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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Introduction
 The temperance alphabet for bands...
 Back Cover






Title: The temperance alphabet for bands of hope
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026661/00001
 Material Information
Title: The temperance alphabet for bands of hope
Physical Description: 30 leaves : ill. ; 14 x 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tweedie, W ( William ) ( Publisher )
Piper, Alfred ( Printer )
Publisher: W. Tweedie
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Alfred Piper
Publication Date: 1871
 Subjects
Subject: Temperance -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1871   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1871
Genre: Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
England -- Ipswich
 Notes
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026661
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001871535
oclc - 29187459
notis - AJU6533

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
    Introduction
        Page 6
    The temperance alphabet for bands of hope
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Back Cover
        Page 34
Full Text

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{z- In the following pages "Abstinence" is allegorically represented as an Angel of Light,
and Strong Drink as an Angel of Darkness. The latter figure applies to the Drink

itself, and not to the persons who are connected with its manufacture and sale.

*










IPSWICH, ENGLAND:

ALFRED PIPER, STEAM PRINTING WORKS, ST. NICHOLAS.
1871.






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ALL BIGHTS BBYBBY.ED.


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TO T

RE&D


1 INTRODUCTION.
The author and designer of the following pages has
sought, by the aid of poetry and pictures, to fasten some great
truths on the minds of the young. The object is to furnish
to members of Bands of Hope, and other young persons, an
Ml. ALPHABET which shall truthfully depict the fearful Story
of Strong Drink, and which shall, at the same time, point
distinctly to Total Abstinence as the one effectual remedy.
SWhilst thus seeking to throw the shield of Total
Abstinence over the rising generation, a strong hope is felt
that others, of an older growth, wearied and broken-hearted
by the tyranny of Drink, will, on perusing these pages, resolve,
S with God's help, to place themselves under the shelter of the
Pledge. May all that are drink-tempted hasten to shelter here,
and at last find an infinitely better shelter under the Cross of Christ!
Reader! Will you help to place this little handbook in the households
of every drink-stricken land?
Sgi The illustrations and arguments apply to every country desolated by strong
drink. Numbers, where given, have reference to statistics in the United Kingdom, but
these, unhappily, repeat themselves in the United States and elsewhere. The border
round the 'pages represents the plant "' Woody Nightshade "-pretty to the eye, but a
subtle poison, to be used (like Alcohol) as medicine only.
mbling&A299 \M .. Add9Lh















A stands for ALCOHOL. What is this ? you inquire:
'Tis the Demon of Drink! the Spirit of Fire!
BS i Alas! the poor Drunkard has known, to his cost,
This curse to the living', this knell of the lost!
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B stands for BACCHUS, heathen goll of strong wine;
His slaves, first all joyous, in ruin soon pine.
B stands also for BOTTLES, glass houses which hold
The foe of the young and the curse of the old.
-A&-- mn-, m&. vmm&, -r~m -a, sOM68 --VON-









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0 stands for CRIME. Alas! Drink leads to Guilt!
One half of our Prisons had ne'er have been built,
o l T Nor half the Asylums nor Homes for the sad
If Drink had not driven its votaries mad.















SD stands for DRUNARDS. I have heard, with dismay,
That thousands of these pass yearly away!
0! murderous Drink! 0 1 terrible doom
That hurries its victims in crowds to the tomb 1
EQW AN cam. a .-






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E stands for EVER. And the souls lost by Drink
For millions of years will in agony think
L Of the warning they heard ere they sunk to the sod,
"No Drunkard shall enter the kingdom of God."













i-a--- -
F stands for FOLLY. How it saddens the heart
That men, for stro ng drink, should from everything 1'.,, t
B RA N I T h a t e n n o b l e s t h e p r e s e n t a n d p o i n t s t o t h e r e s t
Which God has prepared in the realms of the blest I














G stands for GIN. Weary years has it stood
The prince of all curses, the wreck of all good.
611 The sum of its ruin will only be known
When the final award is made at God's throne I














H stands for HEALTH. If this fire-water Drink
Would nourish our systems, and help us to think,
. Some excuse might be made! But no! 'tis a bane
Which fevers the body and palsies the brain.







F"


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I stands for INQUIRE. And the tests of the wise
Prove Alcohol Poison, in deadly disguise.
As well sip the Nightshade portrayed round this page
As drink of this curse of our youth and old age.













J stands for JOY. But Strong Drink, like a thief,
Robs hearts of their gladness and flls them with griet
0M 01 joy-bells of earth I how thy peals will ring out
SWhen this tyrranous King is put to the rout !














K stands for KINDNESS. 'Tis the Spirit of Love
Which lights up the world like a smile from above.
But the Spirit of Drink, more cruel than war,
Scars out its dread pathway in ruin and gore.














L stands for LIQUOR. Of Strong Spirits, we fear,
Thirty millions of gallons are drank every year I
l .What an ocean of torment! A deep rolling curse
Which wrecks every barque save Death's floating hearse.
SA a ^^r^ ^. iw W















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M stands for MODERATE. But surely e'en sips
Of dangerous poison should ne'er touch the lips.
Abstain! 0 1 ABSTAIN! If you never begin
You'll ne'er be undone by this demon of sin I


OfSELtl














stands for NUMBERS. But no pen can count up
Those whomSatan and Death have destroyed by the cup.
Pile up in one curse, Fever, Famine, and War,
Andthe curse of Strong Drinkwilldwarf the huge score.









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0 stands for ONE. And One Glass leads to more-
A fact countless thousands of Drunkards deplore i
o "T Then tempt not the tempter, but solemnly think
Drink leads you to thirst and thirst leads you to drink.
Rk i^ is i aiW^ B- L













P stands for PORTER, of which, with strong BEER,
We drink Eight-hundred-millions of gallons per year I
Less fiery than Spirits, they yet both contain,
As the source of their strength, the Alcohol bane.














SQstands for QUANTITY. But what brain can think,
Without turning dim, of the Ocean of Drink ?
Were but one year's supply in some vast wet dock hurled
It would float all the iron-clad fleets of the world.














R stands for RElIEDL bll thlo i tli Gui.
To TOUCH NOT, to TASTE NOT-a Remedy sure.
And, humanly speaking, nought else will suffice
To drive from the world this terrible vice.













S stands for SPIRITS. Of these, Brandy and Rum,
With Whisky and Gin, make the principal sum.
For Distilling and Brewing we waste, it is plain,
Seventy-millions of bushels each year of good grain.















T stands for TIM6E. Haste to help while you !nay,
For legions of Drunkards are passing away!
And Strong Drink every day breaks into Christ's fold
And lures to the dram shop the young and the old.













U stands for UNION. Let the Pledge be unfurled I
If we slay not the foe he will conquer the world!
He browbeats our Senate; and Gold gives him might
To frown down the noble and crush out the right.














V stands for VIuC. And no tongue can e'er tell
Of its mischief on earth, its record in hell!
Yet Drink is its strength! for the vicious confess
Thatwithout the wild draught they dare not transgress.














W stands for WATER. Rich gift from God's wealth!
Enough, with good food, to secure perfect health.
ISKfy Then drink it, poor Drunkards! Thou God of all love,
0 give them the Water of Life from above !
h.














X is a letter which has the strange task
Of showing the strength in each barrel and cask.
In one gallon of Porter with treble X scored
Twelve ounces of Spirit are usually stored.
3tarfcl eiiifelasat&Y b eai














Y stands for YOUTH. And to you, Bands of Hope,
Is given the task with this giant to cope.
To Abstain is to conquer And Victory won
May save, by example, the lost and undone.














Z stands for ZEAL. Oh! if penury's cry-
The moans of the lost-and the wailings which sigh
OVEA From orphans and widows, can melt thy sad heart,
SIn GOD'S name be Zealous, and act well thy part!











S In the United Kingdom the eonanmption of intoariating liquors
fS 1809 amounted to nearly one thousand million gallons I This vast
AoTl fod would cover 122 Englash area with a depth of 80 feet, and afford
ample room in whih to float all the modern war naxie of the world!
The Cost of these was at least 102,3S8820. This number of sovereigs,
AsD placed one upon another, 16 to I in wold form a column 108 mimaes high.
T .llffl or brewing and distlling purpose there were consumed, in l869, about
~Ii^S*. 70,000,000 bushels of grasi. Those, ifmade lnto bread, would have ro-
S. do*ed more throne. thousand millionfour-Npo d loaves. M .Wm. Vaoyle
of Mnochester, says:-"If the, loaves had to be e ted away from some
biker's shop in London, and tumbled into the ihames, and one horse and
cart were engaged to do it, talking 550 loaes every halt-hour for ten hours
each doa, It would take more than 30 years to cat them all away.
S he amount of Poor and Polie bateapaid daring 1800 was 13,541,827.
It s believed that atleast thresefourths of this-or morethua ten millions
sterling per anauio-would be ulnecesaary were it not for the liquor traffic.
Mr. luics, Secretary of State for England, sas,-"There exits a public
house or a beehouae for every 182 of the population Brawers and
Ditillers have an interest in two-thirds of the licensed houses in larie
S tona. Or plsons, lunae Wsylums, and worIose are called with inmates .wosa
eases have originated in their prison for intozicatmng liquorrs"
iBoentfld Tesatimony :-Alohol is not food but physio ; it injariously stimulates but does not
StenBt~en, Beer and Wie are only les hurtfl than Sprit because they contain le bs Alcohol.
There im more foodin peywrth of Bread than in a gallon of Ale.
SC BtHiking as are the foReobng statements they ar nothing oompaed with reulta which
cannotbe given. Who hall tell ofthe losof trade,timehealthprospority,reputation, earthly
hatpiness and everlasting prompects which must be placd to the account of Strong Drun)P
Phbflathropitsa! thelhuor trall will master h world if yo donotpee"dilynmaterit!




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