• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Hints to teachers
 Step by step
 Stories and poems
 Spelling and writing
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Title: The first reader
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026965/00001
 Material Information
Title: The first reader
Physical Description: 96 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Monroe, Lewis B ( Lewis Baxter ), 1825?-1879
Cowperthwait & Co ( Publisher )
Sherman & Co. (Philadelphia, Pa.) ( Printer )
Westcott & Thomson
Publisher: Cowperthwait & Co.
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Manufacturer: Sherman & Co ; Westcott & Thomson, Stereotypers and Electrotypers
Publication Date: c1873
 Subjects
Subject: Readers (Primary)   ( lcsh )
Primers (Instructional books) -- 1873   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1873   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1873
Genre: Primers (Instructional books)   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Lewis B. Monroe.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on endpapers.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026965
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002234503
notis - ALH4935
oclc - 02323959
lccn - 55054644

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Advertising
        Page i
        Page ii
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Hints to teachers
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Step by step
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Stories and poems
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Spelling and writing
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Advertising
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text








COWPERTHWAIT d CO.'S EDUCATIONAL SERIES.

WA, RH E N'S

SERIES OF GEOGRAPHIES.

I Warren's Primary Geography. 75
II Warren's Commrnon School Geography, I 88
III Warren's Physical Geography, 1.88
T FII- .*r. ; h .. r..,: nlli .- n 11, .r. i.uLhl. n l c-aIr.il'il' I.ii. il gi i"g
popu l li,'n n r.il.r, r I tI .I .. -Jng ii Census of 1E7o. It nm:.'.
prenri t th .: r h I..- :ul-'t .tI- i -n .lripFl .n m it.- r.l .'.n.i lirn- noi '., Io ,
fuund in ilb,' ni'unii r ..I I... 1. 11i n' .i:.-1' r -i H' r.:r in ji"n lit of
erp.'r:r: .r1n. in ii:- ini r' u ir l I, rT-. I r i1, :i f .lm.J, it t atjs.
\W a' rrrin s .r il, m. -Irn ., ...r..r i 1 I tr. 1., 1. rr tI, l.I-.J.
THE SUPERIORITY OF THESE BOOKS is fully demonstrated by
the fact that all the more recent Geographice have adopted some of their
important features and, also, by their long.continued use. and re-adoption
as fast as revised. in nearly all the leading Cities in the Country.

GEOGRAPHICAL CHARTS.

Warren's Political and Outline Charts.
Eight in .ihe -..-n.- i.. ,r .ni.. al -.r .i-, ... n, r' .' i I-, r-r pni-lnled
on r:.ller., nim 'l.'. ci .-i i r" Price per Set. $lo.oo

Warren's Physical and Outline Charts.
SFour it-rr i t, -. ; im.. q.r 1 r..] n-king sIe : n il1.I'i;
tDclosd r in }"'. i if' i .l I I. p-rin;. r. -i 1 br- .,1-lb I'-r Lt ii.nh r
Price per Set. $ib oo.

Apgar's New Geographical Drawing Book.
T hi- ni.-n adni .r .. rl ll .liirr- i..:n l, i..r ir i..- ni m I'r.-.n
mr monr, l y Ith- u ,i .1-, :h Ih. ptlpl 'i ,n" remn rkjt-li .I.ri tp .e r.i tiu.:.
IS e nab l.al. t d, Ih ,n.1.d rll "i.. r-.,- ni il'1. .iil r I l i ,'n. *n p. ,rt..-.n
If h Ih i-r,,J- n.... .. r 71. [ .1.- Retail Pr.ce. 7iCts

Map-Drawing Paper.
T.. ac.'.:nip, ,. r \ t '- li: ".' \' ,. .I' **ri. n ir. L a i T I ,in cilll i..n .-.
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rrince. mr ,- iar i-i ii ..I'ih. V I ,1-;: r1 i r. I M[i..l1. ihi r ,r..:] :, r ctnri c l
f o ur,- of ,e l'niT..-i r ,1- Price per Set 25 Cts

The Geographical Question Book.
'Pr epared f 'r \\',wF.riri l'. -.''ii HNO>I. I;F ,.iF \ il. Iii .1 ir.i ., r, I
JIl acc'jr:.'e m.pr. Re'- D'- -- --
The Balduir Library

In^Plids








COWPERTHWAIT & CO.'S EDUCATIONAL SERIES.

MONROE'S

SERIES OF SCHOOL READERS.

I. Monroe's First Reader, $030
II. Monroe's Second Reader,. .50
III. Monroe's Third Reader, .70
IV. Monroe's Fourth Reader, .84
V. Monroe's Fifth Reader, 1.25
VI. Monroe's Sixth Reader, 1.50
THE Publishers have the pleasure of announcing that they have recently
issued a Series of School Readers, by Prof. LEWIS B. MONROE, Professor of
Vocal Culture and Elocution in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
These Books are Profusely Illustrated
by the best Artists, and in mechanical execution are superior to any school
books now published. The Series is so arranged that the First, Second,
Third, and Fifth Readers form
An Abridged Course,
peculiarly adapted to the wants of ungraded schools in the smaller towns.
This Series of Books has been prepared by a Pratical Teacher of
Reading,-one who has devoted many years to the subject, and carefully
studied its workings in the School Room. The methods presented have been
practically tested for years in the schools of Boston and elsewhere; and the books
contain what experience has shown to be most pioduAive of good results.
Every Practical Teacher
will see at once the advantage of books prepared in such a manner. Experi-
ence is needed to judge what pieces will work well in a class. The selections
must be vivacious, interesting in subject, and happy in style, and must possess
many other merits to give them claims to be used in the School Reader. It
is believed that the compiler of these books has been strikingly successful in
choosing just what is needed. The three higher books alone contain, in
addition to standard pieces, more than two hundred and fifty choice and
spirited selections which have
NEVER BEFORE APPEARED IN A SCHOOL READER.

Monroe's Vocal Gymnastics.
A New Work on Physical and Vocal Training, for the use of Schools, and
for private instruction. No Teacher, Pupil, Clergyman, Public Speaker or
Reader can afford to be without this little Manual. It contains a complete
system of instruction for the proper training of all the Physical and Vocal
Organs concerned in the production of the Tone. Retail Price, $S.oo.






















THE PROPERTY OF
S., A. -Yitugr,
TEACHER & SU BSCHIPTION
B3OOK A -EI NT,
1941 EAST STATE STREET,
itl risburrf. 1T'i.









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THE





FIRST READER.





BY

LEWIS B. MONROE.















PHILADELPHIA
COWPERTHWAIT & CO.











































Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year 1878, by

LEWIS B. MONROE,

in the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.

























WFSTCOTT & THOMSON. PHERMAN & CO.
Stfreotypers and Elretrotypers. Philada. Printer. Philada.









HI-NTS TO TEACHERS.


A BOOK is not the first thing to be put into a child's
hands, even in teaching him to read. He needs a
preparatory drill which will teach him to see, to hear,
and to speak properly.
THE EYE.
Let the children represent the following lines and
figures by means of small sticks placed on the desk.
Bits of wire may be used for curves.
Horizontal Vertical Slanting Parallel
Line. Line. Lines. Lines.
S/\ II 7\

Right Angles. Blunt Angles. Sharp Angles.



Square. Oblong. Triangle. Circle. Ellipse.

F a A OO
The same may be copied on the blackboard or slate,
and varied in size and position. Any other object-les-
sons which serve to train the eve may be added to these.
THE EAR.
The teacher will repeat simple sentences, andi require
the children to imitate. Then single words are to be
treated in the same manner. When this has been done
5






6 THE FIRST READER.

successfully, a few sounds of vowels and consonants may
be taught by ear, without reference to the letters which
represent them. Afterward the analysis of simple mono-
syllables may be brought out, thus:
Teacher speaks the word man. Pupil repeats-man.
Teacher: "Listen, and tell me what sound you hear first,--
m-m-man." The pupil is led to distinguish the sound, and to repeat
it.-m.
Teacher: "Tell me what is the last sound you hear,-man-n-n."
Pupil repeats the sound,-n.
Teacher: "Listen again. What do you hear between m and n,-
m-a-n?" Pupil gives the short sound of a.
Teacher: "Tell me again what is the first sound you hear,-
m-a-n." Pupil gives the sound,-m.
Teacher, making the letter m upon the blackboard: When you
see that letter it means that you are to make the sound, mi." Point-
ing to the letter: "Make the sound." Child repeats,-m.
In the same way the other sounds are taught. After which the
pupil may be led to combine the sounds; as, d-m, a-n, m-d, nm--n.
In this manner teach the first lesson, and proceed with each succes-
sive one, as fast as new sounds are introduced.

THE VOICE.
From the very beginning, children should be taught
to speak in pleasant conversational tones; and the same
tones are to be carried into their reading. To give case
and naturalness, nothing is more important than to read
in phrases. Thus, "I can see," should be spoken as
fluently as if it were one word, like "repartee." The
articles a and the should always be joined to the follow-
ing word, as if they formed the first syllable of it.
The first steps in reading are to enable a child to
recognize on the printed page words with which he is
already familiar in speech. Every new word which
occurs in any lesson is therefore to be taught him in
conversation before he meets with it in type.


















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POSITION FOR READING.
POSITION FOR READING.










STEP BY STEP.


LESSON I.
a t c
By Sound. By Sight.
at I
cat see
a cat I see
I see a cat.

LESSON II.
h n
By Sound. By Sound.
at an
hat > can
a hat c- I can
I can see.
I can see a hat.
To TEACHERS. Teach the short sound of a, and the hard, or
k, sound of c. Require the words "a cat," to be spoken as
fluently as if they formed a single word like ago," or "about."
9





10 THE FIRST READER.
LESSON III.
r e m s
By Sound. By Sound.
at he
rat me

a rat :' see
I can see a rat.
Can he see me ?
He can see me.


LESSON" IV.

.By So und. .1. 14, B.y Sight.
as a bird
has the bird
Ann The bird

Ann has a bird.
I can see the bird.
Ann can see the bird.
The bird can see Ann.
Teach the long sound of e. Explain that two e's are called
double-e and sound just the same as e.






THE FIRST READER. 11
LESSON V.
1
By Son01. :I By Sight.
is boy
his the boy
it : tree
hit .- .. the tree
It is a boy.
Is it a tree ? It is.
Can the boy hit the tree ?
He can hit the tree.

LESSON VI.
P bg
py Sound. ,By Sight.
pig eat
big -can eat
See the pig. It is a big pig.
Can the pig eat ? He can eat.
Can the pig see me ?
The pig can see me.
Teach the short sound of i, and the hard sound of g,






12 THE FIRST READER.

LESSON" V1I.
o x f
By Sound.
on in ox a box
or it fox the box
for sit box the fox










See the fox. He is on a box.
Is the box for the fox ?
It is for the fox. It is his box.
The fox can sit in the box.
Can a fox eat ?
"A cat, a rat, or a pig can eat.
"A fox can eat.
Teach the short sound of o; and the sharp sound of x, like ks.






THE FIRST READER. 13

LESSON VII1.
d 1
By Sound. By Sight.
at log You love
pat dog you little





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Little d< i. little (l- o,
I can see you.
You sit on a log. .
I pat you, little dog. "
I love you, little dog.
Can you love me ?
Teach the capital letters with the corresponding small ones
whenever the capitals are brought into use.






14 THE FIRST READER.

LESSON JX.
By Sound. By Sight.
it if pin top Yes
is in spin not John





Ii, i






John has a top.
It is not a little top, it is a big top.
John can spin it.
Can you spin a top ?
Yes, I can spin a top, if it is big.
I can not spin a little top.
John can spin a little top, or a
big top.






THE FIRST READER. 15

LESSON X.
U w
By Sound. By Sight.
fun but ill to
run not hill do
sun hot will like

A ', ;i i :
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Can you run to the hill, John ?
Yes, I can, but the sun is hot.
I do not like to run if it is hot.
It is fun to run, if the sun is
hot. Do run to the hill, John.
I will run to the tree.
Will you ? Run, John, run!
Teach the short sound of u. Observe that this and many subse-
ouent lessons are dialogues. They must be read like easy talking.






16 THE FIRST READER.

LESS OVA XI.
REVIEW.
John has a big box.
He has a little man in it, and a
pig, a cat, a rat, an ox, a fox, and
a bird.




The rat is as big as the pig, and
the bird is as big as the ox.
See John at his box.
Cat, do not eat the bird!
"Dog, do not hit the cat!
"Man, see to the pig, or he will
run to the top of the hill!
Little rat, run, run or the cat
will see you."
It is fun for me to see John at
his box.






THE FIRST READER. 17

LESSON XII.
By Sound.
nut.






I .c .e. ,--,
nuts ..
if
bit -
give -"w -: -t' -

I can sec a. tt. -
on the tree. (Cai '
you see it, little
boy? ?
Yes, I can see it.
Hit the nut, if 95- .
you can, little )ov. :
Yes, I will.
I like nlut s. -
But, little boy, if you hit the nut,
will you give me a little bit of it ?
I like nuts.
Yes, if I can hit the nut, I will
give you a little of it.
2






18 THE FIRST READER.

LESSON XIII.
By Sound. By Sight.
ill still hit squirrel
till will sit little squirrel

--1
,,,, '









I see you, little squirrel. /
Do not run. I will not hit you.
Do you like nuts to eat, little
squirrel ?
Yes, you do like nuts.
If you will sit still, I will give
you a nut.
I like to see you eat nuts, little
squirrel.






THE FIRST READER. 19

LESSON XIV.
o sh
By Sownd. By Sight.
no go him like your
so she up girl kitty





1-




Is it your kitty, little girl?
No, but I like the kitty.
I like the dog. I will go for him.
0 no; do not go for your dog.
Will kitty run, if she sees him?
Yes, she will run up the tree.
I will not go for the dog, for I
like to see the kitty.
Teach the long sound of o, and sh as one sound.






20 THE FIRST READER.

LESSON XV.
By Sound. By Sight.
set let an my
pet hen and laid
get egg Ann's Mother

Mother, I can see i
an egg. You can i
not see it. i ''
No, I do not see .
an egg.
It is in my hat.
An egg in your ',
hat ?
Yes, in my hat.
You see, mother, I set my hat on
the log. The pet hen got into it,
and laid an egg.
0 you little pet hen If you do
get into Ann's hat, do not get into
my hat.
Teach the short sound of e.






THE FIRST READER. 21

LESSONS XVI.
By Sound. By Sight.
in we fish has my
fin him dish had pretty
fins swim wish hand with

S j 'i ^ :- --_ -
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0 i oteir, see !,. ',, f |
fish a fish !
I see the little fish.i
Is lie int rett ?
He is pretl' I wi
I had him in my hand.
O no; let him be in the dish,
so we can see him swim. Do you
see his fins ?
Yes, I see his fins.
A fish has fins to swim with.






22 THE FIPST READER.

LESSON XVI.
By Sound.
bee feed top bit
beet sees tops rabbit
feet green from did


-
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Ann has a pet rabbit. He can
dig with his feet. He likes to dig.
Ann likes to feed him. He will
eat from her hand.
He will eat the green tops of a
beet.
He bit Ann's hand, but he did it
for fun.
The rabbit will run if he sees
the dog or the cat.






THE FIRST READER. 23

LESSON XVIII.
REVIEW.
John, I will let you go to see
Ann.
You will see Ann's fish. The
fish is in a dish. It has fins, so it
can swim.
You will see Ann's pet hen. If
the hen has laid an egg, you can
get it and give it to Ann's mother.
Ann has a rabbit. She will let
you feed him. He will eat a green
beet-top from your hand.
You will see a squirrel. I will
give you a nut for him.
Ann has a pretty kitty. If the
kitty sees you she will run.
She need not run from you,
John.
Ann will like to see you, John,
So go.






24 THE FIRST READER.

LESSON XIX.
By Sould. By Sight.
red send lot corn father
step well off must whip
'''-. ^__






. ,,


0, father, the ox is in the corn!
He must not be in the corn.
Send him off.
He will not go, if I do not whip
him.
Well, whip him a little. He
must not eat the corn, nor step on
it.
Can he go in the lot on the hill ?
Yes, my lad. Run and see to
him.






THE FIRST READER. 25

LESSON XX.
By Sound. By Sight.
see pin pond hand What
eel fix drop clam line
._ --TT









I wish I had a pin! '
What for ?
To get an eel. I see :
an eel in the pond.
The eel will not go to a line, if
it has a pin on it.
But he will not see the pin. I
will put a bit of clam on it.
Well, you fix the pin and line;
I will go in the pond and see if I
can get him in my hand.






26 THE FIRST READER.

LESS ,XXI.
ka ate
BY Sound. By Sound.
late Kate
slate name





By Sight.
take good
make l.)chool
What is your name, little girl ?
My name is Kate.
What do you make on your
slate ?
O, I make dogs, cats and birds.
Can you make a squirrel ?
No, I can not make a good
squirrel. I can make a good fish.
Do you take the slate to school ?
Yes, and I must not be late.
Teach the long sound of a, and the sound of k.






THE FIRST READER. 27

LESSONr XXII.
By Sound. By Sight.
ax ell make flower
wax cells made honey
O what a pretty
flower! What is
on the flower ?
Io you not see ,
it is a bee ?
0 yes. What ]
will the bee do ?
The bee will go into the flower
and get honey.
What will he do with the honey ?
He will put it in the wax cells
he has made.
Can he make cells of wax ?
Yes, he can; and he can fill the
cells with honey.
Will he eat the honey ?
He will eat but little. We can
get the cells and the honey.






28 THE FIRST READER.

LESSOj XXIII.
By Sound. By Sight.
fine mile time lap Baby
shine ride cap clap grandma

S-i
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C I I' II Ji
S', t'" I ":"







He will ride a mile, to see

will have I
He need not have a cap. The
sun-shine will do higm oood.
He will see the birds and the
pretty flowers.
Kate will give him a flower.
He can give it to grandma.






THE FIRST READER. 29

LESSON XXIV.

By Sound.
by side but lamb
my mine best skip

-- -





'What a pretty Y a
lamb 1! Is it yours? ,
Yes, it is mine. -
What can the lamb do ?
0 he can skip and run.
My dog will run by my side.
So will my lamb; and he will
eat from my hand.
I am glad you like your lamb,
but I like my dog best.
Teach that y sounds the same as i.






30 THE FIRST READER.

LESSON XXV.
By Snund. By Sifdt.
niJanewhat a nice swing you
Yes, father made it for you and
kinlg" he said
the swing for us.
Jau .: :^ ", '*-.^^ A 'f ---^
teii




SJane, what a nice swing you
haveI
Yes, father made it for you and
me, Ann. 'Little girls like to
swing," he s aid. sod
Your father was kind, to make
the swing for us.
Get into it, Ann; and I will
swing you ten times.
0, will you, Jane ? Then I will
let you take my doll.
Teach the s sound of c, and the sound of j.






THE FIRST READER. 31

LESSON XXJI.
By Sound.
say day tell men
may way dry left
hay play rake grass

Say, mother, may I go and see
the men make hay?
Yes, if you will tell me the way
hay is made.
The grass is cut and left in the
sun.
Is it left in the sun all day ?
It is left till it is dry. Then it
is not grass, but hay.
I see you can tell me the way it
is made.
Then may I take my little rake
and play in the hay ?
Yes, if you will not get in the
way of the men.
Ay has the sound of long a.






32 THE FIRST READER.
LESSON, XXTYTI.
By Sound. By Sight.
fly did to kite going
try hill too nice many
sky hobs help are








0, John, what a nice kite! Are
you going to try it ?
Yes, I am going to the hill.
What a lot of bobs it has!
It may have too many bobs.
It will not fly up if it has.
May I go and help you fly it ?
Yes, I am glad to have you go.
We will have a good time. The
kite will fly up, up to the sky.






THE FIRST READER. 33

LESSON XXVII.
By Sound. By Sight.
far star went wings ever
cars mamma would never








h!

Mamma, I can see a pretty star.
Did you ever go to a star, mamma ?
O no, I never went to a star.
If I get into the cars, and ride,
ever so far, can I get to the star ?
No, the cars never go to the star.
If I had wings, like a bird, I
would fly to the star.
What! Go so far from mamma ?
0, but, mamma, you would go too.
3






34 THE FIRST READER.

LESSON XXIX.
REVIEW.
You make pretty birds, dogs, and
cats on your slate, Kate. Can you
write the names of what you make ?
Yes, mother, I like to write.
And see! I cannot make a squir-
rel, but I can write squirrel,
So you can. You write it well.
And I can write' doll, rake, hay,
kite, fly, car, star, wings, flower, bee,
Good. What do I see at the
top of the slate ?
I will write you the name-/amb,
Can you write-a lamb can skip ?
0 yes, mother, and I can write
good father, kind grandma, pretty
baby, best cap, nice ride,
See if you can tell what I write.
Yes, I can tell. It is, / am glad
Kate gets her lessons we/l at school,






THE FIRST READER. 35

LESSON XXX.
u ck
By Sound. By Sight.
sick sugar
milk I-_ her
p cur-( -Ni
pur V .
shall


My doll is sick.
Let me take her hand. It is hot.
What can I do for her ?
Let me see if I can cure her.
What will you do ?
I will give her a little cup of pure
milk. No sugar in it.
No sugar in it ?
Sugar will not cure a sick doll.
What shall we do with the sugar?
We are not sick. We can eat it.
Teach long sound of u, and that ck sounds as k.






36 THE FIRST READER.

LESSON XXXI.
By Sound. By Sight.
hope home sled handsome they
rope hold don't runners shine






See what '
a handsome sled
my father gave me.
It is handsome.
See the runners.
Don't they shine May I try it ?
Get on. I will give you a ride.
Shall I hold on to the rope ?
No; hold on to the sled. Get a
good hold, or you will fall off.
I hope mother will see me. She
will be glad to see me ride home.
Teach the long sound of o.






THE FIRST READER. 37

LESSON XXXII.
By Sound.
all tall have us line
ball small stand must game
fall toss 7

-, .\ : : ", .. 4:L "








Let us all have a game of ball.
John, Ann, Kate, all stand in a
line.
I will toss the ball to you, John.
Then you must toss it to me.
If I let it fall, you must stand
here and toss the ball to Ann.
Then toss it to Kate, then to me.
Teach the broad sound of a, like aw.






38 THE FIRST READER.

LESSON XXXIII.
oU ow
By Sound. By Sight.
how down out were over
now brown sang rain under
., -. -,
I









to school.
Down, down came the rain.
O Kate, how can we ever get to
school ?
Let us go under the pine tree,
Jane, till the rain is over.
So Jane and Kate went under
the pine tree.





THE FIRST READER. 39
The rain is over now, Kate.
The sun is out.
Yes, see how the trees shine.
Just then a little brown bird came
to the tree, and sang.
O Kate, the rain has made the
little bird glad.
Yes, Jane, and it has made me
glad, too. Now let us go on to
school.

LESSON XXXIV.
By Sight.
here chick funny dough away

Here, chick, chick, chick! Here,
chick, chick, chick c!ic Don't you see
I have some nice dough in my tin
dish for you ?
0, you all run to your mother,
do you ? You try to hide under her
wings.






40 THE FIRST READER.
Mother hen, tell your little chicks
not to run away from me.
O, you would like some dough to
eat, would you, hen ? Well, you
shall have some, you good little
mother.

!si/,, ... 1.0 .-'


I .






0, you funny little chicks! You
see your mother run to me; so you
all run, too.
Well, here is dough for you all.
I hope you will not run away
next time I come to feed you.






THE FIRST READER. 41

LESSON XXXV.
By Sound. By Sight.
mouse sly eye
house cheese black
found here where
round mice something
Little mouse, I --
have found you ---- -
out.
I can see you,
with your sly
black eye. J
You came out of this little
round hole.
Where is your house? I can not
see it. It is down in the hole.
You came out to get something
to eat.
Here, little mouse, take this bit
of cheese.
Take it to your house, and give
some of it to your little baby mice.





42 THE FIRST READER.

LESSON XXXVI.
oi oy
By Sound.
boy ahoy think cargo
toy noise thank coming
Troy spoil ship real

Ship ahoy! Ship ahoy!
0 John, why do you make such
a noise?
Don't you see this ship coming
in ? I must send a cargo to Troy.
Let me see your cargo.
Here it is. Ten boxes of sugar.
Do you call them boxes of su-
gar ? I call them stones.
0 mother, don't spoil my fun. I
play the stones are boxes of sugar.
Well, my boy, I will not spoil
your fun. Here is some real sugar
to put on your little toy-ship.
0, thank you! Ship ahoy!






THE FIRST READER. 43

LESSON XXXVII.
00
By Sound. By Sight.
look cool foot both Cora
took noon good cold was
book soon woods dry put
brook boots feet into under








wcood. ^: "'
:..%1 :


-41


the stin. .as "hot. A

S -k i t I t l _i( ,- I

She sat down under a tree.
Then she took off her boots to
cool her feet.






44 THE FIRST READER.
A little brook ran down into the
woods. So Cora put a foot in the
brook.
Soon she will put both feet in
the brook.
She will not take cold. She will
dry her feet, and put on her boots.
Then she will look at her pretty
book.

LESSON XXX III.
ng
By Sound. By Sight.
ring ding cane aboard
sing playing rope steamboat
I am playing steamboat. Do
you see my steamboat ? I made it.
A box, a cane, and a rope,-that
is my steamboat.
If it is time for the steamboat to
go, I ring a bell,-ding-a-ling-ling!
Then I sing out, All aboard!"
Teach ng as one sound.






THE FIRST READER. 45

LESSO.r XXXIX.
REVIEW.
I will tell you what father gave
us all to-day.
He gave James a handsome sled.
He gave Jane a pretty ball.
He had a little toy-ship for John.
John takes it to the brook, and has
nice times with it. He plays it is
a real ship with a cargo of sugar.
Cora had some new boots and a
pretty book.
Father did not forget mother.
He gave her a flower-stand.
I did not tell you what father
gave me. He gave me a little
box of dishes. They will hold real
sugar, milk, cheese, or anything
good to eat.
Now, don't you think my father
is good and kind ? I do.






46 THE FIRST READER.
LESSON XL.
er ir ur
By Sound.
fern bird moss behind
ferns fur house John
sister curl around before
John has made
a little house for
his sister.
He has put
moss and ferns '
around it.
He put a little '
toy bird on a tree ?.L "--
behind it.
He put a little mat before the
house. The mat was a bit of fur.
Then he got his sister's doll, and
set her down on the mat.
He told the doll not to stir.
John is now going to tell his
sister to find her doll if she can.






THE FIRST READER, 47
LESSON XLI.
ea ch
tea leaf peach peaches
eat each teach plate
seat reach teacher napkin
O Cora, let us get tea for the
dolls.
Well; where shall we put the
dishes ?
On this seat, under the peach
tree.
So we will. How I wish we
had a nice peach for the dolls!
So do I. Here is a pole. I will
see if I can reach a peach.
O, I saw four peaches fall!
Good! Now there is a peach
for each of us, and one for each of
the dolls.
We will save one peach, and take
it to teacher.
Teach ch as one sound; and that ea sounds like e.






48 THE FIRST READER.

Yes; teacher likes peaches.
Now you can cut up the peach
for the dolls, and I will get a leaf
to put by each plate for a napkin.
Then we will eat our peaches.

LESSON XLII.
U
By Sound. By Sight.
use plume drum soldier
tune march rub says
Do you hear what my drum says ?
It says rub-a-dub-dub.
Mother does not like that tune.
I do.
What is the use of a drum if you
can not make a noise on it ?
I hope you see my soldier-cap
with a plume in it.
Mother made it. She likes to
make caps. I like to march.






THE FIRST READER. 49

LESSON XLIII.
oa

oar coat foam river
oak float board .water
boat load tied other









Let us get into the boat. '
Will it not float off with us ?
O no. Don't you see it is tied
to the oak tree ?
Yes, I see. Where shall I sit?
Sit on the board and take an oar.
I will take the other oar.
Teach that oa sounds the same as o.
4






50 THE FIRST READER.
See what a pretty foam my oar
makes in the water.
Yes, my oar makes foam too.
I like to play in the boat, don't
you ?
Yes, and when I am a man I
will get a boat, and take a load of
boys and girls down the river.

LESSON XLIV.
ew
new flew ask dear
mew face basket kitty
few cage meat girl
Here is a new basket for you, my
little girl.
A new basket ? What is in it ?
Look and see.
O father! a dear little white kitty!
She looks up into my face, and says
mew, mew, mew.
Teach that ew sounds the same as u.





THE FIRST READER. 51
She asks you for something to eat.
What shall I give her ?
O, a few bits of meat and a cup
of milk.
Father, when my bird first saw
the kitty he flew up and down in
his cage. What made him do so ?
Birds do not like cats.
I shall teach this new kitty to be
kind to my bird. Then he will like
her.

LESSON XL V
art yet odd head
part ail skin sleep
legs tail web flies
James has a new pet.
A new pet ? What can it be ?
Tell me what it is like.
I will tell you part, but not all;
and you can try to find out.
Has it legs ?






52 THE FIRST READER.
Well, it has legs, and yet they
are not like legs.
How odd! Has it wings?
Well, it has wings, and yet they
are not like wings.
That is still more odd. Has it a
tail ?
SWell, it has a tail,
and yet it is not like
: % _-- i. -_ a tail.
If it can fly, it
must be a bird.
It can fly; but it is not a bird.
What is it then ? I am sure I
cannot tell.
It is a bat. Did you ever see
one ? Its wings are made of bone
and skin, like a web.
It goes to sleep with its head
down. It eats flies. It will take
a fly from James, and lap milk
from his hand.






THE FIRST READER. 53

LESS XL VI.
sing bring strong poor
wing long hurt warm
thing song place badly

I have found a poor little bird.
His wing is hurt.
Bring the little thing to me. I
will put him in a warm place, and
feed him till he gets strong.
Will it be long before he gets
strong ?
No; his wing is not badly hurt.
I am glad I found the dear little
thing. When he gets well and
strong, he will sing us a song.
J'. J _- V .




v *






54 THE FIRST READER.
LESSON XL VII
ck qu
duck pick dark sank
ducks back quick think
necks backs quack green







Mother, see the ducks. __'
Yes; how pretty they are! Their
necks are dark green; their backs
are black and white.
If I stand on the rock, will they
pick corn from my hand?
Yes, I think so. Did you see that
duck sink into the water ?
Yes. Where is he ?





THE FIRST READER. 55
He will be back soon. He sees
something in the mud he wants to
pick up.
The other ducks see what he has
got, and they say, quack, quack,
quack!
That means, give me some, quick,
quick, quick!
I will go, duck, and get you some
corn, quick, quick, quick.


LESSON XL VIL
Z
buzz letter word before
Mamma, I can not tell the name
of this letter.
That is the letter z. You have
not seen it before.
If it is z, then I can tell what this
word is. It is spelt b-u-z-z buzz.
I hear a bee buzz.






56 THE FIRST READER.

LESSON XLIX.
REVIEW.
We had a picnic in the woods.
We each took a basket with
something good to eat. We sat
down under the pine trees to eat
our bread, meat, cake, and peaches.
We found a boat tied to an oak
tree. We got into it. We took the
oars and made foam in the water.
Then we got out of the boat and
had a run in the woods.
We heard a funny noise-quack,
quack, quack! We found it was
a lot of ducks. They came to eat
what we had let fall in the grass.
We gave them all the bits of
bread we had left in our baskets.
At last it was time to go home.
We all took home some moss and
ferns to our mothers.




















t ~-/








THE ALPHABET.

ROMAN LETTERS.
Aa J j Ss
Bb Kk Tt
c L I U u
Dd Mm V v
E e N n Ww
Ff 0 o Xx

Sg Pp Yy
Hh Qq Z z
Ii Rr &&

I. II. II. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X.
8










PART II.

STORIES AND POEMS.


STORY OF JOHN AND LIZZIE.

I.-JOHNf AND LIZZIE'S HOME.
THIS is the house where John
Brown and Lizzie Brown live.






Trees grow near the house. On
one of the trees is a swing. The
sun shines into the house all day.
It is a pretty home. John and
Lizzie love their home.
59






60 THE FIRST READER.

II.-JOHNJ AJND LIZZIE'S MOTHER.
JOHN and Lizzie go to school.
Their mother stays at home.
Mother makes bread. Mother
makes pies and cake.
She makes new coats for John.
She makes new dresses for Lizzie.







I -y "

When John and Lizzie come
"home from school, mother is at the
window.
John and Lizzie say, "There is
mother. We will not fret. We
will help mother all we can. Then
she will keep happy and well."






THE FIRST READER. 61

III.-JOHN AAND LIZZIE'S FATHER.
JOHN and Lizzie's father does
not stay in the house all day.
He goes out to the field.
He goes out to the woods.
He goes into the barn.
He works hard all day.
He comes v:..
home from his
work at night. :r !'
Lizzie says, ,
"O, papa, we
are so glad to
see you! Sup- ^i
per is on the --
table. I made the tea."
John says, Papa, you will
not have to bring in any wood
for mother to-night. I have put
enough in the wood-box to last
two days."






62 THE FIRST READER.

IV.-LIZZIE'S CAT.
LIZZIE has a cat. Lizzie does
not call her a cat. She calls her
kitty or puss.
Lizzie eats bread and meat. She
drinks milk.
Puss likes milk to drink.
Lizzie gives puss some milk to
drink every
day, and so
Spuss loves
Lizzie.
_- Sometimes
Lizzie says,
Here, kitty,
kitty, kitty!" Then kitty runs to
Lizzie.
Lizzie sits in her little rocking-
chair and takes kitty in her lap.
She rocks her to and fro and sings,
Hush, my dear, lie still and slumber."






THE FIRST READER. 63

V.-JOH'S .DOG.
JOHN calls his dog Jip.
Jip does not like milk to drink.
He likes bread and meat.
John says, "Come, Jip, beg for
your meat."
Jip stands on his hind legs and
says, "Bow, wow!" -
Then John gives
him his meat.
Jip and pussie are
good friends.
One day pussie '
killed a rat. She gave it to Jip.
Jip said, "Bow, wow! You are
very kind. You keep it, please,
and eat it.
Some day I will give you a bit
of my meat."
When they are tired of play they
go to sleep side by side on the rug.






64 THE FIRST READER.

VI.-JOHN" AND LIZZIE'S HESVS.
JOHN and Lizzie have some hens
to take care of.
Before they go to school they
each take a pail.
John puts corn in his pail.
Lizzie puts crumbs in her pail.
Then they go into the yard and
say, "Chick, chick, chick!"
Sl, 1 --,-"i i 1 1 I .
r, I 1 ii '
-Th-




The hens all run fist.
Each hen tries to get there first.
One hen is in a coop. She has
ten little chicks to take care of.
She can not run.
Lizzie says, "Here, poor hen, I
will give you all you can eat."






THE FIRST READER. 65

VII--THE COWS.
JOHN and Lizzie love to see father
milk the cows.
Father says they are good, kind
cows. Not one cow is cross.
One of the cows has a little calf.
John and Lizzie pat the calf,
and say,
"You dear o
bossy, we love
you. Will you -
come out into
the field and'
play with us?"
But Bossy keeps close to the
mother-cow.
The mother-cow has kind, brown
eyes.
Those kind, brown eyes seem to
say, "I thank you for loving my
baby."






66 THE FIRST READER.

VIII.-THE HORSE.
JOHN and Lizzie's father has a
horse. It is a gentle horse. He
never kicks. He never runs away.
He is a gray horse. He has a
long, white mane. He has a long,
white tail. His name is Mac.







John and Lizzie love to ride, on
Mac's back.
They would not dare to ride if
father were not near.
Father takes hold of Mac's head.
John holds the reins.
Lizzie holds on to John. They
will not fall off.






THE FIRST READER. 67

IX.-THE RABBITS.
NEAR the barn is a little house.
In the little house are four white
rabbits with pink eyes.
When they are hungry, they
watch for John and Lizzie.
They stand; -
on their hind _
legs. They put --
up their ears.
They seem
to say, "Hark!
do w'e not hear
John and Liz- -
zie coming to fisel1 us
John and Lizzie see the rabbits
when they are a long way off from
them.
Lizzie says, "Do see those dear
rabbits! They know it is time for
us to feed them."






68 THE FIRST READER.
John says, We will give them
a treat to-day. They shall have a
nice cabbage."
Lizzie says, "0, yes; they think
nothing is so nice as a cabbage."


I have told you about John and
Lizzie.
You have seen how kind they
are to the kitty, the dog, the cows,
the hens, and the rabbits.
If you will always be as kind,
every one will love you, and you
will love every one.
You will learn to love God, too;
for GOD IS LOVE.



01) ., .--:







THE FIRST READER. 69

















X.-THE DOG AND THE FROG.
I.
A PERT little frog
Sat under a log,
And dared not come out,
For fear of the dog.



The dog said, "Bow, wow!
0 do come out now."
"I won't," said the frog,
So don't make a row."






70 THE FIRST READER.
III.
Then off went the dog,
And left master frog;
And there you may find him,
Still under the log.

XL.-THE LITTLE CA.RT.
LITTLE boy, where did you get
your cart?"
My father gave it to me."
"Where did your father get that
cart ?"
I do not know where he got it."
Little boy, what did your father
give you that cart and that goat
for ?"
So that I might take my sister
and the baby out to ride."
Is that your sister in the cart,
little boy?"
Yes, that is my sister."
And, little boy, is that the baby






THE FIRST READER. 71
at the other end of the cart, next
the goat ?"
"Yes, that is the baby."








IL"
,, -- '








"And are you taking them out
to ride ?'
"Yes, I am taking them out to
ride."
Well, little boy, be careful. Do
not tip over the cart and hurt your
sister and the baby. So walk along,
Mr. Goat, walk along."






72 THE FIRST READER.

XII.-THE CHICKADEE.
I.
THERE'S a bird upon a tree,
And she seems to say,
"Come to me! 0 come to me !"
So I'll go that way.

II.
Little bird, what did you say?
What did you say to me ?
She flew off, saying, "Silly thing,
Only chickadee i"


XIII.-THE LOST COWS.
AT the close of a warm day,
James went to drive home the
cows.
He hunted for them an hour, but
could not find them. So lie went
home and said, "Father, the cows
are lost."
"The cows are lost ?" said his






THE FIRST READER. 73
father. "Where did you look for
them ?"
I looked in the pasture and up
and down the road," said James.
"It is very strange," said his
father. I hope they have not
gone far."
"Father," said Cora, "let me go
out with James, and hunt."
"Very well," said father. "Don't
be gone very long, for it will soon
be dark."
So Cora and James went out to
look for the cows.
"Perhaps they have gone over
that bridge," said Cora.
"Perhaps they have," said James.
So they went on to the bridge.
"This is a pretty place," said
Cora. "Father gave me a sail here
once."
"Yes, and I had a swim in the






74 THE FIRST READER.
river once," said James. "Father
was with me, so I was not afraid."
"Look! look!" said Cora.

I .,
-












Where ?" said James.
"Down the river, under the trees."
I say! There are our two cows
now! 0 you naughty cows, what
a chase you have given me!"
Never mind," said Cora; "they
will give us good milk for supper."
"Then they drove the cows home.







THE FIRST READER. 75

XIV.--THE WIJVD.
I.
I AM the wind,
And I come very fast;
Through the tall wood
1 blow a loud blast.

II.
Sometimes I am soft
As a sweet, gentle child,
I play with the flowers,
Am quiet and mild.

III.
And then out so loud
All at once I can roar,
If you wish to be quiet,
Close window and door.

IV.
I am the wind,
And I come very fast,
Through the tall wood
I blow a loud blast.






76 THE FIRST READER.

XV.-FIDO 7IN THE WOODS.
"DoG, pretty dog, what is your
name ?"
"My name is Fido."

















Who is your master ?"
"My master is a boy, and his
name is George."
Where is your master George ?"






THE FIRST READER. 77
"He is somewhere in these
woods, and I cannot find him."
Why do you not run about
and look until you find him ?"
"I have been running all about,
and I cannot find him any where."
Why do you not bark ?"
I have been barking till I am
tired."
How came you and your mas-
ter George out in the woods ?"
"We came out to take a walk
with some boys."
"And how came you to lose
your master ?"
I ran into the bushes to catch
a little bird, and when I went back
into the path, he was gone."
I am sorry you went away after
the little birds. But come with us,
and we will help you find your
master George."





78 THE FIRST READER.
XVI.-LITTLE GEORGE AJVD THE DOVES.
LITTLE George is four years old.
One day he said, Mamma, I want
to go and see the doves! May I ?"
"Yes," said Mamma.
"And may Grace go too ?"
"Yes," said Mamma; I am glad
you want Grace to go."
Then George said, "Crumbs,
Mamma! Crumbs! I must have
some crumbs to give the doves !"
"So you must," said Mamma.
I will get some for him," said
Grace.
Thank you," said Mamma.
So Grace ran and filled a basket
with crumbs. She poured half of
them into George's apron.
The doves were on the barn.
When they saw George and Grace
and Mamma they were very glad.
One dove said, "I am going down






THE FIRST READER. 79
to see those good, kind friends."
And down he flew.
Another dove said, I am going,
too." And down he flew.
Soon, all the doves flew down.
Grace threw some crumbs on
the ground. Then she said, Here
dove, dove, dove!"
She stooped down, and two doves
ate out of her hand.
Then one little white dove said,
"I know where the best crumbs
are!" and he flew up and picked
the crumbs from George's apron.
This pleased George very much.
He looked up into his Mamma's
face and said, "Mamma, this little
dove knows I will not hurt him !"
Who is most happy, little George,
or Grace, or Mamma ? George says
the -doves are the most happy. I
am sure I cannot tell.






80 THE FIRST READER.













I.
0 LOOK at my kite,
In its airy flight, '',
How gayly it flies,
Right up to the ski. -
II.
Pretty kite, pretty kite,
In your airy flight.
What do you spy,
In the bright blue sky ?
III.
I wish I were you,
To be there, too!
0, then, how soon
I would peep at the moon,






THE FIRST READER. 81
IV.
And see the man there,
Who gives me a stare
When I look up at night
At his beautiful light!


XVIII.-HOW THE CAT SA VED THE HOUSE.
ONE day my cat ran up stairs to
the room where Jane was, and
cried "Mew! mew! mew!"
What can the cat want ?" said
Jane. "The cat knows that she
must not run up stairs."
So Jane went to the door; and,
when the cat saw her, it said
"Mew! mew mew!" more and
more loud.
Then she ran to the top of the
stairs, and said Mew! mew!
mew !" as if she would like to say
"Come! Come as fast as you can!"
Jane went with the cat; and
6






82 THE FIRST READER.
when Jane came to the room down
stairs what do you think she saw?
The stand on which
I -- i 1 1, t- ii tH| 1 .l e
SK 'll:)s t<., dry, lay o-,,i
"" i d f h |iiiire, till s1.e
;''--. : "
"r' W --' t'I "- ',i
on fire, as ell as the caps.

_.- _.-
A





So, if the cat had not run fast,
and said "Mew! mew! mew !" to
Jane, the house would have been
on fire, as well as the caps.
Was not that a good cat, to run
so fast to tell Jane ?






THE FIRST READER. 83
XIX.-THE BOAT SAILING A WAJF.
ONCE I knew a boy who took
a walk on the sea shore with his
father.
While they were there, the boy's
father said, Do you see those men
getting into the boat ?"
Yes, sir," said the boy.
"You see, too, that they are
large men, and that it is a large
boat?"
"Yes, sir," said the boy.
"Well," said his father, "now
we will watch them, and when
they go away, they will seem to
grow smaller and smaller. When
they are a great way off' on the
water, they will look very small
indeed."
So the boy and his father stood
still and watched them as they
sailed away.





84 THE FIRST READER.
The boat began to look smaller
and smaller, and the men began to
look smaller and smaller.
At last, when the boat was a
great way off, it was just as his











father had said: the boat and the
men seemed very small indeed.
So things always look small
when they are a great way off.

















i- I i-




t >7,/ 'n
'^^ :-._- .. l -_--

i^ -

i
,
< -- ", 3








THE ALPHABET.

SCRIPT LETTERS.





/(7 4 6
CA /i


t6/


o(






THE FL.-T READER. 87
LESS IL
at cat hat rat
al c1a/ /va// al
an can as has


he me see tree


LESSON II.
it hit is his
z/ I/ /u4/
in pin fin him




i1//
on not or0 for


ox box fox lot
e <74 4 ~/






88 THE FIRST READER.
LESSON III.
no so go to


sun run fun nut


lad had and hand


LESSON IV.
bee beet feet feed


set let pet hen


ill till hill will
*i/ / ./.. / */ //

fish dish wish swim
1/4*l Wl l 1 /






THE FIRST READER. 89
LESSOR V.
hot top log dog


bit sit big pig


cap lap clap wax


LESSON fI.
ell cell tell well


make rake late slate


mile mine fine shine


nice time ride like
nicua '-e U /^






90 'THE FIRST READER.
LESSON VII.
my by fly dry


try sky say may


hay day way play


LESSON VIII.
men get egg went


ten then red step


car far star part

name pale tae mae
name pale take made
qacwm. /ad a/I. lnava






THE FIRST READER. 91
LESSON IX.
hope rope home hold


fix six did still


all ball fall tall


LESSON X.
men left send best
11w -1 d16I11 -(I/
help sled went web


cure pure pale came


ever never over under
eeiX w2'Zi ~ 6&2i/6i






92 THE FIRST READER.
LESSON XI
now how down brown


but house found round


boy toy ahoy spoil
7 67 / 7

LESSON XII.
look took foot book


noon soon boots brook


good woods cool school


noise spoil think thank

In~d- 4WU~ kWMW CAa^/






THE FIRST READER. 93
LESSON XIII.
tea eat seat leaf


each reach teach peach


her fern fur curl



LESSON XIV.
stir bird girl hurt


oar oak boat coat


load foam board float


new mew few flew

^4 -mW-e.^ c6






94 THE FIRST READER.
LESSON XV.
sees green sleep cheese


ring sing wing bring


thing long song strong


LESSON XVI.
sang bit ship skin


art part ask basket


meat dear ail tail
btals aat auz sun
but must buzz sunk
hi /di 4 au






THE FIRST READER. 95
LESSONr XVII.
duck ducks neck necks


pick sick back milk


quick quack chick wings


LESSONS XVIII.
face place plate cage


up us rub drum


lot toss moss corn


hot doll tops from
41 4/4 A 111n






96 THE FIRST READER.

LESSON XIX.







/ d
















?





IZY/ 'mnY / y /
*i.-fy-v-^e dc~u Cwazt^e/^









COWPERTHWAIT d CO.'S EDUCATIONAL SERIES.

HAGAR'S

SERIES OF ARITHMETICS.

I. Hagar's Primary Lessons in Numbers, $0.30
II. Hagar's Elementary Arithmetic, .50
III. Hagar's Common School Arithmetic, .I.oo
THIS Series, prepared by Prof. D. B. HAGAR, M. A., Principalofthe Massa-
chksetts State Normal School, at Salem,contains many new and valuable features.
Mental and Written Exercises are combined in each Book of the Series; and
their arrangement is such that the Primary Lessons and the Elementary
Arithmetic form an Abridged Course,-the Primary Lessons and
the Common School Arithmetic form a Full Course,-each course
complete in Two Books.
No other Series is so economical of the time of the student, or so practical
and thorough in its teaching. Methods and Processes, such as are
now used by Business Men, are presented instead of those hitherto known
only in the School Room; the Problems are numerous and varied; the books
are profusely illustrated with the finest wood-cuts; and they are admitted to
be the Handsomest Books of their Class ever published.

GREENE'S
NEW SERIES OF GRAMMARS.
I. Greene's New Introduction,. $0.56
II. Greene's New English Grammar, 1.05
III Greene's New Analysis of the English Language, 1.20
THESE Books now form a complete and permanent Series, adapted to the
different grades of city and country schools ; but each book may be used inde-
pendently of the others. The author, Prof. S. S. GREENE, of Brown Uni-
versity, has completed the revisions, and has
Condensed, Simplified, and Otherwise Improved
his system, which is so favorably known throughout thecountry. It is believed
that these improved books are now far in advance of all others.
The Success of Greene's Grammars,
since their revision, is wholly unprecedented. They are already used in a large
proportion of the leading Cities, from Maine to California, in three-fourths
of the Normal Schools of the United States, and have recently been
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