• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Notice
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Kindness to animals
 Effect of compassion on the “King...
 Practical Benevolence
 Power of kindness
 The strength of a kind word
 Animal affection
 An interesting sight
 Farmer Giles
 An accommodating horse
 A word, not a whip
 Old Jack, the sagacious horse
 The power of kindness
 Nothing lost by kindness
 Be kind to your horse
 The faithful dog
 A robber captured
 Anecdote
 Bonaparte and the dog
 Poor Ponto
 The dog messenger
 "Jack Godfrey’s dog;" or, The brute...
 Old Simon Edy and the dog
 Rover and his charge
 The miller's dog and the lette...
 Extraordinary sagacity
 One of the detective force
 A friend in need
 Carlo and the brushes
 Comical dogs
 Rescued from death by a dog
 Sagacity of Newfoundland dogs
 The fireman’s dog
 Reasoning of a dog
 The shepherd’s dog
 The faithful dogs
 Recovery of a watch by a dog
 Pity the poor dogs
 Sheep in the field and the...
 The kind droven
 Led, not driven; or, A word to...
 Lead! Don't drive
 Kindness to dumb creatures
 The goat’s care of her young
 Elephant and the captain
 Sagacity of a cat
 Cunning of the fox
 Birds of spring
 What is it?
 Singing birds
 Trust in providence
 A bird's nest
 The bird’s friend
 Anecdote of the song sparrow
 The hen and the chickens
 Count Zinzendorf and the dove
 The white stork
 A tame stork
 Don't rob the poor birds
 Anecdote of president Lincoln
 The bird-world
 Small birds
 Nightingales and other summer visitors,...
 Affection in animals
 Farmers and sparrows
 A plea for the birds
 The use of birds
 The blind woman and Gander
 Don't rob the birds
 Cruelty
 Scriptual illusions
 God is everywhere
 Back Cover






Group Title: Plea for the dumb creation, being selections from the British Workman, etc.
Title: A plea for the dumb creation
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026980/00001
 Material Information
Title: A plea for the dumb creation
Uniform Title: British workman
Band of hope review
Physical Description: 93, 92 p., 7 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Richardson, Hannah White, 1811?-1882 ( Compiler )
Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals ( Publisher )
Publisher: The Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Publication Date: 1873
 Subjects
Subject: Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animal welfare -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1873
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
General Note: Pt. 1 compiled by Hannah W. Richardson.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026980
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002236073
notis - ALH6542
oclc - 33821138

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Title Page
        Page i
    Notice
        Page ii
    Preface
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Introduction
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Kindness to animals
        Page 11
    Effect of compassion on the “King of beasts”
        Page 12
    Practical Benevolence
        Page 12
        Page 12a
    Power of kindness
        Page 13
        Page 14
    The strength of a kind word
        Page 15
    Animal affection
        Page 16
    An interesting sight
        Page 17
    Farmer Giles
        Page 18
    An accommodating horse
        Page 19
        Page 20
    A word, not a whip
        Page 21
    Old Jack, the sagacious horse
        Page 22
    The power of kindness
        Page 23
    Nothing lost by kindness
        Page 24
    Be kind to your horse
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 26a
    The faithful dog
        Page 27
    A robber captured
        Page 28
    Anecdote
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Bonaparte and the dog
        Page 32
    Poor Ponto
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The dog messenger
        Page 36
    "Jack Godfrey’s dog;" or, The brute wiser than the master
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Old Simon Edy and the dog
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Rover and his charge
        Page 41
    The miller's dog and the letter
        Page 42
    Extraordinary sagacity
        Page 43
        Page 44
    One of the detective force
        Page 45
    A friend in need
        Page 46
    Carlo and the brushes
        Page 47
    Comical dogs
        Page 48
    Rescued from death by a dog
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Sagacity of Newfoundland dogs
        Page 51
    The fireman’s dog
        Page 52
    Reasoning of a dog
        Page 53
    The shepherd’s dog
        Page 54
    The faithful dogs
        Page 55
    Recovery of a watch by a dog
        Page 56
    Pity the poor dogs
        Page 56
        Page 56a
    Sheep in the field and the fair
        Page 57
    The kind droven
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Led, not driven; or, A word to cattle drovers
        Page 59
    Lead! Don't drive
        Page 60
    Kindness to dumb creatures
        Page 61
    The goat’s care of her young
        Page 62
    Elephant and the captain
        Page 63
    Sagacity of a cat
        Page 64
    Cunning of the fox
        Page 64
    Birds of spring
        Page 65
        Page 66
    What is it?
        Page 67
    Singing birds
        Page 68
    Trust in providence
        Page 69
    A bird's nest
        Page 70
    The bird’s friend
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Anecdote of the song sparrow
        Page 75
        Page 76
    The hen and the chickens
        Page 77
    Count Zinzendorf and the dove
        Page 78
        Page 78a
    The white stork
        Page 79
    A tame stork
        Page 80
    Don't rob the poor birds
        Page 80
    Anecdote of president Lincoln
        Page 81
    The bird-world
        Page 81
    Small birds
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Nightingales and other summer visitors, (in England)
        Page 84
    Affection in animals
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Farmers and sparrows
        Page 89
    A plea for the birds
        Page 89
    The use of birds
        Page 90
    The blind woman and Gander
        Page 91
    Don't rob the birds
        Page 88
    Cruelty
        Page 92
    Scriptual illusions
        Page 92
    God is everywhere
        Page 93
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text






vl Rita





DUMB CREATION,



SELECTIONS FROM THE








As olhr worlds ahoe,,




PHILADELPHIA
THE PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY
PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO ANIMALS.
OFICE No. 1320 CnEsCT ST.
1873.















NOTICE.



Mrs. H&ILAxA W. RincamA ,so, the compiler
of this interesting volume, has generouslypresented
the stereotype plates to the Pennsylvania Society
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. The
present edition is published by the Society, with
the hope that its wide circulation may prove an
efficient means of promoting the humane senti-
ments of its founders and upholders.









PREFACE.



THIs little compilation has been made with the
desire of enhancing respect and regard for our
dumb companions; the handy-work of our Creator.
The sagacity and half-reasoning power dis-
played by many of the higher orders of animals,
should elicit our respect, while their fidelity and
attachment, often evinced, illustrate the finer fea-
tures of their character, and ought to make them
objects of our compassionate regard.
Independently of tle higher duty of mercy,
thoughtfulness for the comfort of those, who can-
not, in words, plead for themselves, is but repaying
the debt we owe them, for being so devoted to the
service of mankind.
With the evidences now often adduced in
favor of kind treatment to horses and other
animals, the collector of these records trusts she
(iii)








iv PREFACE.

may indulge the hope, that a brighter day has
dawned upon this, so long abused portion of our
heavenly Father's gifts to us, the unworthy re-
cipients of his bounties.
The usefulness of Birds to farmers is so ob-
vious as to need no comment here.

The birds of song who would destroy ?
So full of life, of love, of joy.
1868. H. W. B.














TABLE OF CONTENTS.


A. PAGE.
Animal Affection...................................................... 16
An Interesting Sight................................................. 17
An Acommodating Horse ....................................... 19
A Word, Not a Whip............................................ 21
A Robber Captured.............................................. .. 28
Anedote .......................................... ............... 29
A Friend in Ned .. ....................... .............. 46
A Birds Nest..................................................... 70
Anecdote of the Song Sp o ................ .......... ........ 75
A Tame Stork................................. ....... ............ 80
Anedote of President Lincoln.................................... 81
Affection in Animals.............................................. 85
A Plea for the Birds.............................................. 89
B.
Be Kind to Your Hor ........................................... 25
Bonaparte and the Dog............................................ 32
Birds of Spring.................................................. ... 65
C.
Carlo and the Brshes..... ........................................ 47
Comical Dogs......................................................... 4
Cunning of th Fox.................................................. 64
Count Zinf ndorf and the Dove.............. ..................... 78
Cruelty .............................................. .. ......... 92
D.
Don't Rob the Poor Birds......................................... SO
Don't Bob the Birda............................................... 88
(v)









vi TABLE OF CONTENT.

E. PAaE.
Extract from Cowper..... ................................. 9
Effect of Compassion on the "King of Bests". ............ 12
Effect of Cruelty...................................................... 15
Extraordmary Sagaity ............................................ 43
Elephant and the Captain.......................................... 3
F.
Farm r Gile.................................... ............... 18
Farmers and Sparrows.............................................. 89
G.
God is Everywhere................................................... 93
j.
"Jack Godfrey' Dog".......... .................................. 37
K.
Kidness to Animals................................................. 11
Kindness to Dumb Cr tur ..................................... 61
L.
Led; not Driven...................................................... 59
Lead Don't Drive.................. .................................

Nothing Lot by Kindne ......................................... 24
Nightigales, & ., in England................................... 84
0.
Old Jack, the Sag ious Horse.................................... 22
Old Simon Edy and the Dog. ...... ............................ 39
One of the Det.etive For ........................................ 45
P.
Pr tical B nevol e e.............................................. 12
Power of Kiodnes................................... .............. 13
Poor Ponto.................. ........................... .......... 33
Pity the Poor Dogs ..................... ......................... 56
R.
Rover and his Charge..... ............... ......................... 41









TABLE OF CONTENTS. Vi


REcr ued from Death by a Dog.................................... 49
Rea ni~ng of a g........................ ......................... 53
Recovery of a Watch by a Dog........ ..................... 56

Sir Matthew Hale and the Poor.................................. 14
Sgcity of a IIo ........................ .......................... 20
Sagacity o Newfn dland Dogs.................................. 61
Shep in the Field and the Fair.................................. 57
Sagaity of a Cat...................................................... 64
Singing Birds.......................................................... 63
Small Biils............... ................................. ............ 82
Seriptual Allusios .................................................. 92
T.
The Strength of a Kind Word................................... 15
The Power of Kindne ............................................. 23
The Fithful Dog.................................................... 27
The Dog Mesenger.............................................. 86
The MAilleis Dog and the Letter................................. 42
The Fireman's Dog.................................................... 62
The Shepherd's Dog........ .................................... 64
The Faithful Dog........... ....................................... 56
The Kind D ver................................................... 57
The Goat's Care of Her Young...................... ......... 62
Trust in Providene ....... ............................... .. 69
The Bird's Fiend.............................................. 71
The Hen and Chickens.......................................... 77
The White Stork.............. .................................... 79
The Bird World................................... ....... 81
The Use o Birds............................................. .. 90
The Blind Woman and Gander.................................. 91
W.
What is It? ..................................................... 67




















umb Qtreatinn.



I woom not enter on my list of friends
(Though gaced ith polished manners and fine sense,
Yet waning sensibility) the man
Who needlessly sets foot upon a worm.
An inadvertent step may crush the snail,
That crawls at evening in the public path;
But he that has humanity, forewarned,
Will tread aside, and let the rptle live.
The creeping vermin, loathsome to the sight,
And charged perhaps with venom, that intrudes,
A visitor unwelcome, into scenes
Sacrd to neatness and repose, th' alcoe,
The chamber, or refectory, may die:
A ecessay act incars no blame.
Not so when, held within their proper bounds,
And guiltless of offence, they range the air,
Or take their pastime in the spacious field;
There they are privileged; and he, that hunts
(9)








10 A PLEA FOR THE

Or harms them there, is guilty o a wrong,
Disltbs the economy o. f naires r ealm,
Who when she formed, designed them an abode.
The sum is this. If mans econ enience, health,
Or safety, interfere, his rights and claims
Are paramount, and must extinguish theirs.
Els they are all-the meanest things that ae-
As free to live, and to enjoy that life,
As God was free to frm them at the first,
Who m his soveaign wisdom made them all.
Ye therefore, who love mercy, teach your sons
To love it too. The springme four years
Is soon dishonored d d d in most
By budding ills, and ask prudent hand
To chek them. But alas! none sooner shoot,
If uniremncd, into luxuriant growth,
Than cruelty, most denhsh of them all.
Morcy to him that shows it, is the rule
And righteous limitaton of its nat,
By which heaven moaes in pardonmg guilty mn,
And he that shows none, being ripe in years,
And conscious of the ontrnge he commits,
Shall seek it, and not find it, in his trn.

Distinguished much by reason, and still mo
By our capacity of grace divine,
From creatures, that exist but for our sake,
Which, havmg served us, perish, we are held
Accountable, and God some future day
Will reckon wth us roundly fur the abuse
Of what he deems no men or trivial trust.
Superior as we are, tey yet depend
Not more on human help thn w e on theirs,
Their strength, or speed, or vigilance was given








DUMB CREATIOI. 11

In aid of our defects. In some onre fnd
Such teachable and apprehUouive parts
Thot monos attanmcnts in his own concerns,
Matched with t' expertnss of the brutes in theirs,
Are ofttimes vanqushed, and thrown far behind.
Some show that nice sagacity of smell,
And read with such discernment, n the port
And figure of the man, his secret aim,
That oft we owe our safety to a skill
We could not teach, and must despair to learn;
But learn we might, f not too proud to stoop
To quadruped instructors, many a good
And useful quality, and virtue too,
rarely exemplified among ourselves;
Attachment never to be weaned, or changed
By any change of fortune; proof, alike,


Can move or warp; and gratitude for small
And trivial favors, lasting as the life,
And glitoning eren in the dying eye Cowrs.




illi, ,, to nimnl.

A eAN of kindness to his beast is kind,
But brutal acehons show a brutal mind;
Remember le who made thee, made the bmte;
Who gave thee speech and reason, formed him mute.
HIe cn.t complain; but God'~ all-seeng eye
Beholds thy cruelty. He hears his ry;
He was designed thy servant, not thy drudge;
And know that his Creator is thy Judge I







12 A PLEA FOR THE


Effect of glompassion on tl)e ini of Dcasts."
A LION which the French at Fort St. Louis in
Africa were about to send to Paris, on account of
its great beauty, having fallen sick before the de-
parture of the vessel which was to convey him to
Europe, was loosed from his chain and carried into
an open area. M. Compagnon, author of "An
Account of a Journey to Bambuk," having returned
home from hunting, found this animal in a very
exhausted state, and out of compassion, poured a
small quantity of milk down his throat, whereby
the lion was greatly refreshed, and soon after re-
covered his perfect health. From that time the
lion was so tame, and acquired so great an attach-
ment for his benefactor, that he ate from his hand,
and followed him about, everywhere, like a dog,
with nothing to confine him but a slender string
tied around his neck.


Practical g~eneVolencq.
TOwER HILL, from its steepness, at all times
severely tests the strength of horses in drawing up
the heavy loads from the wharves, but especially
so during the winter months when the stones are
slippery. Many a noble horse has been saved
from falling, by the labors of a lady. Ashes,
gravel, and rubbish, (begged from the neighbor-







12 A PLEA FOR THE


Effect of glompassion on tl)e ini of Dcasts."
A LION which the French at Fort St. Louis in
Africa were about to send to Paris, on account of
its great beauty, having fallen sick before the de-
parture of the vessel which was to convey him to
Europe, was loosed from his chain and carried into
an open area. M. Compagnon, author of "An
Account of a Journey to Bambuk," having returned
home from hunting, found this animal in a very
exhausted state, and out of compassion, poured a
small quantity of milk down his throat, whereby
the lion was greatly refreshed, and soon after re-
covered his perfect health. From that time the
lion was so tame, and acquired so great an attach-
ment for his benefactor, that he ate from his hand,
and followed him about, everywhere, like a dog,
with nothing to confine him but a slender string
tied around his neck.


Practical g~eneVolencq.
TOwER HILL, from its steepness, at all times
severely tests the strength of horses in drawing up
the heavy loads from the wharves, but especially
so during the winter months when the stones are
slippery. Many a noble horse has been saved
from falling, by the labors of a lady. Ashes,
gravel, and rubbish, (begged from the neighbor-





































Rmonr~aesooroPnn~







DUMB CliEATION. 13

hook, with some purchased,) are scattered upon
the road; where the active personal superintend-
ence of this lady, is deemed needful, to seoure the
adequate care. She assists not only with her
purse, but also with her own hands I
From many a sturdy carter may be heard the
" Thank you, ma'am," as he and his horse passing
safety over the frosty ground. She has received
the public thanks of the owners of horses, for her
benevolent efforts.
Truly, a worthy example for imitation.


Pomer of 3indne5..
A DRIVEn,belonging to the great Northern Rail-
way goods station, had occasion to pass up the
Quadrant road highway, New Park, to deliver a
parcel. On approaching one of the houses, he was
seen by a lady in the window, who immediately
said to some friends staying with her, "Here
comes the kind driver; do come and see what
power he has over his horses." The friends ac-
cordingly came to the window, when Benjamin
Smithson, the driver in question, was asked by
the lady to shake hands" with his horses. With
great good humor he at once complied. Standing
in front of the pair of horses, he called out,," Tom I
shake hands:" when instantly the near horse lifted
up his right foot. After a good shake the driver
2







14 A PLEA FOli THE

said, "Now, Tom, the other foot!" when up went
the foot instantly. The driver then went in front
of the other horse, when a similar scene occurred.
Perhaps, however, the most pleasing incident
remains to be told. Retreating backwards several
yards from the horses, he cried out, "Now, Tom,
turn round, and come onl" Instantly the horses
pulled away at their load, turned the van right
round, without the slightest need of so much as the
crack of a whip, and followed the clever driver, as
the dog would the shepherd. Such an instance
shows clearly how much can be done with animals,
but especially with the horse, simply by the power
of kindness.

IF any poor persons met Sir Matthew Hale in
his walks, or came to his door, he would ask such
as were capable of'working, why they went about
so idly. If they answered that it wasbecause they
could not get employment, he would send them to
some field, to gather all the stones in it, and lay
them in a heap; and then paid them liberally for
their trouble. This being done, he used to send
his carts, and caused the stones to be carried to
such places of the highway as needed repair.
[There are many roads of the present day that
want the help of a benevolent man like Sir
Matthewl The poor horses are often cruelly
overtaxed through bad roads.]






DUMB CREATION. 15

lh4 strengthh of a *ind Mo ord
A MAN was one day driving a cart along the
street. The horse was drawing a heavy load, and
did not turn as the driver wanted. The man was
in an ill-temper, and cruelly beat the horse; the
horse reared and plunged, but he either did not, or
would not, go the right way. Another man who
was with the cart, went up to the horse, and pat-
ted him on the neck, and called him kindly by his
name. The horse turned his head, and fixed Iis
large eyes on the man, as though he would say,
"I will do anything for you, because you are kind
to me," and bending his broad chest against the
load, turned the cart down the narrow lane, and
trotted on briskly, as if the heavy load was only a
plaything. Oh, how strong is a kind word!

A CnHRITIAN parent will check his child for kill-
ing and tormenting even the meanest insects. To
make a sport of suffering in any shape, has a hard-
ening effect upon the heart, destroying the natural
sense of sympathy, which is as much a sense of the
human heart, as the sense of touch or taste; but if
this tender sense be blunted or vitiated, the child
grows up a monster and not a man. How many a
name of the homicide and murderer, writ upon
our calendars of crime, was first smeared in the
blood of tortured insects, on the window pane of
its own home I-J. B. Owea, .M. A.







16 A PLEA FOR THE

animal ejedion.

THE contractors engaged on the Boston, U. S.
Water-works, had a valuable cart-horse injured
some time ago. The animal was led home to the
stable, where about fifty horses were generally
kept. The hostler had a water-spaniel, who for
some months had been constantly about among the
horses in the stable, living on great terms of inti-
macy with them. Immediately after the disabled
horse was led in, he lay down and began to exhibit
signs of great distress. The spaniel at once ran
to the horse, and commenced fawning around him,
licking the poor animal's face, and in various other
ways manifesting his sympathy with the sufferer.
The struggles and groans of the horse being con-
tinued, the dog sought his master, and drew his
attention to the wounded animal, and showed great
satisfaction when he found his master employed in
bathing the wounds, and otherwise ministering to
his wants. The hostler continued his care of the
horse until a late hour of the night. Forty-eight
hours after the horse was injured, the faithful dog
had not left the stable, day or night, for a minute,
not even to eat; and from his appearance it was
believed that he had scarcely shlpt at all. He was
constantly on the alert, not suffering any one to
come near the hose, except those attached to the
stable and the owner of the horse; his whole ap-







DUMB CREATION. 17

pearance was one of extreme distress and anxiety.
He often laid his head on the horse's neck, caress-
ing him, and licking around the eyes, which kind-
ness the poor horse acknowledged by a grateful
look and other signs of recognition.
This fact furnishes a remarkable and affecting
exhibition of animal kindness, and should cover
with shame the unfeeling men, who beat and abuse
that noble and most useful of animals, without
stint or remorse, and are utterly destitute of sym-
pathy for the whole brute creation.


Sn interesting eight.
AN eminent medical gentleman, who takes a
deep interest in preventing cruelty to the dumb,
has a noble horse, with which he drives into town
in the morning. On arriving at his door, the
servant makes his appearance,with a good slice of
bread in his hand, which, on being handed to his
master, is soon transferred to the mouth of the
beautiful horse. The noble creature seems to
have as much affection for his master as he las for
it. It is very amusing to see the horse, as regu-
larly as clock-work, stretching out his head for the
slice of bread, and, on receiving it, walk off most
willingly to the stable. It would, evidently, be no
slight punishment, were he sent off to his quarters
without thii usual token of his master's affectionate
2*







18 A PLEA FOR THE

regard. Little acts of kindness, like this, are not
lost upon tle brute creation. If all the owners of
.j 1 i 1 would be
i 1 ,are often
very unmercifully given to some of the noblest
works of our great Creator.


5iarm~q Oies.
THE village where good Farmer Giles lives, is
separated from the railway by a range of hills,
over which coals have to be "hauled" from the
station to the village. The first time I saw Farmer
Giles, lie was bringing a load of coals up the hill
in his little donkey-cart. Some people would have
beaten the poor donkey, to make it work harder in
toiling with its load up the steep hill; but Farmer
Giles did no such thing. No. He let the donkey
rest at the foot of the hill, and while the poor
animal was standing, he fastened a stout rope to
the cart, put the rope over his own shoulder, and
Farmer Giles and the donkey pulled the cart up
the hill together I I have respected Farmer Giles
ever since, and one day, when I was telling this
incident to a neighbor, I was glad to hear him say,
"I have known Farmer Giles many years, and
there is not a more worthy man in the parish. I
have known him when he has had hard work to get
alonz; but I never heard him complain, nor find







DuMB CREATIOs. 19
fault with other people; and I believe he would
suffer any privation rather than be a burden to
others." "A merciful man regardeth the life of
his beast."--Anon.












I l i.........il l .l Ii, |l ori .
"Several years ago, when I was returning from
a tour to the West, I put up one night at a small
town near the Alleghany mountains. Whilst I
was sitting, watching the variegated hues pro-
duced by the rays of the setting sun upon that wild,
rough, mountain scenery, I saw eight or nine large
bgagage-wagons approaching, drawn by four, and
some of them by six horses. I now ascertained
that the tavern where I was stopping, was a regu-
lar lodging-place for these strong, coarse mountain
wagoners. A short distance from tire ilaci where
I was sitting, in front of the house, was a pump,







20 A PLEA FOR THE

with a large trough, which was used for watering
the horses. The handle of this pump, I noticed,
always sprung up whenever any one got through
using it. Some pump-handles, you know, always
fall down; this sprung up, so that a person, when
pumping, had no occasion to lift the handle; it
raised itself.
At the time this string of wagons approached
the tavern, there was but little water in the
trough-not near enough to supply the horses.
Imagine, if you can, my pleasure and surprise, to
see one of the horses that was first unharnesed, go
to the pump, lay his head over the handle, press it
down, and make the water issue from the spout.
As he raised his head the handle would spring up,
but down again he would press it, and force thie
water into the trough. In this manner that lorso
kept pumping with his head, until all the other
horses had finished drinking. Ile then left the
handle, went round to the trough, drank as nmch
as he wanted himself, and then deliberately walked
into the stable and took his place in one of the
stalls."-Anecdotes from Banvard's "Singular
Sagacity."

"HoRns sometimes manifest great sagacity when


His master fell from his saddle, and hung with one







DUeB CREATION. 21

foot entangled in the stirrup. Instead of dashing
onward, as horses do among us under similar cir-
cumstances, this animal stopped, and by twisting
its body in different directions, endeavored to ex-
tricate the peasant from his dangerous position, but
in vain. The man was severely injured, and almost
helpless, but the shock which he had received
brought him to his senses. Instead of being dis-
posed to take advantage of the man's position, as
he lay upon the ground, the horse stooped, laid
hold of the brim of his hat, and raised his head a
little; lut the hat came off and his head fell again.
The horse then seized the collar of his coat, and by
that means, raised him so far from the ground, that
he was enabled to draw his foot from the stirrup.
After resting some time, he again mounted the
horse and reached his home in safety."
What became of the horse after that?"
,The man was so grateful to him for his preser-
vation, that he would not part with the noble
animal, but kept him, and provided for him till he
died of old age."-bid.


SWMord, not a Mhip.
In one of the London timber-yards there is a
carter who is noted for his kindness to the horse
which is under his care. He is deeply attached
to it, and the handsome creature appears to be







22 A PLEA FOR THE

equally fond of him. Such is the command that
this man has acquired over his horse, that a whip
is unnecessary. He has only to walk a little in
advance, when, after a kind word or two, and the
simple pointing of the finger, the noble animal
will draw his burden much more readily than
those which are cruelly lashed with the whip.
Oh, that more kind words were used in the man-
agement of horses, and fewer lashes of the whip.
Horses, like human beings, are more easily drawn
by kindness than driven by cruelty.


Old lath, thq agaf$iimgs Aonr.
TfE whole of the stone required for Waterloo
Bridge, London (excepting the balustrades, which
were brought ready worked, from Aberdeen), was
hewn in some fields adjacent to the erection on the
Surrey side. It was transported on to the work
upon trucks, drawn along railways, in the first in-
stance over temporary bridges of wood; and it is
a remarkable circumstance that nearly the whole
of the material was drawn by one horse, called
" Old Jack," a most sensible animal, and a great
favorite. His driver was, generally speaking, a
steady and trustworthy man, though rather too
fond of his dram before breakfast. As the railway
along which the stone was drawn passed in front
of the public-house door, the horse and truck were






DUMB CREATION. 23

usually pulled up, while Tom entered for his
,'morning." On one occasion the driver stayed
so long that "Old Jack," becoming impatient,
poked his head into the open door, and, taking his
master's coat collar between his teeth, though in a
gentle sort of manner, pulled him out from the
midst of his companions, and thus forced him to
resume his day's work.


E4h gooer of sinnrins.
ON passing the Great Northern Railway Com-
pany's coal depot, in Holloway, not long ago, I
saw a man vainly endeavoring, by means of a whip,
to make one of the horses go in a particular direc-
tion. A little, strong built man, with a black cap,
made his appearance at the stable door, and whilst
evidently annoyed at the rough treatment the noble
animal was receiving, called out in kindly tones-
" Come here my fine fellow, Hard-upl Hard-upl'"
for that was the name of the horse. He imme-
diately turned in the direction of the friendly
voice, and went like a little child to the kind-
hearted stable-man; and after receiving a few pats
on the neck, and a few handfuls of oats, he quietly
performed the duty assigned him. I was delighted
to hear from the lips of this worthy horse-keeper:
" If you cannot manage a horse, sir, by kindness,
you cannot manage him at all. I don't care how







24 A PLEA FOR THE

vicious a horse is, I think I can bring him to by
kind treatment. Horses do a deal for our com-
fort, and it's hard that they should be cruelly
used." Oh, that all who have charge of horses
were influenced by sentiments like these. How
much suffering-how many blows and oaths would
then be avoided.--Ana.



Tof ing Jost bh kindness.
PAsseG down Church street, in Islington, not
long ago, I observed a man with his donkey, and
cart of vegetables, about to start on their round."
The vegetables were first-rate, and the cheerful
look of the man was pleasing, but what arrested
my attention, was the well-fed, well-groomed, and
beautiful donkey.
SYour donkey does you credit," said I.
"Many folks tell me so, sir, and he is a fine fel-
low. I don't know how I should get on without
JACK."
"I conclude from Jack's appearance that you
manage him without much whipping?"
Whip I I want no whip, sir, I have him at a
word. He knows his work as well, sir, as I do.
If I were ill, and had to send a stranger in my
place, Jack would go the round' and step at every
regular customer's door just as if I were with him."







DUMB CREATION. e5

"How much would Jack sell for, if you had to
part with im ?"
"Donkeys of his age are worth about 2, but
I should be very sorry to part with Jnck at all.
lie's well worth 5 sir. My wife wouldn't let
me sell him for 10."
Ilaving got permission to take a photograph of
tlae donkry and his worthy owner, we parted. As
I passed along, 1 could not refrain from involun-
tarily exclaiming, How true is it, that there is
nothing lost by KINDNESS." S.



Nq Iind to ouq gorsq.
As I was recently walking along one of the
streets, I observed a man by the side of a horse
and cart. The horse was drawing a heavy load
with apparent ease. It was in such good condition,
and was so well groomed, that it would not have
disgraced a gentleman's carriage. I asked the
man if the horse was his own property. IIe an-
swered with honest pride, IIHe is, nia'am, and
when he first came into my possession, he was ex-
ceedingly stubborn, and would not work, but I
would not have a whip used to him, and you see
what he now is." I was much pleased to hear
such a testimony, and wished that some unfeeling
men whom I had seen cruelly beating and distress-
ing the mouths, and in various ways inflicting
3







26 A PLEA FOR TnE DUMB CREATION.

wanton cruelty on the poor unoffending and de-
fenceless animals under their care, would but fol-
low such a good example. How much more labor
would horses, mules, oxen, and other beasts of bur-
den, cheerfully perform, if kindly treated. They
are amongst the most generous, willing, and obe-
dient creatures in existence, if' kindly treated, as
experience has proved in thousands of instances.
May all who have tie care of horses and other
animals, remember tie York carter, and go and do
likewise. Parents should check early, every indi-
cation of cruelty in their children. Surely our
merciful Creator wills that all his creatures may
be made happy in the places where his wisdom las
appointed them, and will le not require in the day
of judgment, a strict account, from all who inflict
wanton crueltyl-JInon.












































SUSPENSE










inetChes of lags.


Tan life-like anxiety with which the dog is list-
ening for his master's footsteps, may teach man a
lesson of fidelity to his "Master in heaven." It
is impossible fully to estimate the value of dogs,
when they are well trained, well fed, and kindly
treated. One of our poets writes-
"With eyes upraised, his master's look to scan,
The joy, the solace, and the aid of man;
The rich man's guardian, and the poor man's friend,
The only creature faithful t t he end."

sh4 Agaithful gog.
ONE day during the summer of a dog was
observedsitting on a man's clothes,which were lying
on the banks of the Mersey, in Lancashire, Eng-
land. The faithful creature kept a vigilant watch
over the clothes, at the same time looking earnestly
at the water, as though longing for his master's re-
turn. No man being visible in the river, some
pasor-by concluded that the owner of the dog had
been drowned. They gave the alarm; inquiries
were made, and it was found that the dog and
(27)







28 A PLEA ron TI;

clothes were the property of a gentleman, of
Chester Road, Manchester. On the river being
searched, his body was found at a little distance
from tile spot where the fIithful dog kept watch
over his clothes. lie had left home early for the
purpose of bathing.


% $obbni 4[aptured.
Soar years ago, a person respectably dressed,
went to a house in Deptford, to take lodgings,
under the pretence that he had just arrived from
the West Indies. Having agreed on the terms,
he said lie should send his trunk that night, and
come himself the next day. About nine o'clock
tie trunk arrived, and was immediately carried
into the lodger's bed-room. As the family were re-
tiring to rest, their little house-dog, deserting his
usual station in the shop, placed himself close to
tihe door of the chamber where the chest was de-
posited, and kept up an incessant barking. On
the chamber door being opened, the dog flew to
the chest, scratching and barking most Ihriously.
All the efforts to get the dog out of the room were
in vain. Suspicion was excited, the police were
called in, the box was opened, when, to their utter
astonishment, they found in it the lodger," who
had been thus conveyed into the house, with the
intention of robbing it.







DUIB CREATION. zu

3nadotf
Ofa BaErian Gentman riding in Egland, ta~ n from "All
the Yelar .oun" by The iMoaan."
OTTO STRIEDINGER, a gentleman connected with
the Royal Victoria Hospital at Netley, went with
two friends to a croquet party at Westend, about
five miles from Netley. He was accompanied, as
usual, by his favorite dog, Worry, a magnificent
black retriever. The weather being extremely
hot, the croquet did not begin before four o'clock,
and was followed by supper, so that it was ten
o'clock before the party broke up. The three
gentlemen walked back to Netley in the dusk.
The footpath by which they returned led through
a private park, and across a common overgrown
with heather. When about a mile from KNtley,
the walkers passed a reservoir which supplies the
hospital with water. The night being hot and
close, Mr. Striedinger wished to give his dog a
swim. He whistled again and again,butno Worry
came; so he made up his mind that the dog had
been hunting for his own private amusement, and
had lost tie track, as there was very little scent
on the ground. Worry's master did not trouble
himself about his whereabouts, as he had been for
years a very independent dog, quite up to taking
care of himself, and would doubtless find his way
home later. Mr. Striedinger arrived at the hos-
3*







30 A PLEA FOR THE

pital, and was preparing to go to bed, when he re-
membered that he had to answer two letters which
he had received by that afternoon's post, just ns he
was starting with his friends to Westend. These
letters were of great importance, and when Mr.
Striedinger had looked for them without success,
he felt extremely uncomfortable. He instituted a
search all over the rooms, turned his writing-case
topsy-turvy, looked through his desk, but all in
vain. He then took a light, and had a hunt in
every nook and corner of his office; but came back
empty-handed. Thoroughly tired and discomposed,
he went to bed. Unable to sleep,he got up in the
middle of the night to make another and an equally
fruitless search. At last the morning sun began
to light up the rooms, which was a signal for fresh
investigations, with the same result. Then, and
not before, the idea struck him that, the letters
having been delivered just as he was starting for
the croquet party, he must have read them on the
way thither, and must have then put them in his
coat pocket; but when he thrust his hand into the
pocket and drew it back empty, he felt convinced
that his letters were lost beyond all chance of re-
covery. Hoping against hope, however, he re-
solved to make one more effort.
lie rushed off, unshaven and unkempt, to re-
trace his steps of tie previous day, looking right
and left, turning over every scrap of paper he saw







ODUMB CllEATON. 31

on the road, stopping wherever he recollected that
he and his companions had stopped the day before,
mistaking every object that was conspicuously light
in the distance for thi papers, and growing more
despairing every minute. After walking on for
about three miles, he espied a black object lying
close to the footpath. It was Worry's black head.
Ieproaching himself for having in his great un-
easiness forgotten his favorite, he whistled to
Worry, who, however, instead of showing his usual
alacrity, remained lying motionless on the ground.
His owner supposed him to be caught in one of the
snares with which he knew the common to be
thickly studded; but, on his approaching Worry,
up jumped the dog, leaving exposed to Ar. Stried-
inger's delighted view the missing letters, together
with a number of other loose papers. There had
been a very heavy dew that night, and Worry's
curly coat was as wet as if he had an hour's swim
in the neighboring reservoir, but the papers were
as dry, hot, and crisp as a breakfast-roll out of a
baker's oven. There were marks of teeth on one
or two of them, showing, either that before having
had recourse to his subsequent and successful ex-
pedient for preserving his master's property, Worry
had endeavored to collect and carry the scattered
manuscripts, or, which is more probable, that he
had, finding them too numerous to allow of his
acting on his retrieving instincts, brought all the







32 A PLEA FOR1 THE

outlying letters within reach of the shelter of his
outstretched body. It was now eight o'clock.
This devoted dog had been on guard over these
papers for sixteen hours; ever since the friends
had gone to Westend, at about four o'clock on
Wednesday afternoon. It must have been then,
and not on the return to Netley, that Mr. Stried-
inger dropped his letters; for they fell out of a
breast pocket of the coat which he hung over his
arm when walking in the sultry heat of the after-
noon, but which he wore on his way home at night,
when it would be impossible for the contents of
the pocket to escape.


Leoii llk and the g0a.
THE night after the battle of Bassano, the moon
rose cloudless and brilliant over the sanguinary
scene I I 1 1 1
ity, or
victory, rode, accompanied by his staff, over the
plain covered with the bodies of the dying and the
dead, and silent and thoughtful, seemed lost in
painful revery.
Itwas midnight. The confusion and the uproar
of the battle had passed away, and the deep silence
of the calm, starlight night, was only disturbed by
the moans of the wounded and dying. Suddenly
a dog sprang from beneath the cloak of his dead







DUMB CREATION. 33

master, and rushed to Napoleon, as if frantically
imploring his aid, and then rushed back again to
the mangled corpse, licking the blood from its face
and hands, and howling most piteously. Napoleon
was deeply moved by the affecting scene, and
turned to his officers, with his hand pointed towards
the faithful dog, and said with evident emotion;
" There, gentlemen, that dog teaches us a lesson of
humanity."


Poor Ponta.
OnE of the most affecting stories I ever heard
about a dog, was told me many years ago, by an
uncle of mine, who once lived in Paris. My uncle
was walking one of the quays, when he saw a man
approach, holding a dog by a chain. The poor
animal was frightened, and ye, did not attempt to
struggle as he was being led along. He looked
up piteously at his jailer, and every now and then
tried to fawn about his feet, as if pleading with
him.
"Poor beast, he might know seemingly what
was going to happen to him," said the man.
What is going to happen ?" inquired my uncle.
Sir, I'm going to drown him; that is what will
happen."
But why, sir, are you his master ?"







34 A PiEA FOR THE

"I am certainly his master, and he is old; poor
Ponto I I am sorry, but it must be."
The dog gave a low whine, and, trembling,
crouched close to his master.
"He does not seem so very old, and drowning
is a hard death," remonstrated my uncle.
"Sir, he is quite useless."
While he was speaking the words, the man un-
moored a little boat, lifted the dog in, and rowed
to the middle of the stream. When he came to
where the water was deepest, my uncle saw him
lift up the dog suddenly, and throw him with
great force into the stream. If the master had
thought that the dog's age and infirmities would
prevent his struggling for life, he was very much
mistaken, for he rose to the surface, kept his head
well up, and trod the water bravely. The man
then began to push the dog away with an oar, and
at last losing all patience, he struck out so lar to
deal the dog a blow, by which he overbalanced
himself, and fell into the river. He could not
swim, and now began the generous animal's ef-
forts, not to save his own life, but that of the
master, who was trying to drown him. The dog
swarm to him, and seizing fast hold of his coat-col-
lar, held him up, until a boat put off to his rescue,


ing, and liliing his hands and face in the greatest







DUB CItEATION. 35

excitement of affection. I remember still the look
with which my uncle used to tell how he stepped
forward and asked the man:
"Do you still think him useless-this noble,
generous dog?"
"I think he deserves a better master," said a
gentleman who had witnessed the incident, and
there and then he made an effort to buy Ponto,
but the man, embracing his dog, said hoarsely,
" No, sir, no; I was wrong. As long as I lave
a crust, I will give half to my poor Ponto."
A woman who had a basket on her arm, came
up at the time and said-
, I should think you would, indeed, or else you
ought to be ashamed to look him in the face," and
out of her basket she took a piece of meat, and the
dog was feasted and patted and made much of, and
from that time as long as my uncle stayed in Paris,
he often saw Ponto on the quay, and the story of
his generosity to his master, made him so many
friends, that the dog's keep was no longer burden-
some. No one was suffered to molest him, and
his old age was doubtless the happiest period of
his life. -Jlten.

We knew a dog which would, on the ringing of
tie bell by the postman, scamper to the gate and
brinr the letters to the house.







36 A PLEA FOR THE


Wh pog fElessengq.
A GENTLEMAN walking along missed his hand-
kerchief. lis faithful dog Major was with him.
"Major said his master. Major was at that
moment on the opposite side of the street, ex-
changing the news of the day with a young spaniel;
but the moment he heard his master's voice call
out "Major he left everything and ran imme-
diately to see what his master wanted of him.
Major," said his master, "I have last my hand-
kerchief." Major paid great attention while his
master put his hand into his left pocket, and
showed him it was not there into his right pocket,
nor wasit there. e took off his hat. "Itisnot
there," said he, shaking his head. "'Now run,
Major, and find it."
The dog did not wait to be told a second time;
he set off instantly on the back track down street.
With Iis nose on the ground, he followed his
master's steps until lie reached a store. In he
went, and running up a flight of stairs, scratched
at the door of a counting-room where his master
had been doing some business. The door was
ajar; in went Major's nose; and smelling around,
he discovered the lost article behind a chair in
the corner of the room.
Whose dog is this?" asked the clerk.
Major did not stop to explain his errand, but







DUMB CREATION. 37

gathering up the handkerchief, he bounded home,
catching his master before he had time to get into
thie Louse.
"Thank you, Major, thank you," said he.


"Jarch 6odfreg's gog;"

OR, THE BRUTE WISER THAN Hni MASTER.
ABOUT one and twenty years ago, at the wharf
of a well-known coal merchant on the Surrey side
of the water, there worked a man, named John
Godfrey. This man owned a dog, which was in
the habit of accompanying his master on his visits
to the public house, which were frequent. This
dog was taught by his master (who ought to have
known better,) to drink malt liquor; and the
animal became so used to it, that he would not
leave the public-house without it. On one occa-
sion, when John Godfrey and one of his compan-
ions visited a beer shop, in Gibson street, Waterloo
road, his companion said, Jack, let us make the
dog drunk l" This was agreed upon; more than
the usual quantity of liquor was given to the
animal, which had the desired effect. On reaching
the house where his master lodged, the poor animal
could not ascend the stairs leading to his master's
room; but kept rolling down as fast as he got up.
This afforded much amusement to Jack Godfrey
4







38 A PLEA FOR THE

and his companion. But the poor dog, who lived
five years alter this occurrence, as if to mark his
detestation of the worse than useless draught,
would never afterwards taste it, but used to show
his teeth and snarl, every time a publican's pot
was presented to him. John Godfrey died in
Lambeth Workhouse, the inside of which he would
probably have never seen, had he followed the ex-
ample of his poor dog. His companion continued
for some time the degrading habit of getting in-
toxicated, and was often reproved by his wife, with
" You have not half the sense of Jack Godfrey's
dog; that poor beast would not touch the filthy
stuff after once feeling its ill effects I"

A snnusON of Leeds, walking in the suburbs of
that town, found a little spaniel who had been
lamed. He carried the poor little animal home,
bandaged up his leg, and after two or three days
turned him out. The dog, however, returned to
the surgeon's house every morning until his leg
was perfectly well. At the end of several months
the spaniel again came, in company with another
dog, that was lame, and the little creature inti-
mated, as well as piteous and intelligent looks
could intimate, that he desired the same kind as-
sistance to be rendered to his friend as had been
bestowed on himself






DUMB CREATION. 39

Old imnon (dg and thq gog.
TOWanRD the close of the last century, an aged
beggar, commonly known as Old Simon," used to
take his station at the old gateway leading into
the churchyard of St. Giles in the Fields. He was
a very eccentric character. He dressed himself
daily, in several hats, coats, and waistcoats. On
his fingers he wore several brass rings. He car-
ried about with him a collection of cuttings from
newspapers, scraps from Fox's Book of Martyrs,"
and a few tattered numbers of The Gentleman's
Magazine;" and lie used to entertain such as chose
to stop and listen to him, with the information he
had gleaned from his ragged library.
Simon had been the owner of many dogs; and
of Rover, the last he ever possessed, the following
story is told.
Rover belonged to a shepherd, at Harrow-on-
the-Hill, who was in the habit weekly of driving
cattle to a slaughter-house, in the neighborhood of
Covent Garden.
One day Rover unfortunately had his left eye
so mucl injured by the horn of a bullock, that its
master requested Simon to take charge of it until
it should recover. The old beggar consented, at-
tached Rover to his arm with a piece of string;
and when, by means of rest and careful tending,
the poor dog recovered his health sufficiently to be






40 A PLEA rFO THE

able to resume his bullock-driving duties-he, not
without a pang of sorrow at the separation, handed
him over to his master. But the dog never forgot
the kindness of the beggar.
Every market-day, the dog, on its way after the
drove to the slaughter-house, would neglect its
charge for a brief time, and, running to the gateway
of St. Giles' church, would enjoy the pleasure of
being patted and caressed by Old Simon; and
would then, in high glee, scamper off to overtake
the drove.
These visits of the dog to the beggar were re-
gularly paid for many months; but they came to a
sudden stop.
Week after week rolled away, and neither Rover
nor his master were seen wending their way
towards the Seven Dials; when, one morning, to
Old Simon's delight and surprise, the grateful
animal came crouching behind his feet, and lifting
up, with sorrowful glance, its only remaining eye,
implored protection and comfort. The dog, though
"its coat was as rough as the bristles of a cocoa-
nut," had a warm heart. Its master had died. It
had watched by his death-bed for weeks, and, when
he was laid within the shadow of the elms of Har-
row-on-the-Hill, it made its way to London, and
devoted its services to him who had befriended it
in its time of suffering.
Rover and Old Simon were inseparable com-






DUMB CREATION. 41

panions ever afterwards, and both lodged under a
staircase in an old dilapidated tenement, called
Rat's Castle, in Dyot street, now George street.
Rover was a universal favorite, and it is recorded
that the Honorable Daines Barrington never passed
Old Simon without giving him sixpence, to be spent
in food for the dog.


ronq and his Ghlaro.
AWAY among the highland hills,
'Mid yellow broom and purple heather,
Where the wild dear and rushing rills
Go leaping down the crags together.
Where gray mists cling around the rocks
In which the eagle has his dwelling,
Where lowing kine and bleating flocks,
Browse round the spring in crystal welling.
Away where blows the mountain gale
Along the seabeat shore of Duart,
Within a birchen-sheltered vale,
Abode a shepherd, Wllie-Stewart.
A faithful dog he had, whose bark
Was known the isle of Mull all over,
And strangers oft would pause to mark
The skill and gentleness of Rover.
Well could he bring the scattered fock


Drive the young lambs in stormy weather
4*







42 A PLEA FOR TOE

And when old Rover was at home,
lie there displayed his kindly feeling
Nothing could tempt him forth to roam
Across the threshold of the shiehng.
IfWitlie and his wife went out,
And left the baby in his keeping,
Old Rover by the cradle sat
And watched the child awake or sleeping.
Unto his trust he still ws true,
And ne 'r gave way to frisking folly,
A better dog I never knew
Than Willie Stewarts shaggy collie.



Sh4 itilIer's gog and thq etttq.
A MrLLEn of Banningham, in consequence of a
scarcity of wind, gave his son leave to spend a day
or two with his grandfather, at Marsham, a dis-
tance of about four miles. On the following day
there was a fresh breeze, and finding he should
require the boy's assistance, and having no person
to send after him, he determined to try what lis
dog could do. A note was written and tied
around the animal's neck, and he was forthwith
despatched on his errand. On his arrival at the
house, a good deal of merriment was caused by the
dog not allowing any one but his young master to
touch the note, but he successfully performed lis
mission.







DUMB CREATIOn. 43



OP THE ETTRICK SHEPHERD'S DOG -SIRAH."
TaS celebrated shepherd-poet James aogg, had
a dog named Sirrah. "He was," says he, "beyond
all comparison, the best dog I ever saw. IHe was
of a surly, unsocial temper, disdaining all flattery,
and refused to be caressed; but his attention to his
master will never again be equalled by any of the
canine race. The first time I saw him, a drover was
leading him by a rope; he was hungry and lean;
and far from being a beautiful cur. The man lhad
bought him of a boy, for three shillings, somewhere
on the border, and doubtless had fed him very ill
on his journey. I thought I discovered a sort of
sullen intelligence in his face, notwithstanding his
dejected and forlorn situation; so I gave the drover
a guinea for him, and appropriated him to myself.
Ile was scarcely then a year old,and knew so little
of herding, that he had never turned sheep in his
life; but as soon as he discovered that it was his
duty to do so, and that it obliged me, I can never
forget with what anxiety and eagerness he learned
his different evolutions. He would try every day
till he found out what I wanted him to do, and
when once I made him understand a direction, he
never forgot or mistook it again. Well as I knew
him, he often astonished me, for when hard pressed
in accomplishing the task that he was put to, he







44 A PI.A FOR THE

had expedients of the moment that bespoke a great
share of the reasoning faculty. After seven hun-
dred lambs, which were once under his care at
weaning time, broke up at midnight and scampered
off in three divisions across the hills, in spite of all
that a shepherd and a lad could do to keep them
together, Sirrah,' cried the shepherd, in great af-
fliction, 'my man, they're a' awa.' The night was
so dark that he did not see Sirrah; but the faitliul
animal had heard his master's words-words, such
as of all others, were sure to set him most on the
alert-and without more ado he silently set off in
quest of the recreant flock. Meanwhile the shep-
herd and his companion did not fail to do all that
was in their power to recover their lost charge;
they spent the whole night in scouring the hills Ior
miles round, but of neither the lambs nor Sirrah
could they obtain the slightest trace. It was the
most extraordinary circumstance,' said the shep-
herd,' that ever occurred in my pastoral life. We
had nothing for it (day having dawned), but to re-
turn to our master and inform him that we had lost
his whole flock, and knew not what had become of
one of them. On our way home, however, we dis-
covered a body of lambs at the bottom'of a deep
ravine, and the indefatigable Sirrah standing in
front of them, looking all around for some relief,
but still standing true to his charge. The sun
was then up; and when we first came in view of







DUMB CREATION. 45
them we concluded that it was one of the lambs
which Sirrah had been unable to manage until he
came to that commanding situation. But what
was our astonishment when we discovered that not
one lamb of the whole flock was wanting How
he had got all the divisions collected in the dark,
is beyond my comprehension. The charge was left
entirely to himself, from midnight until the rising
of the sun; and if all the shepherds of the forest
had been there to have assisted him, they could
not have effected it with greater propriety. All
that I can further say is, that I never felt so grateful
to any creature below the sun, as I did to my
honest Sirrah that morning." JAMEi Hoco.


naq of thq geletin 4 forq.
GoING over one of the large plantations of pears
some years ago, I noticed a fine large dog that
followed our steps. On my expressing my admi-
ration of him, the owner of the plantation said,
with much animation:
Yes, sir; but I had a much finer one before
this a most faithful dog too: and I will give you
a proof of it. I then had in my service a herdman
who had been with me several years, and with
whom the dog was most familiar and friendly.
But one day this man went into yonder store-
house, in the middle of the plantation, and took







46 A PIA. FOr THn

and secreted some of the pears in his pockets, and
was then coming out. But the dog, who had
followed him as usual, saw the transaction, and
placed himself at tile door of the storehouse with-
out. He tlen barked and raged so furiously that
the man was afraid to stir. I was at a distant
part of the plantation, but hearing the strange and
angry barking, I came to see tie cause; and im-
mediately my suspicions were raised. I said to
the man-I am sure something is wrong. What
have you been doing?' The man was obliged to
confess his guilt, produced the stolen pears, and
the dog was instantly pacified. I felt it my duty
to dismiss the man."--.non.


N friend in Teed.
A SaEP men's DOG showed a remarkable degree
of intelligence, which proved exceedingly useful to
two men who were driving a flock of sheep. The
sheep were the property of J. R. Tomline, Esq., of
Stokefield, and the men in charge were almost at
their wit's end in trying to drive them to their
destination, the difficulty being increased by the
approaching darkness. The dog, which happened
to come up, although quite a stranger to the men,
volunteered his assistance, and went with the flock
to their destination, about a mile distant from
where e e met them. Having done his work he
returned home.







DuBl CM1ATION. 47

(arlo and the rushes.
A GENTLEMAN in the city of York had a noble
dog, which was not only expert in latching sticks
out of the river Ouse and the Foss, but had been
taught by his master to fetch things from shops,
etc. Sometimes the gentleman would purchase
an article and leave it on the counter, at the same
moment calling the dog's attention to it. On
leaving the shop, he would proceed perhaps a
quarter of a mile away, and then give the order,
" Go back, Carlo, and fetch that parcel." Away
goes Carlo, and in a few minutes tie noble animal
would return with the purchase. One day the dog
presented a somewhat laughable spectacle. The
owner went into a brushmaker's shop and bought
a dusting-brush. It was pointed out to Carlo as
usual. Unfortunately for the brushmaker he did
not cut the string which tied the brush to a number
of others. When Carlo darted into the shop and
seized his master's purchase, he dragged the large
bundle of about a dozen brushes into Coney street.
Out rushed the brushmaker; but, on attempting to
seize the bundle, Carlo gave him to understand
that he thought they were paid for. Away went
dog and brushes along the streets of York, and
Carlo never stopped until he laid the treasure at
the feet of his astonished master. Itwas not until
the master interfered that Carlo would surrender.








48 A PLEA FOR THE

It was impossible to refrain from laughing at the
comical sight of Carlo dragging along the brushes,
and the unfortunate shopkeeper running after his
stolen goods.-From Our Dumb Companions."



onmiral gogs.
IN the life of that remarkable man, Samuel
Drew, of Cornwall, an amusing account is given of
two dogs belonging to his family. He states:
Our dairy was under a room which was used
as a barn, into which the fowls found their way,
and, in scratching among the chaff, scattered dust
on the pans below, to the great annoyance of my
mother-in-law. In this, a favorite cock of hers was
the chief transgressor. One day, in harvest, she
went into the dairy, followed by our little dog, and
finding dust again on the milk-pans, she exclaimed,
'I wish that cock was dead Not long after, she
being with us in the harvest-field, we observed the
little dog dragging along the cock, just killed,
which, with an air of triumph, he laid at my
mother-in-law's feet. She was dreadfully exas-
perated at the literal fulfilment of her hastily
uttered wish, and, snatching a stick from the hedge,
attempted to give the dog a beating. The dog
seeing the reception he was likely to meet with,
where he evidently expected marks of approbation,







DUMB CREATION. 49

loft the bird and ran off, she brandishing the stick,
and saying in a loud and angry tone, 'I'll pay thee
for this by-and-byl' In the evening she was about
to put her threat into execution, when she found
the little dog established in a corner of the room,
and the large dog standing over it. Endeavoring
to fulfil her intention, by first driving off the large
dog, he gave her plainly to understand that he
was not at all disposed to relinquish his post. She
then sought to get at the small dog behind the
other; but the threatening gesture and fierce growl
of the large one apparently proclaimed, Touch
him if you dare,' and sufficiently indicated that the
i. ii i i The result
'. I .i ] i, -. '- Ibid.



earned from geath lbr a gfo#.
H. HlAWKES, a farmer, residing at Hailing, in
Kent, was late one evening at Maidstdne market.
On returning at night with his dog, who was
usually at his heels, he took his way over Snod-
land brook. The snow fell so fast that he lost his
way, and being exhausted, fell down into the snow,
turning upon his back, and was soon overpowered
by either sleep or cold. His faithful dependent
first scratched away the snow, so as to throw up a
sort of protecting wall around his helpless master,
5







50 A PLEA FOR THE

then mounted upon the exposed body, rolled round
and laid upon his master's bosom, for which his
shaggy coat proved a most seasonable covering
and eventlfl protection during the dreadlfl severity
of the night, the snow falling all the time. The
following morning, a person who was out with his
gun, perceiving an appearance rather uncommon,
ventured to approach the spot; upon his coming
up, the dog got off the body, and after repeatedly
shaking himself to get disentangled from tie accu-
mulated snow, encouraged the sportsman, by actions
of the most significant nature, to come near the
side of his master. Upon wiping away the icy in-
crustation from the face, the countenance was im-
mediately recollected, but the frame appeared
lifeless. Assistance was procured to convey the
body to the first house upon the skirts of thie il-
lage, when a pulsation being observed, every pos-
sibW means was instantly adopted to promote his
recovery. After a short time the farmer was suf-
ficiently restored to relate his own story, asalready
recited, and in gratitude for his miraculous escape,
ordered a silver collar to be made for his friendly
protector, as a perpetual remembrancer of the
transaction.
A gentleman of the faculty in the neighborhood,
hearing of the circumstance, and finding it so well
authenticated, immediately made an offer of ten
guineas for the dog, which the grateful farmer le-







DUMB CREATION. 51

fused, exultingly adding," so long as I have a bone
to my meat, or a crust to my bread, 1 will divide
it with the faitlitl friend who has preserved my
life;" and this he did in a perfect conviction that
the warmth of the dog, in covering the most vital
part, had continued tlhe circulation, and prevented
a total stagnation of the blood by the frigidity of
the elements.--inon.



i ij i II of if i IlllJl.111l 0 .
A GENTLEMAN connected with the Newfoundland
fishery was once possessed of a dog of singular
fidelity and sagacity. On one occasion a boat and
crew in his employ were in circumstances of con-
siderable peril, just outside a line of breakers,
which, owing to some change in wind or weather,
had, since the departure of the boat, rendered the
return passage through them most hazardous.
The spectators on shore were quite unable to
render any assistance to their friends afloat. Much
time had been spent, and the danger seemed to in-
crease rather than diminish. Our friend, the dog,
looked on for a length of time, evidently aware of
there being a great cause for anxiety in those
around. Presently, however, he took to the water,
and made his way through tlh raging waves to the
boat. The crew supposed he wished tojoin them,







52 A PLEA FOR THE

and made various attempts to induce him to come
aboard; but no, he would not go within their
reach, but continued swimming about a short dis-
tance from the boat. After a while, and several
comments on the peculiar conduct of the dog, one
of the hands suddenly divined his apparent mean-
ing. Give him the end of a rope," lie said,
i that is what he wants." The rope was thrown,
the dog seized the end in an instant, turned
round, and qide straight for the shore, where a
few minutes afterwards,boat and crew-thanks to
the intelligence of their four-footed friend, were
placed safe and sound.



thq 4ffreman'f Dofa.
ONE of the most useful of dogs is said to be a
London freman's dog. When the fire-bell rings,
there seems to be no one in a greater hurry to be
off than Bob. He runs before the engine and
clears the way. Arrived at the scene of the fire,
if ordered, he will run up ladders, jump through
windows, and enter dangerous rooms, more quickly
than the firemen.
On one occasion he darted into a burning house,
and in a few moments was seen coming out with
a poor cat in his mouth. He carried her very
safely, and gently dropped her in a place of safety







DUMB CREATION. 53

Among other interesting anecdotes of him, it
is related, that a house was on fire, and the fire-
men thought all the inmates had gone out of it;
but Bob kept barking and scratching at a small
door. The firemen ordered him away, but he
barked more loudly than ever; they were fearful
if this door should be opened, it might make the
fire burn more rapidly, but as the dog continued
boisterous, one of tie firemen said: There's some
reason why Bob makes this ado-let's break open
the door I" The door was burst open, when, to
their astonishment, they found a poor little child,
who, but for him, might have been burnt to death.
The Band of Hope Review.



easoWi1g of n 0og.
EXTRAORDINARY as the following anecdote may
appear to some persons, it is strictly true, and
shows the sense, and I am strongly inclined to
add, reason of the Newfoundland dog. A friend
of mine, while shooting wild fowl with his brother,
was attended by a sagacious dog of this breed.
In getting near some reeds by the side of a river,
they threw down their hats, and crept to the edge
of the water, where they fired at some birds.
They soon afterwards sent the dog to bring their
hats, one of which was smaller than the other.
5f







54 A PLrt. FOn Tr

After several attempts to bring them together
in his mouth, the dog at last placed the smaller
hat in the larger one, pressed it down with his
foot, and thus was able to bring them both at the
same time.-Jlnon.



ghq $hqherd's go#.
A GENTLEMAN sold a considerable flock of sheep
to a dealer, which the latter had not hands to
drive. The seller, however, told him he had a
very intelligent dog, which he would send to assist
him to a place about thirty miles off, and that when
Ie reached the end of his journey, he had only to
feed the dog, and desire him to go home. The
dog accordingly received his orders, and set off
with the flock and the drover; but he was absent
so many days that his master began to have serious
alarms about him, when one morning, to his great
surprise, he found his dog returned with a very
large flock of sheep, including the whole that he
had lately sold. The fact turned out to be that
the drover was so pleased with the colley that he
resolved to steal him, and locked him up till tie
time when le was to leave the country. The dog
grew sulky, and made various attempts to escape,
and one evening he succeeded. Whether the dog
had discovered the drover's intention, and sup-







DUMB CiRATIrO. 55

posed thatthe sheep were also stolen, it is dif lelt
to say; but by his conduct it looked so, for he im-
mediately wont to the field, collected the sheep,and
drove them all back to his master.-Glasgow Post.



9h YilIIIi- 111, I ,

IT seems almost incredible, and yet we are as-
sured it is true. Some time ago, a sporting gen-
tleman was suddenly called away by urgent busi-
ness from his shooting-box. Expecting to return
in a few hours, he left his fine dogs shut up in one
of the rooms in which game was kept. Instead
of returning as expected, the gentleman had to
start for a distant part of the country. He forgot
all about his poor dogs. On his return, several
days later, he found them quite dead. Although
starving for food, the noble creatures had not even
touched their master's game Noble dogs, ye
deserved more thoughtful treatment from your
master We need not add, that the grief of the
owner was great, on finding the sad result of his
forgetfulness, but his reproachings could not re-
store to lilb his faithifl dogs. How much suf-
fering there is in the world, not only amongst
animals but human beings, from forgetfulness.






56 A PLEA FOR THE DURt CREATION.

troveru of a iatt1h bh a ffog.
AN English gentleman some time ago went to
the French Vauxhall Gardens, with large mastiff,
which was refused admittance, and the gentleman
left him in the care of the body guards *ho are
placed there. The Englishmn, sometime after he
had entered, returned to the gates and informed
the guard that he had lost his watch, telling the
sergeant that if he would permit him to take in his
dog, he would soon discover the thief. His re-
quest being granted, the gentleman made motions
to the dog of what he had lost, when the sagacious
creature immediately ran about amongst the com-
pany, and traversed the gardens, till at last he laid
hold of a man. The gentleman insisted that this
person had got his watch, and on being searched,
not only the missing watch, but six others were
discovered in his pockets.


gitg tfliq ooa -gos.
Dumnr the hot months much suffering amongst
tie poor dogs might be prevented, if persons would
keep a supply of water in a small trough or bucket,
from which the canine travellers can "lap as they
pass by: and what a boon it would prove in some
cases if it should avert madness.






56 A PLEA FOR THE DURt CREATION.

troveru of a iatt1h bh a ffog.
AN English gentleman some time ago went to
the French Vauxhall Gardens, with large mastiff,
which was refused admittance, and the gentleman
left him in the care of the body guards *ho are
placed there. The Englishmn, sometime after he
had entered, returned to the gates and informed
the guard that he had lost his watch, telling the
sergeant that if he would permit him to take in his
dog, he would soon discover the thief. His re-
quest being granted, the gentleman made motions
to the dog of what he had lost, when the sagacious
creature immediately ran about amongst the com-
pany, and traversed the gardens, till at last he laid
hold of a man. The gentleman insisted that this
person had got his watch, and on being searched,
not only the missing watch, but six others were
discovered in his pockets.


gitg tfliq ooa -gos.
Dumnr the hot months much suffering amongst
tie poor dogs might be prevented, if persons would
keep a supply of water in a small trough or bucket,
from which the canine travellers can "lap as they
pass by: and what a boon it would prove in some
cases if it should avert madness.
















































*j~M~~I( *IrhX









lisdalanr s Animals.



Sherp in thq field and thq fati.
ONE of the loveliest sights in the country is
that of the sheep and the lambs enjoying their
freedom in the beautiful green fields. One of the
saddest sights to be seen in the city is, when these
same innocent and harmless creatures are cruelly
beaten and goaded to the drove-yard or the
slaughter-house. These poor animals, which have
to be killed for the food of man, are surely enti-
tled, at least, to be treated with kindness and
consideration. God,who has declared not a spar-
row falls to the ground without his notice, is not
unmindful of cruelty practiced on the defenceless
cattle.

9hq jind raoq.n
A GENTLEMAN writes: "In a daily walk, pur-
suing my invariable custom of giving tracts, with
a word of admonition, I met some country drovers
and cattle on their way to London. As nsual, I
individually addressed them, and was pleased with
(57)









lisdalanr s Animals.



Sherp in thq field and thq fati.
ONE of the loveliest sights in the country is
that of the sheep and the lambs enjoying their
freedom in the beautiful green fields. One of the
saddest sights to be seen in the city is, when these
same innocent and harmless creatures are cruelly
beaten and goaded to the drove-yard or the
slaughter-house. These poor animals, which have
to be killed for the food of man, are surely enti-
tled, at least, to be treated with kindness and
consideration. God,who has declared not a spar-
row falls to the ground without his notice, is not
unmindful of cruelty practiced on the defenceless
cattle.

9hq jind raoq.n
A GENTLEMAN writes: "In a daily walk, pur-
suing my invariable custom of giving tracts, with
a word of admonition, I met some country drovers
and cattle on their way to London. As nsual, I
individually addressed them, and was pleased with
(57)







58 A PLEA r on TiE

the respectful manner in which they listened and
received my tracts. To one flock of sheep my at-
tention was particularly attracted; as it steadily
approached me, I noticed their Drover deliberately
waving to and fro a long stick, with a handker-
chief attached to the end, which had the desired
effect of urging them onwards, without the assist-
ance of dogs, for he had none. On presenting him
a tract, published by the London Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, he immediately
said: From you, sir, I received a tract some time
ago-it was indeed very good, and but too true:
cruelty is a crying sin. I act as a Drover only
when I can get no other work. The drover,
whose place I now fill was a sad drunkard; his
master could trust him no longer; his sheep,
through his neglect, were often injured and run
over. Poor sheep suffer dreadfully-they travel
long distances, become tired, fall lame, besides
meeting with ill treatment and accidents. To
urge them on in their suffering state is a great
trial to the temper, and very painful to a man of
feeling. It grieves one to see such patient inno-
cent creatures, ill-used by swearing, passionate,
drinking drovers, who not only deal out heavy
blows with their sticks, but set on their dogs, who
shockingly harass and torment them. I cannot
hurt them myself; this pole that I use answers
every purpose, and I can manage very well with-







DUMB CREATION. 59

out a dog." Sincerely I commended his merciful
conduct, while to heaven I silently offered thanks-
giving and praise, that one, even one of the thought-
less throng of drovers, exercised tenderness and
compassion towards the defenceless groaning crea-
tion. The circumstances affected me. I desired
the drover to call at my house on his return; he
did so, and at my request, told me his brief his-
tory. I was induced by letter to make inquiries
concerning him, to which his minister replied, in-
forming me that the drover and his wife were
members of the church under his pastoral care;
filling up that relation with credit to themselves,
and much satisfaction to him, being "rich in faith,
though poor in this world," a faith proved to be
genuine by 'i r Ti .i shweth
mercy," Psr .. i i i Ieous man
regardeth the life of his beast," Prov. xii.- non.


ctd, got trinen;
OR, A WORD TO CATTLE DROVERS.
I RECENTLY saw on one of the roads leading out
of Birmingham, a flock of about two hundred sheep.
They were coming along cheerfully and quickly,
with a very different air from the bewildered,
frightened look that sheep so often have amid the
crowds and bustle of our large towns. On look-
ing down the road, I expected to see the drovers







60 A Pri. Fon TOE

with some dogs at their heels. To my surprise
there were none. On looking again I saw that a
man was at the head of the flock, and that the
sheep were quietly following him. The scene re-
minded me of the words of the Good Shepherd-
" My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and
they follow me." If the plan of leading sheep
were generally adopted, not only would much suf-
fering and terror be spared to the sheep, but no
little trouble, annoyance, and loss of time to the
men who have the charge of them. Let it be once
well understood that sheep are creatures made to
be led, not driven, and then half the confusion and
cruelty of our markets would be avoided.
[The foreign sheep imported into England are
easily led but cannot be driven. Their train-
ing in this respect is worthy the adoption of
English farmers. A Smithfield drover, who had
a large flock under his charge, said to us some
time ago: "I can manage this flock of foreign
sheep myself with ease, but if they were English
sheep, they would be as much as six men could
manago.]- .non.


Stadl Don't grig.
"I was much amused once," writes Thompson,
in his Note Book of a Naturalist, "in Belgium, at
a curious contrivance adopted by a shepherd to







DUMB CREATION. 61

extricate himself from a dilemma, and at the
readiness with which his sheep obeyed his inten-
tions.
"Preceding his flock, he was moving them to a
fresh pasture, when his progress was stopped by a
large cornfield, through which there was only a
narrow foot-path. His knowledge of the habits of
his charge, made him thoroughly aware of the de-
struction they would commit if left to follow him
at their leisure; so, after a few moments reflection,
he started off at the top of his speed, the whole
flock pursuing him at a gallop, and almost in single
file, without doing the slightest damage."



indness to gumb reature .
How much more happiness there is in the world,
when kind words are used instead of angry words
and blows. How powerful is kindness! Some
years ago a very young calf was taken care of by
a young lady who made a pet of it. When it
became an heifer, for some reason it was parted
with, and she lost sight of it for about two years.
At the end of that time, as she was walking with
a friend in a lane, sie met a herd of cattle, when
one of them came up to her, showing evident
symptoms of pleasure. The lady immediately
patted her old acquaintance, who, after being
6







62 A PLEA FOR THE

satisfied by these marks of favor, quietly turned
back to tlh herd.
Let parents encourage their children in acts of
kindness to the Dumb Creation.


hE bNoat'fs Qnrq o hq Ii'iiiI
THE devices of this animal to hide her young
from the fox are very remarkable. She discerns
her enemy at a great distance, conceals her treas-
ure in a thicket, and boldly intercepts the for-
midable marauder. He seldom fails to approach
the place where the kid is crouching, but the dam
with her horns, receives him at all points, and
never yields till spent with fatigue and agitation.
If a high crag, or stone, should be near when she
describes the fox, she mounts upon it, taking the
young one under her body. The fox goes round
and round, to catch an opportunity for making a
spring at the little tremlder, but the goat thrusts
her horns into his flank with such force as to be
often unable to withdraw them, and all three-
goat, kid, and fox, have been frequently found
dead at the bottom of the precipice. It is said
that the goats know their progeny to several gen-
erations. The various tribes herd and repose on
the hills in separate parties."

Dr. IIancock quotes one of the most remarkable







LiUMI t CIATION. 63

proofs of sagacity and resource in the goat, and
this operation has been, it seems, observed more
than once. When two goats meet on a ledge
bordering upon a precipice, and find there is no
room, either to pass each other or to return, after
a pause, as if for reflection, one crouches down, and
the other walks gently over his back, when each
continues his perilous journey along the narrow
path."


(Ifphant and thq aptain.
AMronG many of the remarkable incidents re-
lated of Elephants, the following is the only one
selected :
An amusing anecdote is given by Captain
Williamson of an elephant named Pangal,' which
showed remarkable sagacity. This animal, when
on a march, refused to carry on his back a larger
load than he thought was right and proper. IHe
would pull down as much of the burden as reduced
it to the weight which lie conceived it was fair for
him to bear. One day the quartermaster of the
brigade became enraged at this apparent obstinacy
of the animal, and ecry cruelly throw a ten-pin at
his head. A few days afterward, as the elephant
was on his way from camp to water, lie overtookl
tlhe quartermaster and, seizing him in his tni k,
lifted him into a largo tamarind tree, rhich over-







64 A PLEA POR THE DUMI CREATION.
hung the road, and left him to cling to the
branches, and get down the best way that he
could."


,j~aarig oa| a dfat.
IN Rees' Cyclopedia a story is given, as well
vouched for, of a cat that had been brought up in
amity with a bird; and being one day observed to
seize suddenly hold of the latter, which happened
to be perched out of its cage, on examining, it was
found that a stray cat had entered the room, and,
that this alarming step was a manoeuvre to save
the bird, till the intruder should depart.


runningg o th4 4ox.
THE cunning of foxes is proverbial; but I know
not if it was ever more remarkably displayed than
in the Duke of Beaufort's country, where Reynard,
being hard pressed, disappeared suddenly, and
was, after strict search, found immersed in a water-
pool up to tle very snout, by which he held a
willow-bough hanging over the pond.
LORD BaOUGan.







64 A PLEA POR THE DUMI CREATION.
hung the road, and left him to cling to the
branches, and get down the best way that he
could."


,j~aarig oa| a dfat.
IN Rees' Cyclopedia a story is given, as well
vouched for, of a cat that had been brought up in
amity with a bird; and being one day observed to
seize suddenly hold of the latter, which happened
to be perched out of its cage, on examining, it was
found that a stray cat had entered the room, and,
that this alarming step was a manoeuvre to save
the bird, till the intruder should depart.


runningg o th4 4ox.
THE cunning of foxes is proverbial; but I know
not if it was ever more remarkably displayed than
in the Duke of Beaufort's country, where Reynard,
being hard pressed, disappeared suddenly, and
was, after strict search, found immersed in a water-
pool up to tle very snout, by which he held a
willow-bough hanging over the pond.
LORD BaOUGan.












3iraf anb tkeir plirci li.ii .




Nir s of, ^i'phlo.
Swner herald of May flowers, small and brown coated,
Who loves rural precincts and dwellings of mn.
From a boy, on thy clear mellow tones I have dated,
As they rang i the fresh mornmg air, little Wren.

And Oh, how the bosom in boyhood was gladdened,
As you came with the tropical breath of Brazil;
When Euruns no more from the cold ocan saddened,
And the evenings inspired the lone Whip-poor-Will

Twas joy ere we rose, in the cold dawn to listen
To ehaintileer's call to the matronly hen;
But the youthful heart echoes, when early dews glisten,
The voices of martin, of Robin and Wren,

The Martin and Wren on their boxes are singing,
The Robin has built in the old poplar tree,
Round the door the fresh grass iin xurane is springing,
Where the slate-olored Catbird hops fearless and free.

'Tis the time of the erb-apple blossoms, sweet scotrd,
While with a.ure loustonias the meadow is gay;
And oh, if the bosom is ever contented,
It m lusl e in the lap of lurion Mlay.
G (GS)








66 A Pl FOR THE

The trees in the peach orchard, clothed in their glory,
Seem lie hills which are mantled with roseate snow;
And the gay Orioles there tell their annual story,
Of the soft vernal pleasures, as singing they go.

And ruby-winged Blackbirds the elm branches clouding,
From afar, send their medley of strains to our door;
Rapid and sweet, as when ripples re crowding
In musical play o'er the pebbly shore.

Mingled with these, are the Reed-birds' clear voices,


And the scarle-robed Tanager glows hke star.



All nature jubiloo see seems to run riot;
But her wldness is beauty, her froh is grace.

And lo! when the fresh of sunset are bring,
And paint the white clouds where they float in the west,
The train of brown Swallows, from forage returning,
Dart one by one to their chimney-built nest.

The yellow Finch wins on the thistle or mullein,
As it waves to and fro in the westerly breeze;
But there is a bird makes the husbandman sullen;
'TIs the King-brd, when climmg his tithe of the Bees

I have know the quick Wrenthehe familiar and peerless,
Build in a gourd while it hung in a hed ;
And 'tows plecu t to see that mralelan so fearless,
Though his rude pendant cradle was brushed by my head.







DUa1B CREATION. 61

Thrice welcome ye warblers, returned from the tropic;
And May, rosy month, there'sa welcome for you;
Not for me shall the Nightingale now be a topic,
Nor the sweet Organista that sings in Peru.

Welcome first born of the three Summer Graces;
Welcome thy cool eve, and warm fragrant day;
Welcome thy brliant, aerial races;
Thrice welcome, thou laughing and garlanded May I
T. A. Corsne.


What is At?



And each flower wears a necklace of pearly daw I
What is it we see in the cloudless sun
When but half of his glorious course is run,
When the lake seems to sleep in its mountain bed,




And look down on earth with their sparkling eyes






O'er the rippling lake and the rpning wheat,








68 A PLEA FOR THE

What is it we hear, when o'er rocks and sad,
The bright waves are racing and chasg to land,
Tll high on the glittering shigle and shells,
They break in a shower of diamond bells.

What is it? There is only one thing it an be I
It has given us the power both to hear and to see,






$ingiag Nirds.
The birds! the birds o summer hours I
They bring a gesh of glee,
To the child among the fragrant flowers
To the sador on the sea.

We hear their thrilling voices
In their swift and airy fight,
And the nmeot heart rejole,
With a calm and pare delight.

Amid the morning' fragrant dew,
Amidst the mists of even,
They warble on, a if they drew
Their nmue down from heoon.

And when their holy anthems
Come pealing through the air,
Our hearts leap forth to meet then,
With a blesing and a prayer.








DUn0 CREATION. 69

Inward, inward to thy heart,
Kindly nat ur, tale me;
Lovely, oven as thou art,
Full of loiung, make me.

Thou knowest naught of dead cold forms,
Knowest naught of littleness;
Lifeful truth thy being warms,
Majesty and earnestess.

'n the joyous song they sing;
In the hqnd air they cleave;
In the sunhino ; in the shower;
In the nests they weae." MA Hownrr.



grust in Irovidencq.

Illustration of Matthew r., 19, 20, 21.
On a bridge I was standing one morning,
And watching the current roll by,
When suddenly into the water
There ftll an unfortunate fy.

The fishes that swam to the surface
Wre looking for something to eat,
And I thought that the hapless young insect
Would surely afford them a treat.

Poor thing I exclaimed with compassion,
"Thy trnls and dangers abound,
For if thou eseap'st being eaten,
Thou canst not escape being droned."








70 A rPEI FOR TIU

No sooner the sentence wan spoken,
Than lo, hlk an angel of love,
I saw, to the waters beneath me,
A leaflet descend from above.

It glided serene on the streamlet,
'Twas an ark to the poor little fly;
Which, soon to the lad re-ascending,
Spread it wings in the breezes to dry.

Oh, sweet was the truth that was whispered,
That mortals should never despair;
For Ie who takes care of an inset,
Much more for Uis children wll care.

And though, to our short-sighted vision,
No way of escape may appear;
Let us trout, for when least we expect it,
The help of" our F'aher" is near.




IT wins my admiration
To view the structure of that little work,
A d's nest. Mark it well; within, without,
No tool had he that wrought, no kmfe to cut,
No nail to fi, no bodkin to insert,




We boast of excellence, whose noblest skill
Instinctive genus foils






DUMB CREATION. 71

ghq gird' friend.
ELIHU BUoarIT, on his walk to the Land's End,
when at Falmouth, visited the country residences
of two brothers named Fox, leading men of that
town, and members of the Society of Friends,
who," he says," with all the appliances of ample
wealth and highly cultivated taste, have made a
joint elysium, with two mansions in it, a little way
out of the town. Both well embody and ills-
trate the tastes and habits of their proprietors,
and the difference between them, still making a
whole of exquisite symmetry. He of Tregedna is
a man of impressive individuality, resembling the
portrait of one of the old hards or sages of classic
history. His grounds, in their natural conforma-
tion, were admirably fitted up for works of art
and taste. And he has filled them to overflowing,
full of trees, shrubs and flowering plants, until his
mansion door looks like the entrance into a grotto
of living wood. As a specimen or measure of the
florid style of embellishment which he has blended
with graver orders, he has planted over 100,000
rose trees of different kinds. But the great and
distinguishing attainment he has won, is in the
feat of making himself the Rarey of the bird-
world; and as such I would introduce him and his
beautiful triumphs, especially to the younger por-
tion of my readers.







72 A PIEA FOB THE

" At this advanced stage of christian enlighten-
ment, when such triumphs of faith and patient
kindness have been won in the softening of the
rough natures of both man and beast; at a time
when iron wire, enough to belt the globe with
netting a yard wide, is made yearly into cages for
birds of different form and feather, it is instructive
as well as interesting to see what the mild eyes,
the kind voice, and gentle hand, of this half hermit
of Tregedna have accomplished in securing a
goodly companionship of the free warblers of the
grove for his deeply-embowered home. Ie has
proved by the happiest ilnstration, that any one,
with the law of kindness in lis heart, on his
tongue, in his eye and in his hand, may have the
most intimate fellowship of these sweet singers,
and their best songs from morning till night,
without the help of snares, or cages. Every such
example is worth more to the world than the dis-
covery of any Arctic explorer. It bridges the
chasm between two worlds, linking earth to the
nearest heaven, and bringing both into pleasant
communion. It does away with the old hereditary'
alienation between man and the creatures given
to walk the earth in his company for his help, or
to fly the air and fill it with their songs flr his
cheer. Thus, the day may come, when the natural
dread and enmity which have banished so many
noble beasts and birds fioa the habitations of







DUMB CREATION. 73

man shall disappear; when his dominion shall be
complete, and the wildest of them all shall yield
him homage and service.
" It was all an incident to his benevolent dispo-
ition, not a premeditated design. It commenced
at the time when le was laying out the grounds
of his little dell park. While at work upon the
walks and flower beds, and turning up the fresh
earth with his spade or rake, several of the little
birds would come down from the trees, and hop
along after him, at a little distance, picking up the
worms and insects. By walking gently and look-
ing and speaking kindly when they wre near,
they came first to regard his approach without
fear, then with confidence. They soon learned
the sound of his voice, and seemed to understand
the meaning of his simple, set words of caressing.
Little by little they ventured nearer and nearer,
close to his rake and hoe, and fluttered and wrestled
and twittered in the contest for a worm or fly,
sometimes hopping upon the head of his rake in
the excitement. Day by day they became more
trustful and tame. They watched him in the
morning from the trees near his door, and Ibl-
lowed him to his work. New birds joined the
company daily, and they all acted as if he had no
other intent in raking the earth than to find them
a breakfast. As the number increased, he began
to carry crusts of bread in the great outside pocket
7







74 A PLEA FOR THE

of his coat, and to sprinkle a few crumbs for them
on the ground. When his walks were all finished,
and he used the spade and rake less frequently,
the birds looked for their daily rations of crumbs;
and would gather in the tree tops in the morning
and let him know, with their begging voices, that
they were waiting for him. He called them to
breakfast with a whistle, and they would come out
of the thick, green leaves of the grove, and patter,
twitter and flutter around and over his feet.
Sometimes he would put a piece of bread between
his lips, when a bright eyed little tiing would
pick it out, like a humming-bird taking honey
from a deep flower-bell without alighting. They
became his constant companions. As soon as he
stepped from his door, they were on the look out
to give him a merry welcome with their happy
voices. They have come to know the sound of his
step, his walks and reereations. Often when lIcan
ing upon his hoe or rake, one of them will alight
upon the head of it, and turn up a bright eye at
his face. Even before he gave up the practice of
shooting birds of another feather, one would some-
times hop upon the gilt guard of the lock, and
peer around upon the brass trigger with a look of
wonder, which he interpreted aright, and left off
killing birds susceptible of the same training. He
leaves his chamber window open at night, and
wlen he awakes early in the morning, he often






DUOM CREATION. 75

finds a robin or goldfinch hopping about on the
bed posts or on tile back of a chair close by,
trying to say or sing in the best articulation
of its speech,' It is time to get up; come and see
the flowers; a dew of pearl is on their leaves, and
the sun is above the sea.' And, what is more
beautiful still and full of poetry-full of the sweet
life of those spontaneous affinities and affections
more beautiful than poetry-these birds follow
him to the sanctuary, a distance of more than a
mile from his house, as a kind of aerial escort, and
sing their Sabbath psalms of gladness and praise
on the way. When the indoor service is ended,
they meet him on his return, and escort him home
with a new set of hymns." The Friend.



nerdotq of thiq mjog $parrom.
IN that season of the year when Spring is
warming up into Summer, and the feathered in-
habitants of our forests are busy rearing their
young, a little sparrow was seen to enter the
kitchen of a country home, and perch upon the
window-sill, in evident distress. Its feathers were
ruffled, and its head ever and anon turned curi-
ously aroundnd nd up, as if looking at something
out of the house and above the window. In and
out it continued to hop, without intermission, re-







76 A PLEA FOR THE

gardless of all offers of food, until the shutters
were closed at twilight, and various were the sur-
mises as to the cause of its strange conduct.
Through the course of the following day the same
scene was enacted, without any clue appearing as
to the cause of its distress.
At length, on the third morning, the mute peti-
tion for aid, still continuing, one of the family,
bethinking herself of tie bird's curious upturning
of the head, caught a new idea from it. Perhaps
she might have a nest in the ivy that encircled the
window, and something might be amiss with its
little household. Going to the second story and
looking down, the cause of the trouble was at once
manifest. A thick limb of the ivy had become
loosened by the wind, and fallen directly across
the petitioner's nest. Itwas too heavy for the bird
to remove, and offered an insuperable difficulty
in the way of her getting in to feed her young-
now almost apparently lifeless. The branch was
quickly removed, when the mother bird, pausing
only for a brief inspection of her brood, was on the
wing, in search of food. Her mate soon joined her,
and both were busy as quick wings, worked by
hearty good will, could make them. Once, one
of the parent birds paused in its work, and as if
desirous to give expression to its gratitude, re-ap-
peared upon the window-seat and poured forth a
sweet and touching song, as of thankfulness to its







DU.UB CREATION. 77

benefactors; returning three successive seasons,
to be noticed and fed, at the same spot, where
the acquaintance and familiarity with man first
commenced. II. W. R. Del.


Dh4 en and O(hithenp
FunstIS a faint image of God's loving care over
his people. See how tenderly the mother hen
watches over her brood. When danger approaches,
they run to her, and how confidingly they repose
under her sheltering wing. OhI how safe is the
child of God under the protecting wing of its
Heavenly Father.
And in the lamentation over Jerusalem, the
Saviour of the world declared, "how often would
I have gathered thy children together. even as a
hen gathereth her chickens under her wings, and
ye would not."
There is an eye that never sleeps
Beneath the wing of night;
There is an car that never shuts,
When sink the beams of light.

There is an arm that never tires,
When human stength gives way;
There is a love that never fils,
When earthly loves decay,
7*







78 A PLEA FOR THE

(ount Zinundorf and the goie.
CRUELTY to animals is always the sign of a
mean and little mind, whereas we invariably find
great men distinguished by their humanity.
I remember having read, some time ago, a beau-
tiful story of Count Zinzendorf, when a boy. He
was, as I dare say you know, a great German
noble, and lived to do a great deal of good in the
world.
One day, when he was playing with his hoop
near the banks of a deep river, which flowed out-
side the walls of a castle where he lived, he espied
a dove struggling in the water. By some means
the poor little creature had fallen into the river,
and was unable to escape. The little count im-
mediately rolled a large washing-tub, which had
been left near, to the water's edge, jumped into it,
and though generally very timid on the water, by
the aid of a stick, he managed to steer himself
across the river, to the place where the little dove
lay floating and struggling. With the bird in his
arms, he guided the tub back, and got safely to
land. After warming his little captive tenderly
in his bosom, the boy ran with it into the wood,
and set it free. His mother, who had watched
the whole transaction, in trembling anxiety for his
safety, from her bed-room window, now came out
But were you not afraid ?" she asked.











Jil


STORK'S NEST
og uleR- of Vpob


~,~5 '~J
,~o~i~j~jgi~







DUMB CREATION. 79

"Yes, I was rather," answered the little boy;
Sbut I could not bear that it should die so, you
know, mother; its little ones might have been
watching for it to come home "--anon.



She Whift Storh.
THE WHITE STORK (Ciconia alba) is found
throughout the greater part of Europe, but passes
the winter in Africa. Its name, in Hebrew, means
mercy, or piety; its English name, from the Greek,
store, signifies natural affection. It is remark-
able for its great affection towards its young, and,
according to'popular belief, for its attention to
the aged ones among them.
It is a tall and stately bird, standing nearly
four feet in height. The jet black of its wings,
and its bright red beak and legs, contrast finely
with the pure white of its plumage.
It makes a rude nest of sticks, reeds, &c., on
the tops of tall trees, or on ruins, spires, or houses.
There are always several located on the tops of
the isolated pillars of Persepolis.
This species attaches itself to our race, for
the service which it renders in the destruction
of reptiles, and the removal of all kinds of garb-
age, and has been repaid by protection from early
times.






8O A PL.EA Fo THE

% gamti Storh.
A GENTLEnA at Carshalton, in Surrey, has a
stork, which, through kind treatment, has become
so very tame that the bird never seems so happy
as when in the society of the laborers who are em-
ployed on the farm, or in following the ploughman
up and down the field.
During the hay-time last year, the mowers had
scarcely taken a stroke with their scythes, before
the stork was at their heels.
When the men were at dinner, he would refresh
himself by taking a short sleep, standing on one
leg.



gon't gob the Poor irds.
I listened to the feathered warblers, pouring
their harmony on every hand, with a genial, kin
dred regard, and frequently turned out of my path
lest I should disturb their little songs or frighten
them to another station. Surely, said I to myself,
he must be a wretch indeed, who, regardless of
your harmonious endeavor to please him, can eye
your elusive flights to discover your secret re-
cesses, and to rob you of all the property nature
gives you, your dearest comforts, your helpless
nestlings. RonE- BuRns.






8O A PL.EA Fo THE

% gamti Storh.
A GENTLEnA at Carshalton, in Surrey, has a
stork, which, through kind treatment, has become
so very tame that the bird never seems so happy
as when in the society of the laborers who are em-
ployed on the farm, or in following the ploughman
up and down the field.
During the hay-time last year, the mowers had
scarcely taken a stroke with their scythes, before
the stork was at their heels.
When the men were at dinner, he would refresh
himself by taking a short sleep, standing on one
leg.



gon't gob the Poor irds.
I listened to the feathered warblers, pouring
their harmony on every hand, with a genial, kin
dred regard, and frequently turned out of my path
lest I should disturb their little songs or frighten
them to another station. Surely, said I to myself,
he must be a wretch indeed, who, regardless of
your harmonious endeavor to please him, can eye
your elusive flights to discover your secret re-
cesses, and to rob you of all the property nature
gives you, your dearest comforts, your helpless
nestlings. RonE- BuRns.







DUMB CiEATION. 81

Vrrident aficoln.
ONE cause of President Lincoln's power over the
masses was his humanity. It was not only general,
but particular, as the following tcident shows:
Walking one day with his secretary, he stopped
at a little shrub and looked into it; then stooped
and put his hand down through the twigs and
leaves, as if to take out something. His secretary
said to him:
SWhat do you fid there, Mr. Lincoln?"
Why," said he, here is a little bird fallen
from its nest, and 'm trying to put it back
again."


9he gird-W world.
THE activity of birds, when they have young, is
most surprising. We have a record of the ob-
servations made on a pair of blue titmice, when
rearing their young. The paront-birls began
their labor of love at half-past three in the morn-
ing, and did not leave off until after eight in the
evening, after being almost incessantly engaged for
nearly seventeen hours.
A person counted their various returns to the
nest, and found them to be 475. Up to four
o'clock, as a breakfast, they wore fed twelve times;
between fle and six, forty times, flying to and







DUMB CiEATION. 81

Vrrident aficoln.
ONE cause of President Lincoln's power over the
masses was his humanity. It was not only general,
but particular, as the following tcident shows:
Walking one day with his secretary, he stopped
at a little shrub and looked into it; then stooped
and put his hand down through the twigs and
leaves, as if to take out something. His secretary
said to him:
SWhat do you fid there, Mr. Lincoln?"
Why," said he, here is a little bird fallen
from its nest, and 'm trying to put it back
again."


9he gird-W world.
THE activity of birds, when they have young, is
most surprising. We have a record of the ob-
servations made on a pair of blue titmice, when
rearing their young. The paront-birls began
their labor of love at half-past three in the morn-
ing, and did not leave off until after eight in the
evening, after being almost incessantly engaged for
nearly seventeen hours.
A person counted their various returns to the
nest, and found them to be 475. Up to four
o'clock, as a breakfast, they wore fed twelve times;
between fle and six, forty times, flying to and







82 A PLEA FOR THE

from a plantation more than one hundred and fifty
yards from their nest; between nine and ten
o'clock they fed them forty-six times, and they
continued at their work till the time specified,
sometimes bringing in a single caterpillar, and
other times two or three small ones. The num-
ber of destructive insects removed by birds when
feeding their young, must be astonishing, if they
are in any degree as active as the two blue tit-
mice, so patiently observed by this person. Great
as the number of returns to the nest seems to be,
it certainly does not exceed that of the common
swallow. Don't kill the little birds.



Small girs.
ToH French are great eaters of bread, the sup-
ply and price of which is therefore of great im-
portance to the whole population; and when we
fnd how enormously those reptiles and insects,
which prey upon the crops of grain and other
kinds of vegetable food,have increased, we see the
result of the short-sighted policy whlch has led to
the wholesale destruction of the small birds. As
an example of the utility of these little creatures,
ten swallows were killed, and in their stomachs
were found the remains of 5,482 insects, giving
each bird an average of 548. Similar results






DUMB CREATION. 83

were found to attend the hedge-sparrows. The
cockchafer deposits from seventy to one hundred
eggs, which are soon transformed into white grubs.
They live on tie roots of our most valuable vege-
tables. The weevil produces from seventy to
ninety eggs, which, laid in so many grains of corn,
become larva, which eat them all up; so that the
destruction of the beautiful feathered songsters
may, if continued, lead to a positive famine.

SPEAKrNG of birds, the custom of shooting them
is heathenish and cold-blooded. They are bless-
ings to the man that tills the soil, and yet the
loaded musket is their only reward. I once killed
birds in my wantonness-God forgive me--merely
to test my skill with the rifle. But I received a
bitter lesson. While once passing to the woods, I
carelessly fired at a bird, caring only to discharge
the gun so as to make the next fire sure. I
wounded a bird which sat upon the fence. I felt
guilt-stricken at once, and attempted to catch it.
Failing in that, I thought it would be humanity to
shoot it. Before I could load my rifle, it flttered
across a field, where I followed it, and found the
panting sufferer at its nest, and its blood dripping
upon its young I never think of that act of
mine without a pang-a keen, startling remorse.
I cannot forget it. My cruelty flashed upon me
in all its nakedness, and I cringed under my re-







84 A PLEA FOR THE

flections like a guilty butcher, as I was. I never
see boys go out with their muskets, or hear the
report of a gun, but I remember how unthinkingly
I once destroyed the beautiful and artless song-
stress of God's creation. TnuRLow W. BnowN.

WHILST English farmers are unwisely destroy-
ing the small birds, the Australian farmers are
importing them into the colony, and paying very
high prices for them. The prevalence of destruc-
tive insects in the colony leads the shrewd emi-
grant farmer wisely to seek the help of the fea-
thered tribe.


I li limlnd:i i
AND OUR OTHER SUMMER VISITORS, (IN ENGLAND.)
TnERE is something very delightful in loving
and being loved; and nothing gives me greater
pleasure than seeing all the birds in my garden
happy. They feel they are in safeguard with me.
I open my window, and I bid them enter. Every
morning I place for them, on the grass-plot, and
in other convenient places, paus and dishes of va-
rious depths, filled with cold spring water. Down
they come, blackbirds, thrushes, starlings, hodge-
sparrows, nightingales, blackcaps, garden warblers,
robins, wrens, &c. &c.; and when they have done
drinking, what a droll sight it is to see them plunge







DUMB CmrEaTIO. s5

bodily into their baths What a fuss they make
Whatanticsthey perform Theydance, they stride,
they caper. See them racing on the lawn, and then
makingg their toilet How very happy they are,
1 gather from the melody of their sweet voices, and
close companionship in the garden. Who would
be without such summer visitorst--non.


tqdtion in animals.
AN article in a recent number of a The Turf,
Field and Farm," after describing the evidences
given by dogs, camels and horses, that they are
sensible to kindness, and appreciate and remember
good treatment, concludes as follows:
Birds show as much affection as is shown by
animals. A lady returning from Cuba, two years
ago, brought a parrot and presented it to little
Katie. The bird was fresh from tie tropics, and
the child had just been transplanted from the ge-
nial climate of Kentucky to tile chilling atmo-
sphere of New York. New faces and now scenes
greeted the eyes of both child and parrot-the
latter named Pcnta--and each seemed to look to
the other for comfort in tle lonely hours of the
slow revolving days. Katie took the bird from
the cage, gently stroked its head and back, wlis-
pering endearing words to it all the while, and
the bird nestled more closely to her young breast,
9







86 A PLEA FOR THE

with a kind of low clucking indicative of sympathy.
Time passed, and the bird of green plumage and
the bright-eyed, flaxen-haired girl became insepa-
rable companions. Katie fed her pet with the
choicest sweetmeats, laughed with it, cried with
it, and developed in its heart a strong, overflow-
ing well of affection. Two years have strength-
ened the early tie, and now the attachment of the
parrot for her kind protector is remarkable.
When Katie is long absent, it will mope and pite-
ously cry for her; if she enters the room when
the bird is in one of these sad moods, it will fly to
her with a wild scream of delight, and when sla
takes it in her hand, it will kiss her lips, lay its
head against her warm, rosy check, and repeat the
endearing phrases that she ias taught it. At
such a time lay your band roughly upon the flaxen-
haired girl, and Pcenta's eyes will turn green with
rage, her feathers ruffle up, and she will fly at you
with savage fury. Strike her, but you cannot
beat her off. When she fights for the idol of her
heart, there is no cowardice in her nature. She
will screen and renew the attack until you desist,
or she lies panting and exhausted on the floor;
and when strength returns to her, and the rough
hand has been removed from the object of her
affection, she will flutter back to that object with
cooing words of comfort, as if she were the only
protector that Katie had in the world. It is a re-







DUMB CnREATIO. 87

markable instance of devotion, and we must accept
it as another evidence of the fact that kindness be-
gets kindness-that the affection of animals and
birds is not the weak, ephemeral effervescence of
tile moment. The sentiment that attaches them
to reasoning beings is not impulsive; its growth
sometimes may be slow, but when once matured,
its fidelity is only measured by tile lines that mark
the limits of life. Surely from these examples we
can deduce a lesson. Let men, in controlling ani-
mals, remember that they are capable of affection,
that they are faithful when an attachment is
formed, and then make this affection the key to
the government of them. If you have a balky, a
vicious, or an unruly horse, harsh treatment will
not make a better animal of him, or make him
more tractable. The more punishment inflicted
upon him by impulsive hands, only widens the
gulf that separates you from the sentiment by
which he may be controlled. Be kind to him, in
his confidence, and tlien he will cheerfiuly obey
your every command. Do not approach him as a
mechanical, unthinking brute, but approach him
as you would approach a reasoning being. An
animal that is capable of such warm attach-
ment is capable of understanding who is worthy
of such attachment. Kindness is the golden key
to affection, and from affection spring obedience
and fidelity.-Cultivator and Country Gentleman.




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