
four years were employed by him in
studying all the elementary branches of
education. He frequently saw the Fairy,
who always gave him some good advice
and wise precepts.
"When his tenth birth-day came, he
was overwhelmed with gifts, but of a
more useful kind, such as books, globes,
&c., &c. The Fairy did not make her
appearance before noon, so the Queen
sent Arthur out to walk, giving him at






16 PRINCE ARTHUR; OR,

the same time a honey-cake, such as only
little Princes are allowed to eat, and
very good it was, and Arthur was very
hungry. He walked through the park,
wondering not a little that the Fairy had
not come, when he saw an old man
sitting on the grass a short distance
before him. The old man looked very
poor, and very tired; his clothes were
in rags, his beard was long and white,
and he had nothing to protect his bald
head from the sun. As the Prince came
near to him, he said, "Dear child, I am
very tired and hungry, give me some of
that cake you are eating."
I confess the Prince felt rather indig-
nant at so unceremonious a request, and
was inclined to answer angrily, but then
he remembered in time, that the Queen
and the Fairy had taught him always to






THE FOUR TRIALS. 17

respect age and grey hairs, in however
poor a condition; so he replied gently,
and gave the old man the remainder of
his cake, asking him where he came
from.
The poor old man ate up the cake
greedily, as if he was famished, and
said that he had travelled a long way;
he had lost his hat, his cloak was stolen,
and his shoes were quite worn out;
" and indeed," he continued, "you could
not do better than add to your kindness,
by giving me your own cap and mantle."
Arthur laughed heartily at this, and
said, My good friend, they would not
fit you. How could you wear them? "
Trouble not yourself about it, young
master, the sun is beating so hotly on my
head, pray give me your cap."
SArthur handed it to him, and it must
B






18 PRINCE ARTHUR; OR,

certainly have stretched a good deal, for
the old man put it on quite easily, and
declared it to be very comfortable ; but
he would not be satisfied without the
Prince's mantle, which was given to him,
and he rose to put it on. That also was
quite large enough, and he wrapped it
cozily round him, but he could not
manage the jewelled clasp at the throat,
so he asked the Prince to fasten it for
him.
Arthur's eye flashed at this new insult,
and his colour rose with indignation, but
he recollected the many lessons he had
learned on the sinfulness of PRIDE, and
the beauty of HUMILITY, so, after a brief
struggle within himself, he advanced and
fastened the clasp.
Then, said the old man; "I am stiff
with age, my child, and have left my






THE FOUR TRIALS. 19

bundle on the grass where I was sitting,
lift it up for me."
this was an easy task after all that the
Prince had done; but the moment he
gave it into the beggar's hand, the man
and bundle vanished, while in their place
appeared his Fairy Mother. She smiled
upon him kindly, and said that his second
trial was now happily over. I do not
reward you this time, my dear boy, save
with my praise; the approbation of
your parents and of your own conscience
will henceforth be a sufficient recom-
pense.







B 2






20 PRINCE ARTaHUJ O,6






CHAPTER III.

PRESENCE OP MIND A MORAL COURAGE.

FOR the next five years the Prince
studied very diligently, and gave com-
plete satisfaction to his parents and
tutors. He was universally beloved for
his good temper, kindness, and discretion,
he held long conversations with thePairy,
and treasured up in his memory all her
wise counsels. The day he became fifteen
years old she did not appear before noon,
s6 he went out for a stroll in the park.
When he had walked some distance from
the Palace, he suddenly found himself in
the midst of a forest of tall trees, with a






THE FOUR TRIALS. P-

thick undergrowth, and no vestige of a
path. He paused, considerably alarmed
at his situation; but, on reflection, he
remembered that the sun had been imme-
diately behind him during his walk; and
if, therefore, he endeavoured to make his
way through the thicket towards the sun
he would arrive safely at his home. He
turned,then, and proceeded with difficulty
some little way, for the busi es were
closely entwined, and the brambles tore
his face and hands. All at once, to his
great joy, he perceived a broad and well-
beaten path which undoubtedly would
take him out of the forest, and he was
going to turn into it, when he observed
that it led in a direction contrary to the
one that he ought to follow, and that in
pursuing it the sun would be again behind
him. He resolved, therefore, to struggle






22 PRINCE ARTHUR; OR,

bravely through the underwood, hoping
to reach an outlet soon. Presently he
came to a small open space, free from
any trees or bushes; and he was gladly
crossing it, when he saw a lion advancing
towards him; his first impulse was to fly,
but the thicket was impenetrable around
him;-he recollected having read of the
power of the human eye, and felt that to
face his present danger was now his only
resource. He advanced slowly towards
the lion, keeping his eye fixed steadily
on the animal, which at last stopped, and
after considering the Prince attentively,
turned, and proceeded leisurely towards
the thicket; looking back once or twice
at Arthur, who never removed his eyes
from him. The Prince was indeed thank-
ful when the lion at length disappeared,
and he began to resume his progress;






THE TOUR TRIALS. 23

when, to his relief, he saw the forest
vanish as suddenly as it had appeared,
and he found himself in a large field
where a number of his young companions
were playing at cricket. They hailed
him with a shout, and besought him to
join their game, to which he willingly
consented. When the game was finished,
and the boys were heated and tired, they
took Arthur to a large-tent, where they
found refreshments, and also some others
of their young friends playing at cards.
They begged Arthur to join them in
card-playing within the shelter of the
tent, but he refused; and when they
pressed him for a reason, he replied that
he knew his Father disapproved of gamb-
ling. They laughed at him, and asked
him how the King was to know what
happened in the tent, as there was no






$4 PRINCE ARTHUR; OR,

spy present, they were all friends, and
none would peach upon another. Arthur
said, that probably the King might never
know it, but that we should feel guilty
and unhappy in having done that which
would displease a kind Father. They
inquired what could be the harm of this
game, or of that; they did not ask him
to play for money, though most of them
were doing so, and many of them were
betting on the issue of the games; but
Arthur replied, that he did not wish to
argue on the evil of their amusements,
his duty was a simple one, and he would
act according to what his conscience told
him was right. They then jeered at him
as a coward and a sneak, and supposed
that he would go and tell his papa of
their playing, and so obtain praise for
himself at their expense. The Prince,






THE FOUR TRIALS. 25

however, assured them that he should
mention the fact of their gambling to no
one, unless he was so closely questioned
on the events of the day that he could
not omit that circumstance without
verging on deception and untruth, when,
at all hazards, the whole truth must be
told. As he spoke, his companions
vanished, and he saw his Fairy Mother
bending over him with a loving smile.
"My dear, good Son," she said, "you
have pleased me and done well to-day.
Bodily courage, and presence of mind in
difficulties are undoubtedly desirable, but
MORAL COURAGE is of far greater value.
In pursuing the straight path of duty, you
will be exposed to the taunts and sneers
of the world; but learn to despise them
as they deserve, and never allow yourself,
through the fear of being lauaged at, to






26 PRINCE ARTHUR; OR,

do wrong because others set you the
"example. Take this book; it contains
all the precepts I have hitherto taught
you, and many others suited to the next
five years. Remember that the last and
fourth trial is more severe than all others,
therefore prepare yourself for it by study
and reflection, that I may welcome you
as victor at the last."






THE POUR TRIALS. 27






CHAPTER IV.

SELF-SUFFICIENCY AND ITS CONSEQUENCES.

SORRY am I to tell you, that during
the following five years, Arthur having
become emboldened by success, thought
nothing about his last trial; considering
he would be so much older and wiser, he
had no doubt that he would get well
through it; and so he entered into the
gaieties of the Court, although his edu-
cation was not properly completed.
Instead of finishing his studies, he gave
up his whole time to amusements, and
the only accomplishments he really per-
fected were those of music, dancing, and






28 PRINCE ARTHUR; OR,

painting. The Fairy's book was laid on
a high shelf, and soon became covered
with dust, while her summons sounded
only twice during the whole period.
Thus matters stood when the Prince's
twentieth birth-day came round. Orders
had been given for a splendid banquet in
the Palace to all the nobles, while thou-
sands of the poor were feasted through-
out the land. Arthur was placed on his
Father's right hand at the banquet, and
charmed every one by his easy, yet dig-
nified manners. His dress was very
splendid, and was composed of satin and
velvet, with a profusion of jewels and
gold embroidery. His fair hair curled
in long ringlets, and his face, though
handsome, bore too great an expression
of effeminacy. As the clock struck six,
and ere the feast was concluded, the Fairy






THE FOUR TRIALS. 29

appeared with a grave and solemn mein.
She desired Arthur to follow her, and she
conducted him into a large and nearly
empty room. The only furniture con-
sisted of a small table, in the centre of
the room, on which a lamp was burning,
and on which there also lay a chaplet of
white lilies woven together, while before
the table stood an arm-chair. The Fairy
led him to the chair, and said, Prince,
your task is to watch this chaplet as it
lies before you on the table, neither touch
it or allow it to be moved, and if you
keep strict watch till the Abbey clock
strikes twelve, the chaplet will bloom as
brightly as it does now. Remember, let
no one lift it; woe be to you if you do."
Having said this, she departed, and locked
the door after her. The Prince was not
at all pleased at leaving the banquet so






30 PRINCE ARTHUR; OR,

early, and thought it particularly stupid
to sit alone. "As to the good Lady's
parting words," said he, they seem
very unnecessary, for who is to touch the
wreath when I only am here." Two
hours passed very slowly, while Arthur
pondered over a few good resolutions,
but much oftener did he fret at the ab-
surdity of his trial, at the want of com-
pany, or laid plans of what he would do
when he was King.
As the clock struck ten, he thought be
heard a strange noise above him, and,
looking up, he saw numberless ormolu
branches spring from the walls, bearing
wax tapers, while, at the same time,
three fine cut-glass chandeliers descended
from the ceiling. Presently the whole of
the candles lighted up, quite outshining
the glimmer of his single lamp. He then






THE YOUR TRIALS. 31

observed that the usually plain walls of
the room were transformed into panels
of various woods, and painted with scenes
of feasting and dancing. Very soon a
number of tables appeared in the room,
and gradually became covered' with
dishes, some of them containing the most
delicate and highly-seasoned ragouts,
such as no mortal cook had ever invented.
Others were filled with the most tempt-
ing fruit; the greater part, however, were
heaped with pyramids of dazzling con-
fectionary; rich cakes were there, and
the most elegant bottles, in golden cases,
filled the air with their various perfumes.
Liqueurs and wines of every description
were .dispersed on the tables; sofas,
covered with the richest velvet, were
placed ready for the guests; and, in short,
the Prince had never beheld luxury and






32 PRINCE. ARTHUR ; R,

magnificence equal to what now sur-
rounded him. He hesitated for some
time, but at length he rose and tasted a
steaming dish close to him; this excited
his appetite, and he continued tasting of
most things, each appearing more excel-
lent than the preceding one. He ob-
served that among the gaudy flowers de-
corating the tables, there was not one lily,
and he involuntarily turned to look at his
chaplet; it lay there quite safe, but he
fancied that the flowers looked less bright
than before. He rose to return to his
arm-chair, but at that moment a strain
of the sweetest music burst upon his ear,
and the room became nearly filled by a
band of youths and maidens, dressed as
for a ball, in the gayest manner. They
danced towards him, and invited him to
join them, but for once Arthur's discre-






THE FOUR TRIALS. S3

tion triumphed, and he resumed his seat
before the small table. He watched
the chaplet for a few minutes, but soon
his eyes wandered away to the bright
scene around him, and he followed the
dancers as they flew hither and thither in
ever-varying mazes. One fair girl at-
tracted his attention by her graceful
dancing, and he requested her name as
she passed him. Zo6," was her reply,
as she threw a long chain of flowers round
him, and strove to draw him to the dance.
He resisted but slightly, for he thought
the flowery chain might easily be broken;
but he was mistaken; and gradually he
was drawn from his chair, and joined the
circle of waltzers, with Zoe for a partner.
He never gave a thought to time, but as
the music became ever more inspiriting,
he whirled round among the fastest dan-
c






34 PRINCE ARTHUR; OR,

cers. When quite tired and breathless,
he sought refreshment in a goblet of wine,
and from that moment he lost all con-
seiousness.






THE FOUR TRIALS. 35






CHAPTER V.

REPENTANCE, AMENDMENT, AND VICTORY.

THE Prince was. suddenly awakened
by a sound of sweet and wailing voices,
mingled with screams of eldritch laugh-
ter. He gazed round him in bewilder-
ment, for the lights, feast, and dancers
had disappeared. He was seated in his
arm-chair, and his lamp was nearly
expiring: it gave one bright flicker
before it left him in darkness, and by
the blaze he beheld with terror, that
where his chaplet had lain theie was
now but a circle of dust.
Poor Arthur! you may imagine his
c 2






36 PRINCE ARTHUR; O,

distress, heightened as it was by a severe
headache and by intense thirst, wmle
his limbs ached as iE he had been beaten.
He had time enough for reflection while
he remained in the dark, and as he re-
considered the past night, he was obliged
to confess to himself that he had fallen,
through self-suficiency; he had relied
too much on his own strength, and now
he discovered his weakness. He dared
scarcely think of the probability of his
sin depriving him of his birthright.
Gradually the day began to dawn; his
thirst was most tormenting, and he
looked round the room in the hope of
finding some remnant of the feast. He
perceived an apple which had rolled
under the table, and eagerly seized it;
but, alas! the beautiful rhind contained
only dust and ashes; thus proving the






THE FOUR TRIALS. 37

deceptive character of the dainties which
had allured him, and that they could
not stand the light of Truth.
At length suspense became intoler-
able, and he summoned his Fairy Mother,
that he might know his fate. When she
appeared her, countenance was very grave
and stern, and in silence she held a
looking-glass before him. The Prince
started when he beheld the change
apparent in his face; his eyes were
bloodshot and heavy; his cheeks hollow
and pale, excepting one fevered spot on
each; his lips were parched and cracked,
his hair in disorder, and his dress covered
with dust. In humble accents he con-
fessed his fault to the Fairy, and besought
her to accept his repentance, and not to
deprive him irretrievably of his birth-
right.






38 PRINCE ARTHUR; OR,

"Prince," she replied, I am per-
mitted by the good King to grant your
forgiveness, seeing that your contrition is
really sincere. Had you sought my
assistance more frequently during the last
five years, you would have gained strength
to ensure your victory; and had you
studied my book, the precepts contained
therein would have stored your mind
with good thoughts, whereby to resist
the allurements of yesterday. You would
also have learnt that the companions
who led you astray were, in truth, evil
spirits, permitted to assume bodily forms
for the purpose of your trial. Negligence,
therefore, has been the chief cause of
your failure; and, in mercy to you, a
second ordeal is allowed you. Your
twenty-first birth-day will bring a repe-
tition of this temptation, and evil will






THE FOUR TRIALS. 39

indeed befall you if you conquer not.
Remember that life is a warfare, and
victory may not be won by those who
live in luxury and self-indulgence. Hard
and stern is the struggle, and they who
would conquer must gird themselves for
the battle, and wear their armour like
soldiers good and true." So saying, the
Fairy disappeared.
With shame and sorrow the Prince
met his Parents that day; but as he
showed real sorrow, they kindly en-
deavoured to strengthen him in all his
good resolutions. He gathered together
his neglected books, and determined to
pursue those studies which were cal-
culated to improre his mind and judg-
ment. He always rose very early, lived
abstemiously, and devoted the greater part
of the day to study; while he also made






40 PRINCE ARTHUR; OR,

himself master of such exercises as tended
to brace and harden his frame. He thus
became able to walk or ride any distance,
and to endure great fatigue. The Fairy
had presented him with a suit of armour,
which he accustomed himself to wear,
and was rarely seen without it. He read
diligently in the Fairy's book, and each
day he learnt some precept by heart,
besides summoning her very often to his
aid. Thus the year passed, and his
birth-day arrived.
Arthur was obliged to appear at the
state banquet given by the King, where,
as before, he sat on his Father's right
hand, but he wore his panoply of steel,
and partook very sparingly of the dainties
provided. He had risen unusually early,
and had spent the day in meditation, and
in study. His personal appearance was






THE FOUR TRIALS. 41

much'changed and improved; his hair
was short and curled close to his head;
his complexion embrowned by exer-
cise; his figure taller and more manly;
the expression of his eyes and mouth was
as sweet as ever, though more grave, and
his whole face was more pleasant to look
upon, because it expressed amiability and
goodness. At six o'clock the Fairy ap-
peared, and again led him to the same
room, where he saw the table, lamp,
chaplet, and chair arranged as formerly.
"Dear Son," said the Fairy, "fain
would I stay and help you, but the war-
fare is yours; remember only that your
sole duty now is to watch, and on no
account loose any of your armour."
" She left him, and he took his station
before the table, resolved, if possible, that
nothing should tempt him from that spot.






42 PRINCE ARTHUR; OR,

His means of defence and safety consisted
in the helmet of Prudence, the coat-of-mail
of Fortitude, the gauntlets of Cqution, the
cuisses and greaves of Humility, the mailed
shoes of Firmness, the spurs ofActivity, the
shield of Self-Denial, and the sharp
sword of Truth. Arthur congratulated
himself that he had two hours for
reflection; but alas, he forgot that the
temptation would be doubled this time,
owing to his previous fall. He had
scarcely been seated a few minutes,
when, by the noise overhead, he knew
that the gold branches were appearing;
the chandeliers descended from the
ceiling, and the room became illuminated.
Now, however, the walls were all looking-
glass, so as to reflect a hundred times
whatever occurred in the room.
Presently the door opened, and a man






THE FOUR TRIALS. 43

entered, followed by two others, carry-
ing a large bale of goods. He advanced
to the Prince and spoke thus, May it
please your Royal Highness, I am
commissioned to travel through the
country on behalf of some, of the first
manufacturers, and they, knowing the
fine taste and correct judgment of your
Royal Highness, have deputed me to
wait on you, and submit for your inspec-
tion some specimens of their trade."
At a sign from him his servants opened
the bale, and displayed to the Prince's
admiring sight the most elegant and
costly fabrics of the loom; the richest
velvets, the softest satins, and embroidery
in colours, and in gold, of the most
exquisite designs. The Prince praised
them highly, and felt gratified that his
people could produce such beautiful






44 PRINCE ARTHUR; OR,

manufactures; he felt inclined to pur-
chase something, and the traveller pro.
duced an embroidered cap and mantle
worthy of an Emperor.
Allow me," said he, to have the
honour of adjusting these on your Royal
Highness. They are only such as you
should wear, and I venture to say that
your Royal Highness will find them more
suitable and becoming than your present
attire."
These last words roused the Prince's
attention, and made him instantly aware
that he had nearly fallen before a strata-
gem of the enemy, who had thus endea-
voured to deprive him of his armour.
One of the Fairy's precepts recurred to
his mind, "Parley not with the tempter,
lest his honied words prevail; but resist
him boldly, and at once." He therefore






THE FOUR TRIALS. 45

struck the man with his gauntletted
hand, and immediately the men and
their goods vanished. Arthur reproached
himself that he should so easily have
been deceived, and determined he would
be doubly vigilant. He remained un-
molested for a short time, and then a
servant appeared, and placed upon his
table a loaf of bread, a knife, and a glass
of water, after which he retired. By
this time the room had become much
warmer, and the weight and heat of his
armour rendered the Prince very thirsty.
The bread and water looked so simple
and undisguised, that he took the glass
and raised it to his lips, when another
maxim occurred to him, Trust not to
appearances, they are often fallacious, and
danger may be concealed under the
simplest form." Arthur replaced the






46 PRINCE ARTHUR; OR,

glass, which, with the bread, soon after-
wards vanished. He was then aroused
from his meditation by hearing a very
sweet voice recite a beautiful passage
from a well-known tragedy; and on
looking up, he beheld a company of
actors, who performed the whole play.
He endeavoured manfully to prevent his
attention being drawn from the chaplet,
and at last he was once more alone.
Soon, however, the tables appeared,
covered with a feast exceeding all others
in beauty and splendour, Never had
the fruit looked so delicious, never had
the bon-bons assumed such tempting
forms, or sparlded with such beautiful
crystals. Never had the various meats
sent forth more irresistible odours, or
the wines and liqueurs appeared more
alluring. The service was of gold,






THE FOUR TRIALS. 47

exquisitely wrought in fantastic shapes;
and gorgeous flowers were arranged in
vases of the purest crystal; but he again
observed that amongst then there was
not one lily. Presently the same troop
of dancers appeared, with Zo8 at their
head; each of them magnificently dressed,
and crowned with flowers. Strains of
music were heard, as some of the dancers
separated themselves from the rest, and
performed a graceful ballet. This was
succeeded by vocal music of the most
bewitching character.
When the Prince saw the dancers enter,
he resolutely fixed his eyes on the lily
wreath, he held his shield before him,
and unsheathing his sword, laid it across
his knee, ready for self-defence. But.
alas! the reflection in the looking-glasses,
and his own remembrance of the former






48 PRINCE ARTHUR; OR,

scene, rendered it doubly difficult for
him to prevent his mind wandering to
what was passing around him. The room
had become oppressively hot, and the
weight of his armour nearly overpowered
him, combined with the suffering of in-
tense thirst. Zoe and her companions
tempted him to join them in the dance;
they threw long chains of flowers round
him, but he divided them with his sword.
Zoe besought him to loosen his helmet,
but he replied not to her entreaties; then
they brought to him the dishes of fruit
and ices, but he never raised his eyes
from the chaplet. At length Zoe pre-
sented him with a brimming goblet of
wine, and used all her eloquence to
persuade him to taste it; but the Prince
struck the cup from her hand-and with
a yell of despair, the spirits disappeared,






THE FOUR TRIALS. 49-

at the same moment as Arthur heard the
first stroke of midnight tollfrom the Abbey
clock He knew he was then safe, and
he saw with surprise that as the clock
chimed, his lily wreath changed, and the
petals became of pure silver, with stamens
and pointal of burnished gold. The lamp
also burnt with a bright and dazzling
flame, and lighted the whole room; the
branches and chandeliers having vanished
with the whole of the feast. As the last
chime sounded, the Fairy became visible,
her face beaming with pleasure, and sur-
rounded with numberless beautiful beings
all clothed in pure white. They all joined
in saying, Hail to thee, Prince, for thou
art victor, thou hast conquered in the
warfare of life."
"'Arthur," said the Fairy, "you have at
last earned the Lily Crown. Worthy are
D





50 PRINCE ARTHUR.

you of the kingdom, for he only is capable
of ruling over others whofirst obtains the
mastery over himself. Receive the chaplet
of honour, and so live as to be an example
to your people in all that is good."
The Prince obeyed his Fairy Mother's'
injunction, and lived long and happily,
and was beloved throughout all his
kingdom.




















TALES BY THE FLOWERS.


BY

CAROLINE B. TEMPLE.
















CONTENTS.



PAGE
THE INVITATION 55
THE HOLLY TREE'S TALE--Cristma 59
THE SNOWDROP'S STORY-The New Year. 63
'THE ROSE-Holy Deeds. . 65
THE THISTLE-Courage 67
THE SHAMROCK-The Teaching of St. Patrick 69
COWSLIP BELLS-Joylness 71
LINNEUS -AND THE GORSE-Thankfulness 73
LENT LILIES-Trust it God 77
THE CELANDINE-Humility 79
THE WILD BRooM--Constany 81
PRIMOSs-The Blessings of the Spirit 83
THE TUFT OF Mloss-Faith 87
THE RINGING OF THE BLUE-BELLS--HOq e 91
THE WILD BRIER-Love .- 93
THE DAISY-Looking Up 95
THE NETTLE AND THE FLOWERS-Kindness and
Unkindness 97






54 CONTENTS.

PAGE
THE LILY BELLS CHIME-Contentment 101
THE PARSLEY WREATH 105
THE SUN-FLOWER'S TALE-Living upon Light 107
THE TALE OF THE OAx LEAVES-The Babes in
"the Wood 109
FaRN LEAVES-The Forest Fountain 111
THE EaR oF CoRN-The Resurection 113
TAsso-Told by the Bay Leaves 115
THE FoRGET-ME-NOT-Memories of Childhood .119
HEARTlsE E-Thoughts of Peace 121
THE MISLETOE-A Missionary Tale 123

















TALES BY THE FLOWERS.





THE INVITATION.

Come with me, come with me,
Fairy bells are ringing,
Over earth, and over sea,
Fairy voices singing-
Come where the early morning
Will tell of future day,
And hail the blessed dawning
Of the sun's empurpled ray;
And then watch the declining
Of his shadows on the hill,
'Twill hush each vain repining
To see such beauty still.






56 TALES BY THE FLOWERS.

Come with me, come with me,
Fairy bells are ringing,
Over earth, and over sea,
Fairy voices singing-
Come, see the lily sleeping,
'Neath her bowery eaves,
The scented violet weeping,
Soft dewdrops o'er her leaves;
The weaver-spider twining
His web at morning prime,
And the bright glow-worm shining
Upon the evening time.



Come with me, come with me,
Fairy bells are ringing,
Over earth, and over sea,
Fairy voices singing-
Come see all nature smiling,
She has no grief to-day;
Come foolish cares beguiling
In scenes so fresh and gay;
The blessed summer brightness
Is shining over all,
To tune each heart to lightness,
The merry song-birds call.






THE INVITATION.. 57

Come with me, come with me,
Fairy bells are ringing,
Over earth, and over sea,
Fairy voices singing.





















THE HOLLY TREE'S TALE.

CHRISTMAS.

The icicles hung their long drops from the eaves,
And fairy-like fret-work encompassed the leaves,
I was shining with berries of yellow and red,
And merrily -danced the snow-flakes o'er my head,
And children's glad voices rang up to the sky,
The Christmas is coming, the Christmas is nigh.

But a little one whispered these words in my ear,-
"0 winter is dismal, and darksome, and drear;
I love not the sound of the snow-sweeping breeze,
I miss the soft summer green hue of the trees,
Then why do glad voices resound to the sky,
That Christmas is coming, the Christmas is nigh!

"The mornings are dark, and the birds do not sing,
And nature is ruled by the iron ice-king _







60 TALES BY THE FLOWERS.

His sceptre of frost-work has shattered the flowers,
And changed into hail storms the summer's light
showers;
Then I will not sing to the echoing sky,
That Christmas is coming, the Christmas is nigh.

The flowers are dead, for they mourn the old year.
And the birds are all trembling with cold and with fear;
Then why do we call this the happiest time ?
And why ring the church bells their joyfulest chime ?
And why do glad voices resound to the sky
That Christmas is coming!-the Christmas is nigh

"0 Christmas will tell you a tale of such love!
You'll not know its fulness till resting above,
But still you may echo its story of peace,
And good-will unto men till your life-time shall cease;
Then add your glad voice to the praises on high,
That Christmas is coming, the Christmas is nigh.

" It comes at the dreariest time of the year,
With hope ever springing, to chase away fear;
It enlivens the gloom of the winter's long night,
As the star blessed the shepherds on Bethlehem's height.
Then surely glad voices should sound to the sky,
That Christmas is coming, the Christmas is nigh.







THE HOLLY TREE'S TALE. 61

"Yes, tell it around you, this tale of high love,
How Christ came on earth from his dwelling above;
It will wake a sweet echo in every clime,
And tune every heart to the Church's glad chime,
Till one voice shall ring through the earth and the sky,
That Christmas is coming, the Christmas is nigh."














THE SNOWDROP'S STORY.-

THE NEW YEAR.

I am the little snowdrop flower,
I come with the new year,
I live beneath the icy shower,
Yet have no thought of fear;
I dwell upon the cold dark earth,
A little thing of lowly worth.

But children, it is mine to tell,
A gentle tale to-day,
To bid you learn of me to dwell
In trustfulness always;
And 'mid the sun and 'mid the shower,
Live like the snowdrop flower.

For when the sun is shining round,
I look up to the sky,
I do not heed the icy ground,
But -lift my head on high;
do not call it dark and drear,
I hail the blessed bright new year.







64 TALES BY THE FLOWERS.

I am a little lowly thing,
Yet well I spend my days,
If I can teach you how to sing
Of me, your Maker's praise;
And though the winter storms may lower,
Be like the little snowdrop flower.

Yes, live a life cf purity,
In Christ's own robe of white,
In heartfelt deep humility,
Though living on the light;
And you'll have learnt a holy tale,
E'en from the snowdrop in the vale.

















THE ROSE.

HOLY DEEDS.

The rose for merry England,
So bright, so fair, so free,
Where'er I bloom, where'er I stand,
Lady of high degree;
With graceful form and eye of love,
That all the summer bright,
Looks upward to the sky above,
With ever new delight.

But beauty will not bless alone,
Without a dearer tie,
The nightingale is all mine own,
While singing sweetly by;
And fragrant scent, like holy deeds,
Is scattered freeand far,
It blesses even the dark weeds,
That all around me are.







66 TALES -BY THE FLOWERS.

The rose for merry England,
So bright, so fair, so free,
Where'er I bloom, where'er I stand,
Lady of high degree;
My faded petals as they fall,
The very ground will bless,
So fragrant and so true withal,
In my calm loveliness.

[The rose became the emblem of England, in consequence
of the red rose being the cognizance of the house of Lancaster,
who took it as their badge when the first Earl of Lancaster was
created Duke of Champagne by tile kingof France, afterhis hav-
ing quelleda tumult in Provence, which city was then famousfora
peculiar species of damask rose. The Yorkists merely used the
white rose as an opposite device. The wars of the roses are well
known in English history, and when peace was restored between
the opposing faction by the marriage of Elizabeth of York with
Henry VII., the rose became confirmed in its high dignity as the
national emblem of England. The loves of the rose and the
nightingale is an often-told tale of eastern origin; from which
source we also trace the less well known story, illustrative of
the value of holy companionship, wherein a piece of clay, on
being admired for its unusual perfume, replies, "I am not the
rose, but have lived near it."'

















THE THISTLE.

COURAGE.

I am a hardy mountaineer,
Without a thought of dread;
I live among the heather drear,
Though summer suns are fled;
I love the lonely mountain side,
And fear not aught that may betide.

And this hath won for me a place-
A noble place of rest-
For this do Scotland's gallant race
Uphold me as a crest;
Because I tremble not, nor cower,
When the dark dreary days have power.

The southern sun is soft and fair,
And many love it well,
But I to lift my head will dare,
Amid the tempest's swell;







68 TALES BY THE FLOWERS.

I do not heed the northern blast,
That round the mountain sweepeth past.

Then learn of me to brave the storm,
The battle storm of life,,
And shrink not with a coward form,
Nor fear amid the strife;
Stand, firmly stand, 'mid life's rude shock,
Like Scotland's thistle, by the rock













THE SHAMROCK.

T11H TEACHING OF SAINT PATRICI.

Come little trefoil of the west,
From the fair island of thy rest,
And tell thy'story;
And how a teacher once of old,
Strove bj thy beauty to 'Infoi
God's triune glory.

"Yes, opening to the summer sun,
He saw my leaf as three in one,
And watched with pleasure;
And then from off my slender stem
He pluck'd the tiny emerald gem,
His little treasure.

" And speaking to the people round,
He showed how even there was found,
So frail and lowly- -
A little thing that still might be,
"An emblem of the mystery
Of God all holy.







70 TALES BY THE FLOWERS.

But faint, and frail, and all too weak,
Of high and heavenly things to speak,
I shrink from teaching;
Yet fondly still, to you will say,
The high thoughts of that earlier day
Of Gospel preaching."


[The Welsh apostle, Manwyn, better known as St. Patrick,
landing near Wicklow, A.D., 433, on a mission from Pope Celes-
tine, met with much opposition to his doctrine, till plucking a
trefoil, and thereby illustrating the mystery of the Trinity in
Unity, his pagan hearers wore said to have become converts, and
were baptized. Hence originated the custom of wearing the
shamrock (a bunch of trefoil), on the anniversary of that saint;
and hence it has become the national emblem of Ireland.--
Withering.]













COWSLIP BELLS.

JOYFULNESS.

It is not a mystic story that tells,
That fairies are lingering within my bells,
Merrily singing,
"With cowslip chimes ringing,
Flinging sweet music o'er summer's gay dells;
Come, thus they softly say,
Come children, come away,
And while around you view each new delight,
Think who hath made them all so fair and bright.

Spirits of gentleness, spirits of love,
Spirits whose home is the heaven above,
Merrily singing,
With cowslip chimes ringing,
Join with the coo of the soft cushat dove;
Come, thus they softly say,
Come children, come away,
And while on earth you see each blessed sight,
Praise Him who made them all sofair and bright.






72 TALES BY THE FLOWERS.

Winter is past away, summer is nigh,
List, the glad chorus that sounds to the sky,
Merrily singing,
With cowslip chimes ringing,
Led by the lark as he soareth on high;
Come,.thus they softly say,
Come children, come away,
Live as we ever live, loving the light,
Bisen, uprisen, from darkness pnd night.
















LINNjEUS AND THE GORSE.

TRANlKFULNE88.

He came from Sweden's distant land,
Across the rolling tide,
To view upon another strand,
The flowers scattered wide;
He loved them with such gentle care
He tended them so well,
He culled each fragrant blossom fair,
By mountain side and dell,
But now he comes afar to roam,
Because a strange wild tale is told,
That a bright flower, like miser's gold.
In distant Scotland finds a home.

O'er ocean waves, by-uplands fair,
All the long way he came,
To seek each flower new and rare,
And give to alla name;






74 TALES BY THE FLOWERS.

"We thank him for the tender love
He bare these gentle things,
For many thoughts will rise above
Upborne on flowerets wings;
But now he will not wait or stay,
He wants not, and he asks not rest,
Till on the mountain's rugged breast,
The blossomed gorse before him lay.


And he hath won his longed-for prize,
Like fairy tale of old,
He views it with enraptured eyes,
A burnished field of gold;
He knelt upon the heather sod,
He raised his eyes to heaven,
To bless the All Creator God,
For such high beauty given;
"I thank Thee, Father, who hast made,
This world so beautiful and bright,
I bless Thee for each blessed sight,
And feel my toils are overpaid."

Yes, all along this world of ours,
The dark path of our days,
How thick are strewn the hedgerow flowers,
With blossoms o'er our ways;






LINNJEUS AND THE GORSE. 75

At every step our feet have trod,
High blessings have been given,
Sent by a mercy-loving God,
An antepast of heaven;
We thank Thee, Father, wl.o hast made,
This world so beautiful and bright,
We bless Thee for each blessed sight,
In Thy love ever overpaid.


[Linnaeus, the great Swedish naturalist, came from his
native country, to see the flowers in other lands, and especially
the gorse; and when he first beheld it glittering in the sun, so
bright in its gorgeous beauty, it is said that he fell on his knees
and thanked God for having made the world so beautiful.]
















LENT LILIES.

TRUST IN GOD.

Live like the lilies, gentle child,
By no false vanity beguiled
Of earth's vain pomp and pride;
The-splendour e'en of earthly kings,
All pales before the lovely things
That God hath scattered wide.

If e'er ye seek a higher lot,
A gayer home, a brighter spot,
Than God hath set below,
O ne'er to such wild fancies yield,
Look on the lilies of the field,
And think ye how they grow.

Ye have much cause for thankfulness,
Much cause a Father's name to bless,
For gracious loving care;
For daily food, a roof above,
For tender parents' watchful love,
And simple weeds ye wear






78 TALES BY THE FLOWERS.

Yes! dearest, yes! a home like this,
Believe me, knows all earthly bliss,
In love and peace to live;
And learning day by day to rest,
On Him who orders for the best,
And will each blessing give.

Yes! love and trust, the lilies tell,
A tale of faith, and teach it well,
It is their Maker's will;
The summer's sun, the gentle shower,
And e'en the very clouds that lower,
Are blessings o'er them still.


- Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow, they toil
not, neither do they spin; and yet I say unto you that even
Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these."-
Matt. vi. 28, 29.]


r













THE CELANDITE.

HUMILITY.

Little Celandine upspringing,
In the low spots of the earth,
With thy fond roots ever clinging,
To the spot that gave thee birth,
Lift thy bright face up to day.
Let me hear what thou wilt say.

I will say, if now thou heedeth,
What the gentle flowers tell,
That it never, never needeth
A high station to do well;
I am not the queen of flowers,
Yet I envy not her bowers.

Here we rest, all, all unthinking
One is greater than the rest,
Never from our neighbour shrinking,
Using all things for the best;
Making e'en the lowliest nook,
Like a little Eden look.






80 TALES BY THE FLOWERS.

Each in our own place remaining,
Making that place fairer still,
Our own graces still retaining,
Showing forth our Maker's will;
By the hillside and the vale,
Telling each our different tale.

Joining too the one glad story,
Which the birds and insects sing,
Praise to the exceeding glory
Of high heaven's Eternal King;
Who blesses all created things,
And guards with overshadowing wm.s.













THE WILD BROOM.

CONSTANCY.

"0 broom of the mountain, come wave in my crest,
Thou gem of the moorland, the truest, the best;
I pluck thee with strength from the firm rifted rock,
To wave in my helm 'mid the battle's proud shock;
I will make thee remembered to every time,
By the winds of the north,'mid the east's burning clime."

Thus spake the proud duke, as he took the wild bough,
With the plume in his helm, he has fastened it now;
He made it his crest, he has kept to his word,
And my name in the battle-field often was heard;
'Mid the sound of the strife, 'mid the din of the war,
The name of Plantagenet sounded afar.

I was lowly by birth, and was lowly by name,
But my firmness and fortitude won for me fame;
So well did I stand by the mountain's rough side,
Unheeding the wild winter storms that betide,
That the lion heart thought mefit emblem to take,
And wear in his bonnet for constancy's sake.







82 TALES BY THE FLOWERS.

And we have another crusade in our time,
Though we go not perchance to the east's burning clime,
The battle of life there is ever to fight,
To strive against wrong, and to stand for the right;
And still to the sons of the true and the free,
The broom of the moorland, fit emblem may be.

Your earthly inheritance counting but loss.
Still fight neathh the banner, the shade of the cross;
Press on like the knights of that earlier day,
Unheeding the danger, the length of the way;
And the broom of the moorland still, still ye may take,
And bear me, and wear me, for constancy's sake.

[Gefroi, Duke of Angou, the father of our Henry II., adopted
the wild broom (Planta genista), as his cognizance, from which
the family race of Plantagenet derived their name; and as the'
badge of his house, the little simple English flower was borne
to the Orusades, by Richard I., our lion-hearted king, the
favourite hero of old romance.]


















PRIMROSES.

THE BLESSINGS O7 THE SPIRIT.

Primroses, sweet primroses,
So very fair and pale,
I come to hear your story,
Within this quiet dale.


"Ours is a holy story,
That we would tell to-day,
How God's exceeding glory
Is manifest always.


"The time was very weary,
The winter seemed so long;
The days so cold and dreary,
We heard no linnet's song.
r 3






84 TALES BY THE FLOWERS.

"Then shone the sun in brightness,
And called us to the day,
To live upon his lightness,
To bask beneath his ray.


"And the soft genial showers,
Came down upon the ground,
And wakened all the flowers
To loveliness around.


"Then live in patient duty,
Look up to Christ to bless,
He'll rise o'er you in beauty,
The 'Sun of Righteousness.'


"And won by His own merit,
The gentle rain and dew,
The blessings of His Spirit,
"Will lighten upon you.


"This is the tale whose telling,
We bid you heed to-day,
Your heart with praise is swelling,
For summer's blessed ray.






PRIMROSES. 85

"Then lift it like the flowers
Right upward to the light,
Live by the sun and showers
Uprisen from the night."

Primroses, sweet primroses,
This is a holy tale,
I knew not I could learn so much
From flowers in the dale.


















THE TUFT OF MOSS.

An incident in the life of Mungo Park, the celebrated African
traveller.]

FAITH.

A traveller neathh the desert sun,
Once wished his weary day was done;
And not alone that day of strife,
But all the bitter time of life;
So lonely seemed the desert way,
That all before, around him lay.

While thus he thought, he stretched his hand,
Upon the parched and burning sand;
It fell upon a little flower
That grew untended by the shower;
Yet felt so cool, it seemed to kiss
His fingers and to whisper bliss.

He started up, he fixed his gaze
Right full upon it, but a haze






88 TALES BY THE FLOWERS.

Came to his eyes-he scarce could see
The plant he clung to lovingly;
And tears down the cheek there ran,
Of that stern, weather-beaten man.

He would not pluck it, it was set
A gem in Nature's coronet;
And now it whisper'd soft, "rejoice!"
Again he listened for the voice,
And then the silver chimes rang out,
And filled the air all round about.

Unguarded by cloud, and unwatered by shower,
I have not the hues of the garden's gay flower;
The desert's hot sand is the home of my rest,
Too little some think to be cared for or blest;
But the Father who made me is keeping me still,
To show forth His praise, and to work out His will.

"One day I was thinking, why, why, am I here,
So far in the desert, where none cometh near;
The last drop of moisture has long been dried up,
And quickly will close, now, my soft mossy cup.
Then I thought that my Father was keeping me still,
To show forth His praise, and to work out His will.

And now can I see why I lived to this day;
Then speed, tired traveller, onward thy way;







THE TUFT OF MOSS. 89

Thy time is not over, thy task is not done;
'Till then thou'rt immortal through tempest or sun;
For thy Father is keeping thee, weary one, still,
To show forth His praise, and to work out His will."

Sure 'twas a voice of love that spoke,
At that dark moment silence broke;
He took it as the food from Heaven,
To him in loving kindness give;
And onward went in that same strength,
Until his work was done at length.


















THE RINGING OF THE BLUE-BELLS.
HOPE.
Ring out, ring out,
"With a joyous shout,
Gay blue-bells ring it out merrily;
'Tis ours to sing
Of the blessed spring,
And we sing it well, and so cheerily.
Winter is past,
It could not last,
The flowers were hanging so drearily;
We lay as dead
'Neath our leafy bed,
And we waited long, and so wearily.
We waited long
For the lark's glad song;
At length we heard it all thrillingly
We gave a shout,
And our bells rang out,
And we danced to the breezes willingly.






92 TALES BY THE FLOWERS.

Yes, all our days,
A song of high praise
We send to the heavens so cheeringly
The gay blue-bell
Hath a tale to tell,
And tells it well, and unfearingly.












THE WILD BRIER.
LOVE.
Come, sister, come to the wood with me,
Sit neathh the shade of the wild-brier tree;
Come while the morning dew is spread,
Come ere the sun is risen o'er head,
Come while the lark is singing on high
His matin song to the golden sky;
And we will see how the bee will sup
Sweet flowing nectar from every cup;
Come, sister, come to the wood with me,
Sit neathh the shade of the wild-brier tree.
Ye are come to rest in the shade by me,
Then list the tale of the wild-brier tree;
A gentle tale that I love to tell,
How the wild wood flowers are guarded well;
The rose is gay in yon rich parterre,
But the woodland flowers are fresh and fair;
No mortal planted us far and wide,
Yet are we blossoming side by side;
For God hath scattered us fair and free,
And watches even the wild-brier tree.






94 TALES BY THE FLOWERS.

Yes, this is the tale it is mine to tell,
And yours to learn in this tangled dell;
Think not the poor are of meaner worth,
Ye are dwellers all upon God's own earth;
Children alike of one Father's care,
Ye are breathing the self-same balmy air,
Ye live neathh the blessed sun and shower;
That come in love to the wild wood flower,
The hand that guards them is guarding ye,
This is the tale of the wild-brier tree.














THE DAISY.

LOOKING UP.

Come, little merry dancing feet,
To meadows clothed with gold,
Where "the daisy is so sweet," so sweet,
And butter-cups unfold.

And pluck the little daisy, dear,
And bid it quickly tell
A tale which you will love to hear,
And which it speaks so well.

"They call ine day's eye; for I raise
My tiny head on high,
As showing forth my Maker's praise,
And looking to the sky.

"I open to the sunny hours,
I shut again at night;
I'm very small among the flowers,
Yet live upon the light.





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