• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 The children and the fly
 Run and play
 The skipping rope
 A rigmarole about a tea-party
 The shower of rain
 The snow man
 Industry
 Persevere
 Back Cover






Group Title: Uncle Ned's picture books
Title: Playtime stories
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026669/00001
 Material Information
Title: Playtime stories
Series Title: Uncle Ned's picture books
Physical Description: 8 p., 4 leaves of plates : 4 col. ill. ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher: McLoughlin Bro's
Place of Publication: New-York
Publication Date: [187-?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry -- 1875
Picture-books for children -- 1875
Publishers' advertisements -- 1875
Children's stories -- 1875
Bldn -- 1875
Genre: Children's poetry
Picture-books for children
Publishers' advertisements
Children's stories
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Poetry and prose for children.
General Note: Title from cover illustrated in colors.
General Note: Advertisements, headed "New picture books for little children", including "Aunt Louisa! big picture series -- 31 kinds": p. 4 of cover.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026669
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001875157
oclc - 17818060
notis - AJV0175

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    The children and the fly
        Page 3
    Run and play
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The skipping rope
        Page 7
        Page 8
    A rigmarole about a tea-party
        Page 9
    The shower of rain
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The snow man
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Industry
        Page 15
    Persevere
        Page 15
    Back Cover
        Page 16
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THE CHILDREN AND THE FLY

Some children at a window pane were
teasing a poor fly;
It chanced a fairy saw them as she was
passing by.
She cried, "You cruel children, this you
have often, done;
Now you shall try, if, as you say, 'it
really is such fun."'
With that she touched them with her
wand, and, much to their surprise,
The fly grew quite as big as them, and
they as small as flies;
And when up and down the glass the in-
sect saw them crawl,
It worried now, as they had done, and
made them cry and bawl;
And, racing round the window-frame, that
fly did buzz and bite;
Of fear the children nearly died, and till-
exhausted quite-
The fairy, kinder far than they, changed
them all back again,
And placed the children on the floor, the
fly upon the pane.
"I hope now," said the fairy, "that you'll
recollect and try
To do to helpless little ones as you would
be done by."








PLAY.


There, run away, you little things,
And skip, and jump, and play;
You have been quiet long enough
So run away, I say.

John, you and Mary roll your hoops,
George on a stick can ride;
And Ann with Charlotte run a race,
Or any play beside.

The sweet, fresh air so softly blows,
So brightly shines the sun,
That active limbs and rosy cheeks
Will in the race be won.

For little boys and girls may sing,
And frisk, and jump, and play;
When work and lessons both are done,
So run away, I say.


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THE SKIPPING ROPE.


Fanny Free can skip better than any
girl I know. She can cross her hands and
throw the rope over her head twenty times.
One day when Fanny was using her
rope, a gig came by. The horse fell down
and broke the shaft of the gig. What shall
I do for a rope?" said the driver. Fanny
ran to him in a minute and gave him her
rope. "Thank you, my little girl," said he.
So he tied up the shaft and drove on.
Two or three girls made game of Fanny
for giving away her rope, but Fanny did
not mind them.
The next day the gig came by again,
and the driver asked for the little girl who
had given him the rope. He had brought
her a new rope to skip with, and as pretty
a little work-box as ever was seen. Nurse
says it is a good thing for a. little girl to
skip well, but it is a better thing to have
a kind heart. Fanny is like a little sun-
beam; we are always glad to see her, and
she is sure to make everybody happy.








A RIGMAROLE ABOUT A TEA-
PARTY.


MRS. DYER
Stirr'd the fire;
Agnes Stout
Poked it out;
Tommy Voles.
Fetch'd the coals;
Alice Good
Laid the wood;
Bertie Patch
Struck the match;
Charlotte Hayes
Made it blaze.
Mrs. Groom
Kept the broom;
Katty Moore
Swept the floor;
Fanny Froth.
Laid the cloth;
Arthur Grey
Brought the tray;
Betty Bates
Washed the plates;


Nanny Gait
Smooth'd the salt.;
Dicky Street
Fetch'd the meat;
Sally Strife
Rubbed the knife;
Minnie York
Found the fork;
Sophie Silk
Bought the milk;
Mrs. Bream
Sent some cream;
Susan Head
Cut the bread;
Harry Hos:
Made the toast;
Mrs. Dee
Poured out tea;
And they all were as
happy as happy
could be.
E. F. S. G.








THE SHOWER OF RAIN.


"Rain, rain, go away Little Susy Dee
wants to take a walk with her doll.
How it pours I There goes Johnny Rose
to market. He does not mind the rain.
It comes more softly now. See, there
is a bright beam from the sun in the sky.
Now the rain stops, and Susy can go out.
As Susy went along she said to her
doll, Now, mind, Dolly I You must be
good, and clean, and tidy, and do as you
are bid.
"You must mind your sewing, and
learn your book; and speak up, and tell
the truth, and act like a little lady."
Just then her mother came up, for she
had been behind her and heard every word.
"Very well, Susy;" said she, "I am
glad that you give Dolly such good advice.
But they that give good advice should fol-
low it. Mind, then, that you are good, and
clean, and tidy, and do as you are bid.







The Shower of Rain.


"Mind, too, Susy, that you attend to
your sewing, and learn your book, and
speak up, and tell the truth, and act like a
little lady."
Little Susy felt the color come into her
face; but what her mother said did her
good.



THE SHOWER OF RAIN.

Rain dr6ps, rain drops, as you fall,
I will try to catch you all;
Do not wet my Dolly's head--
Drop into the tub instead.

Rain drops, rain drops everywhere,
On my face, and on my hair,
On the flowers, and in the can,
In the street, and on the man.













































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THE SNOW MAN



Oh, see the snow is falling now,
It powders all the trees;
Its flakes abound, and all around
They float upon the breeze.

'Tis snowing fast, and cold the blast,
But yet I hope 'twill stay:
Oh, see it blow the falling snow,
In meadows far away.

Jack Frost is near, we feel him here,
He's on his icy sled;
And covered deep, the flowers sleep
Beneath their snowy bed

Come out and play, this winter day,
Amid the falling snow;
Come, young and old, nor fear the cold,
Nor howling winds that blow.









INDUSTRY.

Gather roses while they bloom,
Never lose a day,
Nor in sloth one hour consume-
Time doth pass away.
Now you've opportunity
Both for work and play;
Where may you to-morrow be9-
Time doth pass away.
Men have mourned their whole life through
One good deed's delay;
Do at once what you've to do,-
Time doth pass away.


PERSEVERE.
The fisher who draws in his net too soon,
Won't have any fish to sell;
The child who shuts up its book too soon,
Won't learn any lessons well.
For if you would have your learning stay,
Be patient-don't learn too fast;
The man who travels a mile each day,
Will get round the world at last..









INDUSTRY.

Gather roses while they bloom,
Never lose a day,
Nor in sloth one hour consume-
Time doth pass away.
Now you've opportunity
Both for work and play;
Where may you to-morrow be9-
Time doth pass away.
Men have mourned their whole life through
One good deed's delay;
Do at once what you've to do,-
Time doth pass away.


PERSEVERE.
The fisher who draws in his net too soon,
Won't have any fish to sell;
The child who shuts up its book too soon,
Won't learn any lessons well.
For if you would have your learning stay,
Be patient-don't learn too fast;
The man who travels a mile each day,
Will get round the world at last..









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Big Picture Series-31 kinds.

Quarto dem. Six fall page Illustrations


in Colors in each.
Retail, 25 Cents Each.
Three Bears.
Tom Thumb.
Domestic Animals.
Visit to the Menagerie.
o,:, ome 'Games for Little Boys.
Home Games for Little Girls.
:. IYankee Doodle.
.:. inson Crusoe.
: b- ib Cat.
N.I : Biddle Diddle.
..... ;. ieon inthe Wood.
IJtk and the Bean-Stalk.
n: aned Tortoise.




*/.' it of St. Nicholas.
SIi ; aialusm and his Works.
onipty D iuapty.--Volume 1.
t pty Pudape.t----Volume 2.

n::::I tIat Jack Bitf
VTit Animals.-Part One.
Widt Animals.-Part Two.
Mother Hubbard's Dog.
Tit Tiny, and Tittens.
Fow-Footed Friends.
: Three Little Kittens.
Three Good Friends.
Cock Robin.
McLOT.UGIHLINf BRIi


Uncle Ned's Pioture Books,
/Large 8vo. 15 Cents each.
Frisky, the Squirrel.
The Robin's Christmas Eve.
Hector, the Dog.
Little Ann and her Mamma.
Ditties for Children.
Nursery Play Book.
Playtime Stories. Home Pictures.

GILT COVER PICTUE BOOKS.
Same Sie and Pidce as above.
Gambling Rhymes.
Proverbs for the' 'Ntne
The Robin. Lily's Picture $ook.

GOLDEN LGIi:iS R ES.
Quarto cap. Elegantly' Pi a ol.
Six kind 16 Cent t :".
Wondrous Woarkhofel :i: s.a
Early Life of Jew. :.he Prodigal S.
Last Da of Jesusf Te Twee Apostles.X
Peter's hiractilouwsiditeiance

Half-onrs with the Bible.
A New,Series of Bible Histories for the
young. Elegantly Illustrated by I.
W. Herrick. Square. 32 pages. 12
kinds Fiteen Cents each.
The Creation of the World and the oelga. .
J h and his Brethren.
children of the Bible.
Jeasu our Saviour.:.
JeBa our Example.
St ory of he Aos. IsraeL
Moses ad the eieriNof e of Chidre of
Stories of Abraham, Isaaoa d Jacob.
Joshua and the Mighty aMe of (1.
Xings of Israel sad JudSah *:
Stones ,f the Prophets.
Mrs. Barbauld's Hys. ,


OS., Publisher's, New York.


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