Cracked corn

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Cracked corn
Physical Description:
3 v. : ill. ; 17 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Bullard, Asa, 1804-1888
Pierce, William J ( Engraver )
Whitney, Elias James, b. 1827 ( Engraver )
W.J. Holland & Co ( Publisher )
John Andrew & Son ( Engraver )
Publisher:
W.J. Holland & Company
Place of Publication:
Springfield Mass
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Birds -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Flowers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Prayer -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1873   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1873
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Springfield

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
prepared by Asa Bullard.
General Note:
Illustrations engraved by John Andrew & Son, Whitney and Peirce (Pierce).
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002222973
notis - ALG3221
oclc - 32775587
System ID:
UF00026993:00002

Full Text
































The Baldwin Library
n. ^n ..










CRACKED CORN.









PREPARED BY

ASA BULLARD,
AUTHOR OF CHILDREN'S ALBUM," CHILDREN'S BOOK
FOR SABBATH HOURS," ETC.







Volume II.






SPRINGFIELD, MASS. :
W. J. HOLLAND & COMPANY.
1873.























NOTE.



As corn must be cracked into small pieces for little
chickens, so the stories in this little book, for the little
ones" in the family, have been prepared in plain and
simple language by
THE AUTHOR.
" SUNNYBANK," CAMBRIDGE.








Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1873, by
W. J. HOLLAND,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.
All Rights Reserved.






















CONTENTS.






PAGE. PAGE.
DAVID AND THE LION, . 9 THE LAPLAND CRADLE,. 41
,WAVES ON THE SEA- SATURDAY AFTERNOON, 43
SHORE . . . 11 SWEET BREEZES, . . 45
KINDNESS TO ANIMALS, 13 LITTLE VANITY, . .47
THE WATER-MOLE, . I5 MAKING UP, . . .. 49
WAITING FOR THE FAIR- _HE SNOW-STORM, . .. 51
IES, . . . . 17 A RAGGED BOY IN
PRAYING BY THE WAY, .. 19 CHURCH, . . 58
TO-MORROW . . . 21 HOME, . . . . 55
THE BABY, . . .. 23 THE TOUCAN, . .... 57
LENDING TO THE LORD, 25 STUFFY AND SULKS,. 59
PARCHING CORN,. . 27 FRANK'S PETS, .... . .61
MARY AND THE FLY, . 29 THE FLYING SQUIRREL,. 63
THE SNOWBALL'S LES- MARY AND THE DOVE, 65
SON, . ..... 31 FRANKIE ....... 67
ANGRY NED, . . . 83 HOW TO BE LOVED, . 69
THE FLOWERS, . . .85 HOME PETS, . . .. .71
THE DRUNKARD'S DAUGH- JENNY HELPING FATHER,. 73
TER, . . . . 37 ASLEEP AMONG THE
DOTTIE IN THE GLASS, . 39 FLOWERS, . . 7
[VOL. 2]









6 CONTENTS.

PAGE. PAGE.
HEATHEN IDOLS, .. 77 THE LILY, . . . 105
ESQUIMAUX CHILDREN, 79 WHAT BESSIE GAVE, .107
WINTER SPORTS, . 81 WE DID LOVE THEM
THE TELL-TALE HEN, . 83 so," . . . . 109
IDLE TOMMY, . . 85 BEAUTY AND BUNNY, 111
GOING TO BED . . 87 BESSIE'S WAY, . .. .113
LESSONS FROM SQUIR- GRANDMA HAS COME, . 115
RELS, . . .. .89 AUTUMN . . .. .117
OUR COUSIN HATTIE, . 91 HELPING MOTHER, . .119
THE EAGLE, . . . 98 WELCOME VISITORS,. .121
SATURDAY AFTERNOON, 95 ELLEN AND LUCY, ... 123
CATCHING THE SQUIR- GROWING TALL, ..... 125
REL, . . . . 97 RESTING, .. . . . 127
A BOY THAT CAN BE DANGEROUS PLAYTHING, 129
TRUSTED, . . . 99 THE OLD SOLDIER, . 131
A MOSLEM SCHOOL-BOY, 101 WOMEN OF THIBET, . .133
THE RIVER, . .. .108 PINKIE'S FLOWERS, . 135
[VOL. 2]














































DAVID AND THE LION.










DAVID AND THE LION.


WHEN Saul was at war with the Phil-
istines, a very large and strong man,
named Goliath of Gath, came to defy Israel;
but no man dared to fight with him.
David, the son of Jesse, came to see his
brothers who were in the army. He heard
the words of Goliath, and he said he would
go out to fight him. Saul said to him, Thou
art not able to fight with him; for thou art
but a youth."
David told Saul that, while keeping his fath-
er's sheep, he had killed a lion and a bear
which had attacked them. And David said,
" The Lord that delivered me out of the paw
of the lion, and out of the paw of the bear, he
will deliver me out of the hands of the Phil-
istines."
So David took only a sling and some stones,
and God gave him the victory. He killed
Goliath, and the enemy fled.
9










































WAVES ON THE SEA-SHORE.
10















WAVES ON THE SEA-SHORE.



ROLL on, roll on, you restless waves
That toss about and roar!
Why do you all run back again
When you have reached the shore?

Roll on, roll on, you noisy waves!
Roll higher up the strand:
How is it that you cannot pass
That line of yellow sand?

Make haste, or else the tide will turn;
Make haste, you noisy sea!
Roll quite across the bank, and then
Far on across the lea.

"We do not dare," the waves reply:
That line of yellow sand
Is laid along the shore to bound
The waters and the land;

And all should keep to time and place,
And all should keep to rule,-
Both waves upon the sandy shore,
And little boys at school."
11















































KINDNESS TO ANIMALS.
12










KINDNESS TO ANIMALS.


THAT lad," said a farmer to his friend
makes me dollars richer every year,
by his good temper and kindness to my stock.
He has a kind word for everything on the
farm. Every horse, cow, and even the pigs
know him, and will come to him like dogs.
I can trust him to take cattle or sheep to the
market without any fear of their being over-
driven, and I can thereby get a higher price
for them. If all the farm-servants were like
that lad, there would not be much for the
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Ani-
mals to do."
"Yes," said his friend, "that Society is
doing a great amount of service to the nation,
but I wish that the Committee would give
medals of honor to those who are well known
for their kindness to animals. It is right to
punish the cruel; but why not honor the
kind?"
13






























THE WATER-MOLE.















THE WATER-MOLE.


WHAT a curious-looking creature It
looks qs though it had a bag on its
nose. This animal is the water-mole. It is
about the size and shape of the otter. It has
a horny beak, resembling that of a duck, with
webbed paws, formed for swimming. It is
covered with a brown fur, and lives in bur-
rows near the water, like the otter.
God made every creature just right for its
place, so that he could say of every one, "It
is good."
15

















































WAITING FOR THE FAIRIES.
16









WAITING FOR THE FAIRIES.

LILLY read her book of fairy tales so
much that, instead of reading them,
she used to dream about them, and think
about them.
Sometimes, sitting in the garden, she would
ask the tall white lilies where the fairies dwelt;
but no answer came. Then she would go un-
der the fern leaves in the woods to see if the
fairies were hidden there; or even shake the
fox-glove bells, or peer into the trumpets of
the honeysuckles for her tiny friends.
One day she became very tired, while wait-
ing for the fairies to come, and she fell asleep.
She was found by her father, gently scolded
by him, and told that there were no such
things as fairies; but that fairy-stories are
made up for the purpose of entertaining and
instructing good little boys and girls.
But the little fellow in our picture, who has
fallen asleep among the shrubbery, is surely
surrounded by real fairies-the little birds and
squirrels. and butterflies.
2A 17
















































PRAYING BY THE WAY.
18














PRAYING BY THE WAY.


HERE is a father with his son, on a jour-
ney on foot. They have come to a nice
seat under a big tree, and have stopped a little
while to rest. They are right in sight of a
little quiet village, with its pretty church.
This father is evidently a Christian man.
Perhaps it was the sight of the church, remind-
ing him of his own home, that he had just left,
and the dear wife that he has so recently laid
in the grave, that led him to say to his son,
" Let us kneel down here, my boy, and ask
God to bless us on our journey."
And why should not all more frequently
look to God in prayer? What a lesson this
wayfaring man and his son teach us!
19















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TO-MORROW.
20













TO-MORROW.



A BRIGHT little boy with a laughing face,
Whose every motion was full of grace,
Who knew no trouble and feared no care:
The light of our household-the youngest there.

He went to one whom he thought more wise
Than any other beneath the skies.
"Mother,"-oh, word that makes the home!-
"Tell me, when will to-morrow come? "

"It is almost night," the mother said;
"Most time for my boy to be in bed:
When you wake up and it's day again,
It will be to-morrow, my darling, then."

The little boy slept through all the night,
But awoke with the first red streaks of light:
He pressed a kiss on his mother's brow,
And whispered, "Is it to-morrow now? "

" No, little Eddie ; this is to-day:
To-morrow is always one night away,"
He pondered a while; but joys came fast,
And the vexing question quickly passed.
21
















NO -ll .


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THE BABY.
22












THE BABY.


YES, there is the little curly-headed baby
Sin mamma's work-basket. Mamma and
auntie have left their work, and the sewing-
machine has ceased its hum, for a frolic with
baby. And the visitor is coaxing the little
one to her arms. What a joy that dear one is
in that dwelling! Could thousands of money
buy it away from that mother? Oh, no!
Little reader, have you a baby brother or sis-
ter? Do you not love that precious one more
than tongue can tell?
Oh, how many a sailor-father, dreams of
baby every night, and thinks of the dear one
a thousand times every day.
23











































LENDING TO THE LORD.
24













LENDING TO THE LORD.


THE good Book says, He that giveth to
the poor, lendeth to the Lord:" and
little Susan is now lending to the Lord.
The very sight of such a poor old man,
tottering along with his staff and bending
under the weight of years, is enough to touch
the tender heart of this little girl; and see
how kindly she gives, from her own money, a
little to help meet his wants. She knows this
old man as an aged pilgrim on his way to the
celestial city. She remembers, too, the words
of the Saviour, Inasmuch as ye did it unto
one of the least of these my brethren, ye did
it unto me."
25





















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PARCHING CORN.
26











PARCHING CORN.


HOW many of our young friends have en-
gaged in scenes like this?
Edward has brought in some fine ears of
pop-corn. He raised them himself in the little
garden-spot his father gave him as his own.
A part of it he planted with potatoes, which
he called his Sunday-school potatoes." All
the money he obtained from them he was go-
ing to give to aid the Sabbath-school cause.
And part of his little garden he planted
with pop-corn; and see what fine ears he has
raised !
His three little sisters helped him shell off
the corn; and he is now parching it in the
corn-popper over the blazing fire.
How intently the sisters watch it, as kernel
after kernel pops open white as snow See !
he has already popped his hat heaping full.
what a feast they will have when all is
parched!
27



















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I' ; _'_-------__-




MARY AND THE FLY.
28











MARY AND THE FLY.


MARY has turned from her play with
Miss Doll, seated there by her side, to
watch a fly upon the window. Hear what
she says :-
Oh, you little, silly fly,
There's a spider watching nigh :
You will soon be in his snare,
Buzzing without heed or care."

Mary watches and watches, and by and by
the spider darts out and catches the poor fly.
Now she says:-
"There! the little fly is caught
By the spider, quick as thought:
Lo, he bites and binds the fly.
Silly creature you must die."

But, little girl, are flies the only silly crea-
tures that heedlessly expose themselves to
danger?
Careless children, like the fly,
Do not think when danger's nigh:
Mind not what they do or say,
Thus becoming Satan's prey."
29

















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-- -------








THE SNOWBALL'S LESSON.
30











THE SNOWBALL'S LESSON.


"ROLL away, roll away, Willie," said his
sister Susan. "You will make a fine
large snowball before you have done with it.
When you began, it was not bigger than the
one I have in my hand."
Hurrah shouted Willie, as he gave it
another turn. I shall soon make it as big as
myself."
A lady was passing by, and stopped to look
at Willie, as he tugged away at his snowball;
when she said, "Your snowball, little boy, is
like knowledge, of which a child, who begins
to learn, makes but a very little ball at first;
but as he goes on, with pains and diligence,
he rolls it along, and keeps gathering up, until
it becomes a great ball of knowledge. All
the wisest men who have ever lived began in
a very humble way ; but they went on until
they had stored up heaps of learning and
knowledge."
81














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ANGRY NED.
32















ANGRY NED.


DID you ever see a boy in such a passion
as Ned is ? What can be the matter ?
See his frowning face, his clinched fist, his
raised foot. And see what a cruel work he's
doing, trampling those poor helpless chicks
to death?
What can be the cause of all this anger and
cruelty? Why, just this. He wanted Joe to
swap knives with him. Joe didn't want to;
and then Ned flew into a passion, and said,
" Then I'll kill your chickens! And you
see he is doing it.
What a dreadful thing it is to have such a
fiery passion!
3A 83



















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THE FLOWERS.
84

















THE FLOWERS.



" How could little flowers bloom
If the sun were gone?
All their tints and sweet perfume
Would be quickly gone.

" How can little children's hearts
Bring forth flowers of love,
Unless Christ the Lord imparts
Sunshine from above?

"Love and gentleness and peace
Are the Saviour's flowers:
He himself brought forth all these
In this world of ours.

" Oh, how patient and how kind
Jesus used to be!
He will put his gentle mind,
IfI ask, in me.

"So, though I am weak and small.
Like the little flowers,
In his strength I've power for all;
For his strength is ours."
35































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THE DRUNKARD'S DAUGHTER.









THE DRUNKARD'S DAUGHTER.
'''I: II i.86
,,,;,.










THE DRUNKARD'S DAUGH-
TER.


HOW many children have been a grief
and a shame to their parents!
But it is a painful fact that many a parent
is a source of shame and grief to children.
What child is more to be pitied than that son
or daughter who has a drunken father or
mother ? Who can understand their sorrow
and shame, when, as they mingle with other
children and youth at school, they are taunt-
ingly reminded of the character of their par-
ents! Poor children! Let us pity rather
than mock them. They are not to blame for
the wickedness of those who should be their
protectors.
Look at this pleading daughter, as she en-
treats that besotted father not to go forth
again to the scenes of dissipation. Let us
hope that she will prevail in her entreaties,
and that he may be saved.
37

























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DOTTIE IN THE GLASS.
38













DOTTIE IN THE GLASS.



HERE is Dottie, with upraised hand, gaz-
ing intently on herself in the looking-
glass.
Is it pride that has stopped the dear child
just there ? Is she admiring her chubby
cheeks, fat, dimpled fingers, bright blue eyes,
graceful curls and pretty dress ?
No, no: it is not ugly pride that has stopped
her, but wonder and surprise. She came sud-
denly along, and, all at once, there is a little
girl right before her: and she is astonished to
see how exactly she looks like herself,-just
such eyes and face and dress. How strange!
But look at that sweet face in the library.
Is she reading the sweet story of old,-the
story about the blessed Jesus, who so loved
little children while on earth ? Let us hope so.
39





















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THE LAPLAND CRADLE.
40
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THE LAPLAND CRADLE,
40










THE LAPLAND CRADLE.


MOTHERS in Lapland swing their chil-
dren in cradles very different from
those we use at home. The infant is swad-
dled up in clothes, which are bound round
with bands made of reindeer-skin. One of
these bands is passed over a beam, as you see
in the picture; and the little one swings like
a sailor in his hammock. If it is restless or
cries, the mother comes and swings it to sleep
with a lullaby.
It is only in infancy that the Lapland child
receives much comfort. When the baby, if it
is a boy, grows up, he will be a hunter. If
the baby is a girl she will have a hard lot of
it when she becomes a woman. She will have
to do very hard work all day long. Still
"the heart does not grieve after what the eye
does not see; and the poor Lapp female may
be very happy in her way.
41
















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SATURDAY AFTERNOON.
42

















SATURDAY AFTERNOON.

----**-----

THE school is closed : 'tis Saturday,
The afternoon is fair ;
And to the fields, in happy bands,
The boys and girls repair.

Through grove and glade, in sun and shade
O'er hill and vale, they go,
And run and leap until their cheeks
With ruddy freshness glow.

Dear children, if you would enjoy
Your time and play aright,
Strive in the time of school to learn
With all your heart and might.

Then will your hours of pastime grow
More happy and more gay;
Then will you find how true it is
Work always sweetens play.
43















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SWEET BREEZES.
44















SWEET BREEZES.



DOTTIE has climbed up to the window, to
see if she can catch a little breath of air.
Yes: there is a sweet breeze coming in
from the sea. And Shagg has climbed up
near his little mistress to see if he, too, can
get a sniff at it. Isn't it a pleasant scene ?
A breeze is a light wind. And Dottie is
breathing a sea-breeze. Her cheeks are all
swelled out with it, like a sail full of wind.
Sea and land breezes are usually sweet and
pleasant. But there is a very unpleasant
breeze that sometimes springs up among
brothers and sisters and playmates. Ask your
mother if they ever spring up in your homes.
Alas for the home where such breezes blow !
45












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LITTLE VANITY.
--46










LITTLE VANITY.


HERE is Jennie playing little "vanity," to
be sure. She has dressed herself up in
her mother's best bonnet and mantle, which
she has put on over her Sunday suit, and is
standing before the mirror, gazing admiringly
at herself, while the kitten under the table is
looking on very soberly.
"1 Why Jennie," said Biddie when she found
her," what'll your mother say ? If you haven't
taken her very best bonnet! You'll spoil it
entirely, child! "
"I was only playing at goin' a visiting,
Biddie. I haven't hurt the things a bit."
Isn't it a pity such a little girl could not
find something better to do, than to play little
vanity, and stand there and admire herself in
the glass! She should remember that hand-
some is that handsome does."
47
















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MAKING UP.
49













MAKING UP.


THESE two boys have had a quarrel, and
SMaster Jones told them to "stop after
school."
But what are they doing now ? The very
best and noblest thing they could do.
Master Jones had a long talk with them.
He showed them how wicked it was to get
angry with each other and quarrel. And then
he said, Now, my dear boys, both of you have
done wrong, and both of you should ask each
other's forgiveness.
Tears came into their eyes, and each said
he was most to blame, and asked to be for-
given; and then, in a moment, they were in
each other's arms, as you see, making up.
4A 49


















































THE SNOW-STORM.
50

















THE SNOW-STORM.



"THE snow is falling fast and thick;
The path I cannot see :
But now I know we're almost home ;
So, darling, cling to me."

" Oh, yes, papa! I'll hold you fast,"
Said little blue-eyed May:
"I'm not one bit afraid, because
I know you'll find the way."

And so they toiled along the road,
And little May clung fast,
Until the welcome light they saw,
And home was reached at last.

So when life's sky is filled with storms,
And all our path is dim,
Our Father's arm will bear us up,
If we but trust in him.

He's strong and mighty, and his eye
Can always see the way:
And, through the darkest night, he'll lead
Unto the perfect day."
51















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A RAGGED BOY IN CHURCH.
52











A RAGGED BOY IN CHURCH.


HERE is a ragged, bare-footed boy, who
has strayed into a church. He is struck
with astonishment at the singing.
Look at him! What an expression of in-
terest and wonder, as he gazes at the choir,
and hears their sweet voices and the grand
and swelling notes of the organ I
The minister is looking at him. Poor boy !
He has never been in a church before. It is
all new to him.
What a change would one month in the
Sabbath school bring over that boy, and all
like him! Those ragged clothes would give
place to a new and tidy suit; those bare feet
would be covered; and fresh water and the
comb would produce a wonderful change, so
that you would hardly know him.

Then gather them in, gather them in."
53

















































HOME.
54












HOME.


HERE is a home scene, where absent loved
ones are welcomed back again. It must
be a happy home, for love is there.
You can help make your homes happy. Lit-
tle deeds of kindness, such as a child can ren-
der, may light up a home with love. The
very youngest may find something to do for a
father, mother, brother or sister. But while
you think of home as-

"The dearest place, the sweetest place,
The happiest that can be;
Home! with its bright, good-natured face,
So full of joy to me,"

you must not forget that you may have even
a happier home, where all will be joy. Here
on earth, father and mother may be taken
from you, or you from them; but in that hap-
pier home your heavenly Father will never
leave you, if you trust in him.
55





















































THE TOUCAN.
66















THE TOUCAN.


THIS very curious-looking bird is the.tou-
can, of which there are several kinds.
This bird is never seen in our part of the
country, but lives in the warmer climates of
America.
The toucan is remarkable for the large size
of its bill. It looks almost as large as a
shark's mouth; and the bill shuts together
with teeth like a saw. Its bite must be fearful.
Sad it must be for the poor fish or frog that
gets between those teeth.
When we see the different kinds of birds
and other creatures, we can say, How won-
derful are the works of God! In wisdom he
made them all."
57




























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STUFFY AND SULKS.
58















STUFFY AND SULKS.


D0 you know the meaning of "stuffy?"
Did you ever hear children called so ?
This word means angry and obstinate,
sulky; and sulky means sullen, sour.
You have heard of children having the
"sulks; that is, being in a sulky mood.
This picture shows us what these words
mean. You see that boy is stuffy, sulky. He
has been doing some mischief; and the mother
has told Nancy, the nurse, to take him into
the house. And you see he sullenly resists;
he is bracing his feet and hanging back, and
making her push him along.
Do you think it proper for boys and girls
to be stuffy ? Look, and see what a shameful
sight!
59




















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-



FRANK'S PETS.
60












FRANK'S PETS.


FRANK loves to have pets,-rabbits, pig-
eons, and chickens. He delights in know-
ing that he can call them his own, and in
watching their interesting habits and amus-
ing motions. He also takes much pleasure
in feeding them.
Another good trait in Frank is, that he likes
to have others enjoy his pets with him. He
is not in the least selfish. He often asks his
cousins and schoolmates to come to see his
pets. There you see him now, telling his lit-
tle cousin Bess to choose two of the little
rabbits to take home for herself." That is a
noble, generous spirit; and I feel sure Frank
will, if his life is spared, grow up to be a good,
useful, happy man. I think you will agree
with me, if you only take another look at that
honest-looking, pleasure-speaking face.
61















_-4 .-_..,
/ 1


















THE FLYING SQUIRREL.
62














THE FLYING SQUIRREL.


THIS is the picture of a flying squirrel.
Its form is very much like the gray and
the black squirrel; but it has an expansive
skin on each side, as you see, reaching from.
the fore to the hind legs, by means of which
it is borne up, in leaping from one tree to
another, like a bird by its wings.
So, the more we look into the animal and
the vegetable world, and into everything in
the earth, the sea, and the heavens, the more
evidence shall we see of the wonderful power
of the great Creator. He doeth great things
past finding out; yea, and wonders without
number."
63














































MARY AND THE DOVE.











MARY AND THE DOVE.


ONE day little Mary Grey sat by the par-
lor window, gazing upon a wintry scene.
She espied some wee snow-birds hopping
around on the snow, and also a flock of doves.
She immediately opened the window and threw
out some crumbs of bread for them. Presently
the doves came sweeping down from the house-
tops, and partook of Mary's crumbs. She clap-
ped her hands, and told them to come again.
By and by they flew away; but the next
day, a white dove, one of those Mary had fed
the day before, came and tapped his bill against
the window. Mary cautiously opened it, and
fed it again. And every day it came to the
window to feed, until it finally took up its
abode with Mary, and became tame enough to
perch upon her shoulder and fly after her.
Will you not learn from this true dove
story," to become kind to all God's creatures ?
5A 65












































FRANKIE.
66













FRANKIE.


FRANKIE is a dear little boy. He often
says very cunning things. Last night,
just before his bed-time, he was walking on
the piazza with his mamma, when he said, "O
mamma, see the little stars are sleepy See
them wink!"
A few days ago, his sister was telling him
how his mamma's sunflowers always turned
their heads to the sun. At night, when he
said his prayers, his mother heard him say,
" O Jesus let me always turn to thee as the
sunflower turns to the sun."
Was not that a beautiful prayer for such a
little boy to make ? How happy it made his
mamma feel!
O little children, if you all wish to be good,
as little Frankie did, how many happy moth-
ers would there be!
67







































I\








HOW TO BE LOVED.
68











HOW TO BE LOVED.


ONE little girls and boys have a great
many friends, and everybody seems to
like them. The little girl in the picture is
one of them. But there are others.that no
one seems to be fond of: everybody shuns
them and dislikes them. Why is this?
A good minister once asked his little girl
why it was that everybody loved her."
"I don't know," she replied, unless it is
because I love everybody."
Ah! that was it. Solomon says, "A man
that hath friends must show himself friendly."
And if children would have friends, and have
everybody love them, they must love every-
body. They must be amiable and kind. Will
not all our little readers seek in this way to
win the love and friendship of everybody !
And remember that the Lord Jesus Christ,
too, will love us if we love and obey him.
69














' : i 'i l .' ,,- -

I i I I

i I




II,,







II ,,






t~- _----






HOME PETS.
70













HOME PETS.

----*1*----

I LOVE my spotted kitten!
I watch her at her play,
So frolicsome and nimble,
So busy and so gay !
If I would play as happily,
I heartily must work;
For cheerful play they cannot have
Who daily duties shirk.

I love our pet canary!
How joyously it sings !
We let it fly about the room
Sometimes to stretch its wings.
And as for our poll parrot,
With feathers red and green,
She's fit to go to court, and be
Presented to the queen.

But oh I love our baby
Better than all beside !
Our little, loving, household-pet
Fills every heart, though wide.
When mother takes her in her arms,
She crows for very glee;
And, when I pat her dimpled cheek,
She laughs most merrily.
71
















IIJ
7 ml
























_- 1 --.





JENNY HELPING FATHER.
72









JENNY HELPING FATHER.


JENNY JONES often comes into her fath-
er's shop, and turns the grindstone while
he sharpens his chisel.
"My Jenny always brings the sunshine
with her," her father says. His eyes always
watch his little daughter with pleasure when
she comes from the house with her basket, to
be filled with the nice chips for mother. The
busy hands and busy feet do all they can to
help and cheer both father and mother.
She is a poor child: she has no fine clothes,
no fine playthings, but she is always busy and
always happy, for she is always thinking what
she can do for others; and, like her blessed
Master, she wants to do good to all around
her. She does not fret and scold because
she cannot have everything she wants.
I hope all the little children will be like
Jenny Jones, and help father and mother, or
some poor neighbor. Ask God to teach you
what to do.
73





























,. .-




























ASLEEP AMONG THE FLOWERS.
74
I~

ASEE AMN H LWR

F~ :74








ASLEEP AMONG THE FLOW-
ERS.


ON a bright June day, Lily takes a walk in
the fields to gather wild flowers. How
beautiful the world is !-hill and valley, mead-
ow and grove, stream and fountain. What
chirping and singing among the birds! what
a humming among the insects! How green
the fields and forests how balmy the air how
blue the sky Lily finds it a luxury to be out
doors; and she strolls here and there in the
pasture, and towards the woodland, all the
time on the watch for flowers, that she may
gather enough to surprise her mother with a
fine bouquet when she returns home. Some
she picks by the brookside, some on the rocks,
and some among the tall grass.
After a while, she feels weary; and so sits
down to rest.
But Lily does not sit there long before she
makes the moss-covered rock her pillow, and
falls asleep. And there we will leave her,
asleep among the flowers.
75














































HEATHEN IDOLS.
70












HEATHEN IDOLS.


A MISSIONARY told little Charles all
about the idols, like the one in the
picture, which the poor heathen bow down to
and worship. This made Charles very sorry
that they did not know better; and then he
asked, Charles, would you like to give any-
thing to help support the missionaries we are
sending to tell them about the true God? "
Charles thought a moment, and then said,
"I'll give my new engine and train of cars! I
haven't any money."
Wasn't that a real sacrifice ? Charles didn't
offer some worn out toy that he cared nothing
about: he was willing to give the best play-
thing he had. That was right; we ought to
give God the best.
7T





















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---, -,h -- ----- -


w



























ESQUIMAUX CHILDREN.
78













ESQUIMAUX CHILDREN.


HERE is a winter-scene in a region where
there is always snow and ice.
These are Esquimaux children. They are
so warmly clad, that they do not fear the cold
while they wade through the deep snow, and
engage in their game of ball. Ah, yes! and
there is a kind brother giving his little brother,
all packed so snugly away in that funny sled,
a ride! Is it not a pretty sight! Does it
not speak to the heart of some boys, here in
our happy land, who are not always so oblig-
ing to the little ones?
Let all the little children, in their play,
always be kind to one another. What a
shame that any should be less kind than the
Esquimaux children!
79




























fi_















---.,.._-



WINTER SPORTS.
80
















WINTER SPORTS.


LL children big enough to go out doors
in the winter love to play in the snow.
Johnny, in the picture, is quite an artist. He
has made a snow-man with a feather in his
cap." It is so natural that any one would
know it was intended for a man and not a cow.
. See little Dick kicking up his foot and
swinging his hat, and hallooing in ecstasies
over the wonderful skill of his brother; while
even that old man, all so warmly muffled up
against the cold, as he passes cannot help just
giving it a look. We guess that he remem-
bers that he was a boy once.
81
6A














.'-^"'S sa "^ ^ -^.. **^ --




























THlE TELL-TALE HEN.













THE TELL-TALE HEN.


ONE day Ben Ward got leave to go home
from school before the others. He went
to a cherry-tree, in our school-yard, and, with
a long stick, began to knock off the cherries.
There was an old hen close by that thought
the boy was going to strike her; so off she
went, with one of her noisiest cackles, straight
into the school-room !
The scholars began to laugh.
The master thought the hen was telling him
something that was wrong; and he went out
and caught Ben just laying down the stick.
He brought him into the school-room, and
said,-
"We know, now, what the old hen was
trying to tell us. If she could have spoken
English, she would have said, Oh, dear oh,
dear! Benny Ward is stealing the cherries ?'"
83














































IDLE TOMMY.
84












IDLE TOMMY.


THE world is awake ;
For again it is day:
The men in the meadow
Are raking the hay.

In the sweet clover-blossoms
Are myriads of bees;
And the birds carol sweetly
High up in the trees.

The soft balmy air
Fills each bosom with joy;
And no one is idle
But this lazy boy.

And though poor Sister Jenny
Has come out again
To try and arouse him,
I fear 'tis in vain.

Oh! shame on you, Tommy
To idle away
The bright morning hours
Of this beautiful day!

In this great, busy world
There is plenty to do;
And there's something, I know,
That is waiting for you.
85










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'.,', ", "i '


4 I















GOING TO BED.









GOING TO BED.


SANNIE and Freddie are going to bed.
It is Saturday night, and nurse has just
given them each a nice bath. Now she says,
"It is time to say your little prayers, chil-
dren." And Nannie kneels down in her crib,
and Freddie folds his little hands, as he sits
on nurse's lap; and their childish voices
sound very sweetly, as they say,-

Now I lay me down to sleep,"

Then Nannie adds, "God bless my dear
papa and mamma, and Freddie, and nurse,
and me."-" And pussy, too, dear Jesus!"
says Freddie, smiling.
Then nurse kisses them, and tucks them
up warm, and goes off with the candle; and
the two curly heads lie very still, and the
children are fast asleep.
God watches over them; and he does not
forget their prayers, but blesses their papa
and mamma, who do not pray themselves.
87




























LESSONS FROM SQUIRRELS.









LESSONS FROM SQUIRRELS.


I SELDOM look out of my window with-
out seeing more or less squirrels running
about in sport, or in search of food.
I don't often hurt innocent little animals,
such as squirrels, and birds, and toads, and
frogs, and harmless snakes.
I may learn a lesson of industry and ac-
tivity from my squirrels over the way. They
work for a living, and are up and at it early
in the morning.
And, another thing, they live in peace. I
see no quarrelling or calling hard names,
among my squirrels.
And, again, they answer the end for which
they were made a great deal better than
some boys and girls that I know of. They
will have no sad account to give of wasted
time and talents and privileges. They do as
well as they know how. That is more than
can be said of most of mankind,
89













































OUR COUSIN HATTIE.
90









OUR COUSIN HATTIE.


SHERE she goes, on her way to school,
with satchel in hand, looking as con-
tented as a princess. How do you like your
country cousin, children?
She goes barefoot." Well, what of that?
Feet were made before shoes. You must
recollect that Hattie lives in the country,
where it is a common thing for girls of her
age to go barefoot in summer.
"She is bareheaded, too," you say. Well,
she has a fine head of hair, and is not afraid
of a little sunshine. Hattie never uses a para-
sol; besides, this morning she could not find
her sun-bonnet, as she probably left it some-
where in the barn, when she was hunting eggs
last evening. There is no law against going
to school bareheaded.
"What has she in her satchel?" Why,
her books, her sewing, and her dinner. Our
country cousin is a real smart girl, and will,
no doubt, make a good housekeeper.
91












































THE EAGLE.
92










THE EAGLE.


IHERE are many kinds of eagles,-the
white eagle, the black eagle, the bald
eagle, and the sea eagle; but there is none
like the golden eagle. Among all the birds
of prey, none is so large, none is so swift, and
none is so strong. His eye can look at the
bright sun. He builds his nest on the high
rocks, and he flies abroad in the storm. He is,
indeed, the king of birds.
A little child was left alone by its mother.
Soon after, an eagle came down, and bore it
away. How sad for the poor child to betaken
high up into the air, and carried to the eagle's
nest among the high rocks!
But was the poor little thing torn to pieces ?
No; for four men, who knew the way to the
eagle's nest, took a boat, rowed over the lake,
and got up the rocks, and found the child
unhurt. How glad were the men! How very
glad was the mother of the poor babe!
93













'Ii
-. iii - .. ,,
"I


"I,, *'j


















SATURDAY AFTERNOON.
94

















SATURDAY AFTERNOON.



SCHOOL is done. Hurrah, hurrah!
Fill the air with shout and song !
Duties over,-lessons said,-
Joy and mirth to us belong.

Hours are long to restless boys,
Minding rules and keeping still.
Now we're free as little birds,
Wand'ring at their own sweet will.

Fling our caps high in the air !
No bad marks our hearts annoy;
Sometimes just one little thing
Will a whole day's fun destroy.

Shady woods and cooling stream
Call in tones so loud and clear,
Come, good children, come away!
Happy times await you here."
95















































CATCHING THE SQUIRREL.
96












CATCHING THE SQUIRREL.


JOHNNY RAY set a trap in the woods for
squirrels. He thought he would like to
have one of the little things for his own. He
placed a nice, yellow ear of corn in the trap,
and scattered some grains near, to tempt one
of them in.
Then Johnny sat down among the tall grass
to watch. Soon he saw a bushy-tailed little
fellow nibbling the scattered grains. Then
he looked round a moment, and walked into
the trap, and began to nibble at the ear;
when the cover fell, and he was a prisoner.
Johnny started with him for home; but
soon said to himself, "I almost wish the
squirrel was back again in his woodland
home." He stopped a moment, and then
returned to the woods, and made himself
and the squirrel happy by giving him his
liberty.
7A 97























IIii'










.--'-







A BOY THAT CAN BE TRUSTED.
98











A BOY THAT CAN BE
TRUSTED.


"ED SAWYER'S mother was poor; and
he wanted to earn something to help
her. So, one morning, with his sled and
books, he started off, and soon found an op-
portunity to clear out Dr. Jarvis's path.
His shovel struck something that he found
to be a bright silver dollar that Dr. Jarvis
had lost. Instead of keeping it, as some
boys would have done, he ran at once up to
the door, and rang the bell, and gave it to
Mrs. Jarvis.
The doctor was so pleased with Ned's hon-
esty, that he said,-
"I have been wanting a boy that can be
trusted, and now I have found him."
So Ned was happy as could be, that he had
found a good place where he could earn some-
thing to help support his poor mother.
99









































A MOSLEM SCHOOLBOY.
100