• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 The Chinese boy
 Shut your eyes, and open your...
 Cradle song
 The man in the moon
 Old man of Grenada
 The little men
 Daddy longlegs
 The kings, queens, and knaves
 If you go to Rome
 The kite
 The little boy's pocket
 The drummer boy
 Donnybrook fair
 Rip Van Winkle
 Simple Dick
 Trot, trot
 The monkey and the pussy cat
 Multiplication
 The old woman spinning
 The old man and the bachelor
 If I were a king
 The raindrop
 The bull-frog
 The bear
 The five little mice
 The frogs
 The chimes
 Yankee Doodle
 King Charlie
 The finger mice
 The old gray owl
 The eagle and the lion
 Baker, a loaf of bread
 The locomotive
 Redbreast and cuckoo
 Paddy O'Flynn
 Little curly-head
 The grasshopper
 How much, and how many
 The kitchen party
 My wife Peggy
 The circus
 Only two eyes
 The little fish
 The Atlantic Cable
 Old grandmother Jolly
 King Alfred
 Doctor MacFeeden
 Learning to skate
 The mill-stream
 The lost lamb
 Won't I, and I won't
 The Indian squaw
 Old Tecumseh
 Widow McCree
 The kilkenny cats
 The mermaid
 Tabby and Tom
 Queen Bess
 The dancing pigs
 The menagerie
 Rickety racket
 The wounded dove
 Winter
 Towser and pussy
 Christmas
 The sandman
 Mrs. Dougherty
 The three little bats
 The donkey
 Piggy in trouble
 Up in a balloon
 The stolen nest
 The hungry mouse
 Diogenes
 Piggy in the barber's shop
 The three little whales
 Tit for tat
 The rainbow
 The honey-bees
 A visit to fairy-land
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: The nursery rattle : for little folks
Title: The nursery rattle
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026958/00001
 Material Information
Title: The nursery rattle for little folks
Physical Description: 136 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 21 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Huber, Anne L
Faber, Hermann ( Engraver )
Claxton, Remsen & Haffelfinger ( Publisher )
J. Fagan & Son ( Printer )
Publisher: Claxton, Remsen & Haffelfinger
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Manufacturer: Electrotyped by J. Fagan & Son
Publication Date: 1873, c1873
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Indians of North America -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1873   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1873
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Anne L. Huber ; with twelve superb chromolithographic illustrations, from designs by Hermann Faber.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026958
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002231920
notis - ALH2308
oclc - 13705894
lccn - ca 17001335

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    List of Illustrations
        Page 8
    The Chinese boy
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Shut your eyes, and open your mouth
        Page 12
    Cradle song
        Page 13
    The man in the moon
        Page 14
    Old man of Grenada
        Page 14
    The little men
        Page 15
    Daddy longlegs
        Page 15
    The kings, queens, and knaves
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    If you go to Rome
        Page 20
    The kite
        Page 21
    The little boy's pocket
        Page 22
    The drummer boy
        Page 22
    Donnybrook fair
        Page 23
    Rip Van Winkle
        Page 23
    Simple Dick
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Trot, trot
        Page 29
    The monkey and the pussy cat
        Page 30
    Multiplication
        Page 31
    The old woman spinning
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    The old man and the bachelor
        Page 35
    If I were a king
        Page 36
    The raindrop
        Page 37
    The bull-frog
        Page 38
    The bear
        Page 39
    The five little mice
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The frogs
        Page 46
    The chimes
        Page 47
    Yankee Doodle
        Page 48
    King Charlie
        Page 49
    The finger mice
        Page 49
    The old gray owl
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    The eagle and the lion
        Page 54
    Baker, a loaf of bread
        Page 54
    The locomotive
        Page 55
    Redbreast and cuckoo
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Paddy O'Flynn
        Page 58
    Little curly-head
        Page 59
    The grasshopper
        Page 59
    How much, and how many
        Page 60
        Page 61-62
    The kitchen party
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    My wife Peggy
        Page 67
    The circus
        Page 68
    Only two eyes
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    The little fish
        Page 71
    The Atlantic Cable
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Old grandmother Jolly
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    King Alfred
        Page 79
    Doctor MacFeeden
        Page 80
    Learning to skate
        Page 80
    The mill-stream
        Page 81
    The lost lamb
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Won't I, and I won't
        Page 88
    The Indian squaw
        Page 88
    Old Tecumseh
        Page 89
    Widow McCree
        Page 90
    The kilkenny cats
        Page 90
    The mermaid
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
    Tabby and Tom
        Page 94
    Queen Bess
        Page 95
    The dancing pigs
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    The menagerie
        Page 99
    Rickety racket
        Page 100
    The wounded dove
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
    Winter
        Page 106
    Towser and pussy
        Page 107
    Christmas
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
    The sandman
        Page 112
    Mrs. Dougherty
        Page 113
    The three little bats
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
    The donkey
        Page 119
    Piggy in trouble
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
    Up in a balloon
        Page 123
    The stolen nest
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
    The hungry mouse
        Page 128
    Diogenes
        Page 128
    Piggy in the barber's shop
        Page 129
    The three little whales
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
    Tit for tat
        Page 132
    The rainbow
        Page 132
    The honey-bees
        Page 133
    A visit to fairy-land
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text










......





























































The Baldwin Library
Univemity
Rmtido

















*S























,:' '
46









- ,uu s |
L











THE



NURSERY RATTLE.


FOR LITTLE FOLKS.


BY
ANNE L. HUBER.


ith lvlrct inprb [hiromo- tltognph ic |itratinn,
FROM DESIGNS BY HERMANN FABER.




.,> ,(-.'/, -.


PHILADELPHIA:
CLAXTON, REMSEN & HAFFELFINGER.
1873.



































Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1872, by
CLAXTON, REMSEN & HAFFELFINGER,
in the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington.


ELECTROTYPED BY J, PAGAN & SON, PHILADELPHIA.



















'A"






















PAGE
THE CHINESE BOY, 9
SHUT YOUR EYES AND OPEN YOUR MOUTH, 12
CRADLE SONG, 13
OLD MAN OF GRANADA, 14
THE LITTLE MEN, 15
DADDY LONGLEGS, 15
THE KINGS, QUEENS, AND KNAVES, 16
IF YOU GO TO ROME, 20
THE KITE, 21
THE LITTLE BOY'S POCKET, 22
THE DRUMMER-BOY, 22
DONNYBROOK FAIR, .. 23
RIP VAN WINKLE, 23
SIMPLE DICK, 24
TROT, TROT, 29
THE MONKEY AND THE PUSSY-CAT, 30
MULTIPLICATION, 31
THE OLD WOMAN SPINNING, 32
THE OLD MAID AND BACHELOR,. 35
IF I WERE A KING 36
THE RAINDROP, 37
THE BULL-FROG, 38
THE BEAR, 39
THE FIVE LITTLE MICE, .40 ,.

5













CONTENTS.


PAGE
THE FROGS, .46
THE CHIMES, 47
YANKEE DOODEE, .. 48
KING CHARLIE, .49
THE FINGER MICE, .. 49
THE OLD GRAY OWL,. ......50
THE EAGIE AND THE LION, ...... 54
BAKER, A LOAF OF BREAD, 54
THE LOCOMOTIVE, 55
REDBREAST AND CUCKOO, 56
PADDY O'FLYNN, .. 58
LITTLE CURLY-HEAD, 59
THE GRASSHOPPER, .. .. .59
How MUCH, AND How MANY, .......60
THE KITCHEN PARTY, .. 63
MY WIFE PEGGY, .. 67
THE CIRCUS, 68
ONLY Two EYES, . 68
TIE LITTLE FISH, 71
THE ATLANTIC CABLE,. .. 72
OLD GRANDMOTHER JOLLY, 75
KING ALFRED, 79
DR. MACFEEDEN, .. 80
LEARNING TO SKATE, .So
TIHE MILL STREAM, 8I
THE LOST LAMB,. .82
SWON'T I, AND I WON'T, 88
THE INDIAN SQUAW, .88 "*'




\r














CONTENTS.


PAGE
OLD TECUMSEH, 89
WIDOW MCCREE, 90
THE KILKENNY CATS, 90
THE MERMAID, 91
TABBY AND TOM, 94
QUEEN BESS, 95
THE DANCING PIGS, 96
THE MENAGERIE, 99
RICKETY RACKET, I00
THE WOUNDED DOVE,. .. 1OI
WINTER, .. 106
TOWSER AND PUSSY, .107
CHRISTMAS, 108
THE SANDMAN, 112
MRS. DOUGHERTY, 113
THE THREE LITTLE BATS, .114
THE DONKEY, 119
PIGGY IN TROUBLE, 120
UP IN A BALLOON, 123
THE STOLEN NEST, .124
THE HUNGRY MOUSE, 128
DIOGENES, 128
PIGGY IN THE BARBER'S SHOP, 129
THE THREE LITTLE WHALES, ... 29
TIT FOR TAT, 132
THE RAINBOW, .. .. .132
THE HONEY-BEES, 133
THE VISIT TO FAIRY-LAND, 134





















ri Ot ifU.-t




PAGE
THE CHINESE BOY 9

THE KNAVE OF HEARTS. 17

SIMPLE DICIK .. .25 !

THE FIVE LITTLE MICE 41

THE KITCHEN PARTY .. ...62

THE CIRCUS 69

THE TABBY CAT'S PARTY ..... .74

THE LOST LAMB 83

THE MENAGERIE ,. 98

CHRISTMAS EVE o09

THE THREE LITTLE BATS 115

PIGGY IN TROUBLE .121




P& ;



















THE

NURSERY RATTLE.



THE CHINESE BOY.

HERE was a little Chinese boy,
Named Tanky, Anky, Danky;
He weighed almost nothing at all,
He was so lean and lanky.

His trousers were of nankeen fine,
His jacket silk so red,
And a pretty little velvet cap
He wore upon his head.
9










THE NURSERY RATTLE.


When he went out to take a walk,
Upon a windy day,
He tied himself to his puppy's tail,
To keep from blowing away.


One day the wind was very high,
And broke the string in two,
And away went Tanky in the air,
Spite of all that he could do.


Up higher, and still higher,
Oh, far above the town;
Sometimes his heels were uppermost,
And sometimes they were down.


His velvet cap fell off his head,
His jacket split in two,
And Tanky, almost dead with fright,
Did not know what to do.

Io









THE NURSERY RATTLE.


Oh! then the little puppy dog
Began to yelp and cry,
To see his master whirling
Up in the air so high.


On top of the high church-steeple,
Tanky Anky lodged at last,
And close around the weather-cock
He held his arms tight fast.


The weather-cock turned round and round,
But Tanky held on tight,
And to the gaping crowd he called
For help, with all his might.


But he soon got very tired,
And his strength began to fail;
Just then a boy's kite flew that way,
And he caught it by the tail.

II










THE NURSERY RATTLE.
N S Y R --LW
Very slowly and quite gently,
The kite brought him to the ground,
And puppy frisked and danced for joy,
To see him safe and sound.

Then Tanky tied the broken string,
And homeward went his way,
And thought he never more would walk
Upon a windy day.


SHUT YOUR EYES, AND OPEN YOUR
MOUTH:
Wooden nutmegs and hams,
And sawdust pies;
Come shut up your mouth,
And open your eyes.

Pineapples and oranges,
Brought from the South;
Come shut up your eyes,
And open your mouth.
12









THE NURSERY RATTLE.


CRADLE SONG.

Rock- a bye, baby,
Fall gently to sleep,
While angels above thee
Their loving watch keep.

The daylight has gone,
The stars are on high,
Then go to sleep, baby,
Hush, hush, a bye-bye.

The birds are asleep,
Their heads under their wing;
Then hush a bye, baby,
While softly I sing.

Oh! sweet be thy dreams,
And calm thy repose;
Then go to sleep, baby,
Those soft eyelids close.

13









rw^- -Z---
THE NURSERY RATTLE.


THE MAN IN THE MOON.
The man in the moon
Was married last June,
And a beautiful star was his bride.
Away up on high,
In the bright blue sky,
She glitters and shines by his side.

On that wedding night,
The stars came out bright,
And they sparkled and twinkled with glee;
A meteor flew by,
Across the blue sky,
And took the news over the sea.


OLD MAN OF GRENADA.
There was an old man of Grenada,
And all he lived on was panada,
He looked very pale,
Was as thin as a rail,
This little old man of Grenada.
14









rw^- -Z---
THE NURSERY RATTLE.


THE MAN IN THE MOON.
The man in the moon
Was married last June,
And a beautiful star was his bride.
Away up on high,
In the bright blue sky,
She glitters and shines by his side.

On that wedding night,
The stars came out bright,
And they sparkled and twinkled with glee;
A meteor flew by,
Across the blue sky,
And took the news over the sea.


OLD MAN OF GRENADA.
There was an old man of Grenada,
And all he lived on was panada,
He looked very pale,
Was as thin as a rail,
This little old man of Grenada.
14










THE NURSE R Y RA TITLE.


THE LITTLE MEN.
Little Tommy Snooks,
And tiny Bobby Green,
Were the smallest men
That ever had been seen.

In a cup of water,
Little Tom was drowned,
And in the meadow grass,
Bob was lost and never found.



DADDY LONGLEGS.
A big old daddy longlegs
Creeping on the wall,
I wish that he would go away,
I don't like him at all.

I know he will not hurt me,
But I don't want him here;
So get you gone, old daddy,
And don't come again so near.

I5










THE NURSE R Y RA TITLE.


THE LITTLE MEN.
Little Tommy Snooks,
And tiny Bobby Green,
Were the smallest men
That ever had been seen.

In a cup of water,
Little Tom was drowned,
And in the meadow grass,
Bob was lost and never found.



DADDY LONGLEGS.
A big old daddy longlegs
Creeping on the wall,
I wish that he would go away,
I don't like him at all.

I know he will not hurt me,
But I don't want him here;
So get you gone, old daddy,
And don't come again so near.

I5









, THE NURSERY RATTLE.


THE KINGS, QUEENS, AND KNAVES.
The King of Clubs,
He made some tubs,
And filled them full of water;
The Knave of Clubs,
He took the tubs,
And gave them to his daughter.

The Queen of Clubs
Wanted the tubs,
To do her washing in;
She told the Knave,
He must behave,
And raised an awful din.

The King of Hearts,
He bought some carts,
And put them in the shed;
The Knave of Hearts,
He stole the carts,
Before he went to bed.


~t~x=-_*




































a,,





,s 4l~;~i~i~~~*..~i~;












THE NURSERY RATTLE.


The Queen of Hearts,
She wished the carts
To take a ride on Monday;
To the Knave she said,
I'll cut off your head,
If they're not back by Sunday.


The King of Spades,-
He sent some maids,
To wait upon the Queen;
The Knave of Spades,
He kissed the maids, -
When he thought he was n't seen.


The Queen of Spades
Said to the maids,
I am quite ashamed of you;
The Knave, who was by,
Said, So am I,
If the dreadful tale is true.
19









THE NURSER Y RA TITLE.


The King of Diamonds
Loved Miss Simonds,
And gave her a lock of hair.
The Knave of Diamonds
Watched Miss Simonds,
And told it everywhere.


The Queen of Diamonds
Sent for Miss Simonds,
And said, Young woman, beware.
Your Majesty,
Said the Knave in glee,
Make her give up the lock of hair.




IF YOU GO TO ROME.
Now if you go to Rome,
Do just as the Romans do;
And when you go to Turkey,
You must be a turkey too.
U u 20










THE NURSERY RATTLE.


THE KITE.

Hodge podge!
0 come let us lodge,
Said the flying kite to the string.
Odds dobbs!
Cried the tail with the bobs,
You shall not do any such thing.


No tricks!
Cried all of the sticks,
Look out for the telegraph wire.
That's right,
Said the boy with the kite,
Blow wind, and take it up higher.




Franklin flew a kite on high,
And brought the lightning from the sky.

21










THE NURSER Y RA TITLE.


THE LITTLE BOY'S POCKET.
Starry, fiery, long-tailed rocket,
What does the little boy keep in his pocket?
A pair of mittens, with ragged thumbs,
A half-eaten cracker, and many crumbs;
A handkerchief that once had been white,
Some paper to make new tails for his kite;
A broken knife, with part of a blade,
A whistle some other boy has made;
A marble, a top, two dirty strings,
A button, a ball, and some other things.
And is that all he keeps in his pocket,
Starry, fiery, long-tailed rocket?


THE DRUMMER BOY.
Te rum, a dum, dum,
Here's a boy with a drum,
And his cheeks are as bright as the roses;
The cap on his head,
And his jacket, are red,
S And he comes from among the Blue-noses.
22










THE NURSER Y RA TITLE.


THE LITTLE BOY'S POCKET.
Starry, fiery, long-tailed rocket,
What does the little boy keep in his pocket?
A pair of mittens, with ragged thumbs,
A half-eaten cracker, and many crumbs;
A handkerchief that once had been white,
Some paper to make new tails for his kite;
A broken knife, with part of a blade,
A whistle some other boy has made;
A marble, a top, two dirty strings,
A button, a ball, and some other things.
And is that all he keeps in his pocket,
Starry, fiery, long-tailed rocket?


THE DRUMMER BOY.
Te rum, a dum, dum,
Here's a boy with a drum,
And his cheeks are as bright as the roses;
The cap on his head,
And his jacket, are red,
S And he comes from among the Blue-noses.
22





V.




THE NURSERY RATTLE.


DONNYBROOK FAIR.
Paddy O'Rafferty
Went to Donnybrook fair,
With shilalah in hand.
And what got he there ?

A pair of black eyes,
And a broken head;
Och! it's only a thrifle,
Paddy O'Rafferty said.



RIP VAN WINKLE.
Rip Van Winkle, with his dog Wolf,
Went out gunning one day,
And among the Catskill Mountains
Slept for twenty years they say.

When he awoke, 'twas in the spot
Where years before he stood,
His old dog Wolf was dead and gone,
And his gun was nix for good.
23





V.




THE NURSERY RATTLE.


DONNYBROOK FAIR.
Paddy O'Rafferty
Went to Donnybrook fair,
With shilalah in hand.
And what got he there ?

A pair of black eyes,
And a broken head;
Och! it's only a thrifle,
Paddy O'Rafferty said.



RIP VAN WINKLE.
Rip Van Winkle, with his dog Wolf,
Went out gunning one day,
And among the Catskill Mountains
Slept for twenty years they say.

When he awoke, 'twas in the spot
Where years before he stood,
His old dog Wolf was dead and gone,
And his gun was nix for good.
23









THE NURSERY RATTLE.


SIMPLE DICK.
Simple Dick went to the barn- yard,
To milk the cow, one day;
But when he walked up to Sukey,
Old Sukey walked away.


At last he tied her to the fence,
And sat down with his pail;
But she kicked it over with her foot,
And slapped him with her tail.


Then she got loose and chased him round,
And tossed him over the wall;
But he fell plump into the mud,
And was not hurt at all.


Poor Dick crawled out as best he could,
All dirt from heels to head;
And when his mother saw his plight,
She sent him off to bed.
S24





























oa* 00---',Zl:,


WON










A,7%













THE NURSERY RA TITLE.


One day he thought to take a ride,
And tried to mount the goat;
But she butted Dick with all her might,
And tore his Sunday coat.


He tried to make the chickens swim,
But very soon he found,
That they all to the bottom went;
And thus they all were drowned.


One day, he found upon a tree
An ugly-looking bat;
Oh, what a pretty bird! said he,
I'll put it in my hat.


It made no noise, and kept so still,
Dick thought it must be dead,
So the poor, half-witted fellow
Put the hat upon his head.

27










THE NURSERY RATTLE.


At home, when he took off his hat,
The bat stuck to his hair;
And his mother, who was frightened,
Said, Dick, what have you there?


Nothing but a little birdie,
'Tis pretty too, he said;
And he sat down and raised his hand,
To take it from his head.


The bat held tight fast to his hair,
And he could not get it out;
And it bit him through the fingers,
Till with pain he danced about.


His mother took a pair of tongs,
And caught it by the wings;
And when it squeaked, poor Dickey cried,
0 mother, how it sings!

28










THE NURSERY RATTLE.


If his mother kept him in-doors,
And made him rock the cradle,
He would pinch the baby's fingers,
And spank it with the ladle.

At last she sent him off to school,
But it was of no use;
For Simple Dickey could not learn,
And he was called a goose.



TROT, TROT.
Trot, trot on horseback,
We're going to the Fair;
Trot a little faster,
The sooner we'll be there.

I want to buy a trumpet,
I want to buy a drum;
And when the Fair is over,
On a gallop we will come.
29










THE NURSERY Y RA TITLE.








THE MONKEY AND THE PUSSY CAT.

A monkey and a pussy cat
Were married one fine night;
But before a week was over,
The bride and groom did fight.


The monkey bit the pussy's tail,
And slapped her with his paws;
And pussy spit with all her might,
And scratched him with her claws.


So pussy ran away from him,
And led a single life;
But monkey did not care at all,
And got another wife.

30









THE NURSER Y RA TTLE. L



MULTIPLICATION.

Twice one are two,
A stocking and a shoe.

Twice two are four,
Three keys and a door.

Twice three are six,
Two drums and four sticks.

Twice four are eight,
Seven bars and a gate.

Twice five are ten,
Nine chicks and the hen.







yi~s^ -









THE NURSERY RATTLE.


THE OLD WOMAN SPINNING.

A little old woman was spinning
By the fire-side all alone;
And the crickets were loudly chirping
Under the big hearth-stone.

Close beside her was old tabby cat,
Snugly curled all round in a heap;
And stretched before the blazing fire,
Lay old Towser fast asleep.

The kettle was hissing and steaming,
All ready to make her tea,
And this little old woman, spinning,
Was as happy as she could be.

At last the old woman got tired
Of turning the wheel around;
She shut her eyes, and folded her hands,
And soon she was sleeping sound.

LSfe -Gii










THE NUlS-ER Y RA TITLE.


With her head on the back of the chair,
She slept an hour or more;
And roused up both Towser and pussy,
So loudly did she snore.


Pussy thought it was past supper time,
And wanted her milk and bread;
Old Towser felt very hungry,
And wondered when he would be fed.


Now the dog thought that his mistress
Was taking a very long nap;
And pussy cat tried to awake her,
By jumping up in her lap.


But still the old woman slept soundly,
And snored as loud as before;
So Towser and pussy kept quiet
For twenty minutes or more.
,33










THE NURSERY RATTLE.


Then old Tabby began to miaou,
The dog gave a growl and a bark;
And up jumped the little old woman,
And found they were all in the dark.


As soon as the candle was lighted,
Then the old woman could see,
And she moved around very briskly,
And quickly she made the tea.


When the tea was put on the table,
With bread, sweet milk, and cold meat,
The three all sat down together,
And all had plenty to eat.


As soon as the supper was over,
The old woman took up the light,
Curtsied, and said to her cat and dog,
I wish you a very good night.

34









THE NURSERY RATTLE.


Then she went to her own little room,
Her night-cap she put on her head;
Undressed herself, and put out the light,
And soon was asleep in her bed.






THE OLD MAID AND BACHELOR.

A little old maid,
Crabbed and crusty,
Married a bachelor,
Old, rusty, and fusty.



They lived in an old house,
High up in the garret;
She had a pet cat,
And he had a parrot.

35










THE NURSERY RATTLE. ^
' J ---------------------------- -------------- '..








IF I WERE A KING.

If I were a king,
You should have a gold ring,
And sit on the throne by my side;
Large diamonds to wear,
And pearls for your hair,
And plenty of horses to ride.


If I were a queen,
On your arm I would lean,
And give you my heart, and my hand;
With me you should dine,
And have plenty of wine,
And you should be king of the land.

36










THE NUR.SER Y RA TITLE.


THE RAINDROP.
Glittering like a diamond bright,
And pattering on my pane,
Do tell me, where you come from,
You little drop of rain?

I come from the heavy clouds,
That are floating up so high,
And from your childish gaze
Hide the beautiful blue sky.

Now tell me of what use you are,
And who 'tis sends you here?
Dropping gently to the ground,
Just like a falling tear.

O yes, my little darling,
I will tell you all I know,
'Tis God, who sends me down here,
To make the flowers grow.
37










THE NURSERY RA TITLE.


I fall into the streamlets,
And keep them ever flowing,
And as they pass the mill,
They set the mill-wheel going.

Then the miller grinds his corn,
And makes flour every day.
And now, my little darling,
That is all I have to say.

----- ow'

THE BULL-FROG.
A big green bull-frog,
Sitting on a stone;
He had better hurry off,
For his children are alone.

One wants meat,
And one wants bread,
And one turned a somerset,
And broke his little head.

38









-------------------^ 21^~~
THE7 NURSERY RATTLE. T



THE BEAR.

Old Mrs. Bruin, the big fat bear,
Sent for the barber to curl her hair;
The tongs were so hot, they burnt her skin,
Oh! what a rage Mrs. Bruin was in.

She shook her head, and clapped her paws,
Rolled up her eyes, and wagged her jaws;
The barber, almost dead with fright,
Started, and ran with all his might.

When he reached his home, he rushed up-stairs,
As if behind him were twenty bears;
Without undressing, he went to bed,
And pulled the blankets over his head.


t3. ,, ,r










THE NURSER Y RA TTL E.


THE FIVE LITTLE MICE.

Five little mice were up in a barn,
Playing some merry game,
And these little mice had been christened,
And each little mouse had a name.

First there was Fleet-Foot the oldest son,
Who was so nimble and quick,
He always was sent for the doctor,
When any of them were sick.

Then there was dear little Frisker,
Who frolicked so much all day,
That often before it was dark,
He fell fast asleep in the hay.

The third one was named Little Squeaky,
With a voice so loud and shrill,
That the poor old nervous mother-mouse
Was frequently made quite ill.
40
















ii.


i nf ST i sa c 81 ,8 :" :;
"ii L 3Y"a

c\



I
:
i
L
i
";"`
I. tr
'"
: I LLlt

;i'
'b'
I'
::a















t


r-T ci :a. tu4i u
: .rit.r- i ` rj;;-:



-c i






;'.; "*
:t : ..*. d r:;j ,.












ry^===-==-- -------c---;i^-;it
THE NURSERY RATTLE.


Next came the little rogue Sly-Boots,
Who arose at early dawn,
And kept the table well supplied,
By stealing grain and corn.


The name of the youngest was Bright-Eyes,
His mother's dear darling pet,
And when he could not have his way,
He would always cry and fret.


While they were playing so gaily,
And tossing the new-mown hay,
In came the farmer's big pussy,
And frightened them all away.


Oh! how they all scampered and ran,
To get quickly out of her sight,
They scattered in different directions,
17 Trembling all over with fright.


44 1- ---










THE NURSERY RA TITLE.


Some ran to hide in the corn-crib,
And some ran into the stable,
While pussy-cat ran after them
As fast as she was able.


Frisker, as quick as a lightning-flash,
Jumped into a hole in the wall,
And when old pussy turned her head,
He crept in the horse's stall.


Little Squeaky squealed with all his might,
And tumbled heels over head,
And when at last he reached his home,
He hid himself under the bed.


Sly-Boots crawled under a bag of oats,
Where pussy-cat could not creep,
And if he had not been so scared,
He soon would have been asleep.

44
F f^'









THE NURSERY RA TITLE.


They all got safely back to the nest,
Excepting poor little Frisker,
Who lost the tips of his ears,
And almost half of a whisker.


The old mother could scarcely believe
That her darlings were all alive,
Until they all stood around her,
And she counted and found there were five.


Then she kissed her dear little Frisker,
And bathed his poor wounded ears,
And from his little mousey face
She wiped away the tears.


Then they all crept close to each other,
And snuggled all down in a heap,
And in less than half an hour,
These mice were sound asleep.

45









THE NURSERY RATTLE.







THE FROGS.

In the dark summer nights,
Away down in the bogs,
How plain can be heard
The croak of the frogs.


The wee little fellows
Keep crying knee-deep,
For fear that somebody
Will in the mud leap.


While from old daddy frog
Comes the deep croaking sound,
Don't you come in just here;
You'had better go round.

46









THE NURSERY RATTLE.






V
^ ~ ~ o --- ------------------"--------_-, ----







THE CHIMES.

A chime of bells
In a belfry hung,
And every day
These bells were rung.

And loud and plain
They seemed to say,
O girls and boys,
Be good to-day;

To-morrow too,
And every day,-
Always be good,
These bells did say.

47








THE NURS ERY RA TITLE.


YANKEE DOODLE.

Oh! Yankee Doodle had a fight
On Bunker's Hill one day;
He whipped the British very bad,
And made them run away.

CHORUS.
The Yankee Doodles are ahead
Of every other nation,
And Yankee Doodle's country is
The best in all creation.

Oh! Yankee Doodle did not like
The tax upon the tea;
So, with a mask upon his face,
He tossed it in the sea.-CHORUS.

Oh! Yankee Doodle's wife did fight
As bravely as his son,
For Molly Pitcher stood all day,
And fired off the gun.-CHORUS.
48










THE NURSER Y RA TT[LE.


Oh! Yankee Doodle struggled hard,
Determined to be free,
And many were the battles fought,
On land and on the sea.-CHORUS.



KING CHARLIE.

When Cromwell was hunting King Charlie,
Where he hid himself no one could tell;
But he was safe up in a big oak-tree,
In the great woods of Boscobel.



THE FINGER MICE.

This little mouse was caught in a trap;
This little mouse he heard it go snap;
This little mouse ran all round about;
This little mouse did loudly squeak out;
This little mouse said, Do not bewail,
S But come let us pull him right out by the tail.

49










THE NURSER Y RA TT[LE.


Oh! Yankee Doodle struggled hard,
Determined to be free,
And many were the battles fought,
On land and on the sea.-CHORUS.



KING CHARLIE.

When Cromwell was hunting King Charlie,
Where he hid himself no one could tell;
But he was safe up in a big oak-tree,
In the great woods of Boscobel.



THE FINGER MICE.

This little mouse was caught in a trap;
This little mouse he heard it go snap;
This little mouse ran all round about;
This little mouse did loudly squeak out;
This little mouse said, Do not bewail,
S But come let us pull him right out by the tail.

49










THE NURSERY RATTLE.











An old gray owl
Sat on a tree,
To-whoo, to-whoo,
To-whoo, said he.

You ugly bird,
How do you do?
But still he said,
To-whoo, to-whoo.

Where is your nest,
Will you tell me?
To-whoo, to-whoo,
In this old tree.
50










THE NURSERY RATTLE.


What is in it?
My wife, said he,
And little birds,
One, two, and three.


Then down he came
To my window-sill,
And on the pane
Knocked with his bill.


What do you want
Here at my house?
To-whoo, to-whoo,
I want a mouse.


If you find one,
What will you do?
Eat it all up,
To-whoo, to-whoo.
51










THE NURSER Y RATTLE.


I eat gray mice,
And small birds too,
When I find them,
To-whoo, to-whoo.


Now get you gone,
Don't come so near;
I'm very sure
There 're no mice here.


Your great big eyes
So wildly stare;
Go to the barn,
You '11 find mice there.


My great big eyes
Are made all right,
So I can see
When it is night.

52
. r










THE NURSERY RATTLE.


Can you not see
When it is day?
No, I cannot,
The owl did say.

I did not mean
To frighten you;
I '11 go away,
To-whoo, to-whoo.

He spread his wings,
And off he flew;
But still he said,
To-whoo, to-whoo.










53










THE NURSERY RATTLE.


THE EAGLE AND THE LION.

Once the Eagle and the Lion
Were fighting for the power,
And the Eagle drove the Lion
From every fort and tower.


Then the Lion took his passage,
And sailed across the sea,
And from that day to this one
He has let the Eagle be.


-----OW,(>


BAKER, A LOAF OF BREAD.

Baker! baker! a loaf of bread,
Make it just the size of your head;
Here's the flour, and here's the yeast,
I want it for my wedding-feast.

54










THE NURSERY RATTLE.


THE EAGLE AND THE LION.

Once the Eagle and the Lion
Were fighting for the power,
And the Eagle drove the Lion
From every fort and tower.


Then the Lion took his passage,
And sailed across the sea,
And from that day to this one
He has let the Eagle be.


-----OW,(>


BAKER, A LOAF OF BREAD.

Baker! baker! a loaf of bread,
Make it just the size of your head;
Here's the flour, and here's the yeast,
I want it for my wedding-feast.

54










THE NURSER Y RA TITLE.



THE LOCOMOTIVE.

There goes the train for Harlem,
It is moving very slow;
The locomotive puffs and blows,
Just so, just so, just so.

Now they are going faster,
Don't you see, don't you see, don't you see;
I think the people in the cars
Will soon at Harlem be.

The bell rings, the whistle screams,
What an awful noise they make;
And now they're near the dep6t,
And down goes every brake.

Oh! what a cloud of smoke;
Now the train is coming back,
Almost like a streak of lightning;
Look out there, clear the track!
55










THE NURSERY RATTLE.

(a-

REDBREAST AND CUCKOO.

A little Robin Redbreast
Was singing a sweet song,
When saucy Mrs. Cuckoo
Came with a hop along.

Good morning, Robin Redbreast,
Have you your new nest made?
Thank you, yes, Mrs. Cuckoo,
And all our eggs are laid.


Pray, how is Mrs. Redbreast?
I hope that she is well;
I wish that I could see her,
I have some news to tell.

Please, Robin, go and find her,
While I stay here to rest;
And until you both come back,
I '11 take care of the nest.

56









THE NURSERY RATTLE.


Oh! no, no, Mrs. Cuckoo;
No, that I cannot do;
And I 'm sure my little wife
Has no wish to see you.


You had better say good-bye,
And here no longer stay;
For in our new-made nest
Not one egg shall you lay.


Of your many naughty tricks
I have quite often heard;
And if all they say is true,
You are a lazy bird.


Then the Cuckoo hung her head,
She knew that it was true,
And to lay in Robin's nest
Was what she meant to do.

4 57










3 W THE NURSERY RATTLE.


So, without another word,
Into the woods she flew,
Singing loudly, as she went,
Cuckoo, Cuckoo, Cuckoo.







PADDY O'FLYNN.

Paddy O'Flynn
Put on his new coat,
And went out to take
A sail in a boat.


The boat did upset,
And Paddy fell in.
Bad luck to the sailing
Said Mr. O'Flynn.

58










THE NURSER Y RA TITLE.


LITTLE CURLY-HEAD.

Oh! you little rosy-face,
What makes your hair so curly?
I go to bed at sunset,
And get up very early.

I run out when the sun shines,
And breathe the pure fresh air,
And maybe that's the reason
I have such curly hair.


THE GRASSHOPPER.
Chin-chopper, grasshopper,
Leap like a frog,
Over the meadows,
Into the bog.
But look out for Robin,
While at your play,
Or he 'll eat you up,
Some bright sunny day.
59










THE NURSER Y RA TITLE.


LITTLE CURLY-HEAD.

Oh! you little rosy-face,
What makes your hair so curly?
I go to bed at sunset,
And get up very early.

I run out when the sun shines,
And breathe the pure fresh air,
And maybe that's the reason
I have such curly hair.


THE GRASSHOPPER.
Chin-chopper, grasshopper,
Leap like a frog,
Over the meadows,
Into the bog.
But look out for Robin,
While at your play,
Or he 'll eat you up,
Some bright sunny day.
59










THE NURSERY RATTLE.

TI




HOW MUCH, AND HOW MANY.

How many stars are in the sky?
You don't know, neither do I.

How many fishes are in the sea?
I '11 tell you, if you '11 tell me.

How much water is in the well?
Dip it out, then you can tell.

How many leaves are on the tree?
Pick them off, then you will see.

How marly ding-dongs, in a bell?
The clapper knows, but it won't tell.

How much love has my mother for me ?
72 No tongue can tell, no eye can see.

r60





Pages
61-62
Missing
from
Original









~~aL~-------------------- ^^aro
THE NURSER Y RATTLE.


THE KITCHEN PARTY.

There was a large party
In the kitchen, one night,
And the fire in the range
Gave out a bright light.

Some large silver spoons,
That had got there by chance,
Were the belles of the evening,
And opened the dance.

The iron tea-kettle
Sang one of its songs,
And the brass-handled shovel
Danced and waltzed with the tongs.

On one of the tables
Was a black japanned waiter,
That most of the evening
Made love to the grater.

63










THE NURSERY RATTLE.


Old Daddy Gridiron
Came to dance with Miss Dish;
But she sent him away,
For he smelt strong of fish.


Gridiron was angry,
And said, You're polite,
Then went in the corner,
And stayed there all night.


The clumsy flat-irons
To dance were not able,
So they sat in a row,
On top of the table.


The tin water-dipper,
And the large frying-pan,
Astonished the company
When they danced the Can-can.

64










"THE NURSERY RATTLE.


All the knives and the forks
Had quite a flirtation;
While the pots loudly talked
Of the affairs of the nation.


The long, roller crash towel,
That was on the back door,
Went round, and around,
But never got to the floor.


Two cups and a saucer,
And a white China plate,
Danced polkas and waltzes
At a furious rate.


On a shelf in the dresser,
Where all could be seen,
Looking on at the fun,
Was a big soup-tureen.
65










THE NURSERY RATTLE.


A cute little gray mouse
Crept out of his hole,
And climbed up the scuttle,
And sat on the coal.


But not very long
Did mousie stay there;
For she spied tabby-cat
Sitting under a chair.


Then down in a hurry
Came this little mouse,
And before pussy saw her,
She was safe in her house.


They all danced the german,
Iron, crockery, and tin;
'Twas led by the poker,
And the large rolling-pin.

66










THIE NURSERY RATTLE.


The round clock on the wall
Ticked slowly away;
And the party broke up
Just before it was day.




MY WIFE PEGGY.

My little wife Peggy
Loves apples and pears;
Her left leg fell down
And broke all our stairs.

Oh, no, that is not it.
It was my wife Peg,
Who fell down our stairs
And broke her left leg.




67










THE NURSER Y RATTLE.


THE CIRCUS.
Two little circus boys,
Johnny and Ned,
They could turn somersets,
Heels over head.

High up in the air,
Could fly in a swing;
Without saddle or bridle
Could ride round the ring.

They twisted and turned themselves
All up in a heap,
And through paper balloons
Could jump at a leap.
--------o:to,---

ONLY TWO EYES.
A little old woman
Sold apples and pies,
And this little old woman
She had but two eyes.
68










THE NURSER Y RATTLE.


THE CIRCUS.
Two little circus boys,
Johnny and Ned,
They could turn somersets,
Heels over head.

High up in the air,
Could fly in a swing;
Without saddle or bridle
Could ride round the ring.

They twisted and turned themselves
All up in a heap,
And through paper balloons
Could jump at a leap.
--------o:to,---

ONLY TWO EYES.
A little old woman
Sold apples and pies,
And this little old woman
She had but two eyes.
68



















) I 1

















tNOW
I; -, '.












THE NURSERY RATTLE.


Now what people called her,
I'm sure I can't tell;
But with only two eyes,
She could see very well.


This little old woman
Went to sleep every night,
And then these two eyes
She would shut very tight.





THE LITTLE FISH.

I wish, I wish,
Said a little fish,
That I could get out of the water.
I would jump on the shore
And come back no more,
And would marry the bull-frog's daughter.


L71










THE NURSERY RATTLE.


THE ATLANTIC CABLE.

Cyrus and John, Peter and Abel,
Went out to lay the Atlantic Cable;
When half-way down, it broke in two,
And Cyrus said, What shall I do?

Then back he went to England's shore,
And thought he would make one trial more;
And when again the trial was made,
The Cable from shore to shore was laid.

Old Neptune -did n't see the intention,
But thought of course 'twas some new invention;
But how it was made, or how it came there,
He did not know, and he did not care.

The mermaids think it a splendid thing,
And all day long, sit on it, and swing;
And while they swing, they sing this song,
To Cyrus does all the honor belong.

72














I

k, / I.11










THE NURSERY RATTLE.


OLD GRANDMOTHER JOLLY,
ANDI HER TABBY CAT MOLLY.

Old Grandmother Jolly
Lives close by the hill,
And her only son Peter
Has charge of the mill.

A funny old tabby,
Whose first name is Molly,
Is the only companion
Of Grandmother Jolly.

For Peter is busy
From early in morn,
Filling the meal-bags,
And grinding the corn.

Molly goes to the mill,
And thinks it great fun,
To sit on a shelf,
And watch the mice run.

75









THE NURSERY RATTLE.


But when she is hungry,
She lies on the floor,
And catches some fat ones,
And eats three or four.


When it rains very hard,
Molly stays in the house,
And won't go to the mill,
To look for a mouse.


Then Grandmother Jolly
Gives her something to eat,
Bread and milk in a saucer,
Or a piece of cold meat.


Granny did not forget,
But tried to remember,
That dear Mblly's birthday
Was the first of December.
76










THE NURSER Y RA TITLE.


Then Moll gave a party,
And invited all she knew,
The pretty pussy-cats,
And all their beaux too.


Old Grandmother Jolly
Made a very large cake,
And in the hot oven
She put it to bake.


Molly likes these hot cakes
Full of sugar and spice,
And thinks they are better
Than little gray mice.


But about the refreshments
She consulted Puss Sly,
Who told her she must have
A large hot mice-pie.

77









THE NURSERY RATTLE.


So the very next day,
Before it was light,
Molly went to the mill,
And stayed there till night.


She caught plenty of mice,
Half a bushel or more,
Ant' carried them safely
To grandmother's door.


Old granny was willing
To do all she was able,
So she made the mouse-pie,
To put on the table.


'Twas a very fine party,
And the cats, old and young,
Played all kinds of queer games,
And merry songs sung.
78
AI?r -s

^^*^Arf >^^i^










THE NURSERY RATTLE.


When the party was over,
The cats were polite,
And to Granny and Molly
They all said, Good night.

----Bo^aoo---

KING ALFRED.
When King Alfred was chased by the Danes,
He ran in an old woman's house,
And seated himself by the fire,
And there he sat still as a mouse.

The old woman was cooking her supper,
And told him the cakes he must turn;
But he forgot what she told him,
And let the old granny's cakes burn.

Then she gave him a box on the ear,
And tumbled him off of his seat;
And because he had let the cakes burn,
Not one bit did she give him to eat.

5 79










"THE NURSERY RATTLE.


DOCTOR MAcFEEDEN.
Doctor MacFeeden
Lives in Sweden,
Close by the Baltic Sea;
It's very cold there,
But he don't care,
And it's nothing to you or me.



LEARNING TO SKATE.

Three little girls, so full of fun,
Sally, Mary, and Kate,
Went out upon the ice, one day,
To try to learn to skate.

Oh! what a funny time they had,
They slipped and slid about,
And when their heels went in the air,
They all would laugh and shout. r
8o .










"THE NURSERY RATTLE.


DOCTOR MAcFEEDEN.
Doctor MacFeeden
Lives in Sweden,
Close by the Baltic Sea;
It's very cold there,
But he don't care,
And it's nothing to you or me.



LEARNING TO SKATE.

Three little girls, so full of fun,
Sally, Mary, and Kate,
Went out upon the ice, one day,
To try to learn to skate.

Oh! what a funny time they had,
They slipped and slid about,
And when their heels went in the air,
They all would laugh and shout. r
8o .










THE NURSERY RATTLE.


Sally bruised and scratched her hands,
And Mary cracked her pate.
Oh, never mind! let 's try again;
We soon will learn, said Kate.






THE MILL-STREAM.

Flow, pretty stream, flow,
And make the mill go,
So we can have flour for bread;
Then aunty will make
A nice Christmas cake,
As large and as round as her head.







8x









THE NURSER Y RA TITLE.


THE LOST LAMB.

A little fleecy white lamb,
Not quite three months old,
In the bleak month of December,
Was left out in the cold.

It was a dark stormy night,
And fast fell the snow,
And the dear little lambkin
Knew not which way to go.


It ran hither and thither,
And loudly did cry,
But in the pitiless storm,
No kind friend was nigh.


It was tired and weary,
And shivered with cold,
And it thought of its mother
'7 Safe and warm in the fold.
82














I .... ..











flM
:: A'















i 0 qi%r












THE NURSERY RATTLE.


It bleated ma, ma,
And trembled with fear,
And then it would listen,
But no sound did it hear.


Then the poor little lamb
Lay down in the snow,
And through its soft fleecy wool
The sharp wind did blow.


It thought, it surely must die,
In the cold and the dark,
When it heard in the distance
A sheep-dog's loud bark.


Quickly it sprang to its feet,
From off the hard ground,
And loudly bleating with joy,
It ran towards the sound.

85










THE NURSERY RATTLE.


And then through the darkness
A light it espied,
And then, the good shepherd,
With the dog at his side.


But it felt weary and faint,
And no longer could stand,
And it sank down exhausted,
Just when help was at hand.


It gave a low mournful cry,
And tried to arise,
But it fell back in the snow,
And closed its soft eyes.


But the shepherd had heard it,
And loudly cried out,
Quick, Carlo! look for the lamb,
Seek all round about.
86










THE NURSER Y RA TITLE.


The dog replied with a bark,
And was off with a bound,
And ere long, in a snow-drift
The lost lamb he found.


Here, Carlo! take the lantern,
In your teeth hold it fast,
While I shield the poor lambkin
From the cold wintry blast.


The dog, holding the lantern,
Quickly walked on before,
And they all reached in safety
The good shepherd's door.


Soon, before a warm fire
The little lamb lay,
Where it slept very soundly,
And was well the next day.
87









THE NURSERY RATTLE.


WON'T I, AND I WON'T.
When I shall grow to be a man,
Won't I have lots of fun?
Then I shall have a high-crowned hat,
And a righty, dighty gun.

Then I won't have to wear a bib,
Or have my hair in curls,
And I can dance in high-heeled boots,
With all the pretty girls.

Then I won't play with pussy-cat
Or with the big dog Dash,
And I shall have my second teeth,
And a handsome, curled moustache.


THE INDIAN SQUAW.
-Far off in the woods, on the mountains,
Lived an old Indian squaw,
And she was the ugliest old woman
That you or I ever saw.

88









THE NURSERY RATTLE.


WON'T I, AND I WON'T.
When I shall grow to be a man,
Won't I have lots of fun?
Then I shall have a high-crowned hat,
And a righty, dighty gun.

Then I won't have to wear a bib,
Or have my hair in curls,
And I can dance in high-heeled boots,
With all the pretty girls.

Then I won't play with pussy-cat
Or with the big dog Dash,
And I shall have my second teeth,
And a handsome, curled moustache.


THE INDIAN SQUAW.
-Far off in the woods, on the mountains,
Lived an old Indian squaw,
And she was the ugliest old woman
That you or I ever saw.

88









THE NURSERY RATTLE.


Always thirteen times in a year,
She mounted away on high,
And hung a bright new silver moon
Up in the clear blue sky.


Then she cut the old moon in pieces,
And made of them stars so bright,
And scattered them over the heavens,
And there they shine every night.




OLD TECUMSEH.

Rumsey Dumsey,
Old Tecumseh
Was an Indian red;
He fought with might,
But in a fight
A bullet shot him dead.

89





University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs