• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 A frolic with Carlo
 Feed the birds
 Little basket-maker
 A family ride
 How to get knowledge
 Little ragged orator
 Gathering lilies
 A "Lump" of a bird
 A bouquet for grandpa
 Rum did it
 The porcupine
 A Kitty in the closet
 Good in sickness
 A beautiful scene
 Janes's rose-bush
 Little prisoner
 Spring
 Little deeds of kindness
 A passion for flowers
 A day to do nothing
 Little Lucy
 Louisa and May
 The alligator
 Keeping house
 On the sea-shore
 A savage striking a light
 Grace and her canary
 Two little kittens
 Little Eva's prayer
 May has come
 The fox and the trap
 At his mother's grave
 Love the aged
 Morning thoughts
 The mother-dog's advice
 Stoning the little bird
 The owl
 Tom beck and the birds
 Farmer-boy taking lunch
 Mama and the children
 Sister's twin pets
 Gathering flowers
 Summer in the country
 Children at play
 The wild flowers
 How to get wise
 Keep out of trouble
 Gathering wild flowers
 My dolly
 Going to a mission-school
 I won't gamble
 Clean hands
 Offering to idols
 Windows for the blind
 Kittie's new song
 Flower-voices
 Home, sweet home
 The woodpecker
 We Ought to Love Jesus
 Ines and her teacher
 A prayer for children
 Anybody can do that
 Little peace-maker
 A missionary's lantern
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Cracked corn
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026993/00001
 Material Information
Title: Cracked corn
Physical Description: 3 v. : ill. ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bullard, Asa, 1804-1888
Pierce, William J ( Engraver )
Whitney, Elias James, b. 1827 ( Engraver )
W.J. Holland & Co ( Publisher )
John Andrew & Son ( Engraver )
Publisher: W.J. Holland & Company
Place of Publication: Springfield Mass
Publication Date: 1873
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Birds -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Flowers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Prayer -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1873   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1873
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Springfield
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: prepared by Asa Bullard.
General Note: Illustrations engraved by John Andrew & Son, Whitney and Peirce (Pierce).
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026993
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002222973
notis - ALG3221
oclc - 32775587

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Foreword
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    A frolic with Carlo
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Feed the birds
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Little basket-maker
        Page 12
        Page 13
    A family ride
        Page 14
        Page 15
    How to get knowledge
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Little ragged orator
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Gathering lilies
        Page 20
        Page 21
    A "Lump" of a bird
        Page 22
        Page 23
    A bouquet for grandpa
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Rum did it
        Page 26
        Page 27
    The porcupine
        Page 28
        Page 29
    A Kitty in the closet
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Good in sickness
        Page 32
        Page 33
    A beautiful scene
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Janes's rose-bush
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Little prisoner
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Spring
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Little deeds of kindness
        Page 42
        Page 43
    A passion for flowers
        Page 44
        Page 45
    A day to do nothing
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Little Lucy
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Louisa and May
        Page 50
        Page 51
    The alligator
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Keeping house
        Page 54
        Page 55
    On the sea-shore
        Page 56
        Page 57
    A savage striking a light
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Grace and her canary
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Two little kittens
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Little Eva's prayer
        Page 64
        Page 65
    May has come
        Page 66
        Page 67
    The fox and the trap
        Page 68
        Page 69
    At his mother's grave
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Love the aged
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Morning thoughts
        Page 74
        Page 75
    The mother-dog's advice
        Page 76
        Page 77
    Stoning the little bird
        Page 78
        Page 79
    The owl
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Tom beck and the birds
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Farmer-boy taking lunch
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Mama and the children
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Sister's twin pets
        Page 88
        Page 89
    Gathering flowers
        Page 90
        Page 91
    Summer in the country
        Page 92
        Page 93
    Children at play
        Page 94
        Page 95
    The wild flowers
        Page 96
        Page 97
    How to get wise
        Page 98
        Page 99
    Keep out of trouble
        Page 100
        Page 101
    Gathering wild flowers
        Page 102
        Page 103
    My dolly
        Page 104
        Page 105
    Going to a mission-school
        Page 106
        Page 107
    I won't gamble
        Page 108
        Page 109
    Clean hands
        Page 110
        Page 111
    Offering to idols
        Page 112
        Page 113
    Windows for the blind
        Page 114
        Page 115
    Kittie's new song
        Page 116
        Page 117
    Flower-voices
        Page 118
        Page 119
    Home, sweet home
        Page 120
        Page 121
    The woodpecker
        Page 122
        Page 123
    We Ought to Love Jesus
        Page 124
        Page 125
    Ines and her teacher
        Page 126
        Page 127
    A prayer for children
        Page 128
        Page 129
    Anybody can do that
        Page 130
        Page 131
    Little peace-maker
        Page 132
        Page 133
    A missionary's lantern
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text







































































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The Baldwin Library

^m D ni





F, -



















LI K ~-~i"Lj"













CRACKED CORN.










PREPARED BY

ASA BULLARD,
AUTHOR OF "CHILDREN'S ALBUM," "CHILDREN'S BOOK
FOR SABBATH HOURS," ETC.








Volume I.






SPRINGFIELD, MASS.:
W. J. HOLLAND & COMPANY.
1873.
j *
























NOTE.



As corn must be cracked into small pieces for little
chickens, so the stories in this little book, for the "little
ones in the family, have been prepared in plain and
simple language by
THE AUTHOR.
"SUNNYBANK," CAMBRIDGE.








Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1873, by
W. J. HOLLAND,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.
All Rights Reservcd.























CONTENTS.







PAGE. PAGE.
A FROLIC WITH CARLO, 9 A DAY TO Do NOTHING, 47
FEED THE BIRDS, 11 LITTLE LUCY, .. 49
LITTLE BASKET-MAKER, 13 LOUISA AND MAY, .. 51
A FAMILY RIDE, .. 15 THE ALLIGATOR, 53
HOW TO GET KNOWLEDGE,. 17 KEEPING HOUSE, .. 55
LITTLE RAGGED ORATOR, 19 ON THE SEA-SHORE, .. 57
GATHERING LILIES, .. 21 A SAVAGE STRIKING A
A"LUMP" OF A BIRD, 23 LIGHT,. . ... 59
A BOUQUET FOR GRANDPA, 25 GRACE AND HER CANARY,. 61
RUM DID IT, . 27 Two LITTLE KITTENS, 63
THE PORCUPINE, . 29 LITTLE EVA'S PRAYER, 65
KITTY IN THE CLOSET, 31 MAY HAS COME, . 67
GOOD IN SICKNESS.. 33 THE FOX AND THE TRAP, 69
A BEAUTIFUL SCENE, 35 AT HIS MOTHER'S GRAVE, 71
JANE'S ROSE-BUSH, 37 LOVE THE AGED, . 73
LITTLE PRISONER, .. 39 MORNING THOUGHTS, .. 75
SPRING, .... .41 THE MOTHER-DOG'S AD-
LITTLE DEEDS OF KIND- VICE, ....... 77
NESS, . 43 STONING THE LITTLE
A PASSION FOR FLOWERS,. 45 BIRD, ....... 79
5










6 CONTENTS.

PAGE. PAGE.
THE OWL, .. 81 GOING TO A MISSION-
TOM BECK AND THE SCHOOL, . .107
BIRDS, . 83 I WON'T GAMBLE," 109
FARMER-BOY TAKING CLEAN HANDS. ..111
LUNCH, . 85 OFFERINGS TO IDOLS, 113
MAMMA AND THE CHIL- WINDOWS FOR THE BLIND, 115
DREN, . .. 87 KITTIE'S NEW SONG, 117
SISTER'S TWIN PETS, .. 89 FLOWER-VOICES, .. .119
GATHERING FLOWERS, 91 "HOME, SWEET HOME," 121
SUMMER IN THE COUN- THE WOODPECKER, 123
TRY ... .. 93 WE OUGHT TO LOVE JE-
CHILDREN AT PLAY, 95 SUS, . .125
THE WILD FLOWERS, 97 INES AND HER TEACHER, 127
How TO GET WISE, 99 A PRAYER FOR CHILDREN, 129
KEEP OUT OF TROUBLE, .101 "ANY BODY CAN DO
GATHERING WILD FLOW- THAT," . 131
ERS . ... .103 LITTLE PEACE-MAKER, 183
MY DOLLY, .. . .105 A MISSIONARY'S LANTERN, 135






vol 1




























_-I 4
A FROLIC WITH CARLO,
"I -': is88-- ;. ..r Jr







I1 8
Hi






!: !L i















A FROLIC WITH CARLO.




DWARD and his sister Susie are having
a fine frolic with Carlo.
The little rogue of a dog has seized Susie's
hat by the string, and is running off with it
just as fast as his four short legs.can go. See
what a twinkle of roguery and fun there is
in his eye, as he seems to say,-
"No, you don't catch me, Miss Susie."
Susie, with only two feet, of course, can't run
as fast as Carlo with his four; and she will
have to wait till he gets tired of teasing her,
and then he will bring it back again himself.
Carlo knows well enough that it is all play.
He loves his little mistress, and wouldn't do
anything to grieve her, any more than that
kind brother would grieve his darling sister.
9











































FEED THE BIRDS.
10
















FEED THE BIRDS.



WHEN the fields are white with snow,
And the cold winds roughly blow,
The little birds forget their fear,
And to the cottage-door draw near.

Well they earn the food they ask;
Through the summer, theirs the task
To pursue, with ceaseless care,
Insects swarming through the air.

Quick they snap the stinging gnat,
Grub, and caterpillar fat;
Orchard, garden, and fair field,
Many a dainty morsel yield.

Thus are saved the fruits and grains
Which have been grown with toil and pains,_
Freely, then, the birds we'll feed
With welcome crumbs and chosen seed.

Then, when spring shall come again,
To scatter flowers along the plain,
The thankful birds will sweetly sing,
And make the air with music ring.
11



















I '' -! I I "
4I"














dii





LITTLE BASKET-MAKER.
12













LITTLE BASKET-MAKER.



J ERE is a little blind boy, making him-
self useful in helping his poor mother,
by making baskets. How lovingly his mother,
as she plies her needle, looks down upon
the dear child, as he weaves his basket, and
never utters a word of complaint that he is
blind!
What a shame that the stout, healthy boy,
with two good, bright eyes, and strong hands,
should ever see his poor mother toiling for
their daily bread, and rather spend all his time
in play than to do anything useful! What
a shame to sit in idleness, and see her bring
in the water and chips, and never lift a finger
to aid her! Better be a blind, loving and help-
ful boy, than, with two eyes, be undutiful and
selfish!







































.! '~'~t4M72 '. .






A FAMILY RIDE.
14













A FAMILY RIDE.



SMOTHER is here giving a ride to her
little ones; and they all seem to enjoy it.
This is the Opossum family. They live in
the woods in the southern part of America.
They climb the trees, and hang by their tails
from the branches.
The poor sparrows and other birds are often
obliged to fly for their lives, and see their
young ones devoured by robbers.
This is a curious family. When full-
grown, they are about as large as a cat.
They have a wide mouth and large ears, a
nose like a fox, and a tail somewhat like a rat.
When the mother wants her little ones to take
a journey, they jump upon her back, wind
their tails around hers, and away they go just
as you see in the picture.
15


























.. '

a' N





101

J ', ~ '. .

















HOW TO GET KNOWLEDGE.
16










HOW TO GET KNOWLEDGE.
---------- --

THAT is the question. Get it the same
way the chickens eat their cracked
corn,-pick it up a little at a time. First
learn your letters, A, B, C; then spell little
words; then read easy books, and next bigger
and bigger ones.
"The garden is dug, the field is ploughed,
and the load of wood sawed little by little,
and little at a time.
"And so must your lessons at home and at
school be learned,-long lessons or hard les-
sons, a little at a time. Do not pout or cry,
or look discouraged, like that little boy in the
picture, who can't quite remember how to
spell the word Master Solomon has just put
out, or think it is no use to try, and play
away your time ; but take heart when your
book is before you, and, by learning a little at
a time, the hardest lesson will soon become
easy, and the longest lesson be finally con-
quered."
2 17

































', -. ,














LITTLE RAGGED ORATOR.
18













LITTLE RAGGED ORATOR.


HERE is an evening-school of the street-
sweepers.
That fair-faced boy, though bare-footed and
in rags, has mounted the platform to "speak
a piece." Rather a ragged-looking orator,
surely; and yet he is a fine-looking little fel-
low.
He has a very attentive audience to ad-
dress. Look at them! Not one seems dis-
posed to make fun of him; but they all seem
interested in his plea in behalf of the Sabbath
school. He is telling them of the good in-
structions, beautiful papers, and cards and
books he receives, and inviting them to come
with him and enjoy the same privileges.
Let us hope the little oxator will persuade
them all to go, so that they may be taught to
grow up useful men.
t- _


























S _--. -- '- -






r














i G T E- --- -K"I .
._ --






GATHERING LILIES.
So













GATHERING LILIES.


WHAT beautiful flowers pond-lilies are!
They are not merely idle beauties,
but they bless all those who come near them
with their fragrance. They are like beautiful
people who are always doing good, as well as
handsome-looking.
Here are several persons gathering lilies.
The Bible says,-
"My beloved has gone down into his gar-
den to gather lilies." This is often quoted
to mean the taking of Christ's little ones
home to heaven.
There they will always be pure, and clothed
in white like the lily.
It is a pleasant thought that little children
and those who love Jesus are his flowers, and
that his garden is full of those whom he has
gathered to bloom always near him.
21


































/





A "LUMP" OF A BIRD.
22












A "LUMP" OF A BIRD.

THIS curious bird is the kiwi-kiwi; so it
has more i's (eyes) than appear in the
picture.
The kiwi-kiwi feeds mostly on worms, and
thus helps the farmer. With its large and
strong bill it can pierce several inches into
the earth; and it seldom fails to find its fa-
vorite food.
This bird has scarcely any appearance of
"wings, and is on that account called wing-
less." The general color of the kiwi-kiwi is
chestnut-brown, each feather being tipped
with a darker hue. Its height is about two
feet.
When this curious bird is about to sleep, it
sticks its long bill in the ground to prevent
its toppling over. It is a native of New
Zealand.
23


















"- -~ .-



r





Ait










A BOUQUET FOIR GRANDPA.
24










A BOUQUET FOR GRANDPA.


HERE is a fairy little girl out among the
birds and butterflies, with her little kit-
ten following, gathering wild-flowers. How
bright and happy she looks! Perhaps she is
gathering a bouquet for some dear friend at
home. How pleased that friend will be to
receive it!
A dear little girl, in her city dress, with her
fine hat and feather, and rich profusion of
hair, once brought a sweet bouquet of flowers
to grandpa. And how pleased he looked, as
he held out his wrinkled hands both for the
flowers and for the darling one who brought it!
It was a beautiful scene, if it was in a plain
country kitchen, and if the aged inmates
were plain country people.
Grandpa loves flowers; but brighter and
sweeter than all to him is his precious grand-
child. He always has a pleasant talk with
Lily, or teaches her some pretty hymn.
25











1 '











--I, -.. "_;r r r : S -*- : -r-
'YV














RUM DID IT.
;~23














RUM DID IT.

o--

RUM made that woman a cruel mother.
Do you see her big arm uplifted to
strike her little girl? She is cruel, and rum
made her so.
She was a loving mother once. Her little
girl used to nestle in her arms, and look into
her face, and feel happy. But now she is
afraid of her mother. She sees no love in
that angry face. Rum washed it all out of
her heart.
You see that home is very poor. There is
no nice carpet on the floor, no cosy lounges,
no easy chairs, no pictures on the walls.
Such things used to be there. What has be-
come of them? Rum has swept them all
away. Rum is a great curse to every one.
Don't learn to drink it, children. Don't
touch it.
27


















-'-=- "_. , --






















THE PORCUPINE.
23












THE PORCUPINE.


THE porcupine is a strange-looking animal.
When not angry, his long, sharp quills,
with which he is covered, lie nearly flat upon
his body.
Some of these quills are ten or twelve inches
long, and are sometimes used for pen-holders.
The Indians dye them various colors, and use
them to ornament articles of dress.
When the porcupine fears an attack by an
enemy, he rolls himself up in a ball, with
these sharp spears projecting all over him,
so that nothing can touch him.
Did you ever see any creature but a porcu-
pine that, when cross and angry, almost looked
as though he had sharp thorns all over him, to
pierce the hearts of fathers and mothers and
brothers and sisters ? You ask your mother
if her little boys and girls ever remind her of
a porcupine.
29




















S- 11ii u


















KITTY IN 'IHE CLOSET.
10












KITTY IN THE CLOSET.


SITTY was naughty, and her mother put
her in a dark closet. She sat down on
a box and cried. At first she said to herself,
"Naughty mamma, to put Kitty in the closet!
Good Kitty, naughty mamma "
Then Kitty was still. She began to think;
and then she felt that she had not been quite
right. Then she said, Naughty Kitty, good
mamma!"
She knocked at the door, wanting to ask
mamma to forgive her: nobody came. Kitty's
heart beat quick. She opened the door, and
called, Dear mamma Nobody answered.
Has God took my mamma ?"
She ran into the kitchen, crying,-
"Dear, bestest mamma, here is Kitty I'se
so sorry, mamma !-so-so-forgive Kitty. I
want to be good; I love to be good; only it
is so easy to be naughty! "
31
- ..... -



























; _- .. _-_. .













GOOD IN SICKNESS.










GOOD IN SICKNESS.


O you ever ask what good there can be
in sickness? What good can this poor
boy find in being sick?
He may learn many useful lessons from it.
He may learn to prize health more. If we
were never sick, we should hardly stop to
think what a blessing health is.
He may learn to be more careful. Most
of our sicknesses come from carelessness in eat-
ing, or play, or exposure.
He may learn that his parents know best.
Children do not always believe that.
He may learn how frail we are, how depend-
ent we are upon God for life and for health;
and also, he may learn, by this sickness, the
need of preparation to die.
Now, if this boy learns all these lessons
from this illness, he will certainly find much
good in being sick.
But all may learn these lessons without be-
ing sick.
3 83




























"..,& L---- .-
















A BEAUTIFUL SCENE.
84














A BEAUTIFUL SCENE.


AND what can be more beautiful than a
group of pretty children among the
pretty flowers? Even Solomon in all his
glory was not so beautifully arrayed as are
the flowers of the field.
How beautiful the flowers must have ap-
peared to Jesus, to cause him thus to speak of
them. He says, Consider the lilies;" not
merely look at them, or take pleasure in gath-
ering them ; but consider "-gain all the in-
struction you can from them.
And what a sweet lesson Jesus' words about
the flowers teach us. "If God so clothe the
grass of the field, shall he not much more
clothe you ?" How near this brings Jesus to
us. If he notices and delights to clothe the
flowers and the grass, much more will he
notice and care for all who love him.
35















. 'I''









JANE'S ROSE-BUSH.
86



4










JANE'S ROSE-BUSH.
--*-o-*---

JANE WHITE was ten years old. She
was a cheerful, light-hearted, pleasant-
tempered child: which every line of her
sweet face showed so plainly, that she made
friends wherever she went.
Jane dearly loved flowers; and she might
be seen flitting from one to another, admiring
their bright colors, and enjoying their sweet
scent,-now gathering a bouquet, and now
listening to the sweet notes of some little
bird among the shrubbery.
But there was one rose-bush which she es-
pecially loved; for it was her own. She
tended it with care, keeping the earth loose
about the roots with her trowel. And how it
did grow to reward her care! and how happy
Jane was when the first bud appeared! And
"When we devote our youth to God,
'Tis pleasing in his eyes:
A flower, when offered in the bud,
Is no vain sacrifice."
37















































LITTLE PRISONER.
38














LITTLE PRISONER.
-3--

THIS is little Harry Chase, who has been
shut up all day like a prisoner.
What can be the reason ?" do you ask?
Harry has a kind father, who loves to have
his children all learn to spell correctly.
Harry had a spelling-lesson to learn; but he
wasted his time in play; and, when the
other children could recite the long list very
nicely, he could not spell a single word.
So his father sent him to his room to stay
till night; and, while the other children had
a merry time at play, he was in his room, very
sober and lonely.
Bridget has come, bringing only some
"bread and water" for the poor prisoner.
Poor boy! he paid dearly for his foolish-
ness in neglecting his lesson and grieving his
parents.
39












































SPRING.
40















SPRING.




THE Spring is here, the spring is here!
The floral season of the year
Returns, its warmth and bloom to bring.
Whichever way we look, we see,
In herb and shrub and stately tree,
The bloom and green of genial Spring.

Spring is the children's jubilee :
Their housed-up forms once more are free;
Through wood and field again they roam.
Our very hearts with gladness bound
To see what joy the young have found,
As glad they shout, The Spring has come!"

Then welcome; Spring! thrice welcome, Spring!
Such balm, such beauty, dost thou bring.
At thy warm breath what change we see!
Long-frozen streams now flow along;
Long-absent birds return with song;
And this we owe, sweet Spring, to thee!
41
















































LITTLE DEEDS OF KINDNESS.
42













LITTLE DEEDS OF KINDNESS.


LITTLE Willie is in great trouble. The
dear little kitten his aunt had given him,
which he loved so much, and which had just
begun to play and skip after a string, is gone.
Two large boys came along, and caught his
little pet and carried it off. Oh, how sad he
felt as he sat down, covered his face, and
cried!
Just then a young girl came along. When
she saw Willie's distress, she set down her
basket; and, on learning the cause of his
grief, she put one arm ever so kindly around
his neck, and tried to soothe him. And her
kind words did comfort him. And this was
not all: she went to the house where these
bad boys lived, and told their mother of their
cruel deeds: and she made them carry the
kitten back, and ask Willie's pardon.
43











































A PASSION FOR FLOWERS.
44












A PASSION FOR FLOWERS.


THIS boy must have a strong passion for
flowers, to seek them at such peril.
Perhaps it is at the request of some one else
that he is seeking them.
The chasm into which he has descended is
frightful. The friends who are letting him
down by that strong rope are far up out of
sight. What if he should grow dizzy and fall
out, though there seems to be a rope around
his body to prevent such a fearful event?
All children who expose themselves to bad
companions, bad places, and bad habits, are
in greater danger than is the boy in this
frightful chasm. Your mother's watchful care
is like this strong rope to hold you back from
danger. Always obey her will. A good
"mother's apron-string," as wicked boys call
her commands, is a silken cord that has saved
many a boy from the gallows.
45






























4-






















A DAY TO DO NOTHING.
46











A DAY TO DO NOTHING,


" IF I only could have a whole day to do
Snothing,-no work and no lessons, only
play all day,-I should be happy," said little
Bessie.
To-day shall be yours," said her mother.
"You may play as much as you please; and
I will not give you any work, no matter how
much you may want it."
Bessie laughed at the idea of wishing for
work, and ran out to play. She swung on
the gate ; then she got her doll, and went into
the grove, and played with it a while; but she
was soon tired. She tried all her toys; but
they didn't seem to please her any better.
She went into the garden again, and leaned
over the fence, watching the ducks and geese
in the pond. She longed to help her mother,
and soon went in and said, Mother, why do
people get tired of play ? "
Because God did not mean us to be idle."
47















































LITTLE LUCY.

48











LITTLE LUCY.


LITTLE Lucy lived in the country. She
was a pleasant child. The neighbors
used to call her "Sunshine," because she was
always smiling, and seemed to possess the
power to make every one happy who saw her
sweet face and listened to her pleasant words.
One day, with her arms full of flowers, she
was tripping along homeward from her Aunt
Mary's, when she suddenly saw the minister
approaching.
How do you do, Lucy? said he: "you
are as wide-awake and cheerful as ever, I see.
What makes you always so cheerful ? "
I don't know, sir," said she, unless it is
because I love God, and love everybody.
Mother says that is it."
That was the secret of the child's merry
face and happy heart. Love always makes
the heart glad, and causes even an aged,
wrinkled face to look handsome.
4 49




















-,








































LOUISA AND MAY.

50
















LOUISA AND MAY.



THESE children have been out gathering
flowers. They are now talking about
Caroline Lee, one of their playmates. Louisa
thinks Caroline had ill-used her sister May;
and you can see she is quite angry about it.
I would never speak to her again, the ugly
thing, if I were you," she says.
No, Lou: I would not treat her so for any-
thing. I shall forgive, and forget just as soon
as I can."
Do you not all love that sweet forgiving
of May ? She does not mean to let the sun
go down upon her wrath. She wants, in her
evening prayer, to say, Forgive us our debts
as we forgive our debtors."
51





























"V--_ -" -,:_, ._ -----









THE ALLIGATOR.
62














THE ALLIGATOR.


THIS ugly-looking monster, with his great
mouth full of sharp teeth, is the alli-
gator. He lives in the River Ganges, and
often frightens the natives. He is useful,
though so ugly-looking, because he devours
dead bodies that are found in the stream.
And he devours, also, live babies when he can
catch them.
The heathen worship their gods because
they are afraid of them. Before the mission-
aries told them better, the poor heathen
mothers would often throw their live babies
into the river, as a sacrifice to the goddess
Gunga, to be devoured by these fearful alli-
gators and sharks. They thought such sacri-
fices would prevent the goddess from being
angry with them.
53





















I L




























KEEPING HOUSE.
54













KEEPING HOUSE.


FRANK VERNON was nine years old,
and his sister Amy was eight. One
morning their mother said, "Now, chil-
dren, I am going to Boston to-morrow.
Your father thought we could not leave you;
but I told him I thought we could trust you."
Oh, yes, mamma! they both said in one
breath. And Frank added, "It will be so
nice for us to keep house; and I will be papa,
and Amy shall be mamma."
And so Frank and Amy, as Mr. and Mrs.
Vernon, spent the day in house-keeping, just
like grown-up people, calling each other Mr.
and Mrs. Vernon. But how tired they did
get! and when the mother returned, Amy ran
to her, saying,-
O mother! I never did know, before, how
good it was to have you you, and me me."
55
































-_.... _-- -
`J--











ON THE SEA-SHORE.
56











ON THE SEA-SHORE.


HOW pleasant it is to visit the sea-shore.
Who does not love to sit, like the chil-
dren in the picture, under the lofty cliff, and
watch the restless waves as they roll in one
after another, and break upon the shore at
our feet? Who does not like to watch the
vessels with their snowy sails as they glide
over the deep on their way to distant lands ?
How wonderful is the ocean and it is full
of wonders, millions and millions of fishes and
creatures, so strange and curious. And there
are shell-fish of all kinds and forms, corals
and sponges and sea-mosses and plants of ex-
quisite beauty clinging to the rocks. You may
gather a few of these curious things, but there
are thousands you can never find. The Psalm-
ist says: "The earth is full of thy riches;
so is this great and wide sea, wherein are
creeping things innumerable, both great and
small beasts."
57












































A SAVAGE STRIKING A LIGHT.
58













A SAVAGE STRIKING A LIGHT.
-.0----+c-

WHAT should you think this poor sav-
age was doing? Should you ever
think of whirling a stick around in your hand,
on another stick, in that way, to strike a
light? And yet that is what this savage is
doing.
Have you never seen boys, in their play,
rub two sticks together till there was such
heat, created by the friction, that they
smoked, and perhaps blazed? As this poor
heathen has no lucifer-matches, he is obliged
to strike his light in this way.
The trees and the mountains show that this
is a scene in Africa or Asia. How curiously
this native of a heathen land has arranged his
hair. His waterfall is on the top of his head.
When the Gospel shall be preached to
every creature, all, even the Hottentots, will
be clothed, and taught to love the Saviour.
59














































... .....-.. -i
'I













GRACE AND HER CANARY.
60











GRACE AND HER CANARY.


I SHALL be gone all summer, Will; and
SI do not know of any one I can trust my
Dickey with but you, you are always so
kind to pets. Will you take care of him for
me, Will?"
"Oh, yes, Miss Gracie! I'll take care of
your birdie, and be glad to do it for you."
"We are going to England to see Uncle
Leslie. I wish I could take Dickey with me;
but mother says I must not think of it. So
he'll be yours till I come back, Will. And if
I should die, and never come back to claim
my birdie, I want you always to keep him to
remember your little Gracie by, and think
of me among the angels, when he sings his
sweetest song."
Gracie never returned to claim her pet
canary. She faded away like a summer
flower.
61




































TWO LITTLE KITTENS.
C2
















TWO LITTLE KITTENS.



"Two little kittens, one stormy night,
Began to quarrel, and then to fight.
One had a mouse; the other had none :
And that was the way the quarrel begun.

'I'll have that mouse,' said the bigger cat.
'You'll have that mouse? We'll see about that!"
I will have that mouse,' said the elder son.
'You shan't have that mouse,' said the little one.

" I told you before 'twas a stormy night
When the two little kittens began to fight :
The old woman seized her sweeping-broom,
And swept the two kittens right out of the room.

"The ground was covered with frost and snow,
And the two little kittens had nowhere to go.
So they laid them down on the mat at the door,
While the old woman finished sweeping the floor.

"Then they crept in as quiet as mice,
All wet with snow, and cold as ice;
For they found it was better that stormy night,
To lie down and sleep than to quarrel and fight."
63























LITTLE EVA'S PRAYER.
64













LITTLE EVA'S PRAYER.


LITTLE Eva's mother had a rose-bush, on
which grew a magnificent rose. She
told Eva, over and over again, not to pick it.
What was her surprise, on May-day, to have
Eva bring her that very rose, and say,-
"Here, mamma, is a May-day present from
Eva."
She said she found it on the ground; but
her mother saw her pick it from the bush.
The mother took Eva in her lap, and told her
how wicked she had been in the sight of God.
She then punished her, as she felt it her duty
to do; when Eva said,-
"Mamma,.I want to ask Jesus to forgive
me." And here is her little prayer:-
"Dear Jesus, please forgive me for being
naughty, and help me to be good. Do, dear
Jesus, please, and help me to mind mamma;
for Christ's sake. Amen."
5 65

















~. ,, .. I






7-.










A'Y. ,HA NI .- o










MAY HAS COME.
66











MAY HAS COME.



SWEET, happy, smiling May has come.
It brings again its pretty flowers, and
covers the earth with brightness and beauty.
Everywhere, in meadow and grove, in field
and shady nook, the flowers raise their tiny
stems and brilliant faces. The orchard-trees
become like grand bouquets of beauty, and
load the air, far and wide, with the rich fra-
grance of their millions of tinted flowers.
May is a delightful month; and no wonder
these little girls are out among the flowers
and ferns, making wreaths of beauty to crown
their heads.
Let us sing to the flowers this little
song:-
Gay and fragrant flowers that blow
Where the grass is soft and low,
Who has made you fair and sweet,
Springing thus beneath our feet?
Surely lie must loving be
Who made such tender things as ye."
67





















.. :






















THE FOX AND THE TRAP.
68












THE FOX AND THE TRAP.


WELL, Mr. Fox, they say you are a very
cunning creature; but you were not
cunning enough, this time, to see the trap
that was hid for you. You have made your
escape, it is true; but there is a piece of your
brush in the trap, that will tell the story of
your mischief.
Little Johnnie seems to have thought he
had found a little dog; and he reached his
hand through the fence to pet him, when
foxy was so frightened, that he made a spring,
and escaped, leaving the end of his tail in the
trap.
Reynard may think himself well off that he
escaped with so little loss. Perhaps it is well
for little Johnnie that he did escape; for his
sharp teeth might have caught the little boy's
finger or hand: then both would have been
in a trap.
69






















iMi















-- --' - -

















AT HIS MOTHER'S GRAVE.
70











AT HIS MOTHER'S GRAVE.


THIS lad is standing, with folded hands
and a pensive look, at his mother's new-
made grave. It would be pleasant to know
his thoughts. They may be only thoughts of
affection and love, as he thinks of the dear one
there quietly slumbering in the grave.
And they may be thoughts of remorse, as
he recalls the many instances in which he was
unkind to the departed, and caused that dear
heart to throb with bitter grief.
An old man once saw a little girl weeping
over a grave; and he asked, "Why do you
weep, my little one ? "
Her tears flowed faster, and in the midst
of her sobs she said, This is my little broth-
er's grave; and, now that he is dead, I think
of all the cross and angry words that I said to
him."
71















































LOVE THE AGED.
72












LOVE THE AGED.


THAT'S right, boy! Help the old man
up. Poor old man! If you had not
come along he might have perished. He will
give you an old man's blessing. He was
strong once; but he is old now. Care has
cut many furrows into his cheeks, and the fire
has all left his eyes.
Don't mock him! Some children make
sport of the aged. To do so is cruel, wicked,
foolish. You will be old one of these days,
unless your life is cut off in its prime ; and if
you mock the aged now, God may let wicked
children mock you then.
Love the aged, children. Yes, love them!
Let your kind words make music in their ears,
and your sunny looks be sunshine in their
paths. Love the aged, love the aged, chil-
dren!
73

























" .I i '"ll





















MORNING THOUGHTS.
74
S ii -i





-i ~ -'















MORNING THOUGHTS.

















MORNING THOUGHTS.



TWILIGHT is fading
From moorland and hill;
Sunbeams are streaming
O'er fountain and rill
Trees are all waving
Their heads to the breeze;
Birds are all hymning
Their glad notes of praise.

Gladly I hail it,
The morning's bright smile,
So thrillingly joyous,
Yet gentle the while.
Beautiful morning,
Joy of the heart,
Emblem of hopefulness,
Welcome thou art."
71)












'*'" ':|
''~~ ~ ,1 -^ ^ -^ V '- ;jS1 t^










THE MOTHER DOG'S ADVICE














THE MOTHER-DOG'S ADVICE.


THIS pleasant-looking mother-dog is giv-
ing some good advice to her little son.
"Now, sonny, mother wants you to grow
up to be a noble dog, like your father. You
must not be out in the streets in the evening.
There are a great many bad dogs about, and
they will lead you into temptation. Mother
does not wish you to go with bad dogs. Dogs,
like boys, are known by the company they
keep. You must not run out of the house,
and bark at everybody that passes by or
comes near. A great many children have
been frightened by such conduct."
Now, does not little doggie look as though
he meant always to obey his mother? He
does not mean to be ashamed, as some chil-
dren are, of receiving such good advice.
77










-- ='-. 4.


-I ,F- ;- ,' ,-_- -". " '

,'I










STONING THE' LITTLE BIRD.













STONING THE LITTLE BIRD.


HERE is a young rogue throwing stones
at a little bird that sits upon a bough,
warbling its sweet notes of music. We don't
know whether those other boys are going to
join him in his cruel sport or not.
Another little boy, as he came into the
house, his face all glowing with delight, said,
"Mamma, there was a little bird lighted on a
bough of the lilac-bush, and he sang a long
time to me; and, when he had finished, said,
' Thank you, little bird, for your song. Was
that right, mamma ?"
"Yes," said his mother, who had taught
him to say Thank you! to those who did
him any kindness.
Now, was it not better to thank a little
bird for his song, if he did not understand it,
than cruelly to throw stones at him.
79













































THE OWL.

















THE OWL.

A FABLE.



"A GRAVE gray owl sat on a tree,
Looking as wise as wise could be:
It was in an hour of twilight dim.
A gay young mouse caught sight of him:
He knew it was not safe nor right
For him to be out so late at night;
Yet, like young tipplers on a lark,
Who swagger and shout when in the dark,
He did not dream of danger near :
When sense has fled, there is no fear.
There perched the owl, a feathered cat,
Watching with sleepy eyes the bat,
Which flitted on its wings of leather,
Catching gnats in summer-weather.
The mouse looked at his sleepy eyes,
And wondered why he looked so wise.
'Tu-whit, tu-whoo!' at last he said;
And then the mouse in terror fled.
Alas! he lost his way, and, lo!
Down flew the owl. Tu-whit, tu-whoo!'
He screeched, and bore away the prize
He long had watched with sleepy eyes."
6 81




















; -

A.

" 3 :- "














TOM BECK AND THE BIRDS.
82














TOM BECK AND THE BIRDS.

TOM BECK could not read; and he said,
"I don't want to, and I won't learn."
So he went out to play, instead of going to
school. He found a nest in a large tree; and
the young ones opened their large beaks, and
cried, "Chip! chip!" as much as to say,
" Give us something to eat." Tom took them
down and showed them to his sisters; then
he went away and hid them, for he knew he
was doing wrong. He got some bread for
them; but they could not eat it, it was so
hard. He could find nothing else for them;
and, before long, all the poor things, one after
another, died.
When poor Tom thought of his running
away from school, and of his cruelty to the
little birds, he couldn't help crying. But his
crying could not bring the little birds to life.
83


















3,:
#' _



















-. -



















FARMER-BOY TAKING LUNCH.
84









FARMER-BOY TAKING
LUNCH.
------"---

FRED JONES has just driven up a load
of sweet, new-made hay. The patient
oxen are resting themselves in the barn;
while Fred, seated on a wheel in the yard, is
taking a bit of a lunch.
Fred is a gentle, kind-hearted boy, even to
the animals about the farm. Do you not see
how at home they all seem to be? The lazy
pig, that has lain down by the side of the
barn, lies there without fear; the old rooster
has come up to pick up the crumbs that drop
from Fred's bread and butter; and even a
bird has joined his company, as though it ex-
pected nothing but kindness from him.
"He who would have friends must show
himself friendly;" and, when one makes
friends of the animals around him, we may
know he has a kind and loving heart. Such
a one will not be undutiful and unloving to
parents, brothers and sisters, and associates.
85





































. ,













MAMMA AND THE CHILDREN.
.- -





MAMMA AND THE CHILDREN.
s6









MAMMA AND THE CHILDREN.


YES, here are mamma and the children.
And a nice time they are having Sabbath
evening.
Frank and Eddie are busily engaged read-
ing. Frank is reading the new book he
brought home from the Sabbath-school; and
Eddie is reading his new number of the Well-
Spring. And mamma is telling a story to the
two sisters and to little Freddie. How at-
tentively they listen. Look at the little
Freddie, resting his chin upon his chubby fist.
Mamma must be telling the sweet old, old
story of Jesus and his love. Is there any
story more beautiful and touching than that
of the babe in the manger, the song of the
angels to the shepherds, the wise men with
their gifts, the lost son among the doctors,
the scenes in the garden, on4the cross, and the
resurrection and ascension? This old story is
ever new, and children never tire in hear-
ing it.
S7

















.II







"h i i I i
YI I





















SISTER'S TWIN PETS.
88










SISTER'S TWIN PETS.


DOES any one wonder that Miss Lizzie
calls these cunning little children her
twin pets ? See the dear, chubby things "bill-
ing and cooing" like two little doves. Ex-
cept when one of them is asleep, they are
never separated.
Miss Lizzie never seems to tire looking after
her little brothers. She loves to see their
cunning and affectionate ways. And even the
girl, as she washes the dishes, cannot help
stopping to look at them.
We hope Freddie and Arthur, under the
care of their good sister, will grow up just as
affectionate and loving as they now appear in
the picture. How happy they will then make
all their friends! And who can tell how it
would grieve Miss Lizzie's heart should she
ever see them getting angry with each other!
May God help all little brothers and sisters
ever to be kind and loving !





















II








GATHERING FLOWERS.
-- BOI~o













GATHERING FLOWERS.



GATHER the flower that hidden lies,
Deep in the dew like a truant gem:
"Gather the buds that stately rise,
Two of a color and three on a stem.
Yes," said my child, "I'll gather then well;
For which is the sweetest I cannot tell."

Gather the flowers that speak of hope,-
Scenting the breath of the morning hour;
Gather the buds that only ope
When night comes apace or tempests lower.
Yes," said n:y sweet one, for both are bright,
One's for the morning, the other for night."

" And is it not strange," she gently said,
As she laid down beside me the spoils that were
ours,
" That since I love Jesus, so oft I've been led
To thank him for summer and sunshine and
flowers?
It seems as if now I'm but learning to look
On the woods and the fields as a leaf of God's
book.
91



















'I '





'r j














El ^T- *^'l '~









SUMMER IN THE COUNTRY.
92











SUMMER IN THE COUNTRY.


LITTLE Herbert thought he was the hap-
piest boy in the city when his mother
told him they were going into the country to
spend the summer with Aunt Fields.
0 dear mamma!" said he, "shall I see
real, true flowers, not picture ones, you know,
and real live little chickens and rabbits, and
ever so many free birds,-not like my little
canary, shut up in a cage? And, O mamma!
do you think I shall see any squirrels ?"
Look in the picture, and you will see Her-
bert, with Aunt Fields, little Hatty and the
"baby. They have taken him out to the great
tree, in which is a squirrel's nest; and one of
them has come out to show himself.
Herbert knows who makes the flowers, and
the birds, and all the beautiful things he sees
in the country; and he often says to his
mother, "Isn't God very, very good to us,
dear mamma?"
93


















-







.*-: '.; *^ I -' -*"-.. .- .
,\^-- .,~ f .-;^ ":




-~-5











CHILDREN AT PLAY.
94 p.














CHILDREN AT PLAY.


CHILDREN are very apt to show their
true character when they play.
A selfish boy or girl will be sure to show
their selfishness there. If they can, they will
occupy the swing double the times they
should, and keep their companions from
getting their fair share of enjoyment.
A Christian child, who walks in the foot-
steps of Jesus, will act differently, and will
be ever ready to add to the enjoyment of his
playmates. Many boys and girls will not
believe it; yet this is the sure way to get
real pleasure. Do you not always find that
the way to be happy is to try and make others
happy? TRY IT.
Children, remember the words of the Lord
Jesus, how he said, It is more blessed to
give than to receive."
95





















I
L. -"" =~-


















THE WILD FLOWERS.
96
















THE WILD FLOWERS.

04-0--

O woodland-flowers, that strew the ground,
And blossom at my feet!
I love your colors bright and gay;
I love your perfume sweet.

O summer flowerets, frail and sweet,
So soon to fade away!
Are you not sad to droop and die
When ends your little day?

Oh! can you trust the One above,
When Winter's cold draws near,
That he will keep you safe from harm
Until another year?

"Teach me, dear flowerets, how to live,
And gentle fragrance shed;
So that 'twill linger on the earth
Long after I am dead.

"And teach me how to put my trust
In Him above the sky,
Who, when I fade and droop on earth,
Will bid me bloom on high."
7 97














I 1 .
":' if -
:',IF, nt "



,r .'< i ,'1,


HOW TO GET WISE.
98





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