Harry Hardheart and his dog Driver

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Material Information

Title:
Harry Hardheart and his dog Driver
Physical Description:
8 p. : ill. ; 12 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Herrick, Henry Walker, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
American Tract Society ( Publisher )
Publisher:
American Tract Society
Place of Publication:
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animal welfare -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Dogs -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Human-animal relationships -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) -- 1875   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre:
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Illustrations by Herrick.
General Note:
In pink printed wrappers.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements: p. 4 of wrapper.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002245172
oclc - 20807897
notis - ALJ6176
System ID:
UF00026673:00001

Full Text
SNO 110AMERICAN TRCSCrY150 Namsau-s N. T.xg~4~II


This page contains no text.


HARRY HARDHEART,AND HIS DOG DRIVER.THE dog is a faithful creature. If every-body knew his good qualities, everybody,we think, would be kind to him. He de-lights in our company, and always tries to10.


2 HARRY HARDHEART,do his best to please us. He obeys ourvoice, follows us in our walks, guards ourhomes, and often has saved the life of hismaster.See how he frisks about us to show hisjoy, and licks our hand when we feed him.He comes jumping at our call, and spread-ing out his paws, he looks up in our face,and seems to say, "Well, here I am; whatdo you want with me? If there is anything I can do for you, I will do it in aminute."Some men and boys teach dogs to fightone another, or to worry the chickens andthe cat, or to bark and fly at people asthey pass along the road, and in this wayspoil the temper of the animals. Suchconduct is cruel and sinful.There have been many accounts writtenof the good service of the dog; but thatis no reason why we should not read withpleasure of any other that can be given.The more we hear to his credit, the moreshall we value him, and we shall be theless likely to use him ill.The story we are now going to give isabout a boy whom we will call HarryHardheart.


AND HIS DOG DRIVER. 3Harry's father is a poor man, and sellsturf, wood, and other things in the streets.He keeps a donkey to draw his little cartin which the goods are carried. This pooranimal leads a sad life: it works hard, isbadly fed, and has plenty of kicks andblows.But it is about the way in which thedog Driver was treated that we are aboutto tell you. A large brown and whitedog is Driver; he has fine long ears and anoble bushy tail. He is kept to guard thecart by day, and to watch the shed wherethe wood and turf are placed at night.When Harry was about fourteen yearsold, he' was a rough and rude boy. Hehad never been kept at school long to-gether ; and as he was left to do as hepleased, he was known in the street wherehe lived as a dirty and ignorant littlefellow. His companions were boys asbad as himself, who were always gettinghim into trouble and disgrace.It was so that the dog Driver was theinnocent means of leading Harry's fatherto find him out in some of his sly tricks,and for which he was well punished.Harry was very angry, and afterwards


4 HARRY HARDHEART,showed his spite against the dog. PoorDriver was not to blame; but it was thewicked heart of the boy that led him toshow anger and revenge.A river runs near the cottage of Harry'sfather, and the dog often went there towash himself. One day as he lay on thebank, drying his shaggy coat in the brightsunshine, Harry came to the same place.Driver sprang towards his young master,wagging his tail with delight, and beganto romp around him. Instead of treat-ing him kindly, the cruel thought cameinto Harry's mind, that if he were todrown Driver he should not be found outagain in his wicked doings. So coaxingthe dog into his arms, he managed to tiehis fore legs, and then, we are sorry totell, threw him into a deep part of thestream.Driver sank, but in a moment came tothe surface. As he struggled hard, thestring that bound him slipped off, andgaining the full use of his legs, he wassoon on the shore. It seemed as if heknew and felt the cruel conduct of Harry,for he did not run to him again; butmaking the best of his way home, he got


AND HIS DOG DRIVER. 5into the shed, and panting for breath, laydown quietly on some straw in a corner.A few days passed away, and Harrywas again at his mischief. There is aplace on the river called the Ferry. Hereis kept a boat, which belongs to a manwho gains a living by rowing peopleacross the water. One evening, Harrywith one of his bad companions namedNed Jones crept down to the spot, andgetting into the boat, they pushed intothe middle of the stream. The currentwas strong, and they did not know how tomanage the boat. In vain they tried torow; they soon found themselves driftingalong towards a part of the river whichis said to be very deep and dangerous.They were now sadly alarmed; each ofthe boys thought that he knew best howto take the boat to the shore, and struggledto have his own way. In the scuffle theboat tilted on one side, and then upset,casting the boys into the water. NedJones could swim, and got safely to theshore. He, however, did not think aboutor care for Harry, but ran home, leavinghim in the midst of the stream, whichbore him rapidly along. Harry held up


6 HARRY HARDHEART,his hands and screamed for help; butthere was, at the moment, no person nearthat part of the river.Was there no one to save the wickeddrowning boy? Must he be cut off inhis sins? Yes, there was help at hand.Who was the deliverer? It was Driver.He had heard Harry's cries, and rushingto the spot, plunged into the river. Itwas as if he knew all about it, for -in aninstant he caught the collar of Harry'scoat and with a few strong pulls he broughtthe boy out of the strength of the current,to the side where the waters were shal-low and still. Harry now caught hold ofthe branch of a tree that hung over thestream, and with the help of Driver crawl-ed to land. Thus was he saved fromdrowning by the dog whose life, only afew days before, he had tried to take away.By the time the bad boy had got home,his aunt, who lived near his father's cot-tage, heard of what had taken place, andalso about his cruel conduct to Driver.As she had been like a mother to him-for his own mother was dead-she hur-ried at once to the house. She was awise, pious woman, and had often told


AND HIIS DOG DRIVER.him of his evil conduct, and tried to leadhim to the love of what was right andgood. You may be sure she did so atthis time."Harry," said she, as she sat by hisbedside, "I am sorry to hear what youhave been doing. You see what hascome of your bad and cruel ways. I dolove to see young people kind to animals,for where they are not so, it shows thatthey are either very unfeeling or verythoughtless. God has given us pbwerover them, but we ohght to use our pow-er for their good, and not to their injury.The man or child who is cruel sinks low-er than the brute. He casts away thereason God has given him, and wickedlystirs up the passions of the animals heshould rule and guide in kindness andlove. He who gave you feeling, gave itto dogs also; and as you would not liketo be made to suffer, you should not in-flict pain upon others. You may be surethat the great Creator is angry with uswhen we cause pain to the creatures hehas made. It is written, 'He shall havejudgment without mercy that has shownno mercy.' James 2:13.


8 HARRY HARDHEART."I think, Harry, you have learned alesson.to-day that you should never-for-get. Driver has taught you how to re-turn good for evil. In your anger, youwould have drowned the poor faithfuldog; he has in return saved your life.""I am very sorry, aunt," said Harry."I hope God will forgive me.""Yes, I hope he will; for he is a mer-ciful God. You might have been cut offin your sins, but in his pity he sent Driv-er to snatch you from death. You mustseek for pardon for the sake of Christ, forit is his precious blood that cleanses usfrom sin. I have often told you how helived in this.world, and how he died onthe cross for sinners. If you believe inhim with all your heart, and seek thegrace of his Holy Spirit, then I shall seeyou a pious and kind boy. Having foundmercy yourself, your conduct will be mer-ciful and loving to all."That is all we have to tell about Harryjust now. Let us hope that he will be-come all that his kind aunt wished himto be.


It2p-57


BOOKS F04 THE YOUNG.A T-ARGE VARIETY OF THE BEST ANDPRETTIEST BOOKS FOR CHILDRENOF EVERY AGE,Ben Holt's Good Name. An honestlittle fellow, whose nmie was a life-lougblessing. 35 cts.; post. 8 cts.Max Fleming. A record of a nobleboy. 30 cts.; post. 8 cts.Dean Proctor. The cheering story ofa poor boy's progress in learning and use-fulness. 30 cts.; post. 4 ets.The True Boy. Who loved to do good.25 cts,; post. 4 cts.The Deserted Heroine. Two cuts.20 cts; Wyst, 4 cts.George Wayland, the Little Medicine-carrier. .35 cts.Juvenile Library. Thirty-two stories,bound in eight vols., each 32 pp., large32mno, finely illustrated. In a case, $1 20.PUBLISHED BY THEAMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY,150 N.RASSA-STRTEET, N. T.


Full Text



PAGE 1

AND HIIS DOG DRIVER. him of his evil conduct, and tried to lead him to the love of what was right and good. You may be sure she did so at this time. "Harry," said she, as she sat by his bedside, "I am sorry to hear what you have been doing. You see what has come of your bad and cruel ways. I do love to see young people kind to animals, for where they are not so, it shows that they are either very unfeeling or very thoughtless. God has given us pbwer over them, but we ohght to use our power for their good, and not to their injury. The man or child who is cruel sinks lower than the brute. He casts away the reason God has given him, and wickedly stirs up the passions of the animals he should rule and guide in kindness and love. He who gave you feeling, gave it to dogs also; and as you would not like to be made to suffer, you should not inflict pain upon others. You may be sure that the great Creator is angry with us when we cause pain to the creatures he has made. It is written, 'He shall have judgment without mercy that has shown no mercy.' James 2:13.



PAGE 1

6 HARRY HARDHEART, his hands and screamed for help; but there was, at the moment, no person near that part of the river. Was there no one to save the wicked drowning boy? Must he be cut off in his sins? Yes, there was help at hand. Who was the deliverer? It was Driver. He had heard Harry's cries, and rushing to the spot, plunged into the river. It was as if he knew all about it, for -in an instant he caught the collar of Harry's coat and with a few strong pulls he brought the boy out of the strength of the current, to the side where the waters were shallow and still. Harry now caught hold of the branch of a tree that hung over the stream, and with the help of Driver crawled to land. Thus was he saved from drowning by the dog whose life, only a few days before, he had tried to take away. By the time the bad boy had got home, his aunt, who lived near his father's cottage, heard of what had taken place, and also about his cruel conduct to Driver. As she had been like a mother to himfor his own mother was dead-she hurried at once to the house. She was a wise, pious woman, and had often told



PAGE 1

8 HARRY HARDHEART. "I think, Harry, you have learned a lesson.to-day that you should never-forget. Driver has taught you how to return good for evil. In your anger, you would have drowned the poor faithful dog; he has in return saved your life." "I am very sorry, aunt," said Harry. "I hope God will forgive me." "Yes, I hope he will; for he is a merciful God. You might have been cut off in your sins, but in his pity he sent Driver to snatch you from death. You must seek for pardon for the sake of Christ, for it is his precious blood that cleanses us from sin. I have often told you how he lived in this.world, and how he died on the cross for sinners. If you believe in him with all your heart, and seek the grace of his Holy Spirit, then I shall see you a pious and kind boy. Having found mercy yourself, your conduct will be merciful and loving to all." That is all we have to tell about Harry just now. Let us hope that he will become all that his kind aunt wished him to be.



PAGE 1

It2p-57



PAGE 1

HARRY HARDHEART, AND HIS DOG DRIVER. THE dog is a faithful creature. If everybody knew his good qualities, everybody, we think, would be kind to him. He delights in our company, and always tries to 10.



PAGE 1

AND HIS DOG DRIVER. 5 into the shed, and panting for breath, lay down quietly on some straw in a corner. A few days passed away, and Harry was again at his mischief. There is a place on the river called the Ferry. Here is kept a boat, which belongs to a man who gains a living by rowing people across the water. One evening, Harry with one of his bad companions named Ned Jones crept down to the spot, and getting into the boat, they pushed into the middle of the stream. The current was strong, and they did not know how to manage the boat. In vain they tried to row; they soon found themselves drifting along towards a part of the river which is said to be very deep and dangerous. They were now sadly alarmed; each of the boys thought that he knew best how to take the boat to the shore, and struggled to have his own way. In the scuffle the boat tilted on one side, and then upset, casting the boys into the water. Ned Jones could swim, and got safely to the shore. He, however, did not think about or care for Harry, but ran home, leaving him in the midst of the stream, which bore him rapidly along. Harry held up



PAGE 1

AND HIS DOG DRIVER. 3 Harry's father is a poor man, and sells turf, wood, and other things in the streets. He keeps a donkey to draw his little cart in which the goods are carried. This poor animal leads a sad life: it works hard, is badly fed, and has plenty of kicks and blows. But it is about the way in which the dog Driver was treated that we are about to tell you. A large brown and white dog is Driver; he has fine long ears and a noble bushy tail. He is kept to guard the cart by day, and to watch the shed where the wood and turf are placed at night. When Harry was about fourteen years old, he' was a rough and rude boy. He had never been kept at school long together ; and as he was left to do as he pleased, he was known in the street where he lived as a dirty and ignorant little fellow. His companions were boys as bad as himself, who were always getting him into trouble and disgrace. It was so that the dog Driver was the innocent means of leading Harry's father to find him out in some of his sly tricks, and for which he was well punished. Harry was very angry, and afterwards



PAGE 1

SNO 110 AMERICAN TRCSCrY 150 Namsau-s N. T. xg~ 4~II



PAGE 1

BOOKS F04 THE YOUNG. A T-ARGE VARIETY OF THE BEST AND PRETTIEST BOOKS FOR CHILDREN OF EVERY AGE, Ben Holt's Good Name. An honest little fellow, whose nmie was a life-loug blessing. 35 cts.; post. 8 cts. Max Fleming. A record of a noble boy. 30 cts.; post. 8 cts. Dean Proctor. The cheering story of a poor boy's progress in learning and usefulness. 30 cts.; post. 4 ets. The True Boy. Who loved to do good. 25 cts,; post. 4 cts. The Deserted Heroine. Two cuts. 20 cts; Wyst, 4 cts. George Wayland, the Little Medicinecarrier. .35 cts. Juvenile Library. Thirty-two stories, bound in eight vols., each 32 pp., large 32mno, finely illustrated. In a case, $1 20. PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY, 150 N.RASSA-STRTEET, N. T.



PAGE 1

4 HARRY HARDHEART, showed his spite against the dog. Poor Driver was not to blame; but it was the wicked heart of the boy that led him to show anger and revenge. A river runs near the cottage of Harry's father, and the dog often went there to wash himself. One day as he lay on the bank, drying his shaggy coat in the bright sunshine, Harry came to the same place. Driver sprang towards his young master, wagging his tail with delight, and began to romp around him. Instead of treating him kindly, the cruel thought came into Harry's mind, that if he were to drown Driver he should not be found out again in his wicked doings. So coaxing the dog into his arms, he managed to tie his fore legs, and then, we are sorry to tell, threw him into a deep part of the stream. Driver sank, but in a moment came to the surface. As he struggled hard, the string that bound him slipped off, and gaining the full use of his legs, he was soon on the shore. It seemed as if he knew and felt the cruel conduct of Harry, for he did not run to him again; but making the best of his way home, he got



PAGE 1

2 HARRY HARDHEART, do his best to please us. He obeys our voice, follows us in our walks, guards our homes, and often has saved the life of his master. See how he frisks about us to show his joy, and licks our hand when we feed him. He comes jumping at our call, and spreading out his paws, he looks up in our face, and seems to say, "Well, here I am; what do you want with me? If there is any thing I can do for you, I will do it in a minute." Some men and boys teach dogs to fight one another, or to worry the chickens and the cat, or to bark and fly at people as they pass along the road, and in this way spoil the temper of the animals. Such conduct is cruel and sinful. There have been many accounts written of the good service of the dog; but that is no reason why we should not read with pleasure of any other that can be given. The more we hear to his credit, the more shall we value him, and we shall be the less likely to use him ill. The story we are now going to give is about a boy whom we will call Harry Hardheart.