• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Matter
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 Matty's Sorrow
 Willie's doves
 How a little thief was caught
 God is on the sea
 The sick baby
 Little birdies
 A rabbit family
 Winter scene
 Grandfather
 Timid child's hymn
 Be kind
 Heathen children
 The squirrel
 Making others happy
 The clock
 See my water-wheel
 Family worship
 Matty's conscience
 Busy little lapps
 Little frankie
 Hannah Kilpin
 Confession
 Known by their actions
 Little lights
 A temperance dog
 Hunting eggs
 The Timid rabbit
 Cotton pod and flower
 "Do 'way doggie"
 How a little bird told
 Telling lies
 Cousin marvin
 Child's evening prayer
 The bible says so
 Keeper
 Prince and the kitten
 Cruelty and kindness
 When the dark comes
 The slow-pace loris
 Little Belle
 Dolly's snow man
 The giraffe
 Little children
 Blind, but useful
 Nellies's May-party
 The horned rhinoceros
 Do good
 Little darling
 Mrs. Morris's story
 Pity the poor
 Little mischief
 The strawberry girl
 The pilgrim fathers
 Lame Robbie
 A morning ride
 Temper
 Tommy
 Foolish frights
 Susie's twin dollies
 Little singers
 The golden rule
 Grandpapa's treasure
 Frank and his boat
 The rescued dog
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Cracked corn
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026993/00003
 Material Information
Title: Cracked corn
Physical Description: 3 v. : ill. ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bullard, Asa, 1804-1888
Pierce, William J ( Engraver )
Whitney, Elias James, b. 1827 ( Engraver )
W.J. Holland & Co ( Publisher )
John Andrew & Son ( Engraver )
Publisher: W.J. Holland & Company
Place of Publication: Springfield Mass
Publication Date: 1873
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Birds -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Flowers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Prayer -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1873   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1873
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Springfield
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: prepared by Asa Bullard.
General Note: Illustrations engraved by John Andrew & Son, Whitney and Peirce (Pierce).
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026993
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002222973
notis - ALG3221
oclc - 32775587

Table of Contents
    Front Matter
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Foreword
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Matty's Sorrow
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Willie's doves
        Page 10
        Page 11
    How a little thief was caught
        Page 12
        Page 13
    God is on the sea
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The sick baby
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Little birdies
        Page 18
        Page 19
    A rabbit family
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Winter scene
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Grandfather
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Timid child's hymn
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Be kind
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Heathen children
        Page 30
        Page 31
    The squirrel
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Making others happy
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The clock
        Page 36
        Page 37
    See my water-wheel
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Family worship
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Matty's conscience
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Busy little lapps
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Little frankie
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Hannah Kilpin
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Confession
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Known by their actions
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Little lights
        Page 54
        Page 55
    A temperance dog
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Hunting eggs
        Page 58
        Page 59
    The Timid rabbit
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Cotton pod and flower
        Page 62
        Page 63
    "Do 'way doggie"
        Page 64
        Page 65
    How a little bird told
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Telling lies
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Cousin marvin
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Child's evening prayer
        Page 72
        Page 73
    The bible says so
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Keeper
        Page 76
        Page 77
    Prince and the kitten
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Cruelty and kindness
        Page 80
        Page 81
    When the dark comes
        Page 82
        Page 83
    The slow-pace loris
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Little Belle
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Dolly's snow man
        Page 88
        Page 89
    The giraffe
        Page 90
        Page 91
    Little children
        Page 92
        Page 93
    Blind, but useful
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Nellies's May-party
        Page 96
        Page 97
    The horned rhinoceros
        Page 98
        Page 99
    Do good
        Page 100
        Page 101
    Little darling
        Page 102
        Page 103
    Mrs. Morris's story
        Page 104
        Page 105
    Pity the poor
        Page 106
        Page 107
    Little mischief
        Page 108
        Page 109
    The strawberry girl
        Page 110
        Page 111
    The pilgrim fathers
        Page 112
        Page 113
    Lame Robbie
        Page 114
        Page 115
    A morning ride
        Page 116
        Page 117
    Temper
        Page 118
        Page 119
    Tommy
        Page 120
        Page 121
    Foolish frights
        Page 122
        Page 123
    Susie's twin dollies
        Page 124
        Page 125
    Little singers
        Page 126
        Page 127
    The golden rule
        Page 128
        Page 129
    Grandpapa's treasure
        Page 130
        Page 131
    Frank and his boat
        Page 132
        Page 133
    The rescued dog
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text




















































































































































.... ....



































The Baldwin Library
mrn T '3














/ Ss-















CRACKED CORN.









PREPARED BY

ASA BULLARD,
AUTHOR OF "CHILDREN'S ALBUM," "CHILDREN'S BOOK
FOR SABBATH HOURS," ETC.







Volume III.






SPRINGFIELD, MASS.:
W. J. HOLLAND & COMPANY.
1873.























NOTE.



As corn must be cracked into small pieces for little
chickens, so the stories in this little book, for the little
ones in the family, have been prepared in plain and
simple language by
THE AUTHOR.
"SUNNYBANK," CAMBRIDGE.








Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1873, by
W. J. HOLLAND,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.
All Rights Reserved.





















CONTENTS.






PAGE, PAGE.
MATTY'S SORROW,. .. 9 LITTLE FRANKIE, . 47
WILLIE'S DOVES, .. 11 HANNAH KILPIN, .. .49
How A LITTLE THIEF WAS CONFESSION, . .. 51
CAUGHT, . 13 KNOWN BYTHEIRACTIONS, 53
GOD IS ON THE SEA,. 15 LITTLE LIGHTS, .. .55
THE SICK BABY, .... .17 A TEMPERANCE DOG, 57
LITTLE BIRDIES, .. 19 HUNTING EGGS.. 59
A RABBIT FAMILY, 21 THE TIMID RABBIT, 61
"WINTER SCENE, . 23 COTTON POD AND FLOWER, 63
GRANDFATHER .. 25 "Do'WAY, DOGGIE!" 65
TIMID CHILD'S HYMN, 27 HOW A LITTLE BIRD TOLD, 67
BE KIND, .. .29 TELLING LIES . .69
HEATHEN CHILDREN, 31 COUSIN MARVIN, . 71
THE SQUIRREL, . 33 CHILD'S EVENING PRAYER, 73
MAKING OTHERS HAPPY,. 35 THE BIBLE SAYS SO, 75
THE CLOCK . .. ... 7 KEEPER, ...... 77
SEE MY WATER-WHEEL,. 39 PRINCE AND THE KITTEN, 79
FAMILY WORSHIP, 41 CRUELTY AND KINDNESS, 81
MATTY'S CONSCIENCE, 43 WHEN THE DARK COMES, 83
BUSY LITTLE LAPPS, 45 THE SLOW-PACED LORIS, 85
[VOL. 3] 5









6 CONTENTS.

PAGE. PAGE.
LITTLE BELLE, . 87 THE PILGRIM FATHERS, 113
DOLLY'S SNOW-MAN, 89 LAME ROBBIE, .. 115
THE GIRAFFE, . 91 A MORNING RIDE, 117
LITTLE CHILDREN, 93 TEMPER . .119
BLIND, BUT USEFUL, .. 95 TOMMY, . .. 121
NELLIE'S MAY-PARTY, 97 FOOLISH FRIGHTS, .123
THE HORNED RHINOCEROS, 99 SUSIE'S TWIN DOLLIES, 125
Do GOOD, . .. 101 LITTLE SINGERS, ... ..127
LITTLE DARLING, .. 103 THE GOLDEN RULE, .129
MRS. MORRIS' STORY, 105 GRANDPAPA'S TREAS-
PITY THE POOR, ... 107 URE, .. .... 181
LITTLE MISCHIEF,. .. 109 FRANK AND HIS BOAT, 133
THE STRAWBERRY-GIRL, 111 THE RESCUED DOG, 135
[VOL. 3]
































I-
1 : _IJ






I.-- .. .___


MATTY'S SORROW.
8












MATTY'S SORROW.


T HIS good man has come to see, and try
to comfort little Matty, who is full of
grief. His little baby-brother Willie has
died, and the angels have carried him home
to Jesus.
"When I came home from school," sobbed
Matty, "Willie would try to walk across the
room to meet me; and he would clap his
hands, he would. I bought him that little
yellow bird. Dear Willie won't play with it
any more."
Matty was always kind to his little brother;
so he does not now have to say, as he thinks
of him all cold in death,-
Oh, that I had been kind to him!"
What bitter tears brothers and sisters
have to shed, if they are not kind, when a
dear brother or sister dies!
9


























4,^*^*"^q




~I.~ -
r.7





































WILLIE'S DOVES.
10










WILLIE'S DOVES.


W HAT can be the matter with Susie?
How cross she looks! Willie is hold-
ing out one of his beautiful doves for her to
see, while the other sits on his shoulder; but
there she stands, looking as cross as can be,
and pulling a beautiful flower in pieces, as if
that were to blame.
Her hoe lies on the ground, and she seems
to be a very idle, naughty girl. I think her
mother wished her to work a while in the
garden, before going to Uncle John's with
Willie; but Susie did not want to work, and
was cross about it, so Willie went without
her. He has returned with some beautiful
doves which were given to him, while Susie
has none. And she looks as if she was sorry
he had them. She will not even look at
them, but stands there pulling to pieces what
she can never put together again,-one of
God's flowers.
11






















































12








HOW A LITTLE THIEF WAS
CAUGHT.

SITTLE Tommy had a poll-parrot. He
had taught his pet to repeat a great
many words, and among them, "stop thief! "
"stop thief! and help! "help I though
the bird did not know the meaning of them.
Tommy was a great lover of sweetmeats.
One day he stole away into the closet, stood
on a chair, and with a spoon began to help
himself to some nice preserves. But the poor
boy had hardly tasted it, when his parrot
cried out,-
"Stop thief! stop thief! "
Tommy dropped the spoon and rushed at
poor Polly as though he would tear her in
pieces ; when she screamed out, "help "
"help "help!" as loud as she could. This
brought in Tommy's mother and aunt to see
what could be the matter; and there they
found Tommy's lips and hands all sticky with
the sweetmeats. And thus the thief was
caught.
13












































GOD IS ON THE SEA.
14














GOD IS ON THE SEA.



H'EY that go down to the sea in ships,
that do business in great waters, these
see the works of the Lord, and his wonders
in the deep. For he commandeth, and raiseth
the stormy wind, which lifteth up the waves
thereof. They mount up tothe heaven, they
go down again to the depths; their soul is
melted because of trouble. They reel to and
fro, and stagger like a drunken man, and are
at their wit's end. Then they cry unto the
Lord in their trouble, and he bringeth them
out of their distresses. He maketh the storm
a calm, so that the waves thereof are still.
Then are they glad because they be quiet:
so he bringeth them unto their desired ha-
ven."
15


























I. i




















16









THE SICK BABY.


RS. WHITE was a poor woman whose
husband was dead; and Susie, Tommy
and the baby were her children.
They lived in two small rooms; and every
morning their mother went out to work, that
she might earn bread to keep them from
starving. Susie kept the rooms neat and
clean, and tended the baby; while Tommy
blacked boots, held horses, and earned all
the odd pennies he could, to help his dear
mother.
Susie looks anxious and troubled to-day,
as she holds her little brother in her arms.
He has fallen into a restless sleep, and his
wee hands are turning hot. Tommy has
come in for his dinner; and they are wonder-
ing whether it will be better to send for their
mother, or to go for the kind doctor not far
away, who is kind to the poor as was the
blessed Jesus when he was on the earth.
2B 17


















1qat



J". '# -..1









LITTLE BIRDIES.














LITTLE BIRDIES.




"WHAT do birdies dream of ?
Flowers and leaves and waving wheat,
Brooks and buds and mosses sweet,
Nooks all hidden from the het,
Little birdies dream of.

What do little birdies sing of?
Morning dew-drops pearly fair,
Sunshine rippling down the air,
Heaven's rich beauty everywhere,
Little birdies sing of.

What are birdies proud of ?
Soft-lined houses up the tree,
Baby birdies, one, two, three:
These, my pet, you still may see
Little birdies proud of.
19





























A RABBIT FAMILY.










A RABBIT FAMILY.


UITE a party of rabbits, I am sure.
Don't they look cunning? See!--the
pretty mother sits with her ears pricked up,
listening, always orthe watch lest some
enemy should come and surprise her and her
young children.
One is white, with a black head and ears.
See how comfortable she looks, with her little
paws out in front! Then, beside the mother
there are two cunning "bunnies," with ears
all pricked up like hers, listening and watch-
ing. The one behind, I guess, is taking a
little nap. Perhaps he thinks, So many are
watching, I'll take the chance to go to sleep."
The mother rabbit makes a nice bed for her
little ones, and lines it with fur from her own
breast. How kind and motherly this is!
All the little rabbits are always attentive
and obedient to the father rabbit. A good
lesson for all children.
21













-' .' -" -, '--- .


























22
".. ." -. --- -

.,~~~~~ ~~ ;."''- .











WINTER SCENE.


ERE is a pleasant winter scene. The
father is carrying in an armful of wood
to replenish the fire in the broad old fire-
place; while the children are having a fine
time in the snow. Two boys are giving their
little sister a sleigh-ride on Johnny's sled.
And little Eddie and Dick are having a
nice run-There! Eddie has fallen, and is
half-buried up in the deep snow, while the
roguish Dick almost seems to be laughing at
him.
The rabbits and birds, finding all the ber-
ries and shrubs covered up, are gathering,
with glad hearts, the food the children have
so kindly thrown out for them. These crea-
tures remember kind acts; and much more
do the suffering poor remember them.
Let the boys and girls think of this when
the snow and the cold come.
23














.-l ,.I


,, ',, t ,.. ,

I "

IA
















GRANDFATHER.
24
,u 1 L I'i!,i,,,
''L' i'!li l '''''
GRNDATE











GRANDFATHER.


GRANDFATHER is very old. He is
eighty-seven! Does not that sound
like a great many years to you, little reader,
who count your birthdays by fives and sixes
and sevens and eights ?
Grandpapa Gibson is a good old man; but
once he was young, strong, and vigorous.
Grandpapa had two orphan grandchildren.
Johnny was a fine boy, nine years old; and
little Gracie was only two.
Ah did not these young people make sun-
shine in grandpapa's house? How he loved
the little pets! and Baby Grace seemed like
his own Baby Gracie come back again.
How the toddling little feet would dance
when they saw grandpa in his big chair!
The old man's face would beam with a holy
smile; for he loved the little ones, and felt
that of such is the kingdom of heaven."
25















































TIMID CHILD'S HYMN.
26












TIMID CHILD'S HYMN.



" O LITTLE child, lie still and sleep;
Jesus is near,
Thou need'st not fear.
No one need fear whom God doth keep,
By day or night.
Then lay thee down in slumber deep,
Till morning light.

" O little child, thou need'st not wake,
Though round thy bed
Are dangers spread.
Thy Saviour, care of thee will take,
For he is strong ;
And angels watch thee, for his sake,
The whole night long.

" O little child, when thou must die,
Fear nothing then,
But say Amen'
To God's command, and quiet lie
In his kind hand,
Till he shall say,' Dear child, come fly
To heaven's bright land.'"
27
















































BE KIND.
8









BE KIND.


"(- IVE me my ball: I tell you, give it to
me this minute "
The voice which came in at my window
was very loud and angry; and I drew near,
to see what it could mean. There was my
Lucy, holding her brother's ball behind her;
and he, with a flushed face and ugly scowl,
was trying to recover his treasure. She held
it quite out of his reach, and smiled in his
angry face in a most provoking way. "You
sha'n't have it till I get ready," I heard her
say, and then she gave a scream; for Charlie
had pinched her little white wrist very hard,
and she began to cry, tossing the ball as far
away as she could.
I called the children in, and sent them
each to their own chamber, until they were
ready to kiss and forgive each other. Then
we all knelt down together, and asked the
dear Jesus, with tears, to help them remem-
ber to be more like him in days to come.
29




















i i ,, l ,


iTE CHILDREN






HIEAT HEN CHILDREN.










HEATHEN CHILDREN.


HINK of the difference between heathen
children and those who dwell in Chris-
tian countries. In this country, the light of
the gospel shines almost everywhere; the
name of God, the Bible, and the Sabbath
are known; and children can attend the
sanctuary and the Sabbath school, where
they may hear of Jesus and his salvation.
But in Africa and India, and other heathen
lands, the people "sit in darkness, and in
the region of the shadow of death." The
true and living God is not known; and, if
people worship at all, they bow down to
idols, which have no power to bless or save
those who call upon them. The Sabbath is
not made to differ from any other day.

"These rocks and these dales never heard
The sound of the church-going bell;
Never smiled when the Sabbath appeared,
Or rejoiced at the sound of its knell."
31


























, :' J ";








THE SQUIRREL.
32













THE SQUIRREL.


_jERE is a picture of a pretty squirrel,
gnawing a hole in the nut that little
girl has thrown him out of the window. Do
you not love him, children ? Ile has such a
merry, roguish look, and such bright, black,
sparkling eyes, and such a graceful, feathery
tail, He is very playful, but he is a busy
little fellow, too. He has storehouses in the
holes of old trees, where he lays up nuts and
acorns, that he may have plenty to eat in the
winter.
If he spent all his time in play, he would
starve in the winter.
Little children who would like to play
always, and never to work, might learn a
good lesson from the active little squirrel,
who plays so prettily, jumps so merrily, and
works so hard, too.
3B 33

















I j I -"!-. o







I


























34
MAKING OTHERS HAPPY.~

I i34










MAKING OTHERS HAPPY.


UCY, this nice young miss from the city,
while on a visit at her uncle's in the
country, is trying to make Betty, in her
striped apron and thick shoes, and her next-
door neighbor, Molly Ray, happy.
She has a magnet and a little fish, and she
is showing how the magnet will lift the fish
right into the air. They are very much
pleased. Betty throws her old sun-bonnet
on the ground, and with her honest, homely
face, and earnest manner, looks on with great
interest, but can't understand.
"Now, if you will both come to uncle's
house in the morning," said Lucy, I will let
you see my fish swim in a tub of water, and
you may each take the magnet in your hands,
and see if the fish will not follow you."
When Lucy went to her mother's room,
she told her of these little girls, and said,
" mother, I do wish I could make them
as happy as I am!"
35































. . .








THE CLOCK.
36











THE CLOCK.

~-S

SEE the neat, oaken clock!
In the centre it stands,
And it points at the time
With its two pretty hands:
The one shows the minute,
The other the hour,
As you often may see
In a church or high tower.
The pendulum swinging
Inside the clock-case,
Sends the two pretty hands
Round its neat little face.
There's a nice little bell,
Which the hammer does knock;
And, when you hear that,
You may tell what's o'clock.
We love twelve and five,
Because 'tis a rule:
Our lessons are finished,
We march out of school.
So may I, like the clock,
Keep my face clean and bright,
My hands, while they're moving,
Must do what is right;
My tongue must be guarded
To say what is true,
Wherever I rove, or whatever I do.
37

















'' i i i



IIh
""i ;l',; ,' '





















SEE MY WATER-WHEEL.
38
SE Y AEE-HE.,










SEE MY WATER-WHEEL.


AMES is none of your idle boys. When
he is out of school,-his lessons all
studied, and his other duties performed,-
he goes earnestly to his play. He is quite a
mechanic. He likes to be making things.
He never whittles, without whittling his
stick into a knife, or spoon or sword, or
something of the kind. And when he thinks,
he always tries to think to some purpose.
He has just finished a water-wheel; and
here he is, with his long rubber boots on,
just setting it to going; and see how it
spins, and makes the water fly! He has
called his sisters Jane and Lizzie, and little
bub, to the window, and throwing up his
hat in exultation, and pointing to his work,
he exclaims, "See my water-wheel!" And
isn't it a fine specimen of his skill and in-
genuity ?
39





















VII


























FAMILY WORSHIP.
40








FAMILY WORSHIP.


SOOK at the scene of family worship in
the picture. See how devoutly these
parents, around their rustic table, are engaged
in reading the Word of God. Even little
Lilly, in her father's arms, seems interested
in the sacred service. But little Josie, in
his mother's lap, is so young that he shows
more interest in his ball than in the words
of truth that are read.
Let all our young readers learn to be quiet
and attentive during the time of family wor-
ship. All should feel that the words of
prayer are their own words. If the father
makes confession of sin, let each one in those
confessions acknowledge his own sin. When
he pleads for pardon, through Jesus Christ,
let each make that plea for himself. When
he asks God to watch over them and bless
them, let each make this prayer his own. In
this way all should engage in the service,
and no one will be weary, listless, and drowsy.
41















































MATTY'S CONSCIENCE.
42








MATTY'S CONSCIENCE.


ERE is little Matty, with his missionary-
box in his lap, talking with conscience.
" I wanted so to have kept the box, and got
it quite full to give back to my teacher."
"Yes," said Matty's conscience; "but was
it only that you might send the Bible to the
heathen that you asked for the box, Matty? "
Well, I did care for the heathen, I'm
sure."
"Yes, you did, when your teacher told
you the stories about them; you felt just
then as if you'd have done anything for
them; but afterwards, what made you so
anxious about your box ?"
I don't mean to say that I didn't think it
would be very nice to fill my box before any
of the other boys."
Remember that pennies put in to make
more show than other boys, or for any reason,
except for Christ's sake, won't be the kind
of pennies that the missionary-box asks for."
43


































BUSY LITTLE LAPPS.
BUSY LITTLE LAPIPS.












BUSY LITTLE LAPPS.


HERE is a tribe of busy little people,
who live away in the cold and frozen
region of Lapland, called the Lapps, or Lap-
landers. They do not live in huts, but in
tents, wandering up and down the country.
The reindeer is a very useful animal that
God has provided for them. The reindeer
lives on moss that it finds under the snow.
It has no stable in winter, for God has made
it to endure the cold.
The Lapps use the reindeer as a horse to
travel with, as you see in the picture. And
then they live on its milk, and its flesh an-
swers the purpose of beef and mutton; and
its warm skin makes a coat or a rug, or any
garment the Lapps may choose.
How kind God was to make such a useful
animal for the poor Lapps that live in such a
frozen country!
45

















S I Ii I -

j I ,


















LITTLE FRANKIE.
46
S, :_ : -: __ : -:- .
LITTLEi FRNIE.
II i,















LITTLE FRANKIE.




LITTLE Frankie, our pet,
With his bright, curly hair,
Loved to play out of doors
In the pure, morning air.


He trundled his cart,
And played with his toys,
The happiest and best
Of all little boys.


Then he plucked a sweet rose
From the garden so near,
Which he hastened to bring
To his own mother dear.


And the mother looked down
On her dear boy, and smiled;
And happy was she
In the love of her child.
47
























i L" ;' i' 4, 1 l '"'

j l

HANNAH KILPIN.
48










HANNAH KILPIN.


WHEN this little girl was about five
years old, she was found in India,
lying under a cocoanut-tree, to die with grief;
because, after the death of her father and
mother, her little brother was also taken sick.
She had scarcely a rag to cover her; while
the heavy rain was pouring down, and her
bones almost came through her skin.
This little girl lay there three days without
food or shelter; when, through the kindness
of another little girl, she was taken to the
house of some missionaries. They took the
outcast in, fed and clothed and nursed her,
and gave her the name of Hannah Kilpin.
She soon began to love the missionaries.
She learned to read and repeat hymns, and
also to love the Saviour; and in a few years,
she was taken sick, and soon fell sweetly
asleep in Jesus. Thus, when her father and
mother forsook her, the Lord took her up.
4B 49














I 'I.
,: l ,. 1!, i,




4
; ', .I

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,l r !l.!llilllllB bllR i__ L .I'
















CONFESSION.
50











CONFESSION.


OW many children, when they have
done something wrong instead of go-
ing at once, like this dear child, and confess-
ing the whole, and seeking forgiveness -
hide their fault for days. Have not many of
our readers done this? Was you happy,
those days and nights you hid your fault
from your father or mother.? Ah, no! You
was far from being happy. You was very
miserable. Everything went wrong. You
was dissatisfied with yourself and everybody
else.
In the morning, instead of meeting your
parents and brothers and sisters with pleasure,
you dreaded to see them. You felt as though
they suspected you had committed some
offence. How much better it would always
be, to go at once and confess the fault, and
be forgiven.
51
















"i I I -I'Q


I: I I, I
-, -. ** **. ', .l -i_ ..... --'-' i.






I-I--



























KNOWN BY THEIR ACTIONS.
52









KNOWN BY THEIR ACTIONS.


_]ERE is a little fellow sitting with his
parents, and having a pleasant time
with his picture-books. He is telling his
parents about one of them. He looks like a
good little boy. We hope he is so.
But, little reader, do you know we cannot
always tell what is the true character of a
child by just seeing him once? The tree is
known by its fruit; and children are known
by their actions,-their sayings and doings,
day by day.
We trust this little boy is always trying to
be good; that he cheerfully obeys his mother,
is kind to his baby-sister, and especially that
he 'loves Jesus and tries to obey all his com-
mands.
Oh, how many little children, whose looks
are pleasant enough, are very far from being
good! They are not good toward God, or
toward their parents and friends,
53

















o .....
V 1II 1-




LITL LIGHT












LITTLE LIGHTS.













LITTLE LIGHTS.

----4--*

JESUS bids us shine
With a pure, clear light,-
Like a little candle
Burning in the night.
In the world is darkness;
So we must shine,-
You in your corner,
And I in mine.

Jesus bids us shine,
First of all, for him;
Well he sees and knows it
If our light is dim!
He looks down from heaven
To see us shine,-
You in your corner,
And I in mine.

Jesus bids us shine,
Then, for all around;
For many kinds of darkness
In the world are found.
There's sin, there's want, there's sorrow
So we must shine,-
You in your corner,
And I in mine.
55










-. '
I



=" ._ -. '















A TEMPERANCE DOG.









A TEMPERANCE DOG.



SWORKING-MAN, who spent his even-
ings at the tavern, once persuaded his
dog, who had followed him, to swallow some
liquor. It made the poor brute tipsy; and
he tumbled over, and played such queer an-
tics, that the topers roared with laughter.
The next night the man took his dog, so
as to have more fun; but, when they got to
the door, Caesar would go no farther. He
had taken the pledge, and was not to be
caught in a rum-trap the second time.
It proved to be as good as a temperance
lecture to all those topers. Casar's master
was never known to enter a tavern again.
He made up his mind that he ought to know
as much as a dog; and some of the other
topers followed his example.
Let all the children follow the example of
Casar, and take the temperance pledge.
57


















I 'SI






\ s =---- -----" y
'"1 I Ij. -_















S'. ,- ~ .* :-'




68









HUNTING EGGS.


WHAT nice times in our boyhood, we
used to have hunting eggs! Some-
times one or two brothers or sisters would
go with us. We would climb every ladder,
and go all over the hay-mow and every scaf-
fold, and hunt in every corner, in the hay,
and among the sheaves of wheat and oats,
and in every manger and crib and barrel and
box in the barns.
And, oh, what fun it was now and then to
find a new nest, that we hadn't seen before,
all full of beautiful white eggs!
Sometimes we would carry in to mother a
hatful; and mother's pleasant smile was
always better than all the fun of finding the
eggs. Have you a mother whose smile you
value like that?
How many times have we run up the lad-
der to find more eggs, while our little sisters
have received them in their aprons!
59














S 0-r







-. ..
: t^ '*, '






























THE TIMID RABBIT.
60
S~-'


















60











THE TIMID RABBIT.


W HY do you suppose the rabbit has
such long ears and nimble legs?
Well, the great Maker, who cares for all his
creatures, even the little sparrows and the
young ravens, has given the timid rabbit
long ears, which, like a sort of ear-trumpet,
enable it to hear at a great distance, and
thus give it time to escape to its hole or
burrow in the ground.
You see how the poor, frightened creature
in the picture is fleeing to its retreat.
Was it not kind in our Father in heaven"
to give long ears and nimble legs to the
rabbit? The more we see of his works, and
the more we study how wonderfully he has
adapted every creature and thing to its cir-
cumstances, the more we shall be ready to
say of everything he has made, It is very
good."
61









)









^ .---- ^ 11 ..















COTTON POD AND FLOWER.
62














COTTON POD AND FLOWER.


HIS is a picture of the pod and flower
Sof the cotton-plant. All our readers
know that a large portion of the cloth we
use is made of cotton, which grows as here
shown. In this plant we see the kindness
of our heavenly Father, in making provision
for our clothing.
This plant, as many of our readers know,
used to be cultivated almost wholly by men
and women and children who were in bond-
age. Let us thank the great Father who
has brought this evil of slavery in our land
to an end, so that all can now enjoy the
blessings of freedom. And we can now look
upon our garments that are made of cotton,
and not be constantly reminded of the toils
of those in servitude.
63















* jI























"DO 'WAY, DOGGIE."
64
"DO 'WAY, DOGGIE."










DO 'WAY, DOGGIE I"


"EDDIE is very hot and tired. He has
been playing hard, and nurse is busy.
He sees the kitchen-door wide open, and
thinks the narrow yard a very good place to
play in. Nobody sees him walk out, and so
he wanders through his papa's yard, into the
next neighbor's. He thinks he will go and
meet his big brother coming from school;
but black Fido comes running and barking
at the sight of the little visitor. Dogs are
fond of children if they are kind to them;
but Neddie is afraid of dogs. He has found
a branch of a tree, and is saying, Do 'way,
Doggie! Do wight away!"
Fido understands what he means, but wags
his tail, and stands looking up in his face, all
ready for a frolic.
Nurse comes along just in time, and car-
ries Master Neddie into the house. She must
keep better watch next time.
5B 65

















1>









"" h, II






'i.'.',








'- _- _- _ '' I




HOW A LITTLE BIRD TOLD.
6G











HOW A LITTLE BIRD TOLD.


AVE you ever heard people, when
asked how they found out certain
things, answer, "Oh! a little bird told
me! "
It was long ago that two sisters were in
trouble : their mother had been taken to jail,
having been suspected of stealing a purse
that a lady had suddenly missed while at
their house.
One day a happy little bird flew down
upon the porch, and pulled a piece of red,
silken thread from a vine, and flew back to
the old tree, where she was building a nest.
As soon as the girls saw it, they both
rushed out; and there among the leaves
was the missing purse, where it had dropped
and caught as the lady passed through the
porch. Their mother's innocence was proved;
and it was the little bird that told where the
purse was.
67
















































TELLING LIES.
68











TELLING LIES.


ERE is a boy who is in the habit of
telling lies.
He robbed some poor birds of their nest,
and told his mother he found it in the road.
He struck his sister so that she went into
the house crying; and he told his mother he
thought a bee stung her.
He knew very well that it was not so;
but he thought his mother might punish
him, and so he told a lie to hide what he had
done.
I wonder whether he knows who were sud-
denly struck dead for telling lies.
He ought to read what God says about
liars: All liars shall have their part in the
lake which burneth with fire and brim-
stone."
We hope he will quit this ugly and sinful
habit, and learn always to speak the truth.
09





























71




COUSIN MARVIN.










COUSIN MARVIN.


I HAVE a little cousin whose name is
Marvin; and a dear, darling boy he is.
He is very fond of playing out of doors,
and frolicking with his brother, who is a few
years older than he, riding in the tip-cart, or
perched on the top of a load of hay. His
merry laugh is like music to our ears.
He is very fond of looking at pictures, and
of having poetry read to him. He has
learned many little hymns and poems, which
he repeats to his friends. He was much
pleased with this verse:-

"When little Harrie went to bed,
He always said his prayers;
He kissed mamma, and then papa,
And straightway went up stairs."

But he was for a long time puzzled as to who
"Straightway" could be. I guess he knows
now, however.
71






















.... ..





.\ .: ..



CHILD'S EVENING PRAYER.
72













CHILD'S EVENING PRAYER.



GRACIOUS Saviour, bend thine ear
While now thy little one draws near,
And, bowing low before thy throne,
Thy tender love and care would own.

This day, that loving, watchful care
Has kept me safe from every snare,
And brought me, now the day has fled,
In health and peace to seek my bed.

Now let thy guardian angels keep
Their watch beside me, while I sleep;
And, when the night has passed away,
Let me arise another day.

Forgive me, Jesus, now I plead,
My sins this day of word and deed;
Oh wilt thou now thy blessing give,
And let me in thy favor live ?

A weak and sinful child am I;
But thou for such didst come to die;
And still for children dost thou care,
And lov'st to hear their simple prayer.
73























m ,,, iAY "




THE BIBLE SAYS SO.










THE BIBLE SAYS SO.


RANDMOTHER was reading to little
Lewis, in the good Book, and showing
the picture of Christ Blessing Little Chil-
dren."
Do you know, Lewis," said she, that
everybody has a wicked heart ?"
"Everybody ? "
"Yes, everybody in the world; for the
Bible says so. Do you know, Lewis, that
there is but one way of getting to heaven ? "
Only one way ? "
"Only one way, and that is by Jesus
Christ; for the Bible says so. Do you
know, Lewis, that all who trust in him are
sure to be safe ? "
What! all of them ?"
"All of them. He is able to save all that
come unto God by him; for the Bible says
so. Let us take heed to the Bible, Lewis;
for what God's Word says must be true."
75



















/Li~ l C^^ t"
"V/ l1'j'.r. /
--:'/ ^ > ^
^, .,^ "-' ^ '. '

















KEEPER.













KEEPER.


EEPER is a fine dog. He guards the
house well. When nurse takes the
children out for their walk in the fields,
Keeper is always ready to go with them.
He jumps about, and wags his long, bushy
tail, to show his joy. He runs along a little
while by the side of Minnie; and then back
he goes for little Eddie, who toddles behind.
Dick is tying a letter around his neck for
him to carry to the post-office. He is a fine,
useful dog, and all the children are kind to
him. They are great friends, and are almost
always together in their play. And, if the
children and the dog are kind to each other,
the children ought to be kind and loving to
one another. Don't you think so, little
readers?
77















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; l i i -",,: I




i,








S_ ---








PRINCE AND THE KITTEN.
78














PRINCE AND THE KITTEN.


IT is plain enough that Prince does not
treat kitty just as he should. He has
caught her right up in his mouth, and per-
haps thinks it is fine sport to give her a good
shaking. It is no sport to kitty, however:
and Benny and his mother both think that
Prince is doing something very much out of
place, and which they must put a stop to as
soon as possible; and so they will make
Prince drop kitty, and they will reprove
him till he will be glad to skulk away and
hide himself, and learn to behave better.
Boy's and girls should, also, learn to treat
dogs and cats, and especially each other,
kindly. It does not look well in a dog to
be cross and quarrelsome. How much worse
does it look in children !
79















































CRUELTY AND KINDNESS.

so











CRUELTY AND KINDNESS.


"W'THAT is the matter?" said a man
S to a lad whom he found most un-
mercifully beating, with a heavy stick, a poor
donkey who was drawing a heavy load, yet
who resolutely refused to move one step.
Why, sir," replied the driver, "I have
been trying this half-hour to get this stub-
born brute to go on; but he won't."
The man said, "If you lay down your
stick, I will try what I can do."
The boy did so. The man at once com-
menced patting the donkey on the neck,
rubbed his nose, and spoke kindly to him.
The poor animal evidently understood this
tone of kindness, and started forward as
gaily as possible.
How much better it is to treat all animals
with kindness than with cruelty !
6B 81
























IAI





Ix
-I `






















WHEN THE DARK COMES.
82










WHEN THE DARK COMES.


SLITTLE girl sat, at twilight, in her
room, busily thinking. All day she
had been full of fun and noise, and had
often worried her poor, tired mother.
Ma," said she, "what do you suppose
makes me get over my mischief, and begin to
act good, just about this time every night ? "
"I don't know, dear. Can you not tell?"
"Well, I guess it's because this is when
the dark comes. You know I am a little
afraid of that. And then, ma, I begin to
think of all the naughty things I've done to
grieve you; and so I begin to act good."
Oh, yes! how many, like this little girl,
wait till the dark comes, in the form of sick-
ness, or trouble of some kind, before they
begin to act good! How much better to
be good while we are enjoying life's bright
sunshine! and then, when the dark comes,
we shall be ready to meet it without fear.
83












:_ Er-
e,_
-. _!
1






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i-
THE SLOW-PACED LORIS.











THE SLOW-PACED LORIS.

$06

/MONKEYS are among the most lively
and active of animals. In their na-
tive woods they are ever restless, jumping
from tree to tree; now seen holding a bough,
and then, in a moment, they are out of sight.
But there is one of this tribe which has not
the nimble habits of the rest. It is the slow-
paced loris.
The size of this creature is only that of a
small cat. It is covered with a fine and
thick fur, of a brown color. The forests of
Ceylon and India are its home, where it
sleeps out the day, hanging with its head
downward, and its claws holding fast by the
branch of a tree, and rouses up at night, and
goes forth in search of small birds. Softly
and& slowly it moves, glaring about with its
large, round eyes; and in an instant it seizes
its prey with its long arms, before danger is
suspected by the bird.
85





















I V












I.i
F' rl hh' -



















LITTLE BELLE.
6












LITTLE BELLE.


ELLE is a sweet little girl, with bright
black eyes and curling brown hair;
and is a great pet with all who know her.
She is always sweet-tempered, and as
cheery as a little bird, singing her pretty
songs, running about the house from morning
till night, and helping in her own way to
make all the people about her happy. I wish
all the little boys and girls knew her; for I
am sure they would say, "It is easier to be
good when she is with us."
When her mamma asks her to do some-
thing for her, she does not pout and cry,
even if she would rather do something else.
Shall I tell you the reason why? Every
morning, she asks the dear Lord to make her
a little blessing to everybody; and he keeps
her from being selfish and cross. Is not this
a good way?
87






































,. *-- ~ ~ 'J -- '. -- '
r 47




























.I -. --* -.
i









-a






DOLLY'S SNOW MAN.
88











DOLLY'S SNOW-MAN.


OLLY jumped out of bed one frosty,
December morning, and peered anx-
iously out of the narrow window. Yes! the
snow lay thick and white all over the ground.
This was what Dolly had been longing for
these many days.
She dressed herself quickly, and, tying oni
her little hood, she ran into the yard. Dolly
was poor. You see how cold her bare arms
and neck look, this freezing winter day.
She has even forgotten her little shawl, so
great was her haste to be out in the snow.
Dolly is making a snow-man, which her
little brother Charlie will enjoy when he
wakes up. Tomnmy Brown is watching her
over the fence, and wishing he might help
her. The snow-man seems to smile upon
Dolly, and his frosty face begins to look
quite life-like. Is it not too bad that the sun
will melt him away by and by?
89



























I i

II
I J, I,,







ii



THE GIRAFFE.
90













THE GIRAFFE.


(-EW of our young readers, probably, ever
saw a living giraffe, or cameleopard.
It is one of the greatest wonders among ani-
mals, especially on account of the great
length of its neck and forelegs. See it eat-
ing the leaves from the top of these tall
trees.
A giraffe, in a museum, five years old, was
seventeen feet high.
How can any one look upon such a won-
derful animal, and not think of the wisdom,
skill, and power of Him who created it?
But, so far as we know, it took no more wis-
dom or skill to create the giraffe, than it did
to create the tiniest insect that flits its brief
hour in the sunbeam.
91


















i l .l I' i



i ,


























LITTLE CHILDREN.
92













LITTLE CHILDREN.



" What can little children do?
Little preachers of the Word,
Can those tiny dimpled hands
Labor for the blessed Lord ?
Little hearts can beat for him,
Thinking how he blessed them;
Took them in his arms of love,
And smiled as he carried them.
Little lips can speak for him,
Careful that no naughty word
And no harsh and angry tones,
Only loving ones be heard.
Little feet can run for him,
Carrying comforts to his poor:
Gentle messengers of love,
How they'll bless you o'er and o'erl
Little children, love the Saviour,
Strive his blessed work to do;
Then among the many mansions,'
One he will prepare for you."
93





















I, I




















BLIND, BUT USEFUL.
94












BLIND, BUT USEFUL.



J HE poor girl you see in the picture is
quite blind. When she was six years
of age, she could see as well as you can, and
could run and play with other children; but
now she lives in darkness, and the day and
the night are all the same to her.
She has a large Testament printed in raised
letters; and often she is seen sitting in her
quiet corner, passing her fingers over the
pages,, which is the way she reads.
She is very useful to her mother in many
ways.
She is a dear, good girl, and loves her Sav-
iour, and prays to him very earnestly.
In a few years, she will see him in heaven.
Little children, have you ever thanked your
heavenly Father for the blessing of sight ?
95





















'4




























NELLIE'S MAY-PARTY.
as









NELLIE'S MAY-PARTY.


O UR little friend Nellie is a petted, only
child, living in the prettiest house in
the village. She is not selfish and spoiled,
as are some only children I have known;
but, like a little sunbeam, wherever she
goes she carries light and joy and gladness
with her.
She is very fond of visiting the sick and
the poor, with her mamma, and always wants
to carry something for the children, who
have learned to watch for her coming.
What do you think Nellie is doing in the
picture? She has been getting up a May-
party for her poor children, and is sitting on
the porch, making pretty wreaths for every
one of them to wear on the morrow. Old
Mrs. Grey has just come up the gravel walk
to say that her little grandchild will be well
enough to go with the rest; and Nellie is
very glad, because she had chosen her for
May-Queen.
7B 97





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