• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Looking Over the Gifts
 Little Mischief
 Tired Lulu
 Viola
 Esse Helping Papa
 Thoughtful Maggie
 Two Little Birdies
 Play Doctor
 Butterflies
 Sue's Baby
 Sue's First Doll
 Maud's Letter
 Opening the Gate
 Mamma's Lost Pearl
 Say's Baby House
 The Kind Fairy
 Ella's Present
 The Twin Sisters
 Reading Aloud
 The Chicken's Funeral
 Jo's Discovery
 Towser's Mischief
 Aunt Amy
 Feeding the Horse
 Little Hands
 The Torn Dress
 Harrie and Hattie
 The Explosion
 Lottie's Sister
 Little May's Picture
 Patient Lina
 Blossom Helping Mamma
 Blossom Reading
 Azzie's Return
 Jessie's Errand
 Poor Molly
 Rescued from the Waters
 Wilful Mabel
 Ester's Nap
 Ester's Fright
 Violet
 Hazel's Hat
 Lora's Kitty
 Daph Ironing
 Anne and Will
 Watching the Doves
 Careless Rose
 "Hush! Baby's Asleep"
 Sunshine
 Naughty
 Myrtie and Grandpa
 Sewing
 Ruthie's Rabbits
 Dolly
 Papa's Lamb
 Washing Dishes
 Janie's Pets
 Floy and Mattie
 Effie's Friends
 Leaving for School
 Flora and Ellie
 Pennie Frightened
 Susie's Bouquet
 Robin-Redbreast
 Afraid of the Dark
 Rosy and Etta
 On the Rocks
 Lily and Kitty
 Delia and Corney
 Edie and Marcia
 Mina and the Gardener
 A Day in the Woods
 Tilly's Trouble
 Cassy
 Sylvia
 Good Little Mitty
 Jeanie's Distress
 Rowing
 Lomie and Nero
 Mit and Her Mistress
 The New Dress
 Crossing the Pasture
 Gathering Roses
 Driving the Span
 The Pet Lamb
 The Lost Lamb
 "Still Higher"
 Almost Night
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: The holiday album for girls
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027038/00001
 Material Information
Title: The holiday album for girls
Alternate Title: Picture story book
Physical Description: p. 178-357, 2 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Pratt-Chadwick, Mara L ( Mara Louise )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
G.T. Day & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop & Co.
G.T. Day & Co.
Place of Publication: Boston
Dover N.H
Publication Date: c1874
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1874   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1874   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1874
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
United States -- New Hampshire -- Dover
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Laurie Loring.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027038
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002233314
notis - ALH3722
oclc - 60404862

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Looking Over the Gifts
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Little Mischief
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Tired Lulu
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Viola
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Esse Helping Papa
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Thoughtful Maggie
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Two Little Birdies
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Play Doctor
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Butterflies
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Sue's Baby
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Sue's First Doll
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Maud's Letter
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Opening the Gate
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Mamma's Lost Pearl
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Say's Baby House
        Page 36
        Page 37
    The Kind Fairy
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Ella's Present
        Page 40
        Page 41
    The Twin Sisters
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Reading Aloud
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The Chicken's Funeral
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Jo's Discovery
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Towser's Mischief
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Aunt Amy
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Feeding the Horse
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Little Hands
        Page 56
        Page 57
    The Torn Dress
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Harrie and Hattie
        Page 60
        Page 61
    The Explosion
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Lottie's Sister
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Little May's Picture
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Patient Lina
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Blossom Helping Mamma
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Blossom Reading
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Azzie's Return
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Jessie's Errand
        Page 76
        Page 77
    Poor Molly
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Rescued from the Waters
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Wilful Mabel
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Ester's Nap
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Ester's Fright
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Violet
        Page 88
        Page 89
    Hazel's Hat
        Page 90
        Page 91
    Lora's Kitty
        Page 92
        Page 93
    Daph Ironing
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Anne and Will
        Page 96
        Page 97
    Watching the Doves
        Page 98
        Page 99
    Careless Rose
        Page 100
        Page 101
    "Hush! Baby's Asleep"
        Page 102
        Page 103
    Sunshine
        Page 104
        Page 105
    Naughty
        Page 106
        Page 107
    Myrtie and Grandpa
        Page 108
        Page 109
    Sewing
        Page 110
        Page 111
    Ruthie's Rabbits
        Page 112
        Page 113
    Dolly
        Page 114
        Page 115
    Papa's Lamb
        Page 116
        Page 117
    Washing Dishes
        Page 118
        Page 119
    Janie's Pets
        Page 120
        Page 121
    Floy and Mattie
        Page 122
        Page 123
    Effie's Friends
        Page 124
        Page 125
    Leaving for School
        Page 126
        Page 127
    Flora and Ellie
        Page 128
        Page 129
    Pennie Frightened
        Page 130
        Page 131
    Susie's Bouquet
        Page 132
        Page 133
    Robin-Redbreast
        Page 134
        Page 135
    Afraid of the Dark
        Page 136
        Page 137
    Rosy and Etta
        Page 138
        Page 139
    On the Rocks
        Page 140
        Page 141
    Lily and Kitty
        Page 142
        Page 143
    Delia and Corney
        Page 144
        Page 145
    Edie and Marcia
        Page 146
        Page 147
    Mina and the Gardener
        Page 148
        Page 149
    A Day in the Woods
        Page 150
        Page 151
    Tilly's Trouble
        Page 152
        Page 153
    Cassy
        Page 154
        Page 155
    Sylvia
        Page 156
        Page 157
    Good Little Mitty
        Page 158
        Page 159
    Jeanie's Distress
        Page 160
        Page 161
    Rowing
        Page 162
        Page 163
    Lomie and Nero
        Page 164
        Page 165
    Mit and Her Mistress
        Page 166
        Page 167
    The New Dress
        Page 168
        Page 169
    Crossing the Pasture
        Page 170
        Page 171
    Gathering Roses
        Page 172
        Page 173
    Driving the Span
        Page 174
        Page 175
    The Pet Lamb
        Page 176
        Page 177
    The Lost Lamb
        Page 178
        Page 179
    "Still Higher"
        Page 180
        Page 181
    Almost Night
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
    Advertising
        Page 185
        Page 186
    Back Cover
        Page 187
        Page 188
    Spine
        Page 189
Full Text
'AW'enION'.1L, AN mt;A4,-11 zvl7m7l7,flvl-47.-


S: I The Bald',n Lira n ,|.,..iYQU'fl


* .*ij'A-~ /~-cII,A?


. . . .


THEHOLIDAY ALBUM,.FOR GIRLS.BY LAURIE LORING.S.oston:ublishied by 0. Bothrop & Co.Dover, .N. H.: G. T. Oay y- Co.


Entered, according to Act of Congress, in Ihe year 1874,BY D. LOTHROP & CO.,In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.


8g0 E43 1olj.1-


.;-- --- ------- : -- I- --* --, i f i; ,l iii " 1 ;",, ,^ ^^i .,^ ^1 *I I |'I ^ J J I " I I I I||| I [


LOOKING OVER THE GIFTS.These five little girls have brought their toysand placed them upon the table, for they wishedto see how pretty they would look together. Onlyone little boy is with them. This is their favoritecousin, Ernest. He is lame, so he cannot go outwith the other boys to coast and skate. He issitting at the table now, and Dora is standingwith her hand on his shoulder. They are neverquite as merry when Ernest is with them.See how soberly Ilda looks up at her sister Ada,who is kneeling in the chair. Even wild little Lustands leaning on the table, with one finger in hermouth, as though her restless little feet never feltlike tripping about from morning till night. WhileElfie, who is the cunningest, most lovable littlebody in the world, for once has allowed her rose-bud of a mouth to rest, and isn't kissing eithersisters or cousins.SBut they will soon get tired of looking at theirChristmas gifts; then Ernest will hide away insome quiet corner with a picture book, and thegirls will have a gay frolic.183


PII Ii 4~~~~?~~~L7 IVPI*I&~~


LITTLE MISCHIEF.This is one of the names which have beengiven to little Bell Bartlett. Sometimes, whendressed in blue, her papa calls her his Bluebell.If she has her red dress on, grandma says she isa Redbird. And when mamma finds the contentsof her work-box overturned, she calls her littleMischief.What name should you give her now? Herdolly lies neglected on the table, and its clothesare scattered about instead of being laid in thebureau. Bell spied the box you see in her hand,and everything else was forgotten. She triedand tried to open it, but could not, so she put ongrandma's spectacles, saying, " Guess I can seel,:'\- to do it now."When'mamma talks to her for being naughty,-lew often says, " Don't scold, I's so little." Herii,.:iima doesn't scold, only talks kindly and ploaa-..,itlic to her. If mamma looks sad because shei ii't a good girl, Bell bfels badly, and climbs intoI ..,- lap and kisses her, saying, " I's drefful sorry ; "th. 1 mamma returns the kiss, and Bell is happyill-..- more.


S...i ''''J! Imill..cr


TIRED LULU.Llu has been playing with Gyp, and now shefeels very tired. Gyp is tired too. You cansee him lying on the floor. He likes to be nearLulu, and when she climbed into grandma's lap,he lay down close beside the chair.The book which you see open upon the table isthe Bible. Grandma was reading it when Lulucame in; but she loves little children, and is al-ways ready to take them in her arms. Then sheoften tells them a story. She is telling Lulu onenow. It is about the little baby boy who wasplaced in an ark of bulrushes and then laid in theflags by the side of the river.The little baby did not die, for God took careof him. Do you know his hame, or what he didwhen he became a man ? If you do not, you musta:k your grandmother to tell you the story, or tofind the place for you in the Bible, that you mayread it yourself.Perhaps she will tell you other stories, forthere are many nice ones in -this best ofbooks.187


I40^^^~~i -- """ -___ __________ ^^ __________________________vai^C


VIOLA."Do, Viola, walk along properly, and put upthat horrid jewsharp."" Now, my dear, good sister Maria, I can't besober and steady like you, any way; so don't askIne."" You might help drag the sled, then you couldgo along steadily, I guess."" It might make my arms ache. Besides, I mustprovide music for the march. Will you have' Over the snow we glide,' or Lo the conquer-ing hero comes'?" and Viola put the absurdlittle instrument to her mouth as she danced alongbackward." Viola, why can't you be sober once in y:.o'rlife ?"" Because I think wouldd make me sick," sheanswered with mock gravity. Maria could nothelp laughing at this, and Viola quickly asked,-" Now don't you feel better ?""Better? Why? "" Because you laughed, of course."" It doesn't do one bit of good to talk to you,Viula."" Please stop, then. Don't waste your breath."189


a' .. b cr, bg 181 : I!a fr: ,,,!,I' '''' '!''''I4',. II:1!i\l \ iB e $BP F:..I ;1 111111L 4 11i FYIWUr;'(::* L-


ESSE HELPING PAPA.Mr. North was busy writing his sermon, whenhe heard pattering steps approach, then a faintknock. He said nothing, and soon a bird-likevoice said,-" Esse come, papa !"This was just what he wished to hear, so heopened the door and lifted his darling to a seat onhis shoulder. After carrying her across the roomseveral times, he said, " Now papa must write hissermon..""Esse help! " was her quick reply." Well, what will my little daughter write inthe sermon ?" asked Mr. North, as he sat downwith the child on his knee." God is love," was the ready answer. It washer one verse from the Bible which she repeatedon all occasions." Shall I write it for you?" asked her father." No; Esse write "So he put the pen in her hand and guided ituntil the words were written." Esse help papa write sermon! " was her joyfilexclamation as she ran to her mother." What will Esse do to help mamma? "" Esse love mamma "191


mr.:. A,.; 1.1II'" '',rl II 1,rlli l i ll !! ,; l o


THOUGHTFUL MAGGIE.This poor old lady was so confused by thehurry, confusion, and noise as she entered thecars, that she l.)st her money. And now shewonders how she shlll ever get to her sick daug:.ter's. She is so troubled that she cannot preventone or two tears running down her fur'vowcdcheeks.This only serves to amuse the two young menwho sit behind her; but Maggie Read, the younggirl who is in the same seat, pities her. Shetells her that she will speak to the conductorabout it; then she kindly inquires where ho isgoing. And when she finds that they will traveltogether a part of the way, she promises to helpher all she can. Maggie hasn't a great deal ofmoney herself, but she gives the old lady a part.Others in the car see what she is doing, and theywish to help also.Soon the poor woman has more money thanwhen she started, and Maggie helps her place itsafely in her bag. She is very grateful for thiskindness.There is no trait more lovely in the young thanthoughtful care for the aged.193


sn~CrC *--' tIA2 -AJ'- " ~7 ^ s .."^ "^ .-^ __ ^q-


TWO LITTLE BIRDIES.Two little birdies out in the snow,Merry and gay,Flying about for seeds and for crumbsAll the cold day.Where do you sleep, little birdies, tell;In some old tree ?In a snug hole do you creep away,So none can see ?Who calls you early, at morning light,From cosey nest?Do you change your coat, or do you wearAlways your best?When fierce winds come, rocking your bed,Do you not fear,And oft tremble in your tiny home,With no one near?Ah little birdies, you trust in OneWho cares for all.The good Father above sees evenA sparrow's fall.1?5


1..2 iK$ 'V


PLAYING DOCTOR." Is't fever, doctor Ned ?" asked Tina, with alook of great anxiety." No, 'cause she's too black," was the answer, ina tone which the little doctor tried to make gruff.Then he scowled his forehead as though studyingJudy's case.Suddenly he turned to Tina, saying in his natu-ral tone,-" She's too ditty to be sick. Why didn't youwash her face and make her look white ? Sickfolks are always white as as my handker-chief," he said at last."0, your han'k'chief is just as dirty as Judy'sface. She's white one side. I spilt papa's inkthere, and poor Judy can't be washed when she'sso sick. I guess when babies have ir:isles theyain't white either. I'd say something if I had papa'sbig hat on, and mamma's bag. I know she's awfulsick. You ain't a good doctor," said Tina, look-ing disappointed." 0! papa takes hold of folks' arms. He tellsso;" and doctor Ned grasped Judy's arm, whileTina looked anxious again."Whooping-cough !" said Ned, soberly." That'll do," was Tina's satisfied answer,.197


. -- =- .-_=_-- " - _-- .-N :C.- -.I.- ----Cf.- ^f, L -^ w- w ^:^ -_"^ *:' '':^'^ ^^ i''^- b****^ ,I^f:: i'itel*"f~


BUTTERFLIES.You have all seen butterflies in summer; butdid you ever see one in the winter ? Let me tellyou about one Minnie saw, one cold day in winter,when the ground was covered with snow.In a warm, south window she had a few plants,some of them in bloom. She was out of the room"a short time, and when she came back there was"a beautiful butterfly on the top of a bright scarletverbena. She wondered where it came from, andhow it happened to be on her flowers. She feltquite sure some one put it there. She asked herbrother, but he knew nothing about it. Whenher'father came in to tea, however, he could nothelp smiling, and Minnie felt sure that he was theone who did it.At last he said that it had been in the shop forseveral days, flyin,, about the window and alight-ing upon the floor wherever the sun shone. Hetook hold of its wings and brought it into thehouse, thinking it would look pretty upon- Min-nie's flowers.199


TC:1PIIz"-TnR IP'*IL Li llR" essJ WI % PI ;:::.If ; IR ul. P;;d t)%lg 8i!:b : rPI L l %llli 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8-~_ P',.....bc


"SUE'S BABY.While Mrs. Sherman was walking out one morn-ing, she saw a child on a doorstep with bare feetand legs, and such a forsaken look, that shestopped and asked, "What is your name, little ,girl ?"'" Sue.""What else?"" Just Sue; nothing else " she answered." Where do your parents live? "" Father and mother both dead !"" Where do you live, my child? "" Nowhere " was the hopeless answer."Will you come home with me ? " asked thelady."My baby and cat must come, too."" Where is your baby ? " Mrs. Sherman askedin surprise." Here " and Sue pointed to the bottle dressedup as a doll, which she held in her arms, thenlooked down at the black cat rubbing against herscanty dress." Well, take them both and come with me. Iwill give you a new doll baby."Sue followed her quickly, for to have a real dollwas her greatest desire.201


I b' i 'rccl.,I i ?Els iilglt;P S Ii ln LI I" ';,,, ,, fjfu r iI III rr 1' Vp 'Fh' ;""-' r--1 TaT ': I/: f ;1.'''rC ----- ..%-- T


SUE'S FIRST DOLL.After Sue was washed, and dressed in good,clean clothes, and her hair combed, you wouldhardly know her. Perhaps you would not think itwas Sue, if she did not hold the old bottle babyin her hand. She is telling the lady that she maythrow it away, for she likes her new doll better.Sue is almost eight years old, yet she never hada doll before. This is why she thinks so much ofit.. If she had had as many as some little girls Iknow, she would not enjoy this one half as much.Her black cat was not in the room, for Mrs.Sherman told Sue that the shed was the best placefor it. She gave her a box to sleep in, and plentyof good bread and milk to eat.I think Sue will be a good girl if she lives withMrs. Sherman, for she is such a good -lady. Andshe will be very happy playing with her doll inthe nice, pleasant rooms, or out in the prettyflower garden.I hope little Sue will do all she can. to pleaseMrs. Sherman, for she has been very kind toher.20O


i!P


MAUD'S LETTER." 0, dear, I don't wish .to stop now and write aletter," thought Maud Duncan, as she sat readinga book in her chamber. The pen and ink beingbefore her, she could not forget what her motherhad said." You had better write a letter to your fatherthis afternoon, Maud. He will wish to hear fromhome very much, and I cannot write to-day, forbaby is sick.'.'Maud often wrote short letters to her fatherwhen he was away, but to-day she wished to read.She did not like to stop when she had just com-menced such an interesting chapter. She wouldfinish that, then there would be time enough towrite. But she became more and more interestedin the story and forgot all else, until she heard hermother say,-" Have you finished your letter,.Maud?""Not yet," was the answer, as she hastilyclosed the book and took up a sheet of paper.She wrote a few lines, then hurried down, saying,"I'll go to the office now."" It is too late for the afternoon mail," said hermother, soberly; and without a word of excuseMaud left the room.205


t-. ,. rfle,,S,V - -- _. " -"-'^.^^li''^.;/ ^


OPENING THE GATE.Little Pearl has been playing in the garden withher doll Nix. She gathered all the flowers shewanted there, then she wished very much to openthe gate and go into the field beyond. But mam-ma had often told her not to go out of the garden,nor even to open the gate.The best way would have been not to go nearit. But restless little Pearl kept going nearer andnearer, and at last she stood with Nix in her armslooking through." We shan't open it shall'we, Nix ? " she keptsaying. She had not forgotten what her mothertold her, yet all the time one hand was on thegate." Nix can't see good. I'll open it a little mitefor Nix," she said.Then the gate was slowly opened, and the doll'shead thrust through. But 'twas naughty littlePearl who wished to see, not Nix: and soon shewas in the field beyond. She walked a long dis-tance looking for flowers, and then she could notfind her way back to the gate.207


kvlJr, A I l k.....' .. .,,,- : ,:,:'~14S l'J l ,I


MAMMA'S LOST PEARL.Pearl could not find the way to the gate again,so she crept through the fence out into the road.She often called " Mamma mamma " but shecould not find her. At last she saw a gentlemancoming, and she ran and took hold of his coat,and said," Pearl wants to go home "He looked down pleasantly upon the little miteof a girl, and asked, " Who is Pearl, little one ? "" I'm mamma's Pearl. I want to see my ownmamma " and one or two tears rolled down thedusty little face. Then she looked for her hand-kerchief. As she was wiping her face, tlh ::.cntl,-man noticed a mark in one corner, atndiwit4held it up to see if he could find a name.Yes, there it was Pearl Dayton in tiny let-ters. Thenhe took the child in his strong arms,and told her he would carry her to her ownhome.Her mother was very glad to clasp her littlelost Pearl in her arms again.209


ii;I~ SC t S II YP "`"; 2 r-e p---, iji


SAY'S BABY HOUSE." Halloo, Say! going to ride out in that farmcart ? " said Bob to his sister, as she climbed intothe cart with her doll." This is my baby-house stormy days. Isn't itnice ? " answered Say, as she sat down upon somestraw in the bottom of the cart." Want me to give you both a ride ? I'll do itfor nothing after I've whittled out this arrow."" No. I don't wish to go out in the rain, forCora's new dress will get wet; " and Say lookedat her doll's dress with great delight, for she hadmade a part of it herself. Some of th. stitcheswere rather long and crooked, but it was sewedvery well for a little girl like Say, and shethought nothing could look prettier.Bob loved to tease Say about her doll, so nowhe asked, " Who cut that dress ? "" Mother. Isn't it pretty ? "" It will do very well for a doll. But why didn't".you go to the dressmaker? Then it would havebeen done right." '"It is right now. Mother did it," answeredSay.2119-t


I iAo


THE KIND FAIRY.Eva is a cripple. She cannot run about andplay with other children, or chase the gay butter-flies that flutter among the clover blossoms out inthe field.But she enjoys hearing her brother read verymuch.. He has just read a fairy story from thebook in her lap.It was about a little girl who was lost in a greatforest. She wandered about all day, but couldnot find a path that led out. Now and then shewould see bright-eyed squirrels up in the trees,and once a timid rabbit leaped past her. At lastit began to grow dark, and she was frightened.Just then she saw in an open space two small,milk-white ponies, with saddles and bridles ofblue velvet and silver. A fairy lady sat on one.Her face was so gentle that when she beckoned,the little girl was not afraid, but went to her andwas lifted upon the other pony. They rodeswiftly away, never halting for steep hills -orrough- paths. All at once the forest was leftbehind, and the lost girl was at home. Then witha sweet smile the fairy vanished.213


-(-I~j. I 1 'Im'Ill-11`~- "Kr


ELLA'S PRESENT." 0, grandpa! is this dolly for me ?" askedElla, as she came running into the room with herhair flying about her face." Yes, pet, this is for you."" 0, thank you. You are the best, grandpa Iever had."" I should think you had had a dozen," he said,laughing heartily. " But how about her clothes,Ella? Can you make any for her ? She don'twish to wear this gay dress all the time.""Didn't you bring some in that big box,grandpa ? "" 0, you little witch! Look and see ""dO! O!" cried Ella in delight. " Where didyou find such pretty dresses ? "" I didn't find them; I bought them.""Did you give lots of cents for them ? "" Yes, ever so many. More than a hundred."" 0, I haven't half so many in my bank! Ain'tyou rich, grandpa ? "" Rich enough to buy these, my pet," grandpaanswered, as he kissed her and bade her good by.lI


P 'r III"- ---,,:c''I '-I -eJ-4 r i


THE TWIN SISTERS.Abbic and Addie are twins. They are usuallyvery affectionate, and dislike to be separated. Butto-day Addie, who likes to read a little better thanher sister, wished to stay in the house, while Abbie"preferred to gather flowers in the woods. Neitherliked to give up, so Addie went out on the piazzawith her book, and Abbie.took her walk alone.Both were sorry in a few moments, but did notlike to say so. Addie's book was not half as in-teresting as usual, and Abbie thought the flowers,somehow, were not as pretty as those they gen-erally found.Addie often looked up to see if her sister wasin sight ; but when she saw her running towardsthe house with her arms full of flowers, she.lookedon her book again. Yet she was ready-to receivethe kiss which Abbie gave with the flowers, andreturned it heartily.Their mother was glad to see them happy oncemore.217: -*


"Aq"I45:i...... ...~


-^READING ALOUD.What a pleasant place to read in! every onewill exclaim. Yes, Mr. Hayford and his f.t:ilythink so. The girls, Ida, Nellie, and Grace, takeparticular pains always to make the summer-houseattractive. They take turns in gathering -andarranging the flowers. It is Ida's turn this week,and she has placed them in a basket. How prettythey look upon the rustic table !Every pleasant evening they come out hereafter 'tea. Sometimes they sit and watch thesteamers, vessels, and small boats as they glidein and out of the harbor. Yet oftener they areengaged as you see them now. One is readingaloud for the entertainment of the others.Nellie is reading to-night. They are alwaysglad when it is her turn to read, for she is anexcellent reader. It is a pleasure to listen to her." As good as music, any time," her father says.And, what is still better, she is always ready to(*ge her parents and sisters, and read whateverthey select. She is reading poetry now,


-^'i I"".''.*i ^.::- 21~'' " " " " ~'~' *~*~


THE CHICKEN'S FUNERAL." Now chicky 's dead, let's bury it, so the oldcat can't got it," said Warren." Poor little chicky! we ought to put it in abox. Seems too bad to put the little, soft, whitething in the dirt, don't it? " Ginnie replied." O, I know where there is a box, Ginnie " andWarren ran to the shed. When he returned, hislittle sister Milly asked very soberly, "That'll bea coffin, won't it? ""Yes. We are going to fix it real good," wasthe equally sober answer." Don't they say something 'fore they put folksin the ground ? " was Milly's next question." Yes, of course; " and Ginnie laid the chickenin the box very tenderly.Warren dug the hole, and she was going to putthe box in, when Milly said, " I'll say something.He's the cunningest and best chicky that everlived, and I hope he's gone to heaven. Can't wesing I want to be an angel'?"1After singing, Warren said, " Chickens don'tgo to heaven, Milly.""I wish they did," was her only reply.221


I i ,,i |i!i-,II iII~ ()I)I1l4


JO'S DISCOVERY.Jo Roberts and' her cousin Fan Vinton werespending a week or two with their grandmother.She lived in the country, and the large, o!d-fashioned farmhouse was an endless delight tothem. Yet of all the rooms none pleased Jo sowell as the attic. One day, while she was thereon an exploring expedition, she came across anold chest, which, as she told Fan, must containsomething worth hunting for.Nothing rewarded her search until she came tothe very bottom." O, Fan, what do you suppose there is in thisold thing! " she exclaimed, as she sank upon thefloor, holding a coarse blue stocking in her hand."Do you suppose it is money ? It rattles " sheadded, as she rapidly untied the string, while Fanstood by, her eyes open wide, and her hands raisedin surprise and wonder.Jo held it up by the toe, and out rolled someold brass buttons. Both laughed heartily, and Jo.-:il she wished a fi.i would turn them into goldpieces.223I


.- --,~r -=4C


TOWSER'S MISCHIEF.Lizzie looks as though she felt very badly aboutsomething. She came with her doll, and sat downunder the tree near the brook, thinking it a niceplace to play. Towser came with her. Shethought he would be company for her, but nowshe wishes he hadn't come. She is almost readyto cry, she feels so badly. Do you know whattroubles her ? Look and see what Towser has inhis mouth.It is Lizzio's doll. He is running over thebridge with it, and she is afraid lie will drop itinto the water, or else jump in himself with it.He only does it in play. He doesn't know thatLizzie cares more for the doll than she would fora stick. She often throws a stick and tells Tow-ser to bring it to her.He wanted Lizzie to play with him, and whenshe put the doll down a moment, ho seized it andran away. He thinks Lizzie will chase him, andthey shall have a gay frolic, as they often do; butif she sits still, he will soon bring it back to her.225


C-----r- i 1R i II IIIE P u .16 \PP ..- W; ., WF-jgrre -ia j BpslRrj i ?'- I .r;.'i :' F !II;IBIYlitBl l d1 6; i ':; '- ---i. -- -----


AUNT AMY.Now, did you ever see a pleasanter-looking oldlady ? Aunt Amy not only looks, but is the best,kindest, and pleasantest old lady in the world.She is aunty to all the little boys and girls wholive near.Don't her vegetables look nice? She keepsthem to sell, but she- gives away a good many.Some one asked her one day if she wasn't afraidof becoming poor, and being obliged to go to thepoorhouse." Why, bless you, now The more I give themore I have, I do believe. I lend to the Lord, aridhe returns good measure for all we give to the-poor."The more ragged and forlorn the child, themore aunt Amy gives them. She has driedmany a tear with her rosy-cheeked apples, andsoothed many childish troubles with a handful ofcandy.Even the cats and dogs look upon her as theirspecial friend. Old Nig is ready now for hershare of the dinner. What do you suppose auntAmy has in that big pail? If it is ever so nice,Nig will have some.297


I/kJTr


FEEDING THE HORSE.Annie saw the horse standing out under thetree, and she asked her father if she might feedhim. He gave her an ear of corn, and told her tohold it and let Don bite off a piece. She took thecorn and ran up to the horse, but the moment heopened his mouth and showed his teeth a little,she was afraid and started back. Don thoughtthe corn looked good, so he stepped towards Annieto get it; then she turned and ran to her father.He laughed, and told her that old Don wouldn'thurt her one bit; yet she didn't like to go alone,so her father went with her. Even then shehadn't quite courage enough to hold the corn inher hand, until her father took her in his arms.Then she felt safe.You can see her in her father's arms now, feed-ing Don. He has the harness on, so I think hehas been at work. He will like to eat the good,sweet corn for his dinner. One ear will not beenough. There are more in the basket on theground.229


~-II ~ ~ 1' I i' -"I' '- --'1 l--. _=_--______ __---


LITTLE HANDS.Many acts of kindnessLittle hands can do;Many deeds of mercy,With hearts warm and true.They can smooth so gentlyMamma's tired brow;They can bring the slippersFor dear papa now.They can help big brotherFind the missing ball;They can help kind sister,Working for them all.Should these hands, so useful,E'er in anger rise ?Should they heed the mischiefIn little playmate's eyes ?No, dear little girlies,Gentle, loving waysOnly make you happyThrough the livelong days.231


4 ~ 1__ ">:" __ ^ ~~ ,'\ *'*-.' '\1 -^~~


THE TORN DRESS." O, dear, what shall I do !" cried Helen. " Ican't go to school! I wish I had let the old bossyalone !" and she looked, as well as she couldthrough her tears, at the long rent in her dress." Mother told us not to stop," said her sisterMary." We didn't stop but a minute," sobbed Helen." 0, yes, we've stopped as much as ten minutes.But I'll pin it up, then we'll run home. Perhapsmother can mend it before school-time," was thekind answer, as Mary knek upon the grass to seewhat she e(.'lil do.She looks as though it was rather a difficultthing to pin it doesn't she ? Mary pinned it aswell as she could, however, then they hurriedhome.Their mother sewed it quickly, and then toldthem not to 'stop, even one minute, on the way.They reached the schoolhouse just as the teacherrang the bell. The long darn in Helen's dressmade her more careful about stopping on the wayto school.233


1,;I, _k -.I'', r I [I(; ,- -!1Ir ., r; :I 5,


HARRIE AND HATTIE.What cunning little babies! You can hardlytell them apart. Look and see if there is any dif-ference. Now what is it ?Ah one little girl says, " The one nearest thegentleman has its hair parted in the middle, sothat is Hattie ; and the other has its hair partedon one side, so that is IIarrie."You are right. They are Mrs. Wilson's twinbabies. She loves them very dearly, and theyhave all the care and attention they need. Theyhave been brought to the door to welcome uncleHenry. He loves them too; and their sister Rubythinks there never were such wonderful babies inthe world before. She wishes to take little Hattienow. Their father stands near, also, ready toclasp in his strong arms his baby boy and girl,There are many babies, however, which havenot so much care. They are left by their hardhearted mothers, to fret and cry nearly all day.They are often dirty and ragged. If God hasgiven you kind parents, be very thankful.235


_- ---- _-"i,I 'f= r


THE EXPLOSION.Kitty.King sometimes went to the mine withher father. This was always a great treat toher, for she was never so happy as when byhis side. One day, while she was there, a boygave her a few flowers, and she was so delightedwith them that she wished her father to go di-rectly and show her where she could find some.He was going down into the mine a few min-utes, then he would go with her, he said. Sheplaced the flowers in her sun-bonnet, and wassilently admiring their beauty, when she wasstartled by having her father, with a pale face,spring to her side, lift her in his arms, and rushfrom the spot.She asked him what he was running away fromthe mine for; but he gave no answer. Soon sheheard a rumbling sound, which, young as shewas, she knew too well. Then a confused massof earth, trees, rocks, and stones was thrownviolently up into the air. The mine had ex-ploded. Her father fearing this, had run tosave the life of his child.237


'"Mr, .111111 mmiv.7IN',t';


LOTTIE'S SISTER." Kate, please come and walk with me," saidLottie, as she held up her sister's hat.Kate did not lo(k or.feel very pleasant, as hersister said this, so she answered hastily, " Don'tbother me to-day. My head aches."" It will feel better if you go out won't it ?Mother always says so."" It's too hot! "" 0 it's real cool out under the trees," urgedLottie." I can't go till Carrie comes. There is no funwalking with little girls; " and Kate turned away,taking no more notice of her little sister.Lottie's bright face grow very sober, and oneor two tears stood in her black eyes. She laidKate's hat upon the hall table, and walked slowlyout into the garden." I wish I was a great, big girl," thought Lottie,"' then Kate would walk with me. 0 dear, I wishI could grow real fast! "The pleasant afternoon was upoiled for Lottieby her sister's thoughtless words.


i r i, ,tiinl, i I i i i,i, i 'I 'Illill-ill -'. I 1 ,~ :;3~Srld%$lll 11111!111/1111 l?!111$1111 1 h ir~I


LITTLE MAY'S PICTURE."Iza, put me on paper," said little May toher sister Eliza, as she sat drawing, one afternoon.Eliza loved May dearly, yet she did not wish tostop her work just then, so she told her to runaway and play with her dolls.May walked away very slowly, and sat down inher little chair. But she could not play with herdolls, for she was thinking about Eliza's pictures,which she admired so much.Presently she was peeping over her sister'sshoulder, and with tears in her eyes she againsaid, " Please, Iza, make little May on paper."Eliza could not resist this plea, so she tookanother sheet of drawing paper, and told May toget up into the high chair, and she would put herupon paper as well as she could. See how happyshe looks now!Eliza feels happy, too, because she is doingright. Her drawing can be done another timejust as well; perhaps it can be done better, forthe happier we feel the better we can work.241


7---Y~VV. ;A I~~----- -:.-o-------=- - : -I --=----o -- ----= -,',2j ,. ,-~-~


PATIENT LINA.Lina Fairbanks has been a cripple for severaFyears. At first it seemed very hard to be shutup in the house, except when some one was readyto go out and wheel her chair. But brotherFrank declares it is nothing but play to go outwith her, and every pleasant morning his cheeryvoice is heard, asking, --"Which will you have this morning, the blackor white pony? Both are at the disposal of yourladyship.""I'll take the span;" is her usual answer. ThenFrank and Alice take their places at the back ofthe chair, 'and away they go up and down the nicegravel walks. Lina often grows quite merry withtwo such cheerful companions, and comes in feel-ing refreshed, and thankful that she has such akind brother and sister.In the evening they enjoy singing togethervery much. If Lina was not so patient, Frankwould hardly wish to stay at home in the even-ing. Now he thinks playing games and singingwith his sisters better than being out in thestreet.


----LC-- -- --r',v:FI ; .is t '5,-u"rCllitt i `Z$aPII YII P *\."'


BLOSSOM HELPING MAMMA." Good morning, mamma! Do you feel betterto-day ?" asked little Blossom."Yes, dear, I think I do."" What shall I do for you now ? "" I can't think of anything just now. Nora hasbeen in, and fixed up the room.""Have you had breakfast?" was Blossom'squestion, after a moment's thought." I could not eat anything this morning."" Not a single mouthful -not the least tinybit, mamma? "" No, darling."" Please, mamma, let me bring in somethingnice," pleaded the tender-hearted child." Well, you may help Nora make a little toast;"and mamma smiled faintly as the delighted littlegirl ran from the room." 0, this is real nice, mamma !" exclaimed Blos-som, as she returned, bringing very carefully asmall waiter, on. which was a dainty bit of toast." It tastes very good. I guess my little daugh-ter will make an excellent nurse."There was no answer, but Blossom's eyesshowed that mamma's praise was sufficient re-ward.215


-, l s ', l, ,,(I


BLOSSOM READING." Not in bed yet, Blossom ?" said papa, as heopened the door."I wanted to find about Heaven, papa. Mam-ma says she's going there, and 'tis a beautifulplace. She -said the Bible told all about it."Papa's face grew sad as he took little Blossomin his arms, and said tenderly, -" Let papa find it."" 0, it's way over in the last part. Mammasaid she'd find it to-morrow, but I wanted to readit now.""Shall I read it for you ?"" 0, yes; that will be nicer. I can't tell thebig words."Then in a low voice he read the beautiful de-scription of Heaven."What a pretty home mamma'll have Jesusis good to get it all ready, isn't he ? But I wishshe'd wait till you and I could go, too, papa," Blos-som said, with quivering lips." So do I," replied papa, as he clasped his childmore closely." We'll go some time, won't we ?" said Blossom,hopefully.247


i: 'II jI -I ____ ---- 'd IiI- '',,11iI i,,111 !IiI iiII [I 1, I II=-'-


AZZIE'S RETURN.The teacher sat at the desk feeling very sad.She feared one of her little girls had deceivedher. A paper, which she sometimes allowed thechildren to take, was missing when school closed.The girls thought Azzie had it last; so the teach-er questioned her after the others left, and shefelt quite sure that Azzie knew where it was; yetshe kept saying," I haven't got it."At last the teacher told Azzie she might gohome. While she sat thinking about her, andwishing that she might become an honest, truth-ful child, she heard a step in the entry; then thedoor slowly opened, and Azzie came in with thepaper in her hand." Please, teacher, here's the paper. I hid it."" Come and tell me all about it, Azzie.""I never had no picture papers; so I wantedthis."" My poor child, I'll give you one every week."" I never took one before," said Azzie, tearfully." I hope you never will again. It's very wrong,""answered the teacher, as she kissed her.249


- -,-_. -~ ; 4' \'; '-__ --_i. ;-/ y",- U A. ! ._- _-.-.: _= .. .. . _: -' " .^ "* i r t ( 1, ,'C kid* 0ItS;~Y '~1


JESSIE'S ERRAND."Jessie, can you do an errand for me this morn-ing? " asked aunt Mary." Yes, aunty," was the cheerful answer." Please take this note to the jeweller's. Hewill understand what I wish."" Then I need not say anything? "" Simply say that Miss Stearns sent it."" I'll be back in a few minutes;" and Jessieran merrily down the stairs and through the hall.She had but a short distance to go, and soon herlight stop was heard on the stairs again.** Aunty, Mr. -Harlow gave me this little box!What can there be in it ?" said Jessie, as she en-tered the room." Let us see," aunt Mary quietly replied. Soonshe held up a gold ring, with Jessie's name andage upon the inside." Is this for me ?" asked Jessie, with sparklingeyes." Yes; it is your birthday present."" Thank you! thank you I have always want-ed one like this. I shall never forget the day Iwas ten years old, or my dear, good aunty."


.1' j_- ,,/lu- : - -~~ ~~~ -:----Z '' -':=---,..;_ ! ,- .A li_ ------JiI~it


POOR MOLLY." O, mother! mother! look and see poor Mollyout in the storm Her feet are bare, and it's socold Mayn't I go and ask her to come in?"cried Fannie Browne to her mother, as they sat atthe window." Certainly, my dear. Run quickly, before shepasses the door."Her mother had scarcely finished speaking be-fore Fannie )vas trying to open the door." 0, mother, come quick! I can't open it;Molly'll get past! "Her mother was by her side in a milii.,lniii andthe door opened just as Molly came near." Come in, Molly," said Fannie, pleasantly.Molly looked up gratefully as she said, " Thankyou. I'm most wet through. I'll run in a minute."After she entered the room she said, " My feetare weland muddy."" Never mind, Molly. Stand on this rug nearthe fire, and Fannie will get some cake for you,"answered Mrs. Browne, kindly.253


_-- %P-r C51Fi s i 3 bEF-= i-= is- = 9 ?Ju L ah;, ; 6 I1Jd L 14,. =,----i-%;r,41---------;j.


RESCUED FROM THE WATERS.How idid rain For almost a week the blackclouds hung over the village and poured out theirtorrents. Gracie thought it must be anotherflood.The mill-owners had built a dam across theriver, and now the pond above rose higher andhigher; and even'spread out over the meadows.But still the rain fell and the pond rose.At last the dam could bear the pressure .:."longer, and with a mighty crash it gave wa;y,and the awful flood swept down the valley, bear-ing away trees and fences, cattle and people, andeven small houses.Gracie and her mother were overtaken by therushing waters before they could reach a placeof safety, and were swept away.BuiA me people on the shore saw them. Oneyoung ifah .seized a rope in his hand, and spranginto the water after them. In the picture, thayare- being drawn ashore.255%*


S.... r L 'ITEISlN4iz"J I AM"--~.11,,


WILFUL MABEL." Now, Mabel, don't try to reach those apples.Jump down, and I'll get them for you," said Gran-ville to his sister." No; I'm going to get them myself," answeredMabel, as she stepped upon the topmost rail andgrasped a limb of the tree." You'll surely fall, Mabel " exclaimed herbrother, who still stood near." Well, 'lf get that great red apple, if I do,"was her hasty answer.She gave a slight spring, and her fingers almosttouched the apple she wished, but just then therail broke, and she would have' fallen to theground, if Granville hadn't hastened to the res-cue. She kept hold of the branch until hereached her, or she might have been badlyinjured.After he had helped her to the ground, he gotthe apple and placed it in her hand, saying,-" The next time you wish to gather apples, askme to help you, Mabel. I can climb fences easierthan you can."257


, jif t, ' :!,f ',14,', l l 1


ESTER'S NAP."Ester Ester jump up quickly. Breakfast isalmost ready."" 0, dear," said Ester, as she heard her mothercall, " I do wish I could lay in the morning as longas I wanted to ;" and she scowled her eyebrows,and pouted her lips, until her face looked very bad.She turned this way and that, but did not getup, and in a few minutes she was asleep again." Ester, I called you some time ago; why didn'tyou hurry up then ? " Now her mother's handwas upon her shoulder, and she sat up in bed."I was so sleepy I couldn't keep my eyesopen."" A little cold water will make them feel better.Come, I'll help you now, for father is waiting."" Are you sick this morning, Ester ? " asked herfather cheerfully, as she took her seat at thetable." No," was the rather cross answer."Ester " exclaimed her father, in surprise." No, father, I'm well."" Not very well, I fear," he said, soberly.259*


9 I -- -- -'111'1 r ;rc : _I % g Tgsln ici i f ;:; ... :BAllr ul:."4" -Wntl 2.\$f-- -- -- -,,a


ESTER'S FRIGHT.Here is Ester again; but what troubles hernow? She looks frightened. See her mother andsisters running from the house. They heard herscream, -" Mother! mother O, do come here !" Theythought something dreadful had happened, so theyleft their work and ran out into the garden whereEster was." What is the matter ? " asked, her mother, insurprise. She could see nothing to alarm evena child." that caterpillar " cried Ester, pointing tothe little harmless worm crawling upon theground." And you've made all this fuss about a cater-pillar, you silly child You ought to be ashamedof yourself " exclaimed one of her sisters."He was crawling at me," said Ester, half.crying.- "Well, he couldn't hurt you, if he did. Youcould easily get out of his way. Never be sofoolish again," her mother answered, as she re-turned to the house.261-


,'1(-S---II


VIOLET.How comfortable Violet looks lying upon thelounge dressed in her white muslin She hasnothing to do but lie there and read all day, ifshe wishes. She has lovely, fragrant flowers allabout her. Everything is as attractive and beau-tiful as her parents can make it.Do you envy her and wish you had a room justLike hers, and could lie on a soft lounge all day ?Let me tell you more about Violet before youwish so.She is lame; she cannot run about, cannot evenwalk slowly without crutches. And even withthese, she can go but a short distance on theground.Now, would any of the healthy little girls whoread this be willing to lose the use of their limbsfor the sake of wearing costly dresses and lyingupon a lounge day after day?I am very sure you would not, if you should tryit even for one short week.264


c T -4 e 4 5. I i.*..;r: .ii!:I :i .. ,1 11 1 ;b:"'' Ir. ..P;,hYI'JA *r:y-n 'Cr,--- -L J


HAZEL'S HAT."If there, isn't Hazel on White Prince Andshe's got my old Chinese hat on, too. What onearth is that child up to now? "Phil Lambert said this as he turned suddenlyand saw who was following himself and his cousinLouise." She has a stick in her hand. You don't sup-pose she'd use that on White Prince?" Louiseasked, as she watched the queer-looking rider.Suppose ? I could suppose anything whereHazel is concerned," was the laughing answer.Then stepping directly in front of the horse, helifted his hat, saying, gayly, -"'Hail to the chief who in triumph ad-vances!' ""That's so, exactly, Phil. I've triumphed overgreat obstacles getting so far."" Was that hat one ?" asked Louise." No, of course not. That hat overcomesher," replied Phil before Hazel could speak."I hunted from cellar to garret for it, anyway," said Hazel, with laughing eyes." Haven't the least doubt of that. You alwayshad a fancy for my old hats."265


, I I 1"----S


LORA'S KITTY.See this little white kitty Isn't she cunning?And isn't she mischievous too? Lora thinks herDowny jui..t tl- prettiest kitty in the world. AndDowny seems to understand that the more troubleshe makes, the more hugs and kisses Lora givesher.She likes to curl up in Lora's lap and go tosleep; but if there is a book there, she will some-times run up to her shoulder and lie down, withthe soft curls falling over her.Downy is into all sorts of mischief. But shetakes particular delight in overturning Lora'swork-basket. See her now Lora is busy read-ing, and does not notice.Her basket was there, with the contents arrangedvery nicely, and Downy seemed to think it washer special work to overturn everything.First one little paw went into the basket, thenanother. Each time out came a spool of cotton orsilk, or a ball of worsted. But kitty wanted to domore, so she contrived to tip the basket over, andout rolled everything.


*I " " ', I' -l IIili,-, , ,ii


DAPH IRONING.Daph has plenty of little helpers, hasn't she?Wallie is upon the table, with his curly head bentover as though he were anxious to learn to iron.And little Crissy is standing close by him withher hands on the table, while Ellen is just beyondDaph, watching also. She looks quite sober, too.Do you know why these children stay in thislittle kitchen with Daph ? Their parents aredead, and dear, kind old Daph has been very,"*very good to them. They all love her dearly, forshe works very hard for them.The little ones do not understand, but Ellenknows that Daph earns money washing and ironingfor people, then she spends it all for the children.They would not know where to get food to eat,or clothes to wear, if it was not for dear, goodDaph.She used to live with their father and mother,and when they lost all their money and then died,she said she should take care of the children aslong as she lived.269I


_41 -- I I IIAIS


ANNE AND WILL.Anne Morton was going away with her auntLizzie. She thought she should have a good timeplaying with her little cousins, but she was sorryto leave brother Will.She had no sisters, and he was her only brother.He was much older, yet she preferred him for acompanion rather than any of the little girls wholived near.He was sometimes away to school, but he wasat home now ; for this reason she felt more sorryto leave home just at this time." I shall have to walk all alone, now, Arine,"said Will; as she stood ready to go." I'll stay at home," replied Anne, looking upanxiously." 0, no; I am big enough to take my walksalone, I think. I shall miss you, pet, but I canget along nicely. Now you must be off. Goodby; " and he kissed the sweet lips lifted to his." Good by, Will," were the last words he heardas the door closed.271


? 1. 'rt1. 31 Ir I I i I irAL p1'rli B ff E7 .L' : " i "4%F7 t ird :i b-;JS Ut 1,2?5 3i b " i L-iZ51 '/ c'"" ,1. --"- -1 ------- ?- L C 5 CC


WATCHING THE DOVES."Amy! Amy! I'm going to give the dovessomething to eat. Come and see them !"Neddie ran for the crumbs, and soon both wereout near the shed watching the doves.There were but three on the ground, yet Ned-die had crumbs enough for a dozen. He wasthrowing large handfuls about, when Amy said,-"You mustn't waste it, Neddie. If you doyou'll come to- to something. What is't mam-ma says ? "" Come to want, isn't it ? " asked the wise littleNeddie." That's it, zactly. There's enoughh now to lastVie two, free days. Dovies can't eat but littlemite."She had heard mamma say something like thisto Neddie many times, and she liked to repeat itas well as she could." Vic can't eat a single bit, Amy."" Course she eats, else how'd she live ?"" Dolls don't live They are only made up."" 0 it's naughty to tell such stories; " and Amywalked away much offended.273


lwi


University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs