• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Frontispiece
 Introduction
 Home of the honey peach
 History of the Honey Peach...
 History of the honey peach...
 Characteristics of the group
 Varieties
 Recommendations
 Acknowledgments






Group Title: Bulletin - Florida Agricultural Experiment Station ; 73
Title: The honey peach group
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026680/00001
 Material Information
Title: The honey peach group
Series Title: Bulletin University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station
Physical Description: p. 129-153 : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Reimer, F. C ( Frank Charles ), b. 1881
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 1904
 Subjects
Subject: Peach -- Varieties   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by F.C. Reimer.
General Note: Cover title.
Funding: This collection includes items related to Florida’s environments, ecosystems, and species. It includes the subcollections of Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit project documents, the Florida Sea Grant technical series, the Florida Geological Survey series, the Howard T. Odum Center for Wetland technical reports, and other entities devoted to the study and preservation of Florida's natural resources.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026680
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000921042
oclc - 18156706
notis - AEN1483

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 129
        Page 130
    Front Matter
        Page 131
        Page 132
    Table of Contents
        Page 133
    Frontispiece
        Page 134
    Introduction
        Page 135
        Page 136
    Home of the honey peach
        Page 137
    History of the Honey Peach in Europe
        Page 137
    History of the honey peach in America
        Page 138
        Page 139
    Characteristics of the group
        Page 140
    Varieties
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
    Recommendations
        Page 153
    Acknowledgments
        Page 153
Full Text






BULLETIN NO. 73.


FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION



The


Honey Peach Group,


.By F, C REIMER.


The bulletins of this Station will be sent free to any address in Florida upon application
to the Director of the Experiment Station, Lake City, Fla.

Jacksonville, Fla.,
INDUSTRIAL RECORD PUB, CO,
1904.


JULY, 1904.











BOARD OF TRUSTEES.



GEO. W. WILSON, President ...................... Jacksonville.
C. A. CARSON, Vice-President ............... ........Kissimmee.
F. L. STRINGER, Secretary .........................Brooksville.
F. E. HARRIS ........................................ Ocala.
E. D. BEGGS ..................................... Pensacola
J. R. PARROTT ................................... Jacksonville.
F. M. SIMONTON ......... .. ....................... Tampa.




STATION STAFF.



T. H. TALIAFERRO, C. E., Ph. D. ..................... Director.
*--------- .............. Vice-Director and Chemist.
* ------- .......................... Entomologist.
*__ -- --- ..............Botanist and Horticulturist.
CHAS. F. DAWSON, M. D., D. V. S .................. Veterinarian.
'**C. M. CONNER, B. S. .......... ..........Agriculturist.
* ------ . ..................... Assistant Chemist.
F. C. REIMER, B. S. .......................Assistant Horticulturist.
W. P. JERNIGAN ...................... Auditor and Bookkeeper.
A. TYLER ........................ Stenographer and Librarian.
JOHN H. JEFFRIES .... ... Gardener, Horticultural Department.
E. F. WORTHINGTON ............ Assistant in Field Experiments.
*To be supplied,
**Superintendent of Farmers' Institutes.


131












The following publications of the Florida Experiment Sta-

tion are available for free distribution, and may be secured by

addressing the director of the Experiment Station, University of

Florida, Lake City, Fla.:


Fertilizers........................pp. 48
Annual Report ................... 32
Leeches and Leeching ............ 17
Big Head .......................... 19
Pineapple ....................... 14
Liver Fluke Southern Cattle
Fever......................... ..." 15
The San Jose Scale............... 28
The Culture of Tobacco.......... 28
Cotton and Its Cultivation ........" 4
Orange Groves................. .." 33
Insect Enemies .................. 96
Insects Injurious to Grain ........ 31
Pineapple ........................." 15
Tobacco in Florida................" 63
Strawberries ...................... 48
The Fall Army Worm............. 8
The San Jose Scale............... 30
Some Strawberry Insects........ 55
A Chemical Study of Some Typi-
cal Florida Soils.................pp.128
Some Common Florida Scales.... 24


Baking Powders .................. 15
Some Citrus Troubles............ 35
Pecan Culture...................... 31
Feeding With Florida Feed Stuffs 95
The Cottony Cushion Scale....... 48
Top-working of Pecans.......... 124
Pomelos........................... 43
Cauliflower........................ 20
Velvet Beans ..................... 24
Two Peach Scales. ............... 32
Peen-to Peach Group............. 22
Packing Citrus Fruits............. Folio
Texas Fever and Salt Sick....... pp. 31
The Kumquats................... 14
The Mandarin Orange Group...... 32
The White Fly ................... 94
Pineapple Culture. I. Soils...... 35
Cultivation of Citrus Groves...... ** 30
Pineapple Culture. II. Varieties 32
Japanese Persimmons............ 48
Feeding Horses and Mules on
Home-Grown Feed-Stuffs..... 16


PRESS BULLETINS.


1 Directions for Preparation of Bordeaux
Mixture.
2 Lime and Its Relation to Agriculture.
3 Seed Testing.
4 The White Fly.
5 Basic Slag.
6 Nursery Inspection (part 1).
7 Nursery Inspection (part 2).
8 Care of Irish Potatoes Harvested in
the Spring and Held for Fall Planting.
9 Sore Head.
10 Plants Affected by Root Knot.
1 Vinegar.
2 Seed Beds and Their Management.
13 Treatment for San Jose Scale.
14 Beef from Velvet Beans and Cassava.
15 and 16 Some Poultry Pests.
17 Preservatives in Canned Goods
18 Cantaloupe Blight.
19 Cut Worms.
20 Hog Cholera and Swine Plague.
21 Parturient Paralysis.
22 Nitrogen as a Fertilizer,


23 Protection Against Drought.
24 Orange Mites.
25 Roup.
26 Lumpy Jaw.
27 Cover Crops.
28 Moon Blindness.
29 Food Adulteration.
30 Dehorning Cattle.
31 Coffee.
32 Foot and Mouth Disease.
33 Red Soldier Bug or Cotton Stainer.
34 Ox Warbles.
35 Butter.
36 Hook Worms in Cattle.
37 Velvet Bean.
38 Practical Results of Texas Fever Inoc-
ulations.
39 Lung Worms in Swine.
40 and 41 Glanders.
42 Food Adulterations-Spices and Con-
diments.
43 How to Feed a Horse.
44 Tree Planting.
45 The Sugar-cane Borer.











CONTENT*AND SUMMARY.


Page.
FRONTISPIECE.
Photograph of the earliest illustration of the Honey Peach
in America.-From Downing's Horticulturist, 1846.
INTRODUCTION .............................................. ....... 135
Discussion of the different groups of peaches in Florida;
range and importance of the Honey group.
HOME OF THE HONEY PEACH .................................. 137
China is the home of the Honey peach.
HISTORY OF THE HONEY PEACH IN EUROPE ................. 137
Sent to the Jardin des Plantes, Paris, France, in 1852, by M.
Montigny. Introduced into England from France in 1862.
HISTORY OF THE HONEY PEACH IN AMERICA ................ 138
Seeds of the Honey peach were sent to Mr. John Caldwell, of
Newburg, N. Y., by Mr. J. T. Devan, of Canton, China. These
seeds were given to Mr. Charles Downing, who raised the
seedlings and then sent them to Mr Henry Lyons, of Colum-
bia; S. C. Mr." P. J. Berckmans, of Augusta, Ga., distributed
them throughout the South.
CHARACTERISTICS OF THE GROUP ............................. 140
Distinct from other groups; a late group.
VARIETIES ................................ .. ................... 140
Seventeen varieties listed and described. Some of these are
no longer under cultivation.
RECOMMENDATIONS ........................................... 153
In central and north Florida: Colon, Florida Gem, Imperial
and Triana. In western Florida and southern Georgia, Ala-
bama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas: Colon, Climax,
Florida Gem, Imperial, Pallas, Taber and Triana.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ................................... ...... 153



ILLUSTRATIONS,


Honey Peach ................... ......................... Plate I.
Flowers and Buds of Honey Peach .............................Plate II.
Imperial Peach Tree ........................................... Plate III.
Fruit of Imperial Peach ....................................... Plate IV.







PLATE I.





























Honey Peach,



4r













The Honey Peach Group.


Introduction
The peaches grown in this State comprise a large number of
varieties, classified into six distinct groups. The leading varieties
are included in three of these groups, viz: Peen-to, Spanish and
Honey. The peaches belonging to the other three groups are grown
only to a very limited extent. Two of these groups-Persian and
Northern Chinese-are adapted to more Northern conditions and
will not do well in our warm climate. The Oriental Bloods in-
clude a small number of varieties that do fairly well in some sec-
tions of the southern part of the State.
The Peen-to peach group includes a large number of varieties
well adapted to central and some parts of South Florida. The his-
tory, varieties and importance of this group, have been thoroughly
discussed by Prof. H. Harold Hume, in Bulletin No. 62, of this
Station. The Spanish group includes more varieties than any
other. The peaches, from which all of these varieties have sprung,
were introduced into this State by the Spaniards several centuries
ago. These peaches have become so well adapted to .our climatic
and soil conditions, and are so widely disseminated throughout our
State, that they are often referred to as native-peaches. Most of
these varieties have originated in this State.
The Honey Peach group includes a large number of valuable
peaches. They are distinct, both in form and flavor, from the fruit
of all the other groups. They have a very rich, honey flavor, from
which characteristic the group derives its name. With the excep-








BULLETIN NO. 73.


tion of the parent-the Honey-and one or two other varieties,
every member of the group originated in Florida; most of them
have been originated by Mr. G. L. Taber, of Glen Saint Mary, Fla.
This peculiar group of peaches, then, is another of the valuable ac-
quisitions to Horticulture made by this State. These peaches ripen
at a very desirable season-immediately following the Peen-to
peaches.
The HIoney group is well adapted to sub-tropical conditions,
and is perfectly at home in the central and northern sections oe
Florida. It is especially well adapted to northern Florida, south-
ern Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas.
As most of the peaches of this State are grown in central and
north Florida, and as these groups-Peen-to, Spanish and Honev-
are well adapted to these regions, it can readily be seen why these
groups constitute most of the peaches grown in this State.
As nothing has ever been published, heretofore, on this inter-
esting group of peaches, the necessity of a publication of this
kind is apparent. This is intended to be a companion to Bulletin
No. 62, Florida Experiment Station, on "The Peen-to Peach
Group," by H. Harold Hume. Practically the same general out-
line that was adopted in that publication has been followed in this
Bulletin.
Peach growing in this State is already an industry of consid-
erable importance and is now increasing rapidly. Florida is so
situated that she ought to place her peaches on the market earlier
than any other State. Central and northern Florida are also well
adapted to peach growing, and there are thousands of acres of land
in these sections on which peaches can be, and will be, profitably
grown. The conditions, however, are quite different here from
those in other States, and somewhat different methods must be fol-









THE HONEY PEACH GROUP.


lowed in growing them. As there is no publication on peach cul-
ture, by this Station, and as frequent inquiries are made regard-
ing the different phases of the work, such a publication will be
issued as soon as possible.

Home of the Honey Peach.

The peach is a native of China. All the different groups have
originated there or have originated from peaches "which originally
came from China. The Honey Peach originated in China, and
undoubtedly has been cultivated there for many centuries, for it
reproduces itself almost exactly from seed.

History of the Honey Peach in Europe.

The Honey peach has been grown in parts of Europe for over
a half century. It was introduced into France shortly after it
had been introduced into America. In 1852, M. Montigny, French
Consul to Shanghai, sent stones of the Honey peach to the Jardin
des Plantes, Paris, France. An old synonym for the Honey peach
was De Montigny, which was applied to it because of this French
Consul having introduced it.
This seed was planted and the seedlings fruited for the first
time in 1860, the variety being described in 1861, by M. Carrier
in Revue Horticole, page 11. It was introduced into England,
from France in 1862. According to Robert Hogg* the name Honey
Peach, had its origin in England, for he says: "The name Honey
Peach, which has been given it in England, is expressive of the
peculiar richness of its flavour." This cannot be true, however,
for J. T. Deyan referred to them as'Honey Peaches in 1846-six-
teen years before they were introduced into England.
Robert Hogg, The Fruit Manual. 5th Edition, Pp. 450.









THE HONEY PEACH GROUP.


lowed in growing them. As there is no publication on peach cul-
ture, by this Station, and as frequent inquiries are made regard-
ing the different phases of the work, such a publication will be
issued as soon as possible.

Home of the Honey Peach.

The peach is a native of China. All the different groups have
originated there or have originated from peaches "which originally
came from China. The Honey Peach originated in China, and
undoubtedly has been cultivated there for many centuries, for it
reproduces itself almost exactly from seed.

History of the Honey Peach in Europe.

The Honey peach has been grown in parts of Europe for over
a half century. It was introduced into France shortly after it
had been introduced into America. In 1852, M. Montigny, French
Consul to Shanghai, sent stones of the Honey peach to the Jardin
des Plantes, Paris, France. An old synonym for the Honey peach
was De Montigny, which was applied to it because of this French
Consul having introduced it.
This seed was planted and the seedlings fruited for the first
time in 1860, the variety being described in 1861, by M. Carrier
in Revue Horticole, page 11. It was introduced into England,
from France in 1862. According to Robert Hogg* the name Honey
Peach, had its origin in England, for he says: "The name Honey
Peach, which has been given it in England, is expressive of the
peculiar richness of its flavour." This cannot be true, however,
for J. T. Deyan referred to them as'Honey Peaches in 1846-six-
teen years before they were introduced into England.
Robert Hogg, The Fruit Manual. 5th Edition, Pp. 450.







BULLETIN NO. 73.


History of the Honey Peach in America,
Although there is now a large number of varieties of Honey
peaches cultivated in America, and all of these except the original
variety-Honey-have originated in America, yet the history of
this group in America covers a period of only a little more than
half a century. Furthermore, it was not cultivated to any great
extent previous to 1870. Most of the varieties belonging to this
group have originated in Florida, and since 1885.
In 1846, A. J. Downing, of Newburg, N. Y., received from
one of his neighbors, John Caldwell, some peach pits, which had
been sent to Mr. Caldwell by one of his friends, Dr. J. T. Devan,
of Canton, China. Dr. J. T. Devan in his letter to John Caldwell
speaks of them as "pits of the Honey Peach." Downing, in the
Horticulturist, speaks of them as "some stones of what is evidently
a new and very distinct kind of peach."
The following extract is from J. T. Devan's letter to Mr. Cald-
well: "I have received as a present from a Chinese gentleman a
few 'Honey peaches.' I have never been able to procure any such
at the fruiterers.
"I herewith send you the pits. These peaches are remarkable
for their honied sweetness, and are ripe about the first of June.
Their shape is also peculiar, it being like the sketch* on the oppo-
site side of this paper, form, pointed at one end, rich yellow and
red in colour, very deeply grooved, and about the size of this
sketch. Yours with respect, J. T. Devan." (Downing's The Hor-
ticulturist, Vol. 1.) This letter was dated Canton, June 18, 1846.
This is the earliest introduction of the Honey peach, and the
only one ever made, so far as is known to the writer.
This letter leads one to infer that the Honey peach may have
Reproduced in Frontispiece of this Bulletin.










THE HONEY PEACH GROUP.


been cultivated only to a very small extent at that time, for he
says "I have never been able to procure any at the fruiterers."
Yet it is very probable that it had been cultivated for a long time,
for, according to Downing's "Fruits and Fruit Trees of America,"
this Honey peach reproduced itself with great exactness. Downing
planted these pits, but fearing that the climate of Newburg, N. Y.,
would be too severe, he sent cuttings from the seedlings to Mr.
Henry, Lyons, of Laurel Park, Columbia, S. C. Mr. Lyons planted
these cuttings and on July 30, 1856, obtained his first fruit, consist-
ing of three peaches. This is the first time that this peach fruited
in America. Mr. Lyons says that the fruit he obtained "corres-
ponds very nearly with the plate." He adds further: "I exhib-
ited it on yesterday to the fruit committee of our State Agricultural
Society; all agreed it was the most remarkable, distinct and richest
peach they ever tasted."
In 1857 Mr. P. J. Berckmans, of Augusta, Ga., propagated,
by contract, a few hundred trees of this Honey peach, for Mr.
Henry Lyons. In 1858 Mr. Berckmans purchased these trees of
Mr. Lyons, with full and sole right to propagate and sell. These
trees were then put upon the market without restrictions as to
. propagating, and were distributed throughout the South. The va-
rious nurserymen of that time then began propagating it and in
this way the Honey peach was soon dissiminated throughout vari-
ous sections of the South.
James Fitz, -in "The Southern Apple and Peach Culturist"
(1872), speaks of the Honey peach as "A new variety from South
Carolina, where it ripens the last of June." By this time, how-
ever, it had found its.way into the various fruit sections of the
Central and South Atlantic States, as is shown by the many fruit
lists given by nurserymen and Horticultural Societies of that time.









BULLETIN NO. 73.


In 1878 Mr. P. J. Berckmans originated a new variety, Pallas,
which is a seedling of the Honey peach. This variety is still under
cultivation and is one of the leading varieties belonging to the
group.

Characteristics of the Group,
The trees are large, vigorous growers, upright spreading in
habit, prolific and bear at an early age. The leaves are darl. green
in color, long, narrow, pointed, finely serrated, and have two to
four reniform glands at the base. The flowers are numerous,
large, either solitary or in clusters, and of a crimson color, with
base of petals often bright red. In shape the fruit is distinct and
varies slightly, generally being rounded, oblong with a peculiar,
long, conical apex which is more or less recurved. In size' it varies
from medium to large, most of the varieties being larger than the
parent-Honey. The color is a light yellow or white covered with
red on exposed parts. The skin is. more or less fuzzy and adheres
closely to the flesh. The flesh is firm, meaty and very juicy, gen-
erally white in color, and often streaked with red about the stone.
In flavor they vary slightly, being sweet, or subacid, and the origi-
nal Honey has a distinct honey flavor. The stone is free, or cling,
deeply furrowed, generally curved, long pointed, and always cor-
responds to the fruit in shape. The ripening season lasts from
June 1st until July 15th; there is little danger of the flowers being
killed by late frosts.

Varieties,
Since the introduction of the Honey peach seventeen varieties
have been listed by Florida nurserymen. About one-third of these
have proved practically worthless and are no longer catalogued.









BULLETIN NO. 73.


In 1878 Mr. P. J. Berckmans originated a new variety, Pallas,
which is a seedling of the Honey peach. This variety is still under
cultivation and is one of the leading varieties belonging to the
group.

Characteristics of the Group,
The trees are large, vigorous growers, upright spreading in
habit, prolific and bear at an early age. The leaves are darl. green
in color, long, narrow, pointed, finely serrated, and have two to
four reniform glands at the base. The flowers are numerous,
large, either solitary or in clusters, and of a crimson color, with
base of petals often bright red. In shape the fruit is distinct and
varies slightly, generally being rounded, oblong with a peculiar,
long, conical apex which is more or less recurved. In size' it varies
from medium to large, most of the varieties being larger than the
parent-Honey. The color is a light yellow or white covered with
red on exposed parts. The skin is. more or less fuzzy and adheres
closely to the flesh. The flesh is firm, meaty and very juicy, gen-
erally white in color, and often streaked with red about the stone.
In flavor they vary slightly, being sweet, or subacid, and the origi-
nal Honey has a distinct honey flavor. The stone is free, or cling,
deeply furrowed, generally curved, long pointed, and always cor-
responds to the fruit in shape. The ripening season lasts from
June 1st until July 15th; there is little danger of the flowers being
killed by late frosts.

Varieties,
Since the introduction of the Honey peach seventeen varieties
have been listed by Florida nurserymen. About one-third of these
have proved practically worthless and are no longer catalogued.









THE HONEY PEACH GROUP.


The Honey is no longer considered a good commercial peach. It
has given place to newer and better varieties.
Owing to the extreme drought which was experienced during
the past spring the peaches were under-sized in nearly every in-
stance, therefore due allowance must be made for the measure-
ments.
The ripening season also varies considerably in different
parts of the State. For instance, the peaches grown near the ocean,
along the St. Johns river, were at least one week earlier than those
grown at Glen St. Mary, and also Komoko, Fla., although the lat-
ter place is at least 50 miles further south, but near the center of
the State.
The description of the Honey, the progenitor of the whole
. group, is given first, after which the varieties are arranged alpha-
betically.

Honey, (Downing's-The Horticulturist, 1846-page 382.)
(Berckman's cat. 1858.)
Form oblong, pointed; size medium, 1 7-8x1 3-4x1 5-8, 2x1 5-8
xl 5-8 inches; color whitish yellow washed and dotted with red,
especially on sunny side and base end; apex long, re-curved, dis-
tinctly conical, sharp; cavity deep, narrow, dull yellow in color;
stem short, 1-4 inch long, stout; suture distinct, grooved from base
to apex; skin slightly rough, fuzzy, thin, medium tough; flesh
compact, juicy, creamy white, streaked with red about the stone;
flavor a distinct, rich honey; quality very good; stone free, ellip-
tical, long point, deeply furrowed and pitted, reddish brown, med-
ium in size, 1x1-2x3-8 inch; season June 1st to 15th.
STree a vigorous grower, upright spreading habit, bark reddish
brown. At present this is not a favorite commercial peach .







PLATE II.


Flowers and buds of Honey Peach.









THE HONEY PEACH GROUP.


Introduced into America in 1846 by J. S. Devan, of Canton,
China. Introduced into the South in 1858 by P. J. Berckmans, of
Augusta, Ga.
Described from specimens received from the Griffing Bros.
Co., Komoko, Fla.
Climax, (Taber's cat. 1887-88.)
Form roundish oblong; size medium, 21-8x13-4x13-4, 2x17-8
xl 5-8 inches; color greenish yellow washed with red; apex conical,
distinct, straight or -slightly recurved; cavity shallow and open;
.stem short and stout; suture running from base to apex, very deep
near base, often split; skin fuzzy, thin and rather tender; flesh
white, tinged with red about the stone, firm, meaty, juicy; flavor
sweet, rich, very agreeable; quality excellent; .stone free, elliptical,
long with a long recurved point, deeply furrowed, light brown,
basal half blood red, 1 3-8x3-4x1-2 inch; season June 15 to July 1.
The tree is a rapid upright grower and good bearer. The fruit
is excellent and is a good shipper. A seedling of Honey.
Described from specimens received from Jarvis & Dockrell,
Fulton, Fla., and the Griffing Bros. Co., Komoko, Fla.

Colon, (Taber's cat. 1893-94.)
Form roundish oblong; size large, 2x1 3-4x11-2 inches; color
yellowish white, splashed and dotted with bright red; apex re-
curved, conical with sharp point; cavity deep and open; stem short
and stout; suture distinct, shallow except near base; skin smooth,
slightly fuzzy, thin and tender; flesh white streaked with red,
bright red about the stone, juicy; flavor sub-acid, spicy; quality
very good; stone free, elliptical, sharply pointed, deeply furrowed
and pitted, reddish, large, 1 5-8x3-4x5-8 inch; season, June 10 to 25.









BULLETIN NO. 73.


This is a seedling of a Honey seedling, originated by G. L.
Taber, of Glen St. Mary, Fla., in 1892.
Described from specimens grown at the University of Florida.
Early Cream, (Taber's cat. 1888.)
The following description is copied from Mr. G. L. Taber's
catalogue for 1891-92:
"Seedling from the Honey. Size large, of handsome appear-
ance and fine quality; freestone. This resembles Kite's Honey so
strongly that the two varieties are believed to be identical. As this
variety has been largely advertised, however, under this name, it
is herewith offered with this explanation. Buds of this variety'
were obtained direct from the introducer."
Mr. Taber's Catalogue for 1891-92 lists the two as synonymous,
giving Early Cream the preference, and Kite's Honey seenis to
have then dropped out of existence, as far as name is concerned.
It was impossible to obtain specimens of this variety for de-
scription.
Ferdinand, (Taber's cat. 1893-94.)
Form rounded, oval, flat, bulged on one side; size medium to
large, 1 3-4x113-16x111-16 inches; color dull yellow, well covered
with dull red; apex short, blunt, recurved; cavity abrupt, deep,
narrow; stem short and stout; suture a mere line; skin velvety, thick
and tough, adhering closely, to the flesh; flesh firm, meaty, juicy,
white, streaked with red, bright red about the stone; flavor insipid,
poor; quality poor; stone cling, oval, plump, short, straight point,
deep red, 11-4x3-4x5-8 inch; season July 1st to'15th.
This peach is a seedling of the Honey seedling and was origi-
nated by Mr. G. L. Taber, of Glen St. Mary, Fla., in 1892. This
is a good commercial peach, although of poor quality.
Described from specimens received from the Griffing Bros.
Co., Komoko, Fla.










THE HONEY PEACH GROUP.


Florida Gem, (Taber's cat. 1890-91.)
Form oval in outline, almost three-sided; size medium to large,
1 3-4x1 3-4x1 1-2 inches; color greenish yellow, washed with deep
red on exposed parts; apex conical, long, recurved, very promi-
nent; cavity open, wide, abrupt, medium deep; stem short end
rather thin; suture an indistinct line, almost wanting; skin even,
fuzzy, thin, tough, adhering closely to flesh; flesh firm, juicy,
white, with a trace of pink about stone; flavor very sweet, agree-
able; quality of the best; stone free, elliptical, straight with re-
curved point, reddish, 11-8x5-8x1-2 inch; season June 20th to
July 5th.
This is a seedling of the Honey. It is one of the best Honey
peaches for both home and commercial purposes.
Described from specimens received from the Griffing Bros.
Co., Komoko, Fla.
Hastings,
Form oval, very irregular, early three-sided; size medium
to large, 13-4x13-4x13-4, 17-8x13-4x15-8 inches; color dull:
greenish yellow, well washed and streaked with deep red; apex
conical, distinct, slightly recurved, medium in length; cavity
abrupt, deep, ratk r open; stem short and medium thick; suture a
mere line; skin v ry fuzzy, thin, tough and adhering closely to
fruit; flesh firm, meaty, juicy, with faint trace of red about stone;
flavor sweet, of good character; quality excellent; stone free, oval,
plump, With broad recurved point, red, 11-8x3-4x9-16; season,
June 20th to 30th.
This is a new peach originated by the Griffing Bros. Co.,
Macclenny, Fla., about 1900.' It is destined to become a promi-
nent commercial and home peach.
Specimens received for description from Griffing Bros., Ko-,
moko, Fla.







PLATE m.


Imperial Peach Tree.








PLATE IV.


Fruit of Imperial Peach.







BULLETIN NO. 73.


Imperial. (Taber's cat. 1890-91.)
Form roundish oblong, irregular, often flat and bulged on one
side; size large, 2x2x1 3-4, 2 1-8x1 3-4x1 3-4 inches; color greenish
yellow, slightly washed with red on exposed side; apex long, coni-
cal, recurved, and slightly pointing towards one side; cavity deep,
wide and open; stem short and stout; suture deep near base in
some, in others a mere line; skin very fuzzy, becoming smooth as it
lipens, thin and tough, adhering closely to flesh; flesh white, firm,
raeaty and juicy; flavor sweet, excellent; quality very good; stone'
free, oblong, recurved, long sharp point, plump, deeply furrowed,
light brown often bright red in furrows, large, 11-4x3-4x1-2 inch;
season June 15th to 30th.
This is undoubtedly one of the very best peaches belonging to
the Honey group; the tree is a vigorous upright grower and heavy
bearer; the fruit is firm and stands shipping well.
This is a seedling of the Honey and was originated by Mr.
G. L. Taber, of Glen St. Mary, Fla., in 1890.
Described from specimens received from Messrs. Jarvis &
Dockrell,, Fulton, Fla.
Kite, (Taber's cat. 1888.)
The following description is copied from Taber's supplement
to price list of 1888-89: "A seedling of the Honey, supposed to
be crossed with Peen-to. A magnificent peach, much larger than
the Honey, measuring two by two and one-half inches In diameter;
resembles Honey in shape, but without so sharp a point. Skin
yellow, washed and flecked with red. Flesh fine-grained, sweet
juicy, and of excellent flavor. Perfect free stone. The original
tree is a strong grower, and has borne heavy crops for four years.
Fruit very smooth, ripens uniformly and never cracks. Ripens
June 15th to 25th."







THE HONEY PEACH GROUP.


Kite's Honey.
The following description is copied from Mr. G. L. Taber's
Catalogue for 1889-90:
"Seedling of the Honey, supposed to be crossed with Peen-to.
A magnificent peach, much larger than the Honey, measuring two
by two and one-half inches in diameter. Resembles Honey in
shape, but without so sharp a point; skin yellow, washed and
flecked with red; flesh fine-grained, sweet, juicy and of excellent
flavor; perfect freestone. The original tree is a strong grower, and
has borne heavy crops for four years. Fruit very smooth, ripens
uniformly and never cracks. Quality best. Ripens June 15th to
25th."
Oviedo, (Taber's cat. 1895-96.)
Form roundish oblong, bulged on one side; size large, 2 1-4x
17-8x17-8, 2x13-4x13-4 inches; color greenish yellow, marbled
with dull red on exposed parts; apex short, recurved, cavity shal-
low, open and regular; stem short and thick; suture a mere line, "
deeper near basal end; skin fuzzy, becoming smooth as it ripens,
thin and tough; flesh firm and meaty, white, red about stone, juice
not plentiful; flavor sweet and agreeable; quality very good; stone
free, elliptical, curved, with long recurved point, deeply furrowed,
light brown, partially covered with blood red, 11-2x3-4x1-2; sea-
son, June 20 to 30.
This is one of the best Honey peaches; the tree is a rapid
grower and heavy bearer; and an excellent peach for shipping.
It is a seedling of the Honey and according to the Griffing
Bros. Co. Catalogue, this peach was originated in 1892 by S. J.
Kennard, of Waldo, Fla.
Described from specimens received from Jarvis & Dockrell,
Fulton, Fla.







BULLETIN NO. 73.


Pallas, (Berckman's cat. 1878.)
Form nearly round, slightly pointed; size medium to large,
2x1 3-4x1 3-4 inches; color light yellow, well covered with deep red;
apex straight, short, cavity deep and narrow; stem short and med-
ium thick; suture deep on basal half, mere line above middle;
skin fuzzy and velvety, thin, tender, loosely attached to flesh, not
bitter; flesh white, mealy, soft and rather juicy; flavor slightly
acid, with rich, sprightly, vinous aroma; quality excellent; stone
free, oval, straight point, pits and furrows shallow, bright red,
11-4x3-4x1-2 inch; season June 15 to 30.
It is a seedling of Honey and was originated in 1878 by Dr.
L. E. Berckmans, of Augusta, Ga.
This is a peach of excellent quality and one of the best Honey
peaches for home purposes. It is not considered a very good com-
mercial peach, as it is a poor shipper.
Described from specimens received from Messrs. Jarvis &
Dockrell, Fulton, Fla.
Sangmel. (Taber's cat. 1893-94.)
Form oblong, bulged on one side, slightly pointed; size med-
ium, 1 3-8x11-3x1 3-8 inches; color light yellow, exposed parts
streaked with deep red; apex pointed, straight, blunt; cavity
abrupt, narrow and rather deep; stem short and thick; suture
barely marked at cavity; skin smooth, velvety, thin, tender, sepa-
rating easily from the flesh; flesh firm, meaty, juicy, yellowish,
red just beneath the skin and pink about the stone; flavor sweet,
slightly sub-acid and of good character; quality of the best; stone
free, straight, elliptical, pointed, pits and furrows medium deep,
brown with tinge of red, 11-8x5-8x1-2; season June 25 to July 10.
This peach is a Honey seedling and was originated'in 1892
by Mr. G. L. Taber, Glen St. Mary, Fla.








THE HONEY PEACH GROUP.


Described from specimens obtained from the Griffing Bros.
Co., Komoko, Fla.
Stanley, (Griffing Bros.' cat. 1889.)
Form roundish oblong; size medium to large, 2x17-8x17-8,
1 3-4x1 3-4x1 3-4 inches; color greenish white, washed and marbled
with deep red on exposed parts; apex short, conical, nearly straight,
often a mere point; cavity deep, rather open; stem short and thick;
suture well marked, deep near base, often split; skin thick and
tough, fuzzy; flesh white, rather soft, easily breaking down; flavor
insipid, sweetish, with a tinge of bitter about the stone; quality
poor; stone cling, oblong, plump, with blunt point, dull brown,
large, 11-8x5-8x1-2; season June 10 to 20.
This peach is a seedling of the Honey and was originated
at the Griffing Bros. nursery at Macclenny, Fla.
This variety is very subject to brown rot, and easily breaks
down in transportation, hence a poor commercial peach.
Described from specimens received from Jarvis & Dockrell,
Fulton, Fla.
Taber, (Taber's cat. 1893-94.)
Form roundish oblong, pointed; size large, 21-2x2x17-8
inches; color white and well covered with red; apex conical, long,
recurved; cavity abrupt, deep and open; stem short and stout;
su+ure well marked at basal end; skin fuzzy, thin and tender,
not bitter; flesh white, streaked with red, red about stone, firm,
juicy; flavor sub-acid, rich; quality of the very best; stone cling,
elliptical, recurved, pointed, furrowed and pitted, brown, large,
1 1-4x3-4x1-2; season June 15 to 25.
A seedling of a Honey seedling; originated by Mr. G. L. Ta-
ber, Glen St. Mary, Fla., in 1892.
This is a heavy bearer, of excellent quality and a good home








BULLETIN NO. 73.


peach; it often cracks in the suture, hence it is not so desirable as
some other Honey peaches for commercial purposes.

Triana, (Taber's cat. 1893-94.)
Form roundish oblong, slightly pointed; size large, 2 1-8x1 7-8
xl 7-8 inches; color yellowish white, exposed parts washed with
maroon; apex conical, blunt, slightly recurved, cavity deep and
rather open; stem short and thick; suture deep on basal half, a
mere line above the middle; skin fuzzy but quite smooth when
thoroughly ripe, thin tender, bitter, adhering closely to flesh;-
flesh white, marked with red about stone, meaty, juicy; flavor
sweet, spicy and very agreeable; quality excellent; stone free, oval,
plump, point long and recurved, furrowed, bright red, larg,-
1 5-16x3-4x1-2; season June 20 to July 5.

It was introduced by Mr. G. L. Taber, of Glen St. MA -,', in
1892.

This is one of the best Honey peaches. It is of excellent
quality, a good bearer and shipper.
Described from Specimens obtained from Messrs. Jarvis &
Dockrell, Fulton, Fla:

Townsend, (Taber's cat. 1892-93.)
The following description is taken from the catalogue re-
ferred to above: "Seedling from the Honey. Fruit large, ob-
long; color greenish yellow, washed with red; flesh white, juicy;
excellent flavor; perfect free stone. Ripens July 1st to 10th."
This peach has not been listed in fruit catalogues for a num-
ber of years. It was probably just a different name for some other
variety of the Honey group.









THE HONEY PEACH GROUP.


Recommendations.
This group of peaches is well adapted to central and northern
Florida. It is also at home in the southern portion of Georgia,
Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas. These peaches can
endure more cold and are later than those belonging to the Peen-to
group and therefore should be more largely planted in the northern
section of the State.
The Honey variety, which is the parent and progenitor of
this whole group of peaches, is no longer a favorite. It has been
in cultivation so long that it has, like all other fruits, given way
to newer and better varieties. Or, as the growers term it, "It is
worn out." It cannot be recommended for extensive planting.
The selection of varieties is so much a matter of personal
taste and local conditions that it is almost useless to attempt to
give a list of the varieties. In central and northern Florida, Colon,
Florida Gem, Imperial and Triana are the favorite varieties.
In West Florida and the southern half of the Gulf States,
Colon, Climax, Florida Gem, Imperial, Pallas, Taber, and Triana
are the favorite varieties.

Acknowledgments,
The writer wishes to acknowledge the valuable assistance re-
ceived from Prof. H. Harold Hume, G. L. Taber, of Glen St.
Mary, Dr. P. J. Brackett, Pomologist, Washington, D. C., and P. J.
Berckmans, Augusta, Ga. He also wishes to thank the Griffing
Bros., of Komoko, Fla., and Messrs. Jarvis & Dockrell, of Fulton,
Fla., who furnished most of the varieties for description.









THE HONEY PEACH GROUP.


Recommendations.
This group of peaches is well adapted to central and northern
Florida. It is also at home in the southern portion of Georgia,
Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas. These peaches can
endure more cold and are later than those belonging to the Peen-to
group and therefore should be more largely planted in the northern
section of the State.
The Honey variety, which is the parent and progenitor of
this whole group of peaches, is no longer a favorite. It has been
in cultivation so long that it has, like all other fruits, given way
to newer and better varieties. Or, as the growers term it, "It is
worn out." It cannot be recommended for extensive planting.
The selection of varieties is so much a matter of personal
taste and local conditions that it is almost useless to attempt to
give a list of the varieties. In central and northern Florida, Colon,
Florida Gem, Imperial and Triana are the favorite varieties.
In West Florida and the southern half of the Gulf States,
Colon, Climax, Florida Gem, Imperial, Pallas, Taber, and Triana
are the favorite varieties.

Acknowledgments,
The writer wishes to acknowledge the valuable assistance re-
ceived from Prof. H. Harold Hume, G. L. Taber, of Glen St.
Mary, Dr. P. J. Brackett, Pomologist, Washington, D. C., and P. J.
Berckmans, Augusta, Ga. He also wishes to thank the Griffing
Bros., of Komoko, Fla., and Messrs. Jarvis & Dockrell, of Fulton,
Fla., who furnished most of the varieties for description.




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