• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Frontispiece
 The tea-party on the grass
 Charley's rabbits
 Arthur's lesson
 Duck's corner
 Milking-time
 "How does 'ou do it?"
 The birds' winter sheaf
 The child's prayer
 Pussy and the bell
 Pussy and a tortoise
 The drink at the well
 Baby in mischief
 Greedy puss
 Freddie's bird
 The Goose family
 The blind girl
 Puss and the kittens
 The good daughter
 My dog Dash
 Grandma's picture
 The bird's dinner
 Jennie and Tray
 The nest stealers
 The first plunge
 Kept in
 The stray dog
 The baby brother
 Drilling Frisk
 Clever Dandy
 Knitting socks for Papa
 Mr. and Mrs. Wren
 Tommy's new boots
 Jack's penknife
 The spring of water
 Lazy scholars
 Teaching baby to walk
 John's mishap
 Playing school
 Hattie's album
 The drinking-fountain
 Naughty Mattie
 Cradle song
 The mouse in church
 Baby ride
 Alfred's picnic
 Going to school
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Sunshine for rainy days
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026979/00001
 Material Information
Title: Sunshine for rainy days
Physical Description: 94, 2 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Johnston, J. ( Engraver )
Bookhout, Edward ( Engraver )
Bross, Robert S., b. ca. 1831 ( Engraver )
Darley, Felix Octavius Carr, 1822-1888 ( Engraver )
Smithwick, J. G ( Engraver )
Linton, W. J ( William James ), 1812-1897 ( Engraver )
Kinnersley, Henry ( Engraver )
American Tract Society ( Publisher )
Butterworth and Heath ( Engraver )
Publisher: American Tract Society
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1873
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1873   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1873   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1873
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Citation/Reference: Baldwin Library
General Note: Illustrations engraved by Johnston, Bookhout, Bross, Darley, Smithwick, Linton, Kinnersley and Butterworth & Heath.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026979
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002238217
notis - ALH8714
oclc - 60313673

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    The tea-party on the grass
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Charley's rabbits
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Arthur's lesson
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Duck's corner
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Milking-time
        Page 12
        Page 13
    "How does 'ou do it?"
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The birds' winter sheaf
        Page 16
        Page 17
    The child's prayer
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Pussy and the bell
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Pussy and a tortoise
        Page 22
        Page 23
    The drink at the well
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Baby in mischief
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Greedy puss
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Freddie's bird
        Page 30
        Page 31
    The Goose family
        Page 32
        Page 33
    The blind girl
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Puss and the kittens
        Page 36
        Page 37
    The good daughter
        Page 38
        Page 39
    My dog Dash
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Grandma's picture
        Page 42
        Page 43
    The bird's dinner
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Jennie and Tray
        Page 46
        Page 47
    The nest stealers
        Page 48
        Page 49
    The first plunge
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Kept in
        Page 52
        Page 53
    The stray dog
        Page 54
        Page 55
    The baby brother
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Drilling Frisk
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Clever Dandy
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Knitting socks for Papa
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Mr. and Mrs. Wren
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Tommy's new boots
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Jack's penknife
        Page 68
        Page 69
    The spring of water
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Lazy scholars
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Teaching baby to walk
        Page 74
        Page 75
    John's mishap
        Page 76
        Page 77
    Playing school
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Hattie's album
        Page 80
        Page 81
    The drinking-fountain
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Naughty Mattie
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Cradle song
        Page 86
        Page 87
    The mouse in church
        Page 88
        Page 89
    Baby ride
        Page 90
        Page 91
    Alfred's picnic
        Page 92
        Page 93
    Going to school
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text












































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ENTERED, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1573, by the AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY,
in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.


I






4 SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


THE TEA-PARTY ON THE GRASS.

FOUR little cousins, Ida, Lizzie,
Sue, and Bell, went to have a tea-
party on the grass, with their dollies.
They built two fine houses with two
large umbrellas, and Ida and Lizzie
were very loving and happy. But
Sue and Bell began to quarrel, and
Sue's doll was broken. Ida and Liz-
zie are both gentle little girls, and
never quarrel, playing happily, be-
cause each one is willing to give up
sometimes to the other. Selfish girls
who want their own way all the
time, quarrel, as Sue and Bell did.






6 SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


CHARLEY'S RABBITS.

CHARLEY loves his rabbit,
And its tiny brood;
Loves to pet the little ones
When he brings their food.

Bunnie loves her master too,
And her babies small
Never fear dear Charley's touch,
For he loves them all.

Very sleek is Bunnie,
Fed on corn and hay,
Carrot-tops and lettuce-leaves,
Which Charley brings each day.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


ARTHUR'S LESSON.

ARTHUR is learning to read in
the Holy Bible. His sisters are very
patient and kind, and teach him to
pronounce the long words, without
laughing at any of his mistakes.
Mamma allows them to read in the
large Bible which has pictures in it,
because they are very careful not
to soil or tear it, and never lift it
from the table.
Arthur will soon read nicely, with
two such kind little teachers; and
he tries to learn very fast, so that
he can read well when he is alone.


I






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


DUCK'S CORNER.

Is not that a funny name for a
place? It is a cosey corner of a large
farm in New Jersey, and the chil-
dren gave it that name because the
ducks are sure to be found there,
near a very tiny pond that is half
hidden in tall grass and weeds. Here
the old drake with his splendid green
and purple feathers comes to find
fat frogs for his snow-white wife
and brood of downy ducklings, who
paddle about in the cool water, and
never mind the hottest sun in the
shade of Duck's Corner.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


MILKING-TIME.

THE COWS are standing in the yard,
Swinging their lazy tails;
And Ann is seated on her stool,
Filling the milking-pails.

Come, Gus, we'll go to see her milk,
And watch the white stream flow;
And if you take your little cup,
She'll fill it full, I know.

But ere you drink I hope you'll say
Your prayer of thanks to God,
Who sends his children, day by day,
Kind gifts of drink and food.






14 SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


"HOW DOES 'OU DO IT?"

JAMES is a very kind boy, and
very fond of his little brother, Max.
Just now he is amusing him by ma-
king a rabbit on the wall. He sits
in a sunny spot, and put his fingers
together till the shadow of them on
the brick wall looks just like a rab-
bit. Max is very much pleased, and
will soon try to make one with his
own fat little fingers.
It makes home very happy, when
older brothers are kind to the little
ones, as James is to Max, and always
try to make them happy.






16 SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


THE BIRDS' WINTER SHEAF.

THE snow is on the ground, and
there is no food to be found for the
little birds. The kind farmers put
up a large sheaf of wheat where the
little feathered pets will find it; and
here they come, twittering and chirp-
ing their thanks for a good dinner
on this cold day, when the snow
covers up all the seeds, and bugs,
and worms. I think we may call
these sheaves in the country, "Birds'
Hotels." In the city many people
throw out crumbs for the birds, who
come to be fed.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


THE CHILD'S PRAYER.

O dear Saviour, meek and mild,
Who wast once a little child,
Listen while we children pray
For thy blessing day by day.
Keep our little hands from crime;
Let us never waste our time;
Guard our hearts from thought of
wrong;
Let our lips praise thee in song.
Bless our father and our mother,
Bless our sister and our brother;
May we all, our sins forgiven,
Dwell with Thee at last in heaven.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


PUSSY AND THE BELL.

DING, dong! ding, dong!
Pussy has found a new plaything
that she does not understand very
well. When her soft paw touches
it, it makes a great noise, of which
pussy is half afraid. She is ringing
the bell that calls the farm hands in
to dinner; and the men will not
thank Miss Puss when they come
up from the hay-field, and find there
is no dinner ready for them. She
had better scamper away, and keep
out of such mischief, or she may get
into trouble.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


PUPPIES AND A TORTOISE.

A SIGHT most strange and wonderful
Three little puppies saw:
A creature in a shell of horn
Popped out a head and claw!

They jump and bark, and bark again,
And stare with open eyes;
The sight of such a frightful thing
So fills them with surprise.

"He's good to eat," they think; but
then
They dare not go too nigh;
He's safe within his coat of mail,
And mischief's in his eye.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


THE DRINK AT THE WELL.

UNCLE WILL has come home from
work, tired and thirsty, and good
old Bob, the farm horse, has come
to the well for a drink of the pure
cold water.
Little Dolly, too, has heard the
bucket rattle as it went down into
the well, and has run out with her
own tiny cup. She loves to see the
dripping bucket come up, as uncle
pulls on the chain, though I do not
think she is as thirsty as Uncle Will
and Bob are. See her hold up her
cup for a cool drink.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


BABY IN MISCHIEF.

AH, Master Baby, you are in fine
mischief! If mamma had not been
watching you, you would have pull-
ed the hot flat-iron down on your
pretty head, and hurt yourself very
much. A bruise and a burn at the
same time would be no joke, Master
Baby. You had better go back to
your play with your own little bench
and shovel, and keep your fingers
away from mamma's table, where
you will only hurt yourself and give
mamma trouble, by touching her
work, and pulling it out of its place.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


GREEDY PUSS.

WHY, Mistress Puss, can this be true?
I really am ashamed of you;
You stretch your velvet paws and
head
As if you longed for Tommy's bread.

Daily kind Tommy gives you food,
And strokes your fur if you are good.
Each day a drink of milk he brings,
And shares with you his nicest things.

If mamma saves a scrap or sup,
Tommy brings you to eat it up;
And now, when he is tired with play,
You try to steal his bread away.
i_________________i






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


FREDDIE'S BIRD.


FREDDIE'S papa, who is


a sea-


captain, brought him a bird from
across the ocean; and the little boy
by kindness, tamed his pet, so that
it would fly about in the room, and


eat crumbs


from the table without


any fear.
Little Walter would like to pull
the pretty feathers, but mamma holds
him back. They all love the little
bird, and want to show dear papa
by-and-by, how tame he is; but Wal-
ter is too young to know he would


hurt the pet if he caught it.


I






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.



THE GOOSE FAMILY.


"GoosEY,


goosey,


gander,


tell


where you go,
When the sun is shining, and
spring winds blow ?"


me

the


"I go down the meadows, where the
daisies grow;
Down the sunny meadows, where
the streamlets flow.


"In the stream I wash me,
feathers shine,
Then upon the grass and
fresh I dine."


till my

daisies


Silhl Sinlie






34 SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


THE BLIND GIRL.

THIS poor girl is blind. She can-
not see to read the Bible as we read
it. But there is a Bible for the blind,
with raised letters that they can feel
with their fingers, and they are
taught to read these.
Are you not glad that kind men
have made such books for the blind,
so that they may read the holy
words of the Bible, though they can-
not see them. Perhaps your mam-
ma may take you some day to the
asylum, where they teach the blind
children to read.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


PUSS AND THE KITTENS.

Puss and her babies, soft as silk,
Have come to be fed on Willie's milk.
But Spot is in mischief, and pulls
mamma's shawl;
Come quick, sir, or Snowdrop will
leave none at all.
They are sister and brother, and
love one another,
And are fond of a romp with their
kind, gentle mother,
While Willie, the darling, loves all
of the three,
And all are as happy as happy can
be.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


THE GOOD DAUGHTER.

MARY'S mother had a bad fever,
and for many days was very sick
indeed. The little girl could not
do much for her, but she amused
her little brothers, and tried to keep
the house very quiet. But when her
mother was better and could sit up,
Mary could wait on her as well as
a nurse, and it made her very happy
to bathe her kind mother's head, and
make her a cup of nice tea. I am
glad to tell you that her mother soon
was well again, and loved her trusty
little Mary more than ever.


38






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


MY DOG DASH.

MY dog Dash is fond of fun;
Bow wow, wow.
Oh, if you could see him run!
Bow wow, wow!
A merrier dog you ne'er did see;
Bow wow, wow!
I love Dash, and Dash loves me;
Bow wow, wow!
Yet if e'er I fall asleep,
Bow wow, wow!
Dash beside me watch will keep,
Bow wow, wow!
And when I once more awake,
Dash and I a romp will take.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


GRANDMA'S PICTURE.

HARRY is very fond of drawing
pictures on his slate, and makes very
pretty ships, houses, and animals.
One day he asked grandma to sit
very still while he tried to make a
picture of her kind, sweet face on
his slate. Grandma put down her
knitting, and sat very quiet until
Harry brought the picture to show
her. Aunt Mary, who is leaning
over grandma, says she thinks Har-
ry will be an artist when he is a
man, and paint beautiful pictures, to
hang up in the parlor.
I __ __






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


THE BIRD'S DINNER.

" REACH up, dearest birdie,
Come nearer to me;
I've found a nice room
For thy babies and thee.

"I've hunted the forest
To find sweetest food
For my little bird wife,
And her tiny brood."

So sang papa bird
As he came to his nest
With the dinner he knew
The dear birdies loved best.






46 SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


JENNIE AND TRAY.

JENNIE has had a long walk, and
is resting before she eats her dinner,
but Tray rubs against her to tell her
he is hungry as well as tired. The
little girl is very poor, and cannot
wear shoes in the summer-time,
though she has one pair to put on
when she goes to Sunday-school.
She has been taking her father's
dinner to him, at the farm where he
is working, and she will have a long
walk back again, after she eats her
own simple dinner. But she loves
dearly to wait on her father.
___________






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


THE NEST STEALERS.

O BOYS, I am ashamed of you!
How could you steal away
The babies from the bird that sings
So sweetly all the day?
And then, to make it worse, you fight;
'Tis painful thus to see
Brothers who know the wrong from
right,
Both steal and disagree!
Your wicked fighting stop at once,
And try good boys to be;
And put the poor bird's nest and brood
Back in the old oak tree.






50 SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


THE FIRST PLUNGE.

JOHNNY is a little like a cat, afraid
of the water. Hesitating and hold-
ing back wont make the water any
warmer when the plunge comes;
and if he waits too long he will get
a sousing from his older brother,
who ought to know better than to
use such means to overcome John-
ny's fears. The best way to take a
bath is the best way to take any
other duty: make one plunge and
the trouble is all over. Courage,
Johnny, courage! by-and-by you will
be even unwilling to come out.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


KEPT IN.

"Oh, jolly crow, you come and go,
And never ask permission;
Just look at me, kept in, you see,
While all the rest are fishing!
"This 'six times four is such a bore,
And so is 'eight times seven;
I don't know why, the more I try,
The more I do n't know 'leven.
"'Tis dull and hot in this old spot,
Outside, the wind is blowing,
And oh, that crook in the meadow
brook,
Where all the boys are going!






54 SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


THE STRAY DOG.

WHEN Clara came in from school,
she told her mamma that a strange
dog had followed her, who seemed
hungry. Mamma came with baby
to the door, while doggie, who was
tired, looked up, as if saying, Please
feed me!" Baby is giving him a
flower to smell; but mamma says,
after dinner he shall have a nice
bone, which he will like much bet-
ter. When he has had a dinner and
a nap, I think he will say "Bow
wow," for Thank you," and trot
away to find his master.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


THE BABY BROTHER.

WE love our baby brother,
The darling little boy;
We draw him in his carriage,
While he laughs aloud for joy.

We will not cross or teaze him,
To make him cry and fret,
But we will try to please him,
The tiny, winsome pet.

We'll bring him all our playthings
Our prettiest little toys,
And everything the others have
Shall be the baby boy's.


I






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


DRILLING FRISK.

"Now, Frisk," Tommy said, "you
must hold up your head like a sol-
dier, and stand straight; and you,
Bob, must look forward, and not tip
your head down on one side to look
at Frisk."
Bob stood straight, and put up
his tin trumpet to blow a tune for
Frisk to learn to march. But Frisk,
after a minute, was tired of drilling,
and saying Bow wow, he ran away.
"O dear, dear," said Tommy, "I
am afraid Frisk runs too fast to
make a good soldier."






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


CLEVER DANDY.

I NEVER saw a dog like Dandy,
In every way he was so handy.
O'er house and stable watch would
keep,
And to the meadow drive the sheep.
Would go at night to bring them back,
And never wander from the track;
Would watch beside the cradle keep,
When baby Harry was asleep.
Would be a horse for Harry's cart,
And bark when baby made him start,
And when unharnessed, jump for joy,
To have a romp with baby boy.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


KNITTING SOCKS FOR PAPA.

MARY is knitting a pair of stock-
ings for her father, who will be very
much pleased, I think, to receive
such a present from his little girl.
As it is the first time Mary has tried
to knit stockings, she has to come
to grandma very often to learn how
to shape them, to turn the heels, and
make the feet. Grandma is very
willing to help the little girl, and
thinks she will be able to knit the
next pair without help, because she
tries so hard to learn how. Loving
hearts make labor light.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


MR. AND MRS. WREN.

MR. WREN has been out for a
little hop on the tree twigs, and has
come home to see if Mrs. Wren
would like a nice fat worm for her
breakfast. You must not think Mrs.
Wren is lazy because she is covered
up in the nest, and does not go out
with Mr. Wren. Oh, no; she is not
lazy, but she has some tiny eggs in
the nest to keep warm, and she
knows she must not leave them un-
til they break open and the little
baby wrens come out. And yet no-
body ever taught her this but God.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


TOMMY'S NEW BOOTS.

TOM, with papa has just been out,
And very grand he feels, no doubt;
For dear papa has bought a pair
Of long-legged boots for Tom to wear.
For rain or snow he need not care,
When he has such stout boots to wear.
See how he stands upon one foot,
To show mamma the fine new boot.
Biddy, too, looks up from the fire,
That she the beauties may admire.
Tommy says like a man he feels,
With red-topped boots that have high
heels.






68 SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


JACK'S PENKNIFE.

JACK's uncle Tom gave him a
penknife for a birthday present, and
Jack lost it in the hay-field. Poor
Jack sat down and cried; but Susie,
his sister, ran back to the field, and
after looking a long time, found the
knife.
She ran home at once, calling out:
"O Jack, I've found your knife!"
See how glad Jack looks, as he
thanks his kind sister. Jennie and
little May are glad, too. Jack might
have found his own knife, if he had
not spent the time in crying.






70 SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


THE SPRING OF WATER.

JESSIE and Freddy have come to
the spring for some water for dear
papa's dinner. While Jessie fills the
pitcher, Freddy puts his fat little
hands into the basin to feel the cool
drops. Jessie is singing a Sunday-
school hymn:
Beautiful water,
So fresh and so free!
God gave it to you,
And he gave it to me.
We '11 praise him and thank him,
Wherever we go;
For he made the clear fountain,
That freely does flow.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


LAZY SCHOLARS.


BILLY and Mary spent so


time in play one afternoon, that they


quite forgot their lessons.


The next


morning they did not want to go to
school, for they knew the teacher
would punish them, as they had not


their arithmetic.


nor


They were so slow


in starting, that their mother was
quite angry with them.
I think they will not forget an-
other day, to leave their play in
time. With perfect lessons they will
love to go to school.


much


studied


their line of spelling,






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


TEACHING BABY TO WALK.

LITTLE darling baby
Has not learned to walk;
Cannot hold the kitten,
Cannot sing or talk.

Cannot dress a dolly,
Cannot say her prayers,
Cannot put her shoes on,
Cannot run up stairs.

Grasping Georgie's finger,
Grandpa holding fast,
Soon she'll use the little feet,
Andreach mamma at last.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


JOHN'S MISHAP.

JOHN was sent to the store for


groceries, and his mother said:
"Go quickly, John, and do
go on the ice."


not


But John went on the ice for just
one slide. In that one he fell down,
broke the eggs, and spilled many of
the things in his basket.
His mother was very sorry, but
John promised to be more obedient


after such a sad mishap,


and she


forgave him.
When children are sent on er-
rands, they should never stop to play.






78 SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


PLAYING SCHOOL.

ON rainy days we have a school:
And Fanny, sitting on a stool,
Teaches us all to read and spell,
And makes us learn our lessons well.

We have to spell c-a-t cat,
D-o-g dog, b-a-t bat,
Then learn a page in history,
And do a sum in three times three.

Harry then reads us stories true,
From Fanny's book, so nice and new;
But Willie do n't know A B C,
And falls asleep on Fanny's knee.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


HATTIE'S ALBUM.

HATTIE has been such a good
girl in school that papa has made
her a present of a pretty album.
When Hattie opened it she found it
full of pictures of those she loved.
Papa was first, then mamma, Fred,
Amy, aunt Rose, cousin Sue, and
even the baby in her long, white
dress. The very last picture of all
is Hattie's pet kitten; but she has
not found that yet, though she looks
so happy over her present. Do n't
you think she will laugh when she
sees Kitty in a picture?
L __ __ _ _ _






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


THE DRINKING-FOUNTAIN.

IN the days of dust and heat,
How glad the thirsty are to meet
The fountain in the square or street,
And drink the water cool and sweet.

A drink that brings no pain or woe,
A drink that free for all does flow,
A drink that Adam, long ago,
In Eden's garden found to flow.

But when the cooling cup you raise
To drink, upon the burning days,
Thank God for all his kindly grace,
And lift your heart to sing his praise.






84 SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


NAUGHTY MATTIE.

MATTIE'S mamma was sick, and
a friend sent her a basket of fresh,
ripe fruit. The nurse stood it upon
a table, and a large yellow butterfly
flew in at the window, and alighted
on the fruit. Mattie could see it
quite well, but she tried to catch it,
and in doing so upset the basket.
The poor butterfly was killed, and
mamma's present was quite spoiled,
because Mattie was such a cruel
little girl. God is not pleased when
children are cruel, and destroy the
pretty creatures he has made.
I___-






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


CRADLE SONG.


SLEEP, baby dear,
In thy cradle so warm;
Sister is watching
To keep you from harm.

Now she is sleeping,
I'11 keep very still;
God watches baby,
And guards her from ill.

He always sees her,
Though no one is nigh,
Rock-a-by, baby,
Hush, baby, by, by!


~


I






88 SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


THE MOUSE IN CHURCH.

MAGGIE and Nettie were sitting
in church all alone, for mamma was
sick, and were trying to be good
and quiet, as children should be in
that holy place, when they heard a
scratching noise on the seat. They
looked, and saw a tiny mouse nib-
bling at the cushion. The two little
girls, half afraid, drew close together,
but they made no noise or cry to
disturb others, and soon the mouse
jumped down and ran away, to find
a place where there was some food
and no little girls.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


BABY'S RIDE.

UP we go, my baby dear,
Down we go, but do not fear;
Papa holds your chubby arms,
You are safe from falls or harms.

Baby's horse wont run away;
Baby's horse wont tire of play;
Baby's horse can trot or run,
Just as baby likes the fun.

Up we go, and down we go,
Sometimes fast and sometimes slow;
Gallop, gallop gayly on,
Darling little baby John!





92 SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


ALFRED'S PICNIC.

IT is Alfred's birthday, and his
kind papa and mamma have invited
all his cousins to a picnic in the
woods. Uncle John and aunt Mary
have come, too, and all are busy
now getting dinner. Papa, mamma,
and uncle unpack the basket of
good things, aunt Mary and sister
Annie set the table, Louis brings a
pie, Tillie some fruit, while Alfred
carries carefully the nicely frosted
birthday-cake. When dinner is over,
they will all have some merry games
before they go home at sunset.






SUNSHINE FOR RAINY DAYS.


GOING TO SCHOOL.

PET is having her hat tied, before
she starts to school. She has learned
her line in the spelling-book, and
her little table of figures, and is very
glad to take her place in the class,
and say such a good lesson.
Robbie and Nellie, who are all
ready, are waiting to take Pet by
the hand, so that the little sister will
not fall. Robbie has her primer in
his own bag of books.
It is plain that they all love each
other dearly, as people do that love
the Bible and the Saviour.




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