• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Technique
 Nomenclature and terminology
 Key to genera of phytoseiidae on...
 Discussion of species
 Key to the species of Amblyseiulus...
 Key to the species of Amblyseius...
 Key to the species of Cydnodromus...
 Key to the species of Galendromus...
 Literature cited
 Back Cover














Title: Annotated list and keys to Phytoseiidae (Acarina: Mesostigmata) associated with Florida citrus
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 Material Information
Title: Annotated list and keys to Phytoseiidae (Acarina: Mesostigmata) associated with Florida citrus
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Muma, Martin H.
Publisher: University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Publication Date: 1964
Copyright Date: 1964
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Bibliographic ID: UF00026751
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Introduction
        Page 3
    Technique
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Nomenclature and terminology
        Page 5
    Key to genera of phytoseiidae on Florida citrus
        Page 6
    Discussion of species
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Key to the species of Amblyseiulus Muma
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Key to the species of Amblyseius Berlese
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Key to the species of Cydnodromus Muma
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Key to the species of Galendromus Muma
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Literature cited
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Back Cover
        Page 43
        Page 44
Full Text

Bulletin 685 (Technical)
November 1964






Annotated List and Keys
to Phytoseiidae
(Acarina: Mesostigmata)
Associated with Florida Citrus






Martin H. Muma







Agricultural Experiment Stations
University of Florida, Gainesville
J. R. Beckenbach, Director
















CONTENTS
Page
Introduction -- .. __-- _--- __ 3

Technique -- _----------------------------------------------_-...__ __ .--.--.--.------. 3

Nomenclature and Terminology ----------- --------------------- 5

Key to Genera of Phytoseiidae on Florida Citrus --- ..6---------- 6

Discussion of Species --....-- ..... _.....---------------- ..... ...- ........_--------. 7

Key to Species of Amblyseiulus Muma .- -----------------.---------.--- 9

Key to Species of Amblyseius Berlese -9-----_ ----------------- .9

Key to Species of Cydnodromus Muma -------- 31

Key to Species of Galendromus Muma --------. -----------------38

Literature Cited ..... --------------------------.--..--.. --------- 41

















A contribution from the Citrus Experiment Station.







ANNOTATED LIST AND KEYS TO PHYTOSEIIDAE
(ACARINA: MESOSTIGMATA)
ASSOCIATED WITH FLORIDA CITRUS

Martin H. Muma1

Introduction
In 1955 I published a short paper (6)2 describing the phyto-
seiids then known to be associated with citrus trees in Florida.
Two of the 11 species described then are now in genera that
have been placed in the closely related family Blattisocidae,
leaving nine bonafide phytoseiids.
During the past several years biological control studies of
mites have been intensified. Phytoseiids have received consider-
able attention because of their large size, common occurrence,
and apparent potential as biological control agents. Many addi-
tional undescribed and previously unrecorded forms have been
collected. The new species have been described in two papers
(7, 8), and some of the unrecorded species were reported in
Muma et al. (10). This report is intended as a revision of my
1955 paper and includes keys, citations, diagnostic generic and
specific illustrations, and short diagnoses of all presently known
species from Florida citrus groves. Distributional records and
biologic and systematic remarks have been added.
Thirty species are now known to occur on or under citrus
trees. Table 1 shows the ecologic stratum from which each was
taken; underlines in the table indicate occurrence; X's indicate
common occurrence; a broken line indicates an introduced
species.

Technique
The keys and diagnoses include mainly morphologic details
that are visible only on slide-mounted specimens. Study speci-
mens utilized and referred to are mounted in Hoyer's modifica-
tion of a chloral hydrate-gum arabic mounting medium. The
characters determined and cited were distinguished with a
phase-contrast compound microscope at magnifications varying
from 125X to 787X. Unless otherwise stated, the keys and
diagnoses refer only to the characters necessary to separate or
relate the species found in Florida citrus groves.

1 Entomologist, Citrus Experiment Station, Lake Alfred, Florida.
2 Numbers in parentheses refer to Literature Cited.







ANNOTATED LIST AND KEYS TO PHYTOSEIIDAE
(ACARINA: MESOSTIGMATA)
ASSOCIATED WITH FLORIDA CITRUS

Martin H. Muma1

Introduction
In 1955 I published a short paper (6)2 describing the phyto-
seiids then known to be associated with citrus trees in Florida.
Two of the 11 species described then are now in genera that
have been placed in the closely related family Blattisocidae,
leaving nine bonafide phytoseiids.
During the past several years biological control studies of
mites have been intensified. Phytoseiids have received consider-
able attention because of their large size, common occurrence,
and apparent potential as biological control agents. Many addi-
tional undescribed and previously unrecorded forms have been
collected. The new species have been described in two papers
(7, 8), and some of the unrecorded species were reported in
Muma et al. (10). This report is intended as a revision of my
1955 paper and includes keys, citations, diagnostic generic and
specific illustrations, and short diagnoses of all presently known
species from Florida citrus groves. Distributional records and
biologic and systematic remarks have been added.
Thirty species are now known to occur on or under citrus
trees. Table 1 shows the ecologic stratum from which each was
taken; underlines in the table indicate occurrence; X's indicate
common occurrence; a broken line indicates an introduced
species.

Technique
The keys and diagnoses include mainly morphologic details
that are visible only on slide-mounted specimens. Study speci-
mens utilized and referred to are mounted in Hoyer's modifica-
tion of a chloral hydrate-gum arabic mounting medium. The
characters determined and cited were distinguished with a
phase-contrast compound microscope at magnifications varying
from 125X to 787X. Unless otherwise stated, the keys and
diagnoses refer only to the characters necessary to separate or
relate the species found in Florida citrus groves.

1 Entomologist, Citrus Experiment Station, Lake Alfred, Florida.
2 Numbers in parentheses refer to Literature Cited.








4 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

Table 1.-Ecologic strata inhabited by phytoseiids in Florida citrus groves.

Strata Collected
Species Litter Bark Leaves Fruit
Phytoscutus sexpilis Muma XXXXXXX
Phytoseiulus macropilis Banks
Amblyseiulus cannaensis Muma XXXXXXX
citri Muma XXXXXXX
clausae Muma
detritus Muma
dorsatus Muma XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
iphiformis Muma
"lepidus (Chant) XXXXXXX
macrosetae Muma
putnami (Chant) XXXXXXX
rotundus Muma XXXXXXX
"solens DeLeon XXXXXXX
Amblyseiella setosa Muma XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Amblyseius (Amblyseius)
aerialis (Muma) XXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXXXXXX
(Amblyseius)
floridanus (Muma)
(Amblyseialus)
largoensis (Muma) XXXXXXX XXXXXXX
(Iphiseus) quadripilis
(Banks) XXXXXXXXXXXXXX
(Typhlodromopsis)
deleoni Muma
(Typhlodromopsis)
dentilis (DeLeon) XXXXXXX
(Typhlodromopsis)
simplicissimus
(DeLeon) XXXXXXX
(Typhlodromalus)
hibisci (Chant) XXXXXXX
(Typhlodromalus)
limonicus Gar.
& McG. XXXXXXX
"(Typhlodromalus)
peregrinus (Muma) XXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Cydnodromus gracilis Muma
marinellus Muma XXXXXXX
planatus Muma XXXXXXX
Typhlodromina conspicua
(Garman) XXXXXXX XXXXXXX
Ambyldromella rickeri (Chant)
Galendromus annectens (DeLeon) XXXXXXX
Galendromus floridanus (Muma) XXXXXXX
Clavidromina coma (DeLeon)


Underlines indicate occurrence; X's indicate common occurrence; a broken line indicates
an introduced species.







Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 5

Nomenclature and Terminology
For the sake of brevity synonymic references have been
restricted mainly to the original citations and the first citation
of each species in the genus in which it is here recognized. In
a few instances, junior homonyms have resulted from combina-
tion of genera by workers, and new names have been proposed.
These names are cited here with indications of their present
systematic position. Synonyms not previously recorded are also
cited.

Several systems of setal nomenclature for the dorsal scutum
have been proposed in recent years. Garman (3) proposed the
first adequate system based on dorsal setae, median setae, lateral
setae, and scapular setae. Chant (2) modified it slightly to per-
mit indication of an homologous relationship of lateral setae
using a standard of 9 as the basic number of lateral setae in
Amblyseius Berlese. Muma (7) suggested further modification
based on position of the median and lateral setae and obvious
setal relationships, ignoring homologies. Other systems of setal
nomenclature have been developed. Athias-Henriot (1) attempt-
ed to develop homologies on a supposedly basic setal pattern of
a blattisocid prototype. Hirschmann (4) developed his system
on homologies of the setae among most parasitoid Mesostigmata.
Wainstein (14) independently made a similar attempt to indi-
cate homologies. More recently, Pritchard and Baker (12) have
combined Hirschmann's (4) proscutum and postscutum divi-
sions with a modified Garman system of nomenclature but pro-
posed new names for the dorsal, median, lateral, and scapular
series of setae.

In the present paper Garman's terminology for setae on the
dorsum has been adopted with the following modifications:
M2 of Garman and Chant is referred to as M3 if L5 or L6 of these
authors is medial in position and obviously M2 as proposed by
Muma (7) ; S2 is referred to as an L seta if it is on the scutum
and not distinguishable from the lateral series; the scapular
setae are recognized as the sublateral setae as proposed by
Pritchard and Baker (12) ; D1 and D6 or D7 of Garman and
Chant are considered to be the verticals and clunals as suggested
by Pritchard and Baker (12). No attempt has been made to in-
dicate homologies, as I feel that such is highly speculative.







6 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

Key to Genera of Phytoseiidae on Florida Citrus
1. 4 pairs of anterior lateral setae; usually 3 pairs of preanal
setae ---_--- ---- ---- __ ----- (Amblyseiinae) 2- 2
5 pairs of anterior lateral setae; usually 4 pairs of preanal
setae _- -_ __ (Phytoseiinae) 7- 7
2. 2 pairs of dorsal setae; 2 pairs of
median setae ------- Phytoscutus Muma, p. 7
3 or 4 pairs of dorsal setae; 1 or 3 pairs of median setae_ 3
3. Last pair of dorsal setae (D3) elongate; 1 pair of median
setae; no or 1 pair of preanal
setae ------ ------- ----_---Phytoseiulus Evans, p. 7
Last pair of dorsal setae (D3 or D4) short; 3 pairs of median
setae; 3 pairs of preanal setae ......------ --------------- 4
4. Most dorsal, median, and lateral setae subsequal, L8 sometimes
elongate; sternum longer than wide and not lobate
posteriorly .----------------.. Cydnodromus Muma, p. 31
1 to 3 median and lateral setae much longer than dorsals and
other medians and laterals; sternum wider than long or
lobate posteriorly _---------------_ -------------- -5
5. 3 pairs of dorsal setae; most species are heavily sclerotized
and inhabit litter or low growing
herbs .......------.- ----.-__._------- Amblyseiulus Muma, p. 9
4 parts of dorsal setae; most species are lightly sclerotized
and are arboreal in habit .-----.-----------------------6
6. 7 pairs of lateral setae; 1 pair of preanal
setae ------------------Amblyseiella Muma, p. 18
8 pairs of lateral setae; 3 pairs of preanal
setae ------------------- Amblyseius Berlese, p. 19
7. 10 pairs of lateral setae; 3 pairs of sternal setae; fourth leg
with 3 macrosetae -------Amblydromella Muma p. 35
8 or 9 pairs of lateral setae; 2 pairs of sternal setae; fourth
leg with no or at most 1 macroseta ------------ 8
8. 8 pairs of lateral setae; 2 pairs of sublateral setae ----- 9
9 pairs of lateral setae; 1 pair of sublateral
setae ---------------- Galendromus Muma, p. 38
9. Fourth leg with a distinct macroseta; spermatheca funnel-
shaped -- ------------- Clavidromina Muma, p. 35







Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 7

Fourth leg without a macroseta; spermatheca
tubular ------ Typhlodromina Muma, p. 37

Discussion of Species
Phytoscutus sexpilis Muma
(Figures Phytoscutus 1 to 7)
Phytoscutus sexpilis Muma, 1961, Bull. Florida State Mu-
seum, Biol. Sci., 5(7) : 275, Figs. 25 to 28.
DIAGNOSIS: This species is distinguished by the generic
characters, the lack of a median seta associated with L5, a ridged
and pitted dorsal scutum, and the blade-like, apically-tapered,
dorsally-hooked spermatophore bearer of the male.
DISCUSSION: Living specimens of this species are rose-
red in color and are invariably associated with and feed upon
a large, colonial, undescribed acarid on citrus leaves. This spe-
cies is known locally as the velvet button mite.
RECORDS: Male and two female paratypes from grape-
fruit leaves at Lake Alfred on May 7, 1954, by H. L. Greene.
Female, nymphs, and larvae from leaves at Lucerne Park on
May 28, 1954, by H. L. Greene. Female on orange at Weirsdale
on July 22, 1959, by H. L. Greene. Male, female, and larva feed-
ing on acarids at Lake Alfred on December 4, 1960, by M. H.
Muma. Females and young on grapefruit leaves in acarid
colonies at Lake Alfred on December 5, 1960, by M. H. Muma.
Five females and young from citrus fruit at Cleveland on July
25, 1962, by M. H. Muma and V. E. Flaws.

Phytoseiulus macropilis (Banks)
(Figures Phytoseiulus 1 to 6)
Laelaps macropilis Banks, 1905, Proc. Ent. Soc. Wash., 7:
139.
Phytoseiulus macropilis, Evans, 1952, Bull. Ent. Res., 43(2) :
398, Figs. 1-3.
DIAGNOSIS: This species is distinguished from P. persimi-
lis Athias-Henriot, the only other recognized species of the
genus, by the presence of one pair of preanal setae.
DISCUSSION: Living specimens are pink to red in color,
marked with a milk white spot at the posterior end of the body,







8 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations


Phytoscutus










II






Phytoseiulus
q2 3

6 Y 7








4

Genus Phytoscutus Muma










Phytoscutus sexpilis Muma: Figure 1, Female dorsal scutum. 2, Female
ventrianal scutum. 3, Metapodal platelets. 4, Tip of spermatophore bearer.
5, Macrosetae on leg 4. 6, Spermatheca. 7, Male ventrianal scutum.
Genus Phytoseiulus Evans
Phytoseiulus macropilis (Banks): Figure 1, Female dorsal scutum. 2,
Female ventrianal scutum. 3, Tip of spermatophore bearer. 4, Macrosetae
on leg 4. 5, Spermatheca. 6, Male ventrianal scutum.








Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 9

and are usually associated with tetranychids on low growing
herbs and vines. A few specimens have been collected from citrus
leaves. It is known locally as the long-legged mite.

RECORDS: Female and young from orange leaves at Winter
Haven on April 22, 1954, by H. L. Greene.

Key to the Species of Amblyseiulus Muma
1. L2 distinctly longer than L3----....... -- --------- 2
L2 subequal to or shorter than L3-- ........... .... ---- 7
2. L3, L5, L6 and L7 much longer than dorsal setae; M3 longer
than L8; spermatheca either tubular or goblet-shaped;
spermatophore bearer broadly T-shaped _----_ -----9
L3, L6, L6, and L7 subequal or only slightly longer than
dorsal setae; M3 shorter than L8: spermatheca either cup
or funnel-shaped; spermatophore bearer L-shaped or with
short ectal spur ..----------. ---... -----.. ----- 3
3. Pores on ventrianal scutum located slightly behind but
obviously between the posterior preanal setae; leg 4
macrosetae longest on basitarus----- ----- 4
Pores on ventrianal scutum located obviously behind and
nearly as widely separated as posterior preanal setae; leg
4 macrosetae longest on genu --------- -.-- 10
4. Spermatheca funnel-shaped _--..-- --.--------- -----.. 5
Spermatheca cup-shaped -------- -- ------------ 6
5. Pores on ventrianal scutum equidistant from each other and
the posterior preanal setae; metapodal scuta broadly tri-
angular; spermatheca slender and lightly flared inter-
nally; spermatophore bearer with distinct elongate ectal
spur ------------ -- ---- A. citri Muma, p. 11
Pores on ventrianal scutum further from each other than
from the posterior preanal setae; metapodal scuta obo-
vate; spermatheca slender and distinctly flared internally;
spermatophore bearer with no or an indistinct rounded
ectal spur ---. ------ A. detritus Muma, p. 13
6. Pores on ventrianal scutum equidistant from each other and
the posterior preanal setae; metapodal scuta slender and
pointed anteriorly; spermatophore bearer with a distinct
angulate ectal spur ---------A. lepidus (Chant), p. 15







10 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

Pores on ventrianal scutum further from each other than
from the posterior preanal setae; metapodal scuta equally
broad anteriorly and posteriorly; spermatophore bearer
with no or an indistinct rounded
ectal spur __-------- _________A. putnami (Chant), p. 16
7. Dorsal scutum elongate and lightly sclerotized; macrosetae
on leg 4 longest on genu; spermatheca large and broadly
funnel-shaped ------------------ ------------ 8
Dorsal scutum nearly round and heavily sclerotized; mac-
rosetae on leg 4 longest on basitarsus; parapodal scuta
nearly equal in size, mesal largest; spermatheca small and
tubular-------------- _____--_ A. iphiformis Muma, p. 11
8. Distance between pores on ventrianal scutum nearly equal
to that between posterior preanal
setae --_-----------------A. solens DeLeon, p. 18
Distance between pores on ventrianal scutum much less
than that between posterior preanal
setae _-------------.----A dorsatus Muma. p. 14
9. Spermatheca short and wide; mesal part of transverse arm
of spermatophore bearer 3/5 total
length .---------------A. cannaensis Muma, p. 10
Spermatheca long and slender; mesal part of transverse
arm of spermatophore bearer 1/3 total
length ---------_------A. rotundus Muma, p. 17
10. Leg 1 with several macrosetae; spermatheca funnel-shaped;
spermatophore bearer without ectal
spur --- --------- ----A. macrosetae Muma, p. 16
Leg 1 without macrosetae; spermatheca cup-shaped; sper-
matophore bearer with ectal spur-A. clausae Muma, p. 13

Amblyseiulus cannaensis Muma
(Figures-Amblyseiulus 20 and 24)
Amblyseiulus cannaensis Muma, 1962, Florida Ent., 45 (1):
4, Fig. 4, A-H.
DIAGNOSIS: This species belongs in the A. ovatus (Gar-
man) species group of the genus, those species with L2 elongate
and approaching L' in length, and with M3 > LS. It differs in
having L3 only slightly shorter than L2, in the roughly triangular
metapodal scuta, and in the shorter less constricted tubular







Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 11

spermatheca; and the mesal part of the transverse arm of the
T-shaped spermatophore bearer is about 2/5 of the total length
of the arm.
DISCUSSION: All except one of the specimens associated
with citrus were taken from the litter beneath the trees. The
species has, however, been collected from morning glory, and
was originally described from canna. Living specimens are
hemispheric in shape and are dark red-brown in color. All living
specimens seen have been associated with Brevipalpus spp. in-
festations.
RECORDS: Female from bark at Clearwater on July 11,
1962, by V. E. Flaws. Male from litter at Avon Park on Decem-
ber 7, 1959, by H. L. Greene. Male from litter at Lake Alfred
on February 13, 1961, by M. L. Green. Two females from litter
at Arcadia on April 19, 1961, by J. A. Murrell. Three females
from litter at Cleveland on April 11, 1962, by V. E. Flaws.
Female from litter at Winter Haven on April 26, 1961, by J. A.
Murrell. Male from litter at Minneola on April 14, 1962, by
J. A. Murrell.

Amblyseiulus citri Muma
(Figures-Amblyseiulus 3, 15, and 16)
Amblyseiulus citri Muma, 1962, Florida Ent., 45(1) : 1, Fig.
1, A-G.
DIAGNOSIS: This species belongs in the section of the
genus in which L2 > L3. It is distinguished by the location of the
preanal pores on the ventrianal scutum and the distinctive sper-
matheca and spermatophore bearer.
DISCUSSION: Most specimens have been collected from
the litter beneath the trees (one was recovered from bark
scrapings) by processing the litter through a modified Tullgren
apparatus. Nothing is known about living specimens.
RECORDS: Male paratype from litter at Sebring on Jan-
uary 27, 1960, by J. A. Murrell. Three females from litter
at Kissimmee on April 12, 1961, by J. A. Murrell. Female from
litter at Kissimmee on January 29, 1962, by J. A. Murrell.
Female from litter at Oviedo on January 10, 1962, by D. F.
Farmer. Female from bark at Kissimmee on April 12, 1961,
by J. A. Murrell.







12 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations


Amblyseiulus










12 \" 4 15
717




(12 J i F








18 19


24
22 23




Genus Amblyseiulus Muma
Amblyseiulus lepidus (Chant); Figure 1, Female dorsal scutum. 5, Tip
of spermatophore bearer. A. detritus Muma: Figure 2, Tip of spermatophore
bearer. 12, Spermatheca. A. citri Muma: Figure 3, Tip of spermatophore
bearer. 15, Spermatheca. 16, Female ventrianal scutum. A. putnami Chant:
Figure 4, Tip of spermatophore bearer. 17, Female ventrianal scutum.
A. clausae Muma: Figure 6, Tip of spermatophore bearer. 14, Spermatheca.
21, Female ventrianal scutum. A. rotundus Muma: Figure 7, Tip of sper-
matophore bearer. 13, Spermatheca. 24, Macrosetae on leg 4. A. macrosetae







Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 13

Amblyseiulus clausae Muma
(Figures-Amblyseiulus 6, 14, and 21)
Amblyseiulus clausae Muma, 1962, Florida Ent.,: 45(1): 1,
Fig. 2, A-I.
DIAGNOSIS: This L2 > L3 group species is distinguished
by L2 being much longer than L3, the extreme separation of the
preanal pores on the ventrianal scutum, a bowl-shaped sperma-
theca, and a spermatophore bearer resembling that of A. citri.
DISCUSSION: Living specimens are light brown in color,
apparently because of moderate sclerotization. Although the
species was described from and is common in Pinus clausa litter,
several specimens have been taken from the bark and litter of
citrus trees. A paratype from Titusville, cited at the time of
the original description, was misidentified; it is not this species.
RECORDS: Two females from bark in Turnbull Hammock
near Mims on January 10, 1962, by D. F. Farmer. Female from
litter at Arcadia on April 11, 1962, by V. E. Flaws.

Amblyseiulus detritus Muma
(Figures-Amblyseiulus 2 and 12)
Amblyseiulus detritus Muma, 1961, Bull. Florida State Mu-
seum, 5(7) : 280, Figs. 33-36.
DIAGNOSIS: This species belongs to the L2 > L' group. It
is distinguished from A. citri, the most closely related species,
by the greater separation of the preanal pores of the ventrianal
scutum, the funnel-shaped cervix and elongate atrium of the
spermatheca, and the distinctive spermatophore bearer.
DISCUSSION: I list this species because the male allotype
was taken from citrus litter. This is the only specimen collected
to date, however, and may be a misidentification of a male of
A. putnani (Chant).
RECORD: Male allotype from citrus litter at Avon Park,
December 7, 1959, by H. L. Greene and M. H. Muma.

Muma: Figure 8, Tip of spermatophore bearer. 19, Metapodal platelets.
23, Male ventrianal scutum .A dorsatus Muma: Figure 9, Spermatheca.
11, Female dorsal scutum. 22, Macrosetae on leg 4. A. iphiformis Muma:
Figure 10, Spermatheca. 18, Metapodal platelets. A. cannaensis Muma:
Figure 20, Female dorsal scutum. 24, Macrosetae leg 4.







14 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

Amblyseiulus dorsatus Muma
(Figures-Amblyseiulus 9, 11, and 22)
Amblyseiulus dorsatus Muma, 1961, Bull. Florida State Mu-
seum, 5(7) : 278, Figs. 29-32.
DIAGNOSIS: This species belongs to the section of the
genus in which L3 is longer than or subequal with I2. It is most
easily recognized by the position of the preanal pores of the
ventrianal scutum and by the anteriorly bent tip of the trans-
verse arm of the spermatophore bearer.
DISCUSSION: A. solens DeLeon, A. precipitans DeLeon,
A. popularis DeLeon, and this species are quite closely related
and form a compact group within the genus. A. elongatus (Gar-
man) and probably A. multidentatus (Chant) also belong in the
group. A study of the types might, in fact, prove several of the
above species synonymous. This species group contains the only
known tree- and shrub-inhabiting forms of the genus. Most of
the species are pale colored and lightly sclerotized.
RECORDS: Male from litter at Parrish on January 25,
1961, by M. L. Green. Three females from litter at Oviedo on
April 24, 1961, by J. A. Murrell. Female from litter at Malabar
on April 16, 1962, by V. E. Flaws. Three females from litter at
Knights on April 9, 1962, by V. E. Flaws. Female from litter at
Minneola on July 16, 1962, by J. A. Murrell. Female from bark
at Lake Wales on April 27, 1959, by H. L. Greene. Three males
and two females from bark at Cleveland on April 11, 1962, by
V. E. Flaws. Male from leaf at Scottsmoor on April 21, 1955,
by H. Holtzberg. Female paratype from scaly orange leaf at
DeLand on February 3, 1959, by D. W. Clancy. Male from orange
leaf at Bamboo on April 20, 1959, by M. H. Muma. Male on scaly
leaves at Fort Pierce on January 19, 1959, by H. L. Greene. Two
males and young from orange leaves at Bluefields on January
19, 1959, by M. H. Muma. Male and female from leaves at
Knights on October 2, 1961, by D. F. Farmer. Female from
leaves at Highlands Hammock State Park on March 21, 1963,
by R. F. Kanavel.

Amblyseiulus iphiformis Muma
(Figures-Amblyseiulus 10 and 18)
Amblyseiulus iphiformis Muma, 1962, Florida Ent., 45(1):
6, Fig. 6, A-G.







Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 15

DIAGNOSIS: This heavily sclerotized species is easily iden-
tified by the minute size of the dorsal and small size of the
median and lateral setae, the nearly equal-sized metapodal scuta,
and the unique spermatheca. Males are not known.
DISCUSSION: The sizes of L2 and L3 seem to indicate that
this species belongs in the L3 > or = L2 group, but most charac-
ters rule out this association. At present the species is unique
in the genus. The color of living specimens has not been recorded.
Specimens have been collected from the litter, bark, and leaves.
RECORDS: Female holotype from citrus litter in Turnbull
Hammock north of Mims, January 19, 1960, by J. A. Murrell.
Female from citrus bark at Sebring, January 15, 1962, by D. F.
Farmer. Female from leaf at Weirsdale, August 20, 1959, by
H. L. Greene.

Amblyseiulus lepidus (Chant)
(Figures-Amblyseiulus 1 and 5)
Typhlodromus lepidus Chant, 1959, Canadian Ent., 91(Suppl.
12): 82, Figs. 150-151.
Amblyseiulus lepidus, Muma, 1961, Bull. Florida State Mu-
seum, 5(7) : 278.
DIAGNOSIS: This species and A. putnami (Chant) are
closely related and in the L2 > La section of the genus. In this
species the preanal pores of the ventrianal scutum are equidis-
tant from each other and the posterior preanal setae, and the
spermatophore bearer is less angulate.
DISCUSSION: Living specimens are pale brown owing to
moderate sclerotization. The species is common in the litter and
is occasionally taken from the fruit and leaves of citrus.
The species identified by Schuster and Pritchard (13) as
A. asetus (Chant) is either this species or a closely related form.
Their specimens lack the short L', aligned parapodals and min-
ute or missing preanal pores indicated by Chant for A. asetus.
RECORDS: Female from leaves at Winter Haven on May 23,
1960, by J. A. Murrell. Female from fruit at Sebring on July
10, 1961, by D. F. Farmer. Two females from litter at Knights
on January 9, 1961, by M. L. Green. Female from litter at Mala-
bar on April 12, 1961, by D. F. Farmer. Male and female from
litter at Fort Pierce on April 12, 1961, by J. A. Murrell. Three







16 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

females from litter in Turnbull Hammock near Mims on April
24, 1961, by D. F. Farmer. Three females from litter at Parrish
on April 19, 1961, by J. A. Murrell. Female from litter at Weirs-
dale on April 4, 1962, by V. E. Flaws. Two females from litter
at Clearwater on April 9, 1962, by V. E. Flaws.

Amblyseiulus macrosetae Muma
(Figures-Amblyseiulus 4, 8, and 19)
Amblyseiulus macrosetae Muma, 1962, Florida Ent., 45(1) :
3, Fig. 5, A-F.
DIAGNOSIS: This L2 > L3 species is readily separated from
other species on citrus by the macrosetae on leg 1. It may be
separated from A. gracilisetae Muma, the only other known
species in Florida with macrosetae on leg 1, by the comparative
lengths of L2 and L".
DISCUSSION: To date this species has been taken from the
litter of only one east coast grove. The species is, however,
known from several uncultivated localities and will probably
occur in other citrus groves. It is weakly sclerotized. Living
specimens have not been seen.
RECORDS: Female paratype from litter at Malabar on
January 25, 1960, by J. A. Murrell. Two males and one female
from litter at Malabar on January 17, 1962, by J. A. Murrell.
Three females from litter at Malabar on April 16, 1962, by
D. F. Farmer.

Amblyseiulus putnami (Chant)
(Figures-Amblyseiulus 4 and 17)
Typhlodromus putnami Chant, 1959, Canadian Ent., 91
(Suppl. 12) : 91, Figs. 198-199.
Amblyseiulus putnami, Muma, 1961, Bull. Florida State
Museum, 5(7): 278.
DIAGNOSIS: This species is distinguished from A. lepidus
(Chant) by having the preanal pores of the ventrianal scutum
located closer to the posterior preanal setae than to each other.
Also the spermatophore bearer of this form has a mesal spur
and an angulate tip on the transverse arm.
DISCUSSION: A. lepidus, A. putnami, A. clausae and the







Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 17

A. asetus of Schuster and Pritchard (1963) are quite closely
related species, all having a cup-shaped spermatheca.
Living specimens of this form are light brown and to date
have been taken only in litter under the trees.
RECORDS: Female from litter at Malabar on April 12,
1961, by D. F. Farmer. Female from litter at Arcadia on April
11, 1962, by V. E. Flaws. Two females from litter at Knights
on April 9, 1962, by V. E. Flaws. Two females from litter in
Turnbull Hammock near Mims on April 18, 1962, by V. E.
Flaws. Male from litter at Parrish on April 11, 1962, by V. E.
Flaws.

Amblyseiulus rotundus Muma
(Figures-Amblyseiulus 7, 13, and 24)
Amblyseiulus rotundus Muma, 1961, Bull. Florida State Mu-
seum 5(7): 279, Figs. 37-40.
DIAGNOSIS: This species is closely related to A. cannaensis
in the A. ovatus species group. It is distinguished by having L2
and L' somewhat shorter, the nearly round metapodal scuta, and
the elongate, slender tubular spermatheca; and the mesal part of
the transverse arm of the T-shaped spermatophore bearer is
about 1/3 of the total length of the arm.
DISCUSSION: If Schuster and Pritchard (13) have cor-
rectly placed the specimens that they identify as A. ovatus, this
species may have to be synonymized. A. fragariae (Kennett)
appears to be another species of the group. Except for one
female collected from bark, all specimens have been taken from
citrus litter in Florida. The type was collected from fescue at
Spring Water, Oregon. Nothing is known about living specimens.
RECORDS: Female from litter at Lake Alfred on February
14, 1961, by M. L. Green. Female from litter at Fort Pierce on
April 12, 1961, by D. F. Farmer. Female from litter at Sebring
on April 19, 1961, by D. F. Farmer. Female from litter at
Oviedo on April 24, 1961, by J. A. Murrell. Three females from
litter at Clearwater on January 3, 1962, by D. F. Farmer. Male
and two females from litter in Turnbull Hammock near Mims
on January 10, 1962, by D. F. Farmer. Female from litter at
Parrish on April 11, 1962, by H. L. Greene. Four females from
litter at Arcadia on January 22, 1962, by J. A. Murrell.







18 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

Amblyseiulus solens DeLeon
Amblyseiulus solens DeLeon, 1962, Florida Ent., 45(1): 17,
Figs. 41-46.
DIAGNOSIS: This species is closely related to or identical
with A. dorsatus. It is maintained separately for the present
because of the widely spaced preanal pores of the ventrianal
scutum and slight differences in the spermatheca and spermato-
phore bearers.
DISCUSSION: This species is a lightly sclerotized pale
yellow mite. It has been collected from citrus litter.
RECORDS: Male and two females from litter at Parrish on
April 11, 1962, by V. E. Flaws. Three females from litter in
Turnbull Hammock near Mims on April 18, 1962, by V. E.
Flaws.


Amblyseiella setosa Muma
(Figures-Amblyseiella 1 to 7)
Amblyseiella setosa Muma, 1955, Ann. Ent. Soc. Amer.,
48(4): 266, Figs. 13-15.
DIAGNOSIS: This species is distinguished by the generic
characters; a single pair of preanal setae and pores on the
female ventrianal scutum; 3 pairs of preanal setae and a pair
of widely spaced preanal pores on the male ventrianal scutum;
a funnel-shaped spermatheca; an L-shaped spermatophore
bearer with the transverse arm weakly bifurcate at the tip.
DISCUSSION: This is a large, weakly sclerotized species
that is off-white to yellow in collor. It is frequently found in
association with six-spotted mites on citrus leaves but has also
been taken in numbers from the litter. The crowned mite is the
local common name for the species.
RECORDS: Male, three females, nymphs, and larvae from
leaves at Lake Alfred on June 11, 1963, by R. F. Kanavel. Three
females and four nymphs from leaves at Tampa on May 14,
1961, by J. A. Murrell. Male from orange leaves at Tampa on
May 27, 1952, by M. H. Muma and R. B. Johnson. Female and
male from citrus bark at Parrish on April 11, 1962, by M. H.
Muma. Male and four females from citrus bark at Minneola







Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 19

on April 4, 1962, by M. H. Muma. Female from litter in Turnbull
Hammock near Mims on April 18, 1962, by V. E. Flaws. Two
females from litter at Avon Park on April 17, 1962, by D. D.
Coffey. Female from litter at Knights on April 9, 1962, by V. E.
Flaws. Female from litter at Clearwater on April 12, 1961,
by M. H. Muma. Male from litter at Sebring on January 15,
1962, by J. A. Murrell.


Amblyseislla




3 /5


-p p


/ \


6




7


Genus Amblyseiella Muma
Amblyseiella setosa Muma: Figure 1, Female dorsal scutum. 2, Tip
of spermatophore bearer. 3, Spermatheca. 4, Metapodal platelets. 5, Fe-
male ventrianal scutum. 6, Male ventrianal scutum. 7, Macrosetae on
leg 4.

Key to the Species of Amblyseius Berlese
1. 2 or more pairs of lateral setae elongate and whip-like;
macrosetae on fourth leg longest on genu ...........------ -2
No lateral setae elongate and whip-like; macrosetae on
fourth leg longest on basitarsus ....----- ....------------------- 5
2. Sternum wider than long; ventrianal scutum pentagonal or
shield-shaped ..------------------------.--_ __3







20 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

Sternum as long as or longer than wide; ventrianal scutum
elongate and vase-shaped; metapodal scuta obovate; sper-
matheca slender with a swollen
atrium ---- -------------- A. largoensis (Muma) p. 22
3. Chelicerae greatly enlarged with 3 teeth on movable finger;
pores on ventrianal scutum located behind posterior pre-
anal setae; metapodal scuta tiny and ovate; spermatheca
wide and tubular with constricted
atrium ___- ---------_ A. floridanus (Muma) p. 22
Chelicerae normal in size with multiple teeth on movable
finger; pores on ventrianal scutum located between pos-
terior preanal setae --- ----____------------ 4
4. Dorsal scutum heavily sclerotized; L4 and L8 elongate and
whip-like; macrosetae knobbed; metapodal scuta triangu-
lar; spermatheca slender externally, swollen internally;
spermatophore bearer with forked tip on
transverse arm --- ------- A. quadripilis (Banks) p. 23
Dorsal scutum lightly sclerotized; L1, L4, L8, and M3 elongate
and whip-like, macrosetae pointed; metapodal scuta rec-
tangular; spermatheca slender with swollen atrium; sper-
matophore bearer with knobbed tip on
transverse arm --------- A. aerialis (Muma) p. 21
5. Posterior margin of female sternum straight or concave;
ventrianal scutum pentagonal or shield-shaped---- 6
Posterior margin of female sternum lobed; ventrianal scu-
tum elongate and slightly to strongly vase-shaped ---- 8
6. Spermatheca gradually tapered from mesal end to atrium;
posterior preanal setae approximate and located just in
front of approximate preanal pores; L1 and L4 twice length
of L2 and L3; spermatophore bearer with a broad lobe at
mesal end of transverse arm --- ------ 7
Spermatheca a bowl internally with a thin stem leading to
swollen atrium; posterior preanal setae distant with pores
located between them; L' and L4 at most slightly longer
than L2 and L3; spermatophore bearer T-shaped and taper-
ed to a tiny knob at mesal end of
transverse arm -------- A. dentilis (DeLeon) p. 27
7. L2 and L3 subequal or L3 slightly longer; spermatophore
bearer with mesal lobe bent at right angle to transverse
arm ---- --------- A. simplicissimus (DeLeon) p. 27







Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 21

L2 distinctly shorter than L3; spermatophore bearer with
mesal lobe a straight continuation of
transverse arm ------------ A. deleoni Muma, p. 26
8. M3 elongate and plumose; spermatheca goblet-shaped; sper-
matophore bearer with a broad
spatulate tip --- -------- A. peregrinus Muma, p. 29
M3 short and setaceous; spermatheca with a thin stem and
flat and bowl-like mesally; spermatophore bearer bent
sharply at tip ...------.-. ..---------------- ---- 9
9. M3 small, 1/3 the length of L8; spermatophore bearer shaped
like a halberd -- ---------A. hibisci (Chant) p. 28
M3 tiny, less than 1/6 the length of L8; spermatophore
bearer shaped like a golf club --------
------ A. limonicus Garman and McGregor, p. 29

Amblyseius (Amblyseius) aerialis (Muma)
(Figures-Amblyseius 1, 22, and 25)
Amblyseiopsis aerialis Muma, 1955, Ann. Ent. Soc. Amer.,
48(4) : 264, Figs. 7-9.
Amblyseius aerialis, Athias-Henriot, 1957, Bull. Soc. Hist.
Nat. Afr. 48: 338, Fig. 5, A-B.
DIAGNOSIS: This species is a typical long seta Amblyseiu.
with the longest fourth-leg macroseta on the genu and the
sternum wider than long. It is separated from closely related
forms by having L2 small but > L3; the form and placement of
the preanal pores on the pentagonal female ventrianal scutum;
the tubular spermatheca; the form of the spermatophore bearer.
DISCUSSION: All parts of the tree association, fruit, leaves,
bark, and litter, are visited by this species. It is somewhat more
common on the leaves. The species is weakly sclerotized and is
pale brown or yellow in color. It is frequently associated with
infestations of Brevipalpus spp. on fruit and leaves. Long-haired
mite is the local common name for the species.
RECORDS: Male and female from litter at Clearwater on
January 21, 1960, by H. L. Greene. Two females from litter at
Fort Pierce on April 16, 1962, by V. E. Flaws. Female from
litter at Weirsdale on December 17, 1952, by J. A. Coddington.
Young female from C. sinensis twigs at Oak Hill on May 22,
1953, by L. C. Knorr. Female from bark at Minneola on October







22 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

10, 1960, by J. A. Murrell. Female from leaves on north Merritt
Island on May 18, 1955, by H. Holtzberg. Female and young
from leaves at Fort Pierce on April 25, 1955, by H. Holtzberg.
Young female from six-spotted mite infested leaves on north
Merritt Island on May 18, 1955, by H. L. Greene. Young female
from leaf at Winter Haven on December 14, 1952, by M. H.
Muma. Males and females from old grapefruit at Lake Alfred
on November 12-21, 1963, by A. G. Selhime.

Amblyseius (Amblyseius) floridanus (Muma)
(Figures-Amnblyseius 15, 17, 21, 24, and 33)
Amblyseiopsis floridanus Muma, Ann. Ent. Soc. Amer. 48
(4) : 264, Figs. 4-6.
Amblyseius floridanus, Athias-Henriot, 1958, Bull Soc. Hist.
Nat. Afr. 49: 33, Fig. 14, A-B.
DIAGNOSIS: This long seta species is readily recognized
by its large chelicerae, the position of the preanal pores, the
tubular spermatheca with a reduced atrium, and the pick-axe
form of the tip of the transverse arm of spermatophore bearer.
It belongs in the species group in which the longest fourth-leg
macroseta is on the genu.
DISCUSSION: This species has been taken from citrus bark
and litter but is far more common in woodland litter. It is a
moderately sclerotized species that is pale brown in color.
RECORDS: Female from litter at Weirsdale on January 15,
1953, by M. H. Muma. Female from litter at Weirsdale on
January 15, 1956, by H. L. Greene. Two females from bark at
Fort Pierce on January 17, 1962, by D. F. Farmer.

Amblyseius (Amblyseialus) largoensis (Muma)
(Figures-Amblyseius 14, 18, and 28)
Amblyseiopsis largoensis Muma, 1955, Ann. Ent. Soc. Amer.,
48(4): 266, Figs. 10-12.
Amblyseius largoensis, Athias-Henriot, 1957, Bull. Soc. Hist.
Nat. Afr. No., 48: 336.
DIAGNOSIS: This long seta Amblyseius is easily distin-
guished from most other species of the group by the elongate,
constricted, vase-shaped, female ventrianal scutum, and by the







Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 23

female sternal scutum which is longer than wide. It may be
separated from A. magnoliae Muma by its smaller S1 and by
the lack of a distinct shelf at the anterior end of the female
ventrianal scutum. The tip of the transverse arm of the sperma-
tophore bearer is weakly bifurcate.
DISCUSSION: This species has been collected from the fruit
and leaves of citrus and from the litter beneath the trees. It
is a weakly sclerotized form that is off-white to pale yellow
except while feeding on dark hosts, when typical gut markings
may be seen. The species is relatively common and is frequently
taken in association with spider mites and Brevipalpus spp.
RECORDS: Female from fruit at Oviedo on July 23, 1962,
by V. E. Flaws. Female from leaves at Tampa on May 14, 1961,
by D. F. Farmer. Male and nine females from leaves on Siesta
Key near Sarasota on May 7, 1961, by D. D. Coffey. Three
females from leaves at Fort Pierce on June 17, 1958, by H. L.
Greene. Two females from litter at Malabar on April 16, 1962,
by V. E. Flaws. Female from litter at Clearwater on April 9,
1962, by V. E. Flaws. Two females and young from litter at
Fort Pierce on April 12, 1961, by D. F. Farmer. Female from
litter at Weirsdale on October 2, 1961, by M. H. Muma.

Amblyseius (Iphiseius) quadripilis (Banks)
(Figures-Amblyseius 19, 20, and 23)
Seius quadripilis Banks, 1905, Proc. Ent. Soc. Wash., 7: 138.
Amblyseius quadripilis, Muma, 1955, Ann. Ent. Soc. Amer.,
48(4) : 263, Figs. 1-3.
DIAGNOSIS: This is an atypical long seta species; it is
easily distinguished by the minute M3 and the broadly knobbed
macrosetae on leg 4. The cervix of the spermatheca is bowl-
shaped mesally and tubular ectally with a distinct atrium; the
tip of the transverse arm of the spermatophore bearer is dis-
tinctly furcate.
DISCUSSION: Although most workers have placed this
form in Banks' species, color notation in the original description
casts doubt on its identity. Banks states "pale yellowish",
whereas the species cited here is always a deep red-brown in
the living state and even on slides several years old. This is,
however, the only species on Florida citrus that matches Banks'







24 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

morphological description; so, for the present, this placement
must stand.
With a single exception this is the most common species on
citrus in the state. It is hemispheric in shape and very heavily
sclerotized, which results in the deep color reported above. The
sclerotization makes it extremely difficult to observe morpho-
logic details and has resulted in a number of descriptive and
illustrative errors by the author and other workers.
Food-habits studies presently being conducted on the species
indicate a distinctive biology within the family.
Locally this species is known as the shiny button mite. It is
found on the fruit, leaves, and bark and in litter of citrus trees.

RECORDS: Because this species is so common, only a few
representative collections are cited.
Two females from fruit at Parrish on July 25, 1962, by
V. E. Flaws. Male from fruit at Knights on April 9, 1962, by
V. E. Flaws. Female from fruit at Sebring on January 15, 1962,
by D. F. Farmer. Female from fruit at Minneola on October 2,
1961, by D. F. Farmer. Males, females, and young from grape-
fruit leaves at Lake Alfred on December 5, 1960, by M. H.
Muma. Male from scaly leaf at Weirsdale on May 27, 1952, by
D. Ozanne. Female from scaly leaf at Fruitland Park on March
25, 1952, by M. H. Muma. Female from leaves infested with
six-spotted mites at Clearwater on January 30, 1956, by H. L.
Greene. Female at Fort Pierce on April 16, 1958, by H. L.
Greene. Female from leaves on Siesta Key near Sarasota on
May 7, 1961, by M. H. Muma. Male and two females from grape-
fruit leaves at Lucerne Park on May 25, 1959, by H. L. Greene.
Female from litter at Arcadia on April 11, 1962, by V. E. Flaws.


Amblyseius (Typhlodromopsis) deleoni Muma
(Figure-Amblyseius 6)

Amblyseius deleoni Muma, 1962, Florida Ent., 45(1): 7,
Fig. 12, A-B.

DIAGNOSIS: Only the male of this species is positively
known. It is very closely related to A. simplicissimus (DeLeon),
from which it may be distinguished by the broad, spatulate,
unflexed tip of the transverse arm of the spermatophore bearer.







Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 25


Amblyseius
















Genus Amblyseius Berlese
Amblyseius (Typhlodromopsis) simplicissimus (DeLeon): Figure 1, Tip
of spermatophore bearer. 8, Spermatheca. A. (T.) dentilis (DeLeon):
Figure 2, Tip of spermatophore bearer. 9, Spermatheca. A. (T.) deleoni
Muma: Figure 6, Tip of spermatophore bearer. Amblyseius (Typhlodro-
malus) peregrinus (Muma): Figure 3, Tip of spermatophore bearer. 10,
Spermatheca. A. (T.) hibisci (Chant): Figure 4, Tip of spermatophore
bearer. 5, Posterior end of dorsal scutum. 11, Spermatheca. A. (T.) limoni-
cus Garman and McGregor: Figure 7, Tip of spermatophore bearer. 12,
Posterior end of dorsal scutum.


DISCUSSION: Hirschmann (5) synonymized this species
with A. simplicissimus, but the collection of additional males has
convinced me that it is distinct. I have one associated female
and male. The female is indistinguishable from A. simplicissi-
mus. Living specimens are off-white in color.

RECORDS: Male and (?) female from sour orange leaves
in Highlands Hammock State Park near Sebring on February 15,
1963, by M. H. Muma. Two males from leaves in Turnbull
Hammock near Mims on October 24, 1961, by D. F. Farmer.

Amblyseius (Typhlodromopsis) dentilis' (DeLeon)
(Figures-Amblyseius 2, 9, and 31)

Typhlodromus dentilis DeLeon, 1960, Ent. News.

Amblyseius dentilis, Muma, 1961, Bull. Florida State Mu-
seum, 5(7): 287.







26 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations


Amblyseius




14



15 16
13 C

19 20
18 C


7 / 125

e, ~ /( ;2 4

228





30 32

29 sr 33


Genus Amblyseius Berlese
Amblyseius (Amblyseius) aerialis (Muma): Figure 13, Female dorsal
scutum. 22, Spermatheca. 25, Tip of spermatophore bearer. A. (A.) flori-
danus (Muma) : Figure 15, Female sternal scutum. 17, Cheliceral fingers.
21. Spermatheca. 24, Tip of spermatophore bearer. 33, Macrosetae on leg
4. Amblyseius (Amblyseialus) largoensis (Muma): Figure 14, Female
sternal scutum. 18, Tip of spermatophore bearer. 28, Female ventrianal
scutum. Amblyseius (Iphiseius) quadripilis (Banks): Figure 19, Tip of
spermatophore bearer. 20, Cheliceral fingers. 23, Spermatheca. Amblyseius







Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 27

DIAGNOSIS: This is a typical short seta Amblyseius in
which the posterior margin of the female sternum is concave
or straight, and the female ventrianal scutum is pentagonal
or shield-shaped. It is distinguished from closely related species,
A. sabali (DeLeon) and A. dillus (DeLeon), by details of the
spermatheca and spermatophore bearer.
DISCUSSION: Previous recordings of the two above men-
tioned species from citrus in Florida are erroneous. This is the
only species of the complex now recognized from citrus. It is a
weakly sclerotized, off-white to pale yellow species that is found
on the leaves and in the litter.
RECORDS: Two males and six females from leaves at Cleve-
land on May 18, 1962, by R. F. Kanavel. Female from leaf at
Fort Pierce on October 16, 1961, by D. F. Farmer. Female
from orange leaf at Lake Placid on March 13, 1952, by F. E.
Fisher. Four females from litter at Cleveland on January 22,
1962, by D. F. Farmer. Female from litter at Parrish on April
19, 1961, by J. A. Murrell. Female from litter at Weirsdale on
January 15, 1953.

Amblyseius (Typhlodromopsis) simplicissimus (DeLeon)
(Figures-Amblyseius 1, 8, 26, and 30)
Typhlodromus simplicissimus DeLeon, 1959, Florida Ent.,
42(3) : 117, Figs. 11-13.
Amblyseius simplicissimus, Muma, 1961, Bull. Florida State
Museum, 5(7): 287.
DIAGNOSIS: This species is a short seta Amblyseius with a
straight or concave posterior margin on the female sternum and
a pentagonal or shield-shaped female ventrianal scutum. It is
easily distinguished from related forms, except A. deleoni, by
the approximate position and equal spacing of the posterior
preanal setae and preanal pores. It is distinguished from A.
deleoni by the bent and narrowed tip of the transverse arm of
the spermatophore bearer.

(Typhlodromalus) peregrinus (Muma) : Figure 16, Female dorsal scutum.
A. (T.) hibisci (Chant): Figure 29, Female sternal scutum. A. (T.) limo-
nicus Garman and McGregor: Figure 32, Female ventrianal scutum. Am-
blyseius (Typhlodromopsis) simplicissimus (DeLeon): Figure 26, Female
sternal scutum. 30, Female ventrianal scutum. A. (T.) dentilis (DeLeon):
Figure 31, Macrosetae on leg 4.







28 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

DISCUSSION: This is the most common form of this species
group on citrus in the state. It is weakly sclerotized and off-
white to pale yellow in color. Nothing is known of its food
habits.

RECORDS: Male from litter at Weirsdale on November 22.
1959, by J. A. Murrell. Five females and two nymphs from C.
sinensis twigs at Oak Hill on February 12, 1954, by L. C. Knorr.
Three males, female, and nymph from leaves at Highlands Ham-
mock State Park on April 24, 1963, by H. L. Greene. Ten
females from leaves infested with six-spotted mites at Scottsmoor
on March 21, 1955, by H. L. Greene. Female under purple scale
armor on leaf at Lake Alfred on March 21, 1952, by M. H.
Muma. Two females from leaf in Turnbull Hammock near Mims
on July 25, 1960, by M. H. Muma. Two males and female from
orange leaf at Bluefields on January 19, 1959, by H. L. Greene.
Female from fruit in Turnbull Hammock near Mims on Janu-
ary 10, 1962, by D. F. Farmer. Male from fruit at Oviedo on
January 10, 1962, by D. F. Farmer.

Amblyseius (Typhlodromalus) hibisci (Chant)

(Figures-Amblyseius 4, 5, 11, and 29)

Typhlodromus hibisci Chant, 1959, Canadian Ent., 91(Suppl.
12) : 68, Figs. 100-101.
Amblyseius hibisci, Muma, 1961, Bull. Florida State Museum,
5(7) : 288.

DIAGNOSIS: This is a typical short seta Amblyseius on
which the posterior margin of female sternum is lobed and the
female ventrianal scutum is narrow, elongate, and frequently
vase-shaped. It can be easily distinguished from related species
on Florida citrus by the comparative lengths of M3 and L8 and
the position of the preanal setae and pores. The same characters
and genitalic details will separate it from any related form.

DISCUSSION: Living specimens are off-white to pale yellow
in color. The species is weakly sclerotized. It is fairly common
on the leaves and fruit in the northern areas. Specimens are
frequently taken in six-spotted mite colonies.
This species has the local common name of hibiscus mite.







Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 29

RECORDS: Two males from leaves at Fruitland Park on
March 25, 1952, by J. A. Murrell. Male from leaf infested with
six-spotted mites at Bartow on March 13, 1956, by J. A. Murrell.
Two females and two nymphs from scaly leaves at Weirsdale
on June 25, 1956, by M. H. Muma. Two males from leaf infested
with six-spotted mites at Spring Lake on February 28, 1957,
by H. L. Greene. Male and eight females from orange leaves
infested with six-spotted mites at Lake Weir on April 20, 1959,
by M. H. Muma and H. L. Greene. Female from leaf at Orlando
on May 9, 1962, by R. F. Kanavel.

Amblyseius (Typhlodromalus) limonicus Garman & McGregor
(Figures-Amblyseius 7, 12, and 32)
Amblyseius limonicus Garman & McGregor, 1956, Bull. So.
Calif: Acad. Sci., 55(1) : 11, P1. 5, Figs. 1-6.
Amblyseius limonicus, Muma, 1961, Bull. Florida State Mu-
seum, 5(7) : 288.
DIAGNOSIS: This species belongs in the same group as A.
hibisci but is readily distinguished by the much smaller M3 and
different positions of the preanal setae. Genitalic details will
separate it from other closely related forms.
-DISCUSSION: A weak sclerotization results in an off-white
to pale yellow color. Specimens have been recovered from citrus
leaves, but the species is more common on other plants in the
state.
RECORDS: Female from orange leaf at Palmetto on April
13, 1959, by D. W. Clancy. Female from leaf infested with six-
spotted mites at Scottsmoor on April 20, 1955, by H. L. Greene.
Male and female from leaf at Fort Pierce on March 20, 1959,
by H. L. Greene.

Amblyseius (Typhlodromalus) peregrinus (Muma)
(Figures-Amblyseius 3, 10, and 16)
Typhlodromus peregrinus Muma, 1955, Ann. Ent. Soc. Amer.,
48(4) : 270, Figs. 22-24.
Typhlodrornus robiniae Chant, 1959, Canadian Ent., 91
(Suppl. 12) : 98, Figs. 232-233.
Typhlodromus evansi Chant, 1959, Canadian Ent., 91 (Suppl.
12) : 99, Figs. 234-235.







30 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

Typhlodromus primulae Chant, 1959, Canadian Ent., 91
(Suppl. 12): Figs. 236-237.
Amblyseius peregrinus Muma, 1961, Bull. Florida State Mu-
seum, 5(7) : 288.
DIAGNOSIS: Although this species belongs to the same
subgenus as the two preceding species, it differs in having MI
1/2 to 2/3 the length of LS and plumose. In this respect it is
more closely related to A. olombo Pritchard and Baker and A.
planetarius (DeLeon) from Africa and Mexico. Proportions of
setae on the dorsal scutum and genitalic details separate it from
these forms.
DISCUSSION: This is the most common of all phytoseiids
on Florida citrus. Most living specimens are milk-white to pale
yellow in color. When it has fed on a dark host, typical gut
"markings" are seen, but such are rarely seen in grove-collected
specimens.
As indicated by the synonymy above, this is a variable species
and is found on citrus, in litter, and on a wide range of plants
in the state. Muma and Denmark (9) have, however, shown
that there are intergrades that indicate a single species.
It is commonly called the yellow mite.
RECORDS: Because of its extreme abundance only a few
typical records are cited.
Male and three females from leaves at Fruitland Park on
December 15, 1953, by J. A. Coddington. Male from leaf at
Oviedo on January 16, 1961, by M. H. Muma and J. A. Murrell.
Female from leaves at Clearwater on October 3, 1960, by M. L.
Green. Female from orange leaf at Knights on October 3, 1960,
by M. H. Muma. Female from leaf at Winter Haven on October
5, 1960, by J. A. Murrell. Male from orange leaf at Yalaha on
March 26, 1953, by J. A. Coddington. Male and female from
scaly orange leaf at Weirsdale on January 22, 1959, by M. H.
Muma. Male and five females from leaves infested with six-
spotted mites on north Merritt Island on April 28, 1958, by
M. H. Muma. Four males and five females around button on
young fruit at Tampa on May 18, 1954, by M. H. Muma.. Four
females on fruit at Sebring on July 10, 1961, by J. A. Murrell
and D. F. Farmer. Female from fruit at Arcadia on January
22, 1962, by J. A. Murrell. Female from fruit at Minneola on
April 4, 1962, by V. E. Flaws. Female from orange twigs in







Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 31

Brevard County in April, 1954, by H. L. Greene. Female from
bark at Clearwater on October 12, 1959, by H. L. Greene. Male
and female from bark at Avon Park on April 17, 1961, by
J. A. Murrell. Two females from litter at Oviedo on April 25,
1960, by D. F. Farmer. Female from litter at Cleveland on
January 25, 1961, by M. L. Green. Female from litter at Clear-
water on April 12, 1961, by D. F. Farmer.

Key to the Species of Cydnodromus Muma
1. M3 subequal with or only slightly longer than L6; no distin-
guishable macroseta on fourth tarsus; primary metapodal
platelet parallel-sided; spermatheca with swollen atrium
and an elongate slender cervix that terminates internally
in a funnel-like enlargement; spermatophore bearer L-
shaped with the distal end of the transverse arm bent
forward (in some positions the bend is
not visible) -. ..........___.------- C. marinellus Muma, p. 29
Ms distinctly longer than L6; a distinct slender macroseta on
the fourth tarsus; primary metapodal platelet
lenticular -- --------- 2
2. Cervix of spermatheca funnel-shaped internally, broadly
tubular medially and constricted in front of the swollen
atrium; spermatophore bearer as in
C. marinellus --------..-------. C. planatus Muma, p. 31
Cervix of spermatheca cup-shaped internally, short and slen-
der medially and with a swollen atrium; spermatophore
bearer L-shaped but with the
tip straight- .--- ._....-----C. gracilis Muma, p. 28

Cydnodromus gracilis Muma
(Figures-Cydnodromus 4, 7, 13, and 14)
Cydnodromus gracilis Muma, 1962, Florida Ent., 45(1): 9,
Fig. 11, A-B.
DIAGNOSIS: Separation of this species from others that
are found on citrus in Florida is relatively easy. This form has
M3 > L6, a cup-shaped cervix of the spermatheca, a nearly
straight spatulate tip on the transverse arm of the spermato-
phore bearer, and a distinct macroseta on the fourth basitarsus.
Distinguishing it from such closely related species as C. vallis







32 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

(Schuster and Pritchard), C. comitatus DeLeon, and C. amicus
(Chant) may not be possible without comparison of the types.
DISCUSSION: With a single exception all specimens of this
species have been collected from litter beneath the trees in one
grove. The exception was two females taken from Olla v-nigrum
var. plagiata Csy. These two specimens were pale yellow in
color. Nothing is known of the habits of the species, and its
occurrence on a ladybeetle is an enigma.
RECORDS: Three females and six nymphs from litter at
Sebring on April 19, 1961, by D. F. Farmer. Female from litter
at Sebring on July 30, 1962, by V. E. Flaws. Two females on
Olla v-nigrum var. plagiata Csy. from citrus at Lake Alfred on
April 14, 1963, by R. F. Kanavel.

Cydnodromus marinellus Muma
(Figures-Cydnodromus 5, 6, 8, 11, and 12)
Cydnodromus marinellus Muma, 1962, Florida Ent., 45(1) :
8, Fig. 10, A-B.
DIAGNOSIS: This species is distinguished from others on
citrus in the state by MI = L6, no macroseta on the basitarsus
of leg 4, a lack of a constriction in the cervix of the spermatheca,
and a pick-axe shaped tip on the transverse arm of the sperma-
tophore bearer. Its separation from such closely related species
as C. brevispinus (Kennett) and C. huffakeri (Schuster and
Pritchard) would be dependent on an examination of types com-
paring genitalia, macrosetae, and other details.
DISCUSSION: The specific name of this species relates it to
C. marinus (Willman). This relationship was indicated in a
comparison of specimens of this species with Chant's (2)
description and illustrations of Willman's (15) species and with
females from West Virginia apple orchards identified by Chant
in 1957 as C. marinus. Recently, Schuster and Pritchard (13)
have described and illustrated C. californicus (McGregor), a
species synonymized by Chant (2) with C. marinus. Obvious
differences between C. californicus as recognized by Schuster
and Pritchard, C. marinus, Chant from West Virginia apples,
and C. marinellus indicate that Willman's type must be tho-
roughly illustrated and described before the systematics of this
group of species can be clarified.







Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 33


Cydnodromus












7 \ / 8
r r














9 10 1 12 13 14



Genus Cydnodromas Muma
Cydnodromus planatuis Muma: Figure 1, Female dorsal scutum. 2,
Female sternal scutum. 3, Metapodal platelets. 9, Tip of spermatophore
bearer. 10. Spermatheca. C. gracilis Muma: Figure 4, Female ventrianal
scutum. 7, Macroseta on leg 4. 13, Tip of spermatophore bearer. 14, Sper-
matheca. C. marinellus Muma: Figure 5, Metopodal platelets. 6, Female
dorsal scutum. 8, Genu, tibia, and basitarsus of leg 4. 11, Tip of sperma-
tophore bearer. 12. Spermatheca.

C. marinellus is the most common species of the genus that
is associated with citrus in Florida. It has been taken from
citrus, litter, fruit, and bark. The species is weakly sclerotized
and pale yellow in color.
RECORDS: There are at least 30 slides of this species in
the collection. The following are representative records.
Two females from fruit at Sebring on July 10, 1961, by D. F.
Farmer. Male from bark at Avon Park on October 9, 1961,
by D. F. Farmer. Female from citrus bark at Parrish on April
by D. F. Farmer. Female from citrus bark at Parrish on April







34 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

11, 1962, by M. H. Muma. Three females from litter at Weirs-
dale on April 4, 1962, by V. E. Flaws. Male and two females
from litter at Minneola on April 3, 1961, by J. A. Murrell. Two
females from litter at Knights on April 9, 1962, by V. E. Flaws.
Male from litter at Lake Alfred on February 13, 1961, by M. L.
Green. Male from litter at Arcadia on July 19, 1961, by D. F.
Farmer. Four females from litter at Parrish on April 11, 1962,
by D. F. Farmer. Male from litter at Clearwater on January 3,
1962, by D. F. Farmer. Two females from litter in Turnbull
Hammock near Mims on April 18, 1962, by V. E. Flaws. Female
from citrus litter at Fort Pierce on April 12, 1961, by M. H.
Muma.

Cydnodromus planatus Muma
(Figures-Cydnodromus 1, 2, 3, 9, and 10)

Cydnodromus planatus Muma, 1962, Florida Ent., 45(1): 9.
Fig. 9, A-H.

DIAGNOSIS: This species is readily distinguished from the
preceding two forms by M3 > L6, a distinct macroseta on the
basitarsus of the fourth leg, and a constriction of the cervix of
the spermatheca just mesad of the atrium. The spermatophore
bearer of the male is very similar to that of C. marinellus, from
which it is distinguishable by the comparative length of M3 and
L8 and the presence of a slender macroseta on the fourth basi-
tarsus. The form of the spermatheca is distinctive and permits
segregation of the species from all females in the genus.

DISCUSSION: Unfortunately the illustrations provided with
the original description were mislabeled. The figure citations
as given here are correct.
This species has also been taken from the litter, bark, and
fruit of citrus. It is weakly sclerotized and pale yellow in color.

RECORDS: Female on young fruit at Arcadia on April 17,
1961, by D. D. Coffey. Female from litter at Cleveland on Feb-
ruary 1, 1960, by D. F. Farmer. Female from litter at Cleveland
on April 19, 1961, by J. A. Murrell. Female from litter at
Parrish on April 19, 1961, by J. A. Murrell. Female from litter
at Arcadia on April 19, 1961, by J. A. Murrell. Female from
litter at Kissimmee on April 12, 1961, by J. A. Murrell.








Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 35

Amblydromella rickeri (Chant)
(Figures-Amblydromella 1 to 7)
Typhlodromus rickeri Chant, 1960, Canadian Ent., 92: 62,
Figs. 13-15.
Amblydromella rickeri, Muma, 1961, Bull. Florida State
Museum, 5(7) : 294.
DIAGNOSIS: On Florida citrus this species is readily identi-
fied as the only species with 6 pairs of lateral setae on a line
with or anterior to D3, with 3 macrosetae on leg 4, and with 4
pairs of preanal setae. It can be distinguished from related spe-
cies of the genus by the unknobbed macrosetae and by L2 being
only a fraction of the length of L3.
DISCUSSION: This tiny species is known to feed readily
on citrus rust mites, Phyllocoptruta oleivora (Ashmead), and
because of this, attempts are being made to introduce it into
Florida citrus groves. Post-introduction recoveries have been
made for 2 weeks to 3 months following releases, but post-freeze
(1962-63) establishment has not been proved. For this reason,
its occurrence is indicated in Table 1 by a broken line. It- is
a weakly sclerotized species that is off-white to pale yellow in
color.
RECORDS: Male from leaf at Orlando on June 20, 1962,
by R. F. Kanavel. Male, three females, several nymphs from
leaves at Lake Alfred on September 8-9, 1962, by R. F. Kanavel.
Nymph from leaf at Lake Alfred on June 13, 1963, by R. F.
Kanavel. Four males, two females, and five nymphs from
leaves at Lake Alfred on May 31, 1963, by R. F. Kanavel.
Male from leaf at Lake Alfred on May 21, 1963, by R. F. Kana-
vel. Four males and three females from leaves at Lake Alfred
on April 25, 1963, by R. F. Kanavel. Female from leaf at Lake
Alfred on April 4, 1963.

Clavidromina corna (DeLeon)
(Figures-Clavidromina 1 to 8)
Typhodromus cornus DeLeon, 1957, Florida Ent., 40(4) : 142,
Figs. 4-7.
Clavidromina corna, Muma, 1961, Bull. Florida State Museum,
Biol. Sci., 5(7) : 297.








36 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations


Amblydromella

S2








r 66


























Genus Amblydromella Muma
Amblydromella rickeri (Chant) : Figure 1, Female dorsal scutum. 2,
Female sternal scutum and metasternal platelet. 3, Female ventrianal
scutum. 4, Spermatheca. 5, Tip of spermatophore bearer. 6, Metapodal
platelets. 7, Macrosetae on leg 4.
Genus Clavidromina Muma











Clavidromina corna (DeLeon) : Figure 1, Female dorsal scutum. 2,
Female ventrianal scutum. 3, Female sternal scutum. 4, Tip of spermato-
phore bearer. 5, Spermatheca. 7, Macrosetae (?) on leg 4. 8, Male ventri-
anal scutum.
I 4











Genus Amblydromella Muma
Amblydromella, rickeri (Chant): Figure 1, Female dorsal scutum. 2,
Female sternal scutum and metasternal platelet. 3, Female ventrianal
scutum. 4, Spermatheca. 5, Tip of spermatophore bearer. 6, Metapodal
platelets. 7, Macrosetae on leg 4.
Genus Clavidromina Muma
Clavidromina coma (DeLeon): Figure 1, Female dorsal scutum. 2,
Female ventrianal scutum. 3, Female sternal scutum. 4, Tip of spermato-
phore bearer. 5, Spermatheca. 7, Macrosetae (?) on leg 4. 8, Male ventri-
anal scutum.








Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 37

DIAGNOSIS: This is the only species of the genus known to
date from Florida citrus. It may be distinguished by the generic
and key characters. All setae on the dorsal scutum are more or
less thickened, and M2 and L8 are serrate. The spermatheca is
funnel-shaped, and the spermatophore bearer is L-shaped with
a lateral spur.
DISCUSSION: DeLeon recorded this species from citrus at
Coral Gables at the time of the original description. An addi-
tional collection from the same locality is in the collection of the
Division of Plant Industry at Gainesville.
RECORDS: Female from Citrus sp. at Coral Gables on May
2, 1962, by C. E. Stegmaier.

Typhlodromina conspicua (Garman)
(Figures-Typhlodromina 1 to 5)
Iphidulus conspicuous Garman, 1948, Conn. Agri. Exp. Sta.
Bull. 520: 14, Fig. 16.
Typhlodromina conspicua, Muma, 1961, Bull. Florida State
Museum, 5(7) : 297, Figs. 15, 19, and 20.

DIAGNOSIS: On Florida citrus this species is readily recog-
nized by the generic characters, 4 pairs of dorsal setae, 2 pairs
of median setae, 8 pairs of lateral setae, 2 pairs of scapular
setae, 2 pairs of sternal setae, 4 pairs of ventrianal setae, and no
macroseta on the fourth basitarsus. The median and lateral
setae are weakly and indistinctly serrate; this serration is
much more distinct on M3 and L8. The spermatheca is tubular
with a tendency to be narrower at the mesal end than at the
atrium.
DISCUSSION: Although this species has been identified as
T. conspicua, there is considerable reason to doubt this place-
ment. It has never been compared with Garman's type. Although
more than 20 slides representing over 100 specimens have been
examined, no males have been found. No males are mentioned by
Garman (3), Nesbitt (11), or Chant (2); but Schuster and
Pritchard (13) identify a bisexual species with T. conspicua.
The specimens reported here agree rather well morphologically
with the females described and illustrated by the latter workers.
This systematic problem will not be solved until a study of the







38 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

types of T. conspicua, T. herbertae (Nesbitt), and T. tropicus
Chant has been made.
Living specimens of this species are quadrate in outline,
light tan in color, and shiny. They are frequently found in six-
spotted mite colonies and under empty scale armors. The species
is relatively common on citrus and is commonly referred to as
the conspicuous mite.
RECORDS: Five females from litter at Avon Park on
January 15, 1962, by J. A. Murrell. Female and young female
from litter at Bamboo on December 17, 1952, by M. H. Muma.
Female from litter at Cleveland on April 13, 1960, by M. H.
Muma. Female from top of grapefruit trees at Babson Park on
January 17, 1952, by C. H. Stearns, Jr. Female from orange
leaf at Weirsdale on May 24, 1952, by H. L. Greene. Female
from leaves infested with Florida red scale at Lake Alfred
on August 15, 1953, by M. H. Muma. Female from leaf at Vero
Beach on March 29, 1955, by H. Holtzberg. Female from leaf at
Palmetto on January 13, 1959, by H. L. Greene. Female from
leaf at Tarpon Springs on October 12, 1959, by M. H. Muma
and H. L. Greene. Ten females from leaves at Orlando on June
12, 1962, by R. F. Kanavel.

Key to the Species of Galendromus Muma
1. M1 distinctly shorter than D2; peritreme extending forward
beyond L2 on females, L' on males;
large species ----------- G. floridanus (Muma) p. 35
M1 as long or longer than D2; peritreme extending forward
to or beyond L3 on females, L4 on males;
small species ----------- G. annectens (DeLeon) p. 34

Galendromus annectens (DeLeon)
(Figures-Galendromus 5, 6, 7, and 9)
Typhlodromus annectens DeLeon, 1958, Florida Ent., 41 (2):
75, Fig. 12.
Galendromus annectens, Muma, 1961, Bull. Florida State
Museum, 5(7) : 298.
DIAGNOSIS: This species is easily distinguished from G.
floridanus (Muma), the only related species on citrus, by its
small size, M1 as long as or longer than D2, and the comparatively
shorter peritremes. It may be separated from the closely related







Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 39

Typhlodromina





S4


I 5

Galendromus











r H'
4 6 7




8 9


Genus Typhlodromina Muma
Typhlodromina conspicua (Garman): Figure 1, Dorsal scutum. 2,
Sternal scutum. 3, Metapodal platelets. 4, Ventrianal scutum. 5, Sperma-
theca.
Genus Galendromus Muma
Galendromus floridanus (Muma): Figure 1, Female dorsal scutum. 2,
Tip of spermatophore bearer. 3, Leg 2 male femur. 4, Spermatheca. 8,
Female ventrianal scutum. G. annectens (DeLeon) : Figure 5, Tip of sper-
matophore bearer. 6, Spermatheca. 7, Female dorsal scutum. 9, Female
ventrianal scutum.







40 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

G. ferrugineus DeLeon by the imbricate dorsal scutum, by D"
extending to D4, and by 3 pairs of ventrolateral interscutal
setae.
DISCUSSION: Although this species is common on many
plants in the state, it has been found only occasionally on citrus.
It is weakly sclerotized, off-white to pale yellow in color and is
nearly always associated with spider mite infestations.
RECORDS: Male from leaves infested with six-spotted
mites on north Merritt Island on April 28, 1958, by M. H. Muma
and D. W. Clancy. Two males, four females, and two nymphs
from leaves infested with six-spotted mites in Turnbull Ham-
mock near Mims on April 28, 1958, by M. H. Muma and D. W.
Clancy.

Galendromus floridanus (Muma)
(Figures -Galendromus 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8)
Typhlodromus floridanus Muma, 1955, Ann. Ent. Soc. Amer.,
48(4): 269, Figs. 19-21.
Typhlodromius helveolus, Chant, 1959, Canadian Ent., 91
(Suppl. 12) : 58, Figs. 58-59.
Galendromus floridanus, Muma, 1961, Bull. Florida State
Museum, 5(7) : 298.
DIAGNOSIS: This species is distinguished from the pre-
ceding by its larger size, M1 much smaller than D2, and the
comparatively longer peritremes. It is separated from its clos-
est relative, G. gratus (Chant), by L2 and L3 subequal with L1
and L4, and D2 extending to D3.
DISCUSSION: This is the most common species of the genus
on citrus. Living specimens are pale brown in color, which has
resulted in the local common name, tan mite. The species is
frequently found in colonies of the six-spotted mite, but has
been taken feeding on citrus red mite and Texas citrus mite.
Some specimens have also been collected from under the armors
of dead scale insects.
Unpublished laboratory investigations indicate that the
species is potentially capable of controlling spider mite infesta-
tions. Laboratory cultures of spider mites are frequently deci-
mated by contamination of this mite.








Annotated List and Keys to Phytoseiidae 41

RECORDS: The following records are from six-spotted mite
colonies unless otherwise stated. Male from fruit at Winter
Haven on June 14, 1954, by M. H. Muma. Female on grapefruit
leaf infested with citrus red mites at Tavares on March 7, 1953,
by R. B. Johnson. Four males, two females, and one nymph
from leaves at Lake Alfred on April 23, 1953, by J. A. Codding-
ton. Three males, five females, and two nymphs from leaves at
Palm Harbor, May 14, 1953, by M. H. Muma. Male and three
females from grapefruit leaves at Tern Lake on April 26, 1954,
by H. L. Greene. Male and four females under Florida red scale
armors on leaves at Kissimmee in February 1955 by M. H.
Muma. Male, two females, and two nymphs from leaves at
Fort Pierce on June 6, 1957, by H. Holtzberg. Four females
from leaves at Minneola on April 21, 1958, by H. L. Greene.
Three females from leaves at Weirsdale on May 22, 1959, by
M. H. Muma and H. L. Greene. Male from leaves at Shiloh on
March 14, 1962, by R. F. Kanavel.



Literature Cited

1. Athias-Henriot, C., 1957, Phytoseiidae et Aceosejidae (Acarina:Gama-
sin) d'Algerie, I genres Blattisocius Keegan, Iphiseits Berlese, Ambly-
seius Berlese, Phytoseius Ribaga, Phytosei lus Evans, Bull. Soc. Hist.
Nat. Afrique Nord 48: 319-352.
2. Chant, D. A., 1959, Phytoseiid mites (Acarina: Phytoseiidae) Part I.
Bionomics of seven species in southeastern England. Part II. A taxo-
nomic review of the family Phytoseiidae, with descriptions of 38 new
species, Canadian Ent., 91 (Suppl. 12): 1-166.
3. Garman, Philip, 1948, Mite species from apple trees in Connecticut,
Conn. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bull. 520: 1-27.
4. Hirschmann, W., 1957, Gangsystematic der Parasitiformes, 1: Rumpf-
beharrung und Ruckenflachen, Schrift. Vergl. Milbenkunde: 1-20.
5. Hirschmann, W., 1962, Gangsystematic der Parasitiformes, 5(5):
Gamasiden, Schrift. Vergl. Milbenkunde: 1-56.
6. Muma, Martin H., 1955, Phytoseiidae (Acarina) associated with citrus
in Florida, Ann. Ent. Soc. Amer., 48(4): 262-272.
7. Muma, Martin H., 1961, Subfamilies, genera and species of Phytoseii-
dae (Acarina: Mesostigmata) Bull. Florida State Mus. (Biol. Sci.)
5(7) : 267-302.
8. Muma, Martin H., 1962, New Phytoseiidae (Acardina: Mesostigmataj
from Florida, Florida Ent., 45(1): 1-10.
9. Muma, Martin H., and H. A. Denmark, 1962, Intraspecific variation
in phytoseiidae (Acarina-Mesostigmata), Florida Ent., 45(2): 57-65.








42 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

10. Muma, Martin H., A. G. Selhime, and H. A. Denmark, 1961, An anno-
tated list of predators and parasites associated with insects and mites
on Florida citrus, Univ. of Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Tech. Bull. 634: 1-39.
11. Nesbitt, H. H. J., 1951, A taxonomic study of the Phytoseiinae (Family
Laelaptidae) predaceous upon Tetranychidae of economic importance,
Zoologische Verhandelingen (12): 1-64.
12. Pritchard, A. Earl, and Edward W. Baker, 1962, Mites of the family
Phytoseiidae from central Africa with remarks on the genera of the
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13. Schuster, Robert 0., and A. Earl Pritchard, 1963, Phytoseiid mites of
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rina: Parasitiformes), Acarologia, 4 (1) :5-30.
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