• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Home, and saying good-bye
 London outside and inside
 Smoky days, but a clear sky...
 Spring-time in two senses
 A stormy night and unwelcome...
 The robbery and its consequenc...
 Great changes
 Gloomy times in a beautiful...
 How the clouds cleared
 Good days, winding up with...
 A bad woman's malice
 Escape to a refuge, and end
 Ricahrd Rowe's parcel
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Tom Carter; or, the ups and downs of life.
Title: Tom Carter or, the ups and downs of life
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026637/00001
 Material Information
Title: Tom Carter or, the ups and downs of life
Alternate Title: Ups and downs of life
Physical Description: 350 p., 2 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bickersteth, Emily
Hoyt, Henry ( Publisher )
Pierce, William J ( Engraver )
Publisher: Henry Hoyt
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: [1872?]
Edition: From the London Ed.
 Subjects
Subject: Young men -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Students -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Teachers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Parsonages -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Death -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1872
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Baldwin Library copy date from inscription.
General Note: Title page illustrated in colors.
General Note: Illustrations engraved by Peirce (Pierce).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026637
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225580
notis - ALG5855
oclc - 59546122

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Home, and saying good-bye
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    London outside and inside
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Smoky days, but a clear sky above
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Spring-time in two senses
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    A stormy night and unwelcome arrival
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    The robbery and its consequences
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Great changes
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 90a
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    Gloomy times in a beautiful place
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
    How the clouds cleared
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
    Good days, winding up with a wedding
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
    A bad woman's malice
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
    Escape to a refuge, and end
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
    Ricahrd Rowe's parcel
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 294a
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
        Page 313
        Page 314
        Page 315
        Page 316
        Page 317
        Page 318
        Page 319
        Page 320
        Page 321
        Page 322
        Page 323
        Page 324
        Page 325
        Page 326
        Page 327
        Page 328
        Page 329
        Page 330
        Page 331
        Page 332
        Page 333
        Page 334
        Page 335
        Page 336
        Page 337
        Page 338
        Page 339
        Page 340
        Page 341
        Page 342
        Page 343
        Page 344
        Page 345
        Page 346
        Page 347
        Page 348
        Page 349
        Page 350
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text
















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THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.





FROM THE LONDON EDITION.














BO STON:
PUBLISHED BY HENRY HOYT,
NO. 9 CORNHILL
Wv~hvWh/~ WWvvv vvWvvvW~



























CHAPTER I.


Home, and saying Good-Bye, -

CHAPTER IL


London Outside and Inside,


- 5


40 40 17


CHAPTER III.


Smoky Days, but a clear Sky Above,

CHAPTER IV.


Spring-Time in Two Senses,


- 29


- 41


CHAPTER V.


A Stormy Night and Unwelcome Arrival,


CHAPTER


- 57


VIL


The Robbery and its Consequences, -


- 71


CHAPTER VII.


Great Changes,


- 77





CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VIII.


Gloomy Times in a Beautiful Place,

CHAPTER IX.


How the Clouds Cleared,


S -m 103


- 117


CHAPTER X.


Good Days, Winding up with a Wedding,


- 135


CHAPTER XI.


A Bad Woman's Malice,


S- 149


CHAPTER ~*II.


Escape to a Refuge, and End,


IV


w s 16













uome, and


aAging


)Od-








" Oh, well, can I remember
My first and earliest home,
The woodlands and the meadows
When we at eve did roam:
" The aspen leaves that quivered
'Neath the winds so wild and free,
Trembling and trembling ever
With a sound like the distant sea;
" The laurels dark and glossy
That glistened in the moon;
The skylark, glad and joyous,
That carolled loud at noon;
" The lawn so green and grassy,
Bedecked with morning dew,
That glittered in the sunlight
With every rainbow hue;
The grave and silent churchyard,
Where we strewed the snowdrops fair,
On the grave of our gentle mother
And little brothers there;
The church with its old gray tower
That reared its head on high,
A pillar of remembrance,
Right up against the sky.
How oft we watched the sunset
And the shadows on the lawn,
Or together held a secret prayer
At the time of early dawn.
"Yes, all those years of childhood
Seemed one long holiday,
For we loved each other dearly,
And our hearts were glad and gay."













TOM CARTER.


CHAPTER 1.


NICE-LOOKING, civil-spoken
Tom Carter. Every one said


lad was
so, from


^ \ the dame
think his curly
ornament to -he
hired him first
then made up h
fellow like that
or as house-boy,
week more, and
ises. The clergW
teacher liked T


shho(


olmistress,


who used to


head and clean pinafore an
r school, to the farmer who
to follow the plough, and
is mind that a quick, active
would be handy in the stable
and so gave him sixpence a
kept him about on the prem-
yman and his Sunday-school
om. He was always in his


place


at the
i


time,


and


if he


was not very


- ------- -* d- -





0 TOM CARTER; OR,

bright--for poor Tom was one of a large
family, and had had small chance of learning
since he was seven years old, except what
he could pick up on a Sunday -he gave his
mind to his class, and looked as if he loved
to listen. Besides, no one ever heard Tom
swear, and he never sat in the idle pews"
at church, with the lazy fellows who. only
went to trifle or to sleep. His favorite seat
was right in front of the pulpit, and he used
to follow the preacher, as well as he could,
spelling out the words of the text in the
Bible, which had been given him as a Sunday-
school prize, and listening when the sermon
came, with both his ears. The other children
at his home used to say that Tom was a
Christian; that he had always gone on like
one since his favorite sister died of scarlet
fever. But his mother knew that keeping
out of bad ways was not hard, placed as


surrounded by so


many home


the


was


Inow,




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


restraints, and
show.
Well, perhaps
was, that, when a
to the clergyman:
handy, trusty bo:


sort of page
give him five
clothes, and


she only saic


you can see
Gentleman in
n to say that
v to take into


or foot
pound
every.


1 time


would


by this how it
London wrote
he wanted a
his house as a


man, and that he would
Is a year Wages, a suit of
hing found, Mr. Brown


thought there was no boy in the place so
likely to answer the purpose as Tom; and if
Mr. Fenton liked to try him, and the farmer
had no objection, he should go. The farmer
was kindly willing that Tom should take
advantage of any opening that promised for
his good, and after a few busy days for his
mother in making him new shirts, busy days
for Tom in picking up all that he could learn
of in-door work at the Parsonage, the short
interval had passed, and the time for good-bye
came.





TOM CARTER ; OR,


It was a strange feeling for


poor little


Tom.


After he had


had his last lesson in waiting


table, and cleaned


Mr. Brown's


knives for


.last time- Tom


he thought


loved to clean anything


Mr. Brown would use -he


out into the Parsonage


more look round


to himself how he


garden, to


have


that
stole


one


before the sun set, and fancy


should think of it all


after


he had


gone away:


the trim gravel-walk that


he had run along,


with


pockets, many a frosty,


his hands


starlight


in his


night, when


he was coming to the night-school; the pretty
green lawn, where he had spent all the very


happiest


days of


his life at the yearly school


treats, and
fancy must


which as a


be just


little fellow


like the


garden


he used to


of Eden;


and, lastly,
pleasant in


the study-window,


the gray


looking


so


autumnal twilight, with


the ruddy


blaze


that good


Mrs.


Brown


stirred


up to welcome her husband, when


came back


from his


afternoon's visiting -the


10


at


the


heC


I I a





THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


study
went


from
up for


whence he knew so many a prayer
him and his to heaven.


A lump
thought of
tear into hil
lad, and by
for a little,
half out, in


came into Tom's throat as he
it all, and something very like a
s eye; but he was a brave-hearted
no means disposed to give way
so he turned the sigh, which was
to a cheery whistle, and recalled


his Sunday teacher's parting words, Walk
in the fear of God, my boy, and you need fear
nought beside. If God be for you, who can
be against you ?"
But it was harder still the good-bye at his
own home, when supper was over, and all the
little ones, except the fat baby of nine months,
clung so fast round his neck, kissing and
loving him, for fear they should not be awake
by the time that he had to be off in the morn-
ing; and when they were sent to bed, and
Lucy and his mother were putting in the last
stitches at the table, and Tom sat by his


11





12 TOM CARTER; OR,

father up in the snug chimney-corner, where
his three-legged stool had stood ever since he
ran alone poor fellow! he durst not speak,
for he knew if he had he should have burst
out sobbing, and he didn't want to upset his
mother by that.
So these four sat together very still for a
long while, their hearts swelling hard with
the love and the thoughts which seemed too
strong to utter, till at last the father spoke out
what was in the minds of all, when he laid his
hand on Tom's head, and said, It is hard to
part from thee, my son, but 1 have a good
confidence thou hast chosen the better part,
which shall not be taken away from thee;
and with God, thy Father, ever caring for
thee; the Lord Jesus, thy Friend and Saviour,
always close beside; and the blessed Spirit
within thee, to comfort and to guide, how
canst thou lack ? "
The words were few Carter had always




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE: 13

been a man of deeds rather than words-- but
they, made their way, like a sunbeam of joy
and trust, into the poor child's heavy heart.
How often in.after life, when tossing upon the
rough waves of this troublesome world, he
thought of them again, and clung to them as
to a strong rock of comfort. Now, his heart
was too full t:o answer;. le only leaned his
head closer against his father's shoulder,,and
wiped off a few quiet tears.
That night was the real wrench of parting.
When he woke up fresh, after a good sleep,
next morning, and heard the joyous song of
the lark in the field close by, and saw the
stars paling in the clear dawn, which prom-
ised a brilliant day, everything seemed to
have turned the bright side outwards. He
remembered that he was going to have his
first ride in the train" at last, and going
to see London," the thing he had wished
to do all his life; and so pleasant did it look,





TOM CARTER! OR,


the thought of the stir and the
the sameness of the past, that
whistling over his dressing, a
his parents that he had picked r
for his journey.
They walked with him to the
father hooked the boy's bundle


umbrella,
shoulder,
bor's car
first-born.
train can
the station
opened th
my man,'
hands we
looked th
could not
had started
yet he wa


change after
Tom fell to
sure sign to
ip good heart


station
on the


his
new


they had bought him, over his
and his mother left baby in a neigh-
e, that she might see the last of her
The ticket was bought; the great
ie screeching, puffing, steaming into
n; the good-natured railway porter
ie door, and with a kindly, Now,
Scurried Tom into the carriage;
re wrung through the window, eyes


e yearnings
utter, and
,d alone on
Ls not alone.


of affection which lips
he was off! Their boy
life's long journey; and
This was the parent's


resting-place.


wonder,


oh, how


often I


14


I
/




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE. 15

wonder, how in the world do those get
through trouble who know nothing of God ?
STom didn't feel in trouble just then; he
was vastly amused and delighted with the
smooth, swift motion of the train, the fields
and hedges that seemed to go flying past
the windows, and the hasty glimpses of the
smart little stations into which they shot in
and shot out, like a bullet out of a gun
almost, thought Tom to himself. It was all
so much better than going along jog-trot"
with a horse -and cart; and though the tunnels
were queer places to be sure," Tom was
pleased to find that he thought them by no
means alarming. Then he was smitten with
admiration of the railway porters, such fine-
looking fellows in their dark suits and bright
buttons, and always with a civil word for
everybody. He thought he wouldn't much
mind taking to that line of business himself,
if' service didn't suit him; but what he had




TOM CARTER.


begun lie
and: thin.


would


abide


by now, through


thick


Hazlewood


from


London,


was not more than fifty


so that a couple


miles


of hours'


whirling,


whistling,


flying


along,


brought


them


within


and Tom's


the confines of the


good


opinion


of the


mighty city;
railway men


was yet


further


heightened


which


they came


to his


relief in the


painful


confusion of first arriving.


16


by


the


way


in













and


nuglde.







" THE trees and flowers are beautiful,
The sky is blue and high,
And the small streams make pleasant sounds
As they run swiftly by.

" But all these things are not for me;
I live amid dark walls;
And scarcely through these dusty panes
A single sunbeam falls.

" Oh, murmur not, thou lonely one,
That here thy home must be,
And iut amid the pleasant fie) s,
Or by the greenwood tree.

' There is a voice can speak to thee
Amid the works of men;
Speak with a sound as loud and clear
As in the lonely glen.

" Do not the works thou seest around
Spring from man's thoughtful mind,
And in that is there nought of God
For thee, for all, to find ?

" The earth with all its varied blooms
Will have to pass away;
But man's immortal mind will live
Through everlasting day.

" And without mind these sheltering walls
Around thee had not been,
These busy engines had not moved,
No whirling wheels been seen! "


18














CHAPTER II.


ONDON is a big


place, and no mistake,"


' thought Tom to hin
been duly directed
porter, he walked along the s
with his bundle slung by his i
shoulder, to Mr. Fenton's
houses, houses! nothing but
way you turn, and however
while the mere smoke out
makes a dark sky over yoi
out of the seven. However,


spite of that.
and bustle on
alive, running
19


self,


as,


having


by the railway
,mooth pavement,
umbrella over his
house. Houses,
houses whichever
r far you look,
of the chimneys
ir head six days
Tom liked it, in


It did him good to see the stir
all sides; everybody seemed
after their business as he




20 TOM CARTER; OR,

expressed it to himself, like sheep with the
dog behind them!
The inside of Mr. Fenton's house was rather
.a contrast, as the boy thought when he was
once fairly inside and heard the door shut
behind him. Mr. Fenton was a single gentle-
man, who had retired from business some
years since with a competency; he lived alone,
as he had done pretty well all his life, with a
housekeeper to do what a woman may in a
home, and a .boy to clean knives and shoes,
run errands, and wait at table.
It had so happened Mr. Fenton and Mrs.
Jones considered it' to be the particular form
of ill-luck by which they were haunted that
a downright plague of a boy" had seemed
all along to fall to their share, when troops
of applicants for situations were divided
amongst employers at the Registry-office.
Either he fingered the pastry, slurred over
his work, and wasted half his time playing




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


in the streets when he was sent on


or sharp enough in
sharp tongue also, a
frequent rebukes wit
pudence," that after
was sent about his
bearing." No doubt


an errand;


his work, he betrayed a
ind repaid Mrs. Jones's
h such "' intolerable im-
very few altercations he
business as past all
he was past Mrs. Jones's


bearing; what it might have been with others
I can't say.
It was rather remarkable, considering the
same thing had happened not once, but twenty
times, that boys of all sorts and sizes had all
alike thus turned out unsatisfactorily, that it
never occurred to Mr. Fenton and his house-
keeper to ask whether the fault might not be,
at least in some measure, in themselves, and
their own plan of management-- but some
people would rather blame the great God than
admit for a moment that it lies on their own
shoulders. At least, I don't know what it is


but blaming


God, when they venture to say
*


21


it




22 TOM CARTER-; OR,

has been their luck, their chance, that thiings
have so fallen out to them. If not a sparrow
falls to the ground without Him, is it not
plain that He orders all ?
The old proverb, As you make your bed
so you must lie upon it," holds good, in my
humble opinion, both ways, in service. Bad
masters and mistresses make careless, selfish
servants, as bad servants make unjust, unkind
employers; and most. of all with the young
of either sort. It is a hard matter for a
young couple, who have begun life"with un-
grateful, unprincipled servants, to recover a
good opinion of the race in general after-
wards. And it is just as hard for a young
girl or lad who has suffered from unfair
treatment in his or her first place, to work
faithfully in a loving, trusting, obedient spirit,
for the time to come. Hard, but not impos-
sible, not a-temptation out of which there is
no way of escape. Let the masters and mis-




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


tresses


only persevere


inl


" doing as


would be done by," they. will come
better side of their servants at last;
the servant only mind the Bible ru
do service with good will, as unto th
not as unto men, and, like gold in t
their value must be known in the end.
I dare say it was well that his
hearted mother did not know when
cepted the place for him, how much
dirt other folks had left behind," as
pressed i, her Tom would have to
up after them." I say it was well,


Sto the
and let
le, and
e Lord,
he fire,


tender-
she ac-
; of the
he ex-
" sweep
because


I believe in this case she would not have
let him go, and thus would have kept him
back from many goo things which were to
spring for him, out of the vexations he went
through at Mr. Feiton's. God's love is wiser
than man's wheri He teaches his children
to enduree hardships." It is the heaviest
blows which make the finest steel.


23


they




24 TOM CARTER; OR,

We left Tom inside the door of his new
home. It grated somewhat harshly on the
cheery dutiful purposes of doing his best that
he had just been recalling to mind, when
Mrs. Jones greeted him with a surly, And
so you are the boy? well, come in if you
must;" and looking him over from head to
foot, she grumbled on, half to herself and
half to her astonished listener, If master
had half the plague with the boys that I have,
he would look a long time before he let them
set foot inside the door."
Her wrath melted a little before the sun-
shine of the face Tom lifted up to her's.
"Indeed, missis," he said, I don't mean
to be a plague to you at all, but just the
other sort, if I any ways can."
Then you'll be the first boy of the other
sort I ever came across," answered she,
"that's all;" but her tone was not quite so
sharp this time.




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


25


Tom's thoughts wandered back to the many
" dear old boys" he had left behind him, each
and all he thought nice in their own way, and
he wondered if London boys were quite dif-
ferent.
The housekeeper now led the way to the


little slip of a room
own, where she told ]
It was clean enough
ing-stand were bette
used in his life, but


that. It
little air
window,
about it,
fresh air
up alone
think it 1
then he r
Sunday
himself, 1


was partly


which
him to


he
put


was to call his
down his things.


i, and the bed and wash-
r than any Tom had evei
it had a dull look for all
underground, so that very


or light came in at the hig
and it had a smoky, mu,
not pleasant to one used to t
of Hazlewood. When Tom
there at bed-time, he was
ooked very like a prisoner's
rememberedd the story he had
school of one who, worse


I


iad found


the lonely


desert


h grated
sty smell
he sweet,
was shut
ready to
cell; but
heard at
off than
beautiful




26 TOM CARTER; OR,

as the house of God, blessed as the gate of
heaven. If I ever get Jacob's dream here,
I dare say I shall think it a fine place after
all," said he to himself; and he kneeled
down and prayed Jacob's prayer before he
went to rest. *
Mrs. Jones had bidden him settle his things
in the wooden box which now stood empty at
the foot of the bed, and was turning to go,
when she bethought herself, and observed,
The bed's well aired; you needn't be afraid
of that."
Toan thanked her heartily, and felt com-
forted. Mrs. Jones was a woman after all; it
was the one thing she had said which re-
minded him of his mother.
Soon after, the bell rang for the boy to go
up to his master. Mr. Fenton was not long
past middle-age, but his face was marked with
deeper wrinkles than those of time. There
was a peevish, fretted look upon it, which




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


awakened simple pity in
sunny-hearted village child.


tleman," said Tom
a deal of trouble ii
I am sure 1 should
if I could." But
servant's duty was
ter'.s thoughts, nor
work he now went
that, and the other
with exactness and


the
49


mind
Poor


of
old


the
gen-


I to himself, "you've seen
a your day, I'll be bound;
like to cheer you up a bit,
this part of his young
by no means in his mas-
mentioned in the list of
through with him. This,
he expected all to be done
perfection, and if anything


was left undone, why Tom should smart for
it, that was certain!
The boy's heart failed him a little. A
woman's tongue in his own rank of life he
understood; he had suffered from it before
now; but a selfish and irritable gentleman he
had never come across before, and it made
him anxious. However, he spoke the simple
trutl when he answered," '11 try to do my best,
sir, to give you satisfaction, and I hope you'll


27




28 TOM CARTER

kindly overlook it, if things aren't just to your
mind at first."
"I wish you to understand that I shall
overlook nothing," said Mr. Fenton, with
severity; "I suppose you will always have your
excuses ready, but they will serve you nothing
with me, I can tell you. If you don't suit
me, you leave, and that's the long and the
short of it."
With these words Mr. Fenton motioned him
out of the room. Poor Tom!












ab, but a ilar
y~f ^k


SkB


B~






- j


"Days come and go,
In joy or woe;
Days go and come,
In endless sum.
Only the eternal day
Shall come but never go;
Only the eternal tide
Shall never ebb but flow.
O long eternity,
My soul goes forth to thee.

"Suns set and rise
In these dull skies;
Suns rise and set,
Still men forget
The day*is at the door
When they shall rise no more.
0 everlasting sun,
Whose race is never run,
Be thou my endless light,
Then shall I fear no night 1'














CHAPTER III.


F "the dawn paints the day," Tom's first
arrival at Mr. Fenton's, No 5, Street,
might be said to picture the sort of life
which fell to his lot during the weeks and
months which followed. He -was better fed,
and clothed, and lodged than he had ever been
in his life before; he was slowly indeed, and


painfully, but


yet surely, getting


a knowle


of his work.; and he had the huge satisfac-
tionf of knowing that when the quarter was
up, he should have a gold sovereign and a
five-shilling piece to take, all his own honest
earnings, nearly as good as a harvesting, and
that in the dull season of the year, when
31


dge





32 TOM CARTER; OR,

many had been out of work in the country
villages.
Yet for all this, our poor Tom could no
more be said to be enjoying himself at No. 5,
than you or I, dear reader, could manage to
enjoy a sojourn in a bed of nettles! Without
being really cruel or unjust, Mr. Fenton and
Mrs. Jones contrived to crowd a large share
of petty annoyances and discomforts into the
daily life of those with whom they had to do,
and Tom felt it acutely; of course he blun-
dered over his work at first, blundered terri-
bly; and had several accidents with the china
and glass, that Mrs. Jones seemed to value
as highly as if they were worth their weight
in gold; but in truth, it was not a little her
fault, after all. She flurried and upset him
so with her bursts of temper when anything
went wrong, that instead of learning how to
do better another time, Tom felt more at a
loss than ever, for a while. It was only when
4




p
THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE. 33

he learned patiently to wait until the storm had
spent itself, and put himself out as little as
possible with it meanwhile, that he began to
see how to do differently.
And when at last, by degrees, overcoming
his confusion and awkwardness, he began to
improve, manifestly and rapidly, he only knew
it by the rareness of the scoldings which used
to be so frequent. Mrs. Jones never praised
anybody. She had probably forgotten how to
do so! Tom made out to himself that in her
case silence proved consent, for no word of
approval or encouragement ever fell from her
lips, or Mr. Fenton's either. The poor boy
longed sometimes, with a downright craving,
for the hearty, Well done, my lad, you'll be
a man soon," which used to come from his
last master, the farmer, pleasantly and cheer-
ingly, when he had taken more pains than
usual; but now he got into a way of lifting his
thoughts upwards, and calling to mind the





TOM CARTER; OB,


SWell done, good and faithful
promised to all who are doing the
Master up in heaven.
And though it was but slowly,


sense of
pleasure.
be so bef
himself
thorough
self the


progress became at last a
His father had told him
ore he came away; that if h
to Ihis work, whatever it
earnest, he would assuredly
master of it at last; and (


servantZ
will of a


his


own


sensible
it would
e applied
was, in
feel him-
)nee coln-


quered it was
to a trade; it
his fortune in
might enlarge
chose; before 1
Tom began to


as good as
was laying


being
the fo


days to come
upon his little
the first six moi
have a stout (


apprenticed
undation of


SMrs. Jones
failings as she
iths were over,
conviction that


boots never could be cleaned much better
than he now polished her's and his master's;
and that no butler from the West End could
have laid the clot4i and waited at table, more
cxacily in the style that Mr. Fenton preferred.




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


But the loneliness t
Both his master and
warned him when he ca
of no acquaintance, no
boys at the door, or in
had readily promised t<
before he knew how har(
from day to day without
or taste of congenial (
as lie had been to the
other lads brought uiD


cradle, besides an ample
his heart drooped and
the withering solitude of


;oo was very trying.
the housekeeper had
ime, that they allowed
gossiping with other
the streets, and Tom
o do as they wished,
d it would be to go on
Sa word of sympathy
companionship. Used
hearty friendship of
with him from the
Share of home love,
sickened sadly under
that loveless, joyless


dwelling. If he could but have had one kiss
from his mother, and but once have felt his
little sister's arms about his neck; but it
might not be, and Tom cried himself some-
times to sleep of. a night with the vain weary
longing. Here it really seefied as if nobody
cared for him, or took an interest in his wel.


35


u r-


C

L

2





<> TOM CARTER; OR,

fare. I don't know what he would have done
but for one little text lie had learned at the
Sunday school, which he sometimes repeated
to himself twenty times in the day, "The
hairs of your head are all numbered." There
was then One who cared for even the smallest
thing that concerned him.
Nor was the loneliness all. The dullness in
that house was something like the darkness of
Egypt it was a dullness which might be felt.
Nothing young, or bright, or hopeful, or inter-
esting seemed to belong to it, except Tom. If
its inhabitants had ever known the spring and
summer of life, it was late in tleir autumn
now. Blighted hopes lay round them, thick
as withered leaves, and what could they look
for, but yet deeper winter gloom, as year by
year they must grow older and feebler, till at
last they dropped into tleir graves.
Tom had thought himself a sober lad com-
pared to many of his companions at Hazle-




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE. 37

wood; but he loved a good joke, and a hearty
laugh, a little fun and a little change, as well
as any of them; and the very thought of such
a thing never seemed to cross the minds of
his companions, either for themselves or for
him. I don't know what the poor boy would
have done without the Sunday. It seemed to
come back, week after week, with its own
sunburst of heavenly hope, and just as he said,
' to set him'on his legs again, when the six
week-days had pretty well knocked him over."
Mrs. Jones and Mr. Fenton used to take a
long nap after a better dinner than usual, of
a Sunday afternoon, and as this was consid-
ered sufficient guard for the house, Tom was
allowed to go out, with strict injunctions to
come back as soon as the service was over.
A feast it was to the poor child's hungry
heart, that half-filled London church, with its
dingy walls and flaring gas-lights. It was
his Father's house, and he had a sense of





TOM CARTER; OR,


welcome


felt at No. 5.
the sermons -
there was alw
school lessons
Saviour loved
while He was
daily training
for him one
above. Howev
his duty in the


there, that


he


Whatever their
and they varied
ays something i
which reminded
him and cared
preparing his


loving


for heaven, was getting ready
of those many mansions "
rer difficult it had seemed to dc
Week, there was always some-


thing on Sunday to bring back the thought of
the Spirit's mighty power to aid, and to
strengthen his courage to bear on bravely
with the assurance, that He who was with
him, was stronger than he who was against
him.
Then the hope of hIeaven; how Tom loved
returning thanks for that. How the radiant
brightness of the heavenly city, with its gates
of pearl and streets of gold, bathed in the


had never yet
'e might be in
a good deal -
.n the Sunday
. him how his
for him; and
child by life's




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


glory o
out by
streets,
A


f God's own presence
contrast with the
that seemed to prison


,used
smoky
him in


to stand
London
on every


side. How beautiful the thought of 1
waters of the river of life, shaded by 1
which bear twelve manner of fruits,
was yearning for the green sights and


the clear
the trees
when he
musical


sounds of his village home. If heaven is
coming sure, I have no right to fret," he
would murmur to himself, as lie trudged home
with his hands in his pockets, in the dim and
chilly twilight; and often he came in with
such a sunshine on his face, that Mrs. Jones,
waking up in her easy chair from the bad
dreams which used to torment her after she
had eaten a little too much, made sure that
instead of going to church, he had been
' pleasuring, or after some mischief." When
by strict inquiry she had satisfied herself on this
point, her suspicions were changed into pure.
wonder! Going to church never made her


light-hearted, that was certain.


39


C--





40 TOM CARTER.

True, it sometimes looked a long way off,
that bright heaven-home. He was, what his
mother used to call a young youth" now. It
might be that many a long year of toil and
trouble lay between him and its eternal glad-
ness; but Tom used to think of two lines he
had learned at Sunday school -

And nightly pitch my roving tent
A day's march nearer home."

"A day's march nearer," he would say to
himself, as he put his head on the pillow of a
night; it seemed such a comfort 1










ci n5555











We all might do good,
Where we often do ill;
There is always the way,
If there is but the will.
Tho' it be but a word,
Kindly breathed or suppressed,
It may guard off some pain
Or give peace to some breast.

We all might do good,
In a thousand small ways,
In forbearing to flatter,
Yet yielding due praise.
In spurning-ill-rumor,
Reproving wrong done,
And treating but kindly
The heart we have won.

"We all might do good,
Whether lowly or great,
For the deed is not gauged
By the purse or estate.
If it be but a cup
Of cold water that's given,
Like the widow's two mites,
It is something for heaven."






42












CHAPTER IV.


J ONTHS passed on, and the dreary win-
ter days of grimy snow and slippery
mud had run their course so differ-
ent from the same season in the country,
when the sparkling frost brings its enchanting
sliding on the ice, and throws its dazzling
mantle over trees and fields--the genial
spring-time at last approached. The black-
ened twigs of the trees in the square near
by, put forth their germs of living green;
the prisoned larks, suspended for an hour or
two in their narrow cages, outside shop-doors
or windows, mingled their glad songs of wel-
come to the sunshine, with the everlasting
clatter and rumble of vehicles in the streets
43




44 TOM CARTER; OR,

recalling to other captives, thoughts of home.
Trusty and industrious fellow as he was, when
sent on an errand, Tom caught himself linger-
ing to listen sometimes, with involuntarily
tears in his eyes. He scarcely knew whether
it was most pleasure or pain. But the month
of May brought to him one unmingled and
most unexpected delight. A smart ring at
the bell one bright afternoon early in the
month, saw him promptly at the door. He
thought it was the milk-man, and Mrs. Jones
had a- righteous dislike to- the tradespeople
being kept loitering about the premises, but
who should he see but Mr. Brown! The good
man had come up after his long campaign of
winter work among his people, to refresh
himself with some of the delightful gather-
ings of God's children held at this season in
the great city; and the meeting that day
being over a little earlier than he expected,
he thought he would come and look after a




THE UPS AND


DOWNS OF LIFE.


form ler


lamb


of his flock.


Somehow,


though
Z":


Mr. Brown
this when


had promised to try


they


parted,


Tom


and manage


had gradually


set it down


impossible, and


in his own mind as well


now,


between


the joy


the surprise,


he


was too confused


to utter a


word.
which


He stood
Mr. Brown


still,


kindly


grasping


held


the


out to


hand
him,


and gazing


mutely into


his face,


as if he


had suddenly lost the power of utterance.


Well,
kindly, "


my boy,"


said the clergyman,


I suppose I have 'struck you


all of


a heap,' as
not expect
you hardly


they say at Hazlewood; you


me to-day:


knew meo,


why,


you


stare


Tom."


" Know you, sir!"


Tom


found


his tongue


then.


" Oh


sir, I am more


glad


than


I was in my life to see you!"


"Well,


that's


right,"


said


Mr. Brown;


" and now do


you think I may


come in


a while ?


should


like to see


your master


45


nigh
and


did


as if


ever


for





46 TOM CARTER ; OR,

first, and then, perhaps, he will allow me
a few words with you before I go."
Tom only took it in slowly, but upon Mr.
Brown's repeating what lie had said, he turned
round, opened the door of the dining-room
with trembling eagerness, and announced the
visitor.
In truth, a visitor in that house was such
a rare occurrence, that Mr. Fenton's agitation
was second only to Tom's, but no one could
long be ill at ease with Mr. Brown. His feel-
ing inquiries first after Mr. Fenton's health and
general welfare, and then after the few mutual
friends they had known in former years, so
softened and gratified his host, that he ac-
tually expressed a hope that Mr. Brown would
stay and have a cup of tea with him.
After a while, the clergyman led the con-
versation to the poor boy whose happiness
lay very near his heart, and was at first
greatly shocked and distressed, by Mr. Fen-




TIE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


47


ton's launching out into grievous abuse of
boys as a race; and descriptions of the suf-
ferings he and Mrs. Jones had endured from
them.
Tell lies!" at length exclaimed Mr.
Brown, with.a burst of uncontrollable feeling :
"lies, is it possible ? why I should have
trusted Tom's word almost as soon as my
own. Pray, sir, let me understand, have you
really proved Tom Carter in a falsehood? "
"Why, no, I don't know that, exactly,"
replied Mr. Fenton, "not him in particular,


perhaps;
he is like
God
warmly,
been my
certainly


but all boys tell lies, and,
the rest."
forbid!" cried Mr. Brow
"Thanks be to Him, that
experience; and as to To
have altered for the w(


of course,


in; adding
has never
m, he may
)rse, but I


used to th
cut off, as
Well,


ink he would as soon have his hand
tell an untruth."
perhaps so; I'm sure I can't say,"


I





48


TOM CARTER: OR,


replied the master, a little moved by the
other's earnestness; certainly, I don't recall
any instance at this moment; but the lying
is only one of many troubles, Mr. Brown--
the idleness now of these fellows is past all
bearing. They seem to think they come to
me solely to secure board and lodging free
of expense; always lying in bed after hours
of a morning, and neglecting their work for
play or mischief of some sort or another."
But excuse me, sir, it is very strange;


can it be
idle ? It i
he always 1
Well,
know that
probably;
of course,
Who ever


Tom you mean ? Has Tom been
s the very opposite to the character
bore with us."
sir, if you put it in that way, I don't
he has, not more than the rest,
may be he is better than some, but,
they are all alike, Mr. Brown.
heard of a boy," and Mr. Fenton


laughed gently, who ever heard of a
did not like play better than work ? "


boy who




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


49


The clergyman ventured to differ from this
opinion also, and was greatly relieved to find
that although Mr. Fenton had grievous views
of the race of boys in general, he could say
nothing against Tom in particular, but on the
contrary, the boy seemed to have been uni-
formly truthful, respectful, painstaking, and
obedient. By the time that Mr. Brown had ar-
rived at this conclusion, a new light had been
dawning on Mr. Fenton also. Certainly,
when he came to talk it all over, Tom was
not so bad as some of them: at least, he had
been there eight months, and neither master
or housekeeper had ever thought of sending
him away: at all events, there must be some-


thing in a lad in
Mr. Brown, took
intercourse with


whom a real gentleman, like
so warm an interest. Tom's
Mr. Fenton brightened from


that day forward.
Tea over, the clergyman obtained leave to
say a few words to the boy alone. Tom made


If





50 TOM CARTER; OR,

no voluntary complaints; he had never clearly
made out to himself that he had ground for
complaining; but he had a thousand eager
questions to ask about Hazlewood, and all so
dear to him at home. As neither of his
parents could write, and Tom made a very
poor hand of a letter himself, he had heard very
little home news since he left. When at last
Mr. Brown, looking at his watch,. found that
he must soon be going, and observing that
all at home would be equally anxious to hear
of him, asked Tom what he must say; he
looked down, and answered that he was
getting on pretty well; he knew he was get-
ting the better of his work, and he had happy
days Sundays; but "
But what, my boy ? urged Mr. Brown,
kindly.
It's wonderful lonesome, up in this big
place, sir; those who are doing well at home
had best keep as they are; there isn't a soul




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


to speak


poor


Tom


a kind word to you, nowhere; "


turned


hastily


away,


to hide


starting tears.
Mr. Brown


boy's


head:


laid his hand tenderly on


" My


poor fellow, I can see


have had something to bear, and I am sure I


would


lighten


the troubles for


you if I could,


but you mustn't be altogether cast down;


don't


give


way so," for


earnest now, broke


sympathy;


think


Tom was sobbing
n down by the n


of the One above


in real
minister's
who is


always looking upon


you, caring for you; take


the troubles to


Him


in


prayer.


You know


He must love


you, or He


would


never


have


laid down


his own


life in your stead; you will


never go to him in vain."


" I do, I


sobbed


poor


Tom;


" I could


never have held out at all, sir, if it worn't for


Him; but if


one to


I could only see


speak to


you, sir, or some


me of these things.


aml


almost afraid sometimes, that I shall forget all
that I have learned."


51


and
the


the
you


do)"





52 TOM CARTER: OR,

Never, while you read your Bible, my boy.
There is nothing like that for keeping us in
mind of our Saviour. But it is hard for you
to have no one to speak to. Do you think you
could read my letters, if I wrote to you some-
times ? "
Tom looked up radiant through his tears:
Oh, I know I could, sir, if it wasn't troub-
ling you too much. Didn't I always make it
out as well as any of them, when you used to
write for us on the black board at night
school ? "
Very well, Tom, then I shall try and send
you a few lines about once a month; and you
must make a point of answering my letters;
that will keep up both your writing and spell-
f,
ing. As for your being lonesome, my boy,
remember the best possible cure for it is love.
A blazing fire will warm all you bring near it.
I fully hope you have striven to do justly by
your master and his housekeeper, as I doubt




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


not you have had ordinary justice
but if you feel lonely, it proves
something more than this. You:
kindness, and then I doubt not but i


from
you
must
in due


them,
need
show
time


you will receive kindness back again."
Show kindness." Tom repeated the words
half-unconsciously after the clergyman, but his
eyes said for him that he did not know exactly
how this might be done.
"I see it puzzles you, Tom, tlhe very notion


of it; but remember t
before you can show ]
anything like grace.
your heart towards t
seems to me they are
their loneliness than


you have your
and as far as I
have no one to
are fifty little
tried, just only


fhat you must feel love
kindness, at least, with
Ask God to put love in
thesee poor people. It
more to be pitied for
you are, for, after all,


dear ones at home to think of,
can see, your master seems to
cheer or comfort him. There
things you might do if yov
to make them a little happier."


w





TOM CARTER; OR,


u"I
'Lbut


did
Mrs.


try when I
Jones, she


first came," said Tom;
was always a-jawing at


me; and master, I never could do
please him, and then somehow I left
Mr. Brown could scarcely forbear
the simplicity of the description, b


swered, quietly, "Ah, I can
came about, Tom, very plainly
your work better by this time;
to be so much danger of fa
any rate, you must try, and Go
and bless you in it. Show fe


see
; but
there
ult-fin
)d will
eling


Thing to
off agin."
a smile at
it he an-
how that
you know
ought not
ding. At
help you
for them,


try to be sorry, and to show that you are so
when anything out of the way'happens to
vex them, and be on the look-out to see if you
cannot make them a bit of pleasure sometimes
in some things."
Tom thrust his fingers in his hair. "There's
the early rhubarb coming on at home. If
father was to send up a bit of that next time
you're coming, sir "


54




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


55


True, a very good thought, Tom. I don't
know that I am coming again just now, but J,
could easily manage to send the parcel, if
your father would like to spare some. Now
kneel down, and let us ask God's blessing
before we part."
They did so, and the faithful pastor earnest-
ly committed his tried and lonely lamb to the,
care of the Good Shepherd, beseeching that
above all else, He would keep him from sin,
and then that He would graciously show favor
unto him, and prosper him in things of this


life as well as in those
The tears fell like rain
during the prayer,, but
shower, which, in falling,
behind, the gloom inelted
and after Mr. Brown had
winter was gone, and the


of the life to come..
i from Tom's eyes
like the summer
leaves the blue' sky
away from his heart,
left, he felt that the
spring had come in


good earnest now, within as well


as without.




















Ut .
.4-

'4i

.4 -k




























I- -
p. I










4 -





I


~q



































* 9
V~~~ -' .- a

~V .

















j. F~ '
*:















''





























































*L S











an d 4nUiromnur yrin.


~ ~lmrura




















" BREAST the wave, Christian, when it is strongest,
Watch for day, Christian, when the night's longest;
Onward and onward still be thine endeavor;
The rest that remaineth will be forever!

"Fight the fight, Christian, Jesus is o'er thee;
Run the race, Christian, heaven is before thee;
He who hath promised faltereth never;
The love of eternity flows on for ever.

"Lift the eye, Christian, just as it closeth;
Raise the heart, Christian, ere it reposeth;
Thee from the love of Christ nothing shall sever;
Mount when thy work is done--praise Him forever!"













CHAPTER V.


HE packet of early rhubarb came, and it
certainly did good. The pies and pud-
dings made from it sweetened Mrs.
Jones's tongue for nearly a week-; and Mr.
Fenton was so moved by the unwonted atten-
tion that, not to be outdone in generosity, he
made an excuse for presenting Tom with a
threepenny bit, not long after. Tom made a
hole in it, and hung it on his chain when he
got a watch, years later, as a curiosity.
But, after all, the fact of Mr. Brown's visit,
and the arrival of his monthly letters, did
more than anything else, towards softening
the rigor of the yoke which had pressed so
heavily on his young friend's shoulders.
59





60


TOM CARTER; OR,


' The boy," in whom so real a
Mr. Brown took a marked and
terest, was a person of far more


gentleman as
continued in-
consequence


than the lonely village lad. "Nothing but a
clodhopper," as Mrs. Jones used to say, con-
temptuously. Besides, the knowledge that
Tom was in constant communication with his
clergyman, made both master and housekeeper
more shy than formerly, of doing things that
they would not like should come to Mr.
Brown's knowledge. When he counted up
the little troubles that were come to an end,
and the little comforts by which they had been
replaced, Tom felt that in a great measure his
prayers had been answered, though if you had
offered him to stay all his life at Mr. Fenton's,
I expect that he would still have said, No,
thank you." To do him justice, he never


thought of
ing.
His pla


mending matters


n


was,


to stay


by


two


giving


years.


warnl


Mr.


I




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE. 61

Brown used always to say to the children at
Ilis school preparing for service, that he hoped
they would never stay less than two years in
their first place, for several reasons a young
servant who runs home again, or looks out for
another place, the first little disagreeable that
occurs, hurts his or her own mind. He helps
to make himself a weak-minded softy, who has
no spirit to battle through anything; while a
young fellow who makes up his mind to bear
bravely all this sort of thing, and stick to his
place through thick and thin, like a leech, will
marvellously strengthen and fortify his own
character by so doing. He acquires patience,
and courage, and perseverance, and self-re-
spect; and in the end, a far better knowledge
of his work. Then a rolling stone gathers no
moss. He who is always changing can never
in any place become really master of his work.
Then he hurts his pocket. Who are the ser-
vants who can ensure good wages when they




62 TOM CARTER; OR,

are seeking another situation? Those who
have stayed a long time in the last. My own
experience would almost lead me to say, that
for every year you remain in your place, you
may ask for another pound's wages when you
leave. And you may reckon upon this: you
will save-the cost of waiting about when you
change, for a servant who has a good long
character from the last place, will never have
any difficulty in obtaining another.
Tom had always been trained up in these
notions, therefore he had taken his resolution
from the first to remain his two years, then to
go home for a holiday, and to look out for
something where he would be likely to see
more of" the inns and outs of his profession,"
than he ever could at Mr. Fenton's.
So man proposes, but God disposes. Tom
was to leave Mr. Fenton's, but under very dif-
ferent circumstances from those he had
pictured to himself. He had been there, at




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


(3~


the time I now speak of, about a year and
three-quarters. He had had another blessed
visit from Mr. Brown: and once a great joy
in a glimpse of one of his sisters, whom he
had been allowed to meet at the railway
station, on her way through town to a place in
service. By dint of huge care and saving (for
he had his washing to pay out of his wages,


and boots
managed


and shirts to
to put away


buy), Tom had
his five-shilling


always
pieces


when he took his wages,
bag, which his mother


keepsake.
gold as
sovereign,
piece now
sum. To
for safety


best


into
had


The crowns we
the quarters rol
a half-sovereign, a
weighted his little
m often looked at
he kept the bag in


trousers,


which lay


fold


the little leather
given him for a
re changed into
led on; and a
nd a five-shilling
bag with a goodly
it for pleasure;
the pocket of his
ed up smooth at


the bottom
much, and


of his box.
if the ruddy


He had
brown of


grown very
his fornme





TOM CARTER; OR,


hue had, changed to something of
pallor, and his very round pleasant


become longer and thinner,
of quickened intelligence ab


lip, which
Something
which his 1
ness of his
remark fro
home after
would turn
Mr. Fen
changed.


greatly


improved


of style, too, in
iair was brushed,
bow when taking
'm his sister, in
she had seen him
out a smart fellow
iton and Mrs. J


Tom


delivered


London
face had


there was a look
out both eye and
his appearance.
the fashion in
and the correct-
orders, drew the
her first letter


that our Tom
after all."


roines were not
himself, indeed,


from the many little fretfulnesses which used
to be aimed at him by pursuing the plan
which Mr. Brown had advised; but their
habits of grumbling and discontent were too
firmly rooted, to give way to any extent be-
fore the little arts. that he brought to bear
upon them; that is, they always found some-


thing


about


which to make


themselves mis-


64


I


,
,


v




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


erable.


When, from the


boy's real progress


in his work,
Mr. Brown's
Tom, it was
the coals, or
troubles they
inasmuch as


joined to a lurking desire for
good opinion, it ceased to be
the bread, or the butter, or
the weather. Without Jacob's
had caught Jacob's language,
they were continually saying,


" All these things are against me."
SThe hay-season was late that year; a time
of heavy rain coming on when the crops were
nearly ready, had kept a .good many who
had come to the fields near town for employ-
ment, hanging about with nothing to do; and
some wandered into London, with intent to
buy or steal the daily bread which they could
not obtain by labor.
One or two acts of robbery in the neigh-
borhood had put all the householders on the
alert, and Mr. Fenton, after long consulta-
tions with Mrs. Jones, had unwillingly gone
to the expense of buying a large bell, which


65





66


TOM CARTER; OR,


he always placed at night on a chair at his
bedside, and looked upon as a far safer and
more effectual protection than a pair of pis-
tols. Tom went so far as to suggest that the
"house would be a deal safer if they had
prayers of a night but. Mr. Fenton, when
he heard the remark, bade him to hold his
tongue, and not meddle with things which
did not concern him.
It was a stormy night; the rain beat and
pelted like hailstones against the windows,
and the wind whistled mournfully round the
corners of-- Street, and down the chim-
neys of old houses like No. 5. Tom thought,
as he was 'undressing himself, that it was
just a night for them to be out as loved
deeds of darkness," and it might be as well
for him to keep awake for a bit. He never
slept so soundly now as in the Hazlewood
days, when, at work in the open air from


morning to night, he could


scarcely


have


held




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE. 67

his eyes open to save his life. Now he lay
for an hour or two after he had put out his
candle, thinking and praying at first about
the fear of robbers, which had somewhat pos-
sessed him; but by degrees thoughts wandered
to his own plans for the future, how he should
frame his words," when he gave Mr. Fenton
notice, the joy of returning to Hazlewood,
and the delightful sort of place he meant
to try for after that.
These pleasant fancies beguiled him from
his intended vigilance, and he was just drop-
ping into slumber, when he was startled by
a noise at the dining-room shutters overhead.
The wind, probably, but he sat up in bed to
listen more intently, and heard movements
outside-yes,.he was certain of it: the sash
was being lifted, slowly and cautiously, then
he could feel the vibration of a soft and silent
tread upon the creaky floor of the sitting-
room. For a moment the poor boy was stu.





68 TOM CARTER; OR,

pefied with terror--all the dreadful stories
he had ever heard of house-breakers murder-
ing the inhabitants and running off with the
valuables, rushed to his mind a cold sweat
burst out all over him, and he felt as if he
could do nothing but creep under the bed-
clothes, and lie there hidden, for his life.
But this was only for a moment. Tom had
not committed himself in vain before he lay
down that night, to a heavenly Father's care
and help; and better, braver thoughts came
to him now with the short fervent petition
which, like Nehemiah, he lifted up to the God
of heaven. No one seemed to be awake but
himself; then it was for him to warn his poor
old master, and try to save him from the
ruin which Tom believed must follow, if the
thieves made their way to the money-drawers
in the parlor. Nay, if he could but get up-
stairs softly and quickly, he might seize the
great bell at Mr. Fenton's bedside, and by




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE. 69

ringing it, frighten the fellows off, before they
done any damage.
Possessed with this resolution, the boy
no longer hesitated. The horrible quaking
which had seemed to freeze the very blood in
his veins, had gone from him, when in a
strength not his own lie determined to act.
Going purposely with bare feet, that he might
make no noise, he grasped the poker, which
lately he had always kept handy at his bed-
side, and stealing out, felt his way up the first
pair of stairs to the dining-room floor. Now
he could plainly enough hear some one
moving in the sitting-room, and see, as he
mounted the last stair, there was a light there,
a dim light as from a dark lantern, just
visible through the chink of the door, which
stood ajar.
Tom paused a moment, and fancied he
heard a footstep overhead also. He had not
heard any one leave that room; could it be
g





TOM CARTER.


that they had already gone
one thought of sickening
fractious master, he crept u
feeling himself like some


fires. Oh dear, oh dear,
was open also, there was
also, like that which cam


up higher ? With
fear for his poor
p the second flight,
one between two


M
a


e


[r. Fenton's door
. dull light there
from the lantern


below; and as Tom held his breath to listen,
in terrible perplexity as to what he should do
next, he distinctly heard the jingle of keys;
some one was rifling Mr. Fenton's pocket's,
as his clothes lay at the bedside. One
moment, the thought of fear, the mighty
desire to flee for his life returned, but resolute-
ly quelling it, Tom resolved to enter, poker in
hand, and make a rush for the bell; if he
could but give it a hearty peal, all might yet
be well. What the result proved, we must
hear another time.


70


I












fhe obbert, and its


anseqnUters.







" Go on! go on! no moments wait
To help the right.
Be strong in faith, and emulate
The virtues of the good and great
With all thy might.
Go on!

"Go on! go on! the skies may lower,
The storm may burst;
Unshaken in the trial hour,
God's gracious help shall give thee power
To brave the worst.
Go on!

Go on! go on! thou canst not tell
Thy mission here;
Whatever thou doest, labor well,
Nor let a doubt within thee dwell
On coward fear.
Go on!

" Go on! go on! 'tis never late
To act thy part;
For prayerful strength shall conquer fate,
And springs of happiness create
Within thy heart!
Go on!

" Go on! go on! thy onward way
Leads up to light:
The morning now begins to gray;
Anon the cheering beams of day
Shall chase the night.
Go onal














CHAPTER VI.


keys,
below.


E left poor Tom
his courage" to
was rifling his
in order to get
He pushed th


painfully gathering up
face the robber, who
master's pockets of his
at the money-drawers
e door gently; it was


already, as we have said, ajar, and sure
enough there was the thief, with his back to
the door, so that he did not see Tom the first
moment, bending down over the clothes on
the chair by the bed-side. Favored in so
doing by having approached unobserved, Tom


now sprang
pretty severe


of the neck.
73


forward, and dealt the
blow with the poker on


It must


have


fellow a
the back


hurt him,


for




74 TOM CARTER; OR,

with a short fierce cry of pain he reeled for-
wards for an instant, but the next he had
turned quick as thought, flew upon Tom like
a tiger, and grasped him by the throat. The
poor lad struck out bravely with the poker,
but he was choked by that iron gripe on his
throat, and must soon have been worsted, had
not his master, wakened by the cry and the
scuffle, been roused sufficiently by this to come
to the rescue. Leaping from his bed, he
attacked the robber from behind with such
vehemence, that the man left Tom and turned
upon his new assailant. But enfeebled as he
was, partly with years and partly by his
sedentary life, the poor gentleman was no
match for his powerful foe, and in a few
seconds the robber flung him backwards
against the sharp corner of the bedstead,
where he lay bleeding and senseless from a
blow on the back of the head. This mo-
mentary diversion, however, was enough to




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


Tom
at the


time
bell,


to recover himself,
and ring out such a


make
peal,


wakened Mrs. Jones in a twinkling, and set
her screaming to add t tthe uproar.
Anyhow, there was noise enough to bring
the thieves to reason; between the bell and
the woman, there was no doubt that the
police would now come to the rescue, and
making one more savage aim at Tom with
some weapon he had caught up cutting
open the poor boy's hand the man made for
the door, warned his fellows below, and they
were gone, like the lightning.
The whole thing passed in far less time
than it has taken me to write, or you to read
it, and, sick and dizzy with pain and bewilder-
ment, Tom shut his eyes, and leaned back
one moment against the wall, to try and re-


cover himself, but the
by Mrs. Jones' renewed
which -might have been


next he was roused
and piercing shrieks,
heard in the street,


give
dash


75


a
as




TOM CARTER;


all the storm


she reiterated
last realized 1


tacked,


of wind


" Murder,


that she might


and really


and rain.


murder!"


have


be in danger


Tom


been
)f her


also; so that
to her room.


picking up the poker, he hurried
The door was locked as usual;


Tom forgot that the housekeeper always locked


her door


of


a night,


and it increased


fear of further


mischief.


Throwing


himself


against it


with all his force, he


burst it open,


and was vastly relieved


but the


poor woman.


to find


She was


no one
sitting


there
up in


screaming


" Murder,


murder,"


her might.


" What


hurt you?


is it, Mrs. Jones?


how ?"


asked


where


have


he, in genuine


they
con-


cern for her distress.


"Oh,


Tom,


Tom, is that you ? bless God, oh


dear


Tom!"


And quite


he was only the boy,"


arms round


his neck,


forgetting


Mrs. Jones
and clung


that


threw hei


to him


if he had been her son or her father.


76


above


ORP


As
L at
at-
life


his


bed,


with


all


my




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


77


Where be you hurt, Missis ?" repeated
Tom, as soon as he could disengage himself;
what have they done to you ? "
Done, done! why, frightened me out of
my seven senses. I shall never get the better
of it, Tom, never; and throwing herself
back, the poor creature began to weep and
sob, as Tom described it to his own friends,
"quite in what you may call the high strikes"
(hysterics).
But as soon as he felt clear that the loss
of her seven senses was really all that had
befallen her, he replied, If that be all, Mis-
sis, I think I had best see to Master, for lie
is worse nor frightened, I doubt, by a long
way."
Mrs. Jones tried to urge that she dare not
be left alone, but Tom freed himself from
the detaining grasp she had laid upon his
arm, and turned back to Mr. Fenton's bed-
chamber. The poor man lay stunned and





78 TOM CARTER: OR,

bleeding on the floor, looking so ghastly, that
Tom thought he was dead, and lifted up a
bitter cry of distress at the sight. This
roused Mrs. Jones; wrapping a blanket around
her, she hurried after him, and, with the
claim upon her woman's sympathies, forgot
all her -own terror. Between them they lifted
the poor man upon the bed, bound up his
wound, bathed his face with water, and soon
had the relief of seeing him open his eyes,
saying feebly, Where am I, what has hap-
pened, Tom?"
Tom was about to answer, when a thunder-
ing rap at the door sent Mrs. Jones into
another screaming fit, and poor Mr. Fenton
afresh into a swoon.
"Do hold your tongue, Missis, and see
after him, in the stead of making all that
row," cried Tom, feeling at last as if he had
had about as much as he could bear. It's
only the police, come to see what they can




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


do for us.'
when the


' It
door


proved to be two
was opened, and


policemen
this was a


huge relief to all parties. One
naturedly ran off for a doctor,
stayed with Tom to examine M
extent of the mischief done i
keep guard, should the rogues r
found that with the exception
little silver articles, nothing r
had been taken. The thief b


dently
ton's
which
when
timely


been
money


disappointed


y-dra


f


wers,


his fellow was
Tom found him.
interference had


in


of


them


and the c
that the e
might be,
return. It
of one or


open


for lack


hunting
The boy
thus actu


;ood-
)ther
xact
and
was
two


ally of value
low had evi-
ing Mr. Fen-
of the keys,
for upstairs
's brave and
Lally been the


ns of saving his master from ruin,
policeman complimented him highly
courage and spirit he had shown.
rather taken aback by the country 1l


answer,
ter, it
power."


"It
was


worn't none of
God Almighty


my
as


doings, mas-
give me the


79


mea:
the
the
was


and
on
He
ad's


g





80 TOM CARTER; OR,

The doctor soon plastered up the boy's in-
juries, and Mrs. Jones was set to rights with
a soothing draught, but from the first Mr.
Fenton's case looked more serious. The blow
and the fright together seemed to have given
his constitution a shock from which it was
doubtful whether he could rally, and he was
ordered to keep his bed entirely.
Now it was that his young servant's loving,
feeling nature shone out in all its Christian
beauty. If Mr. Fenton had been his father,
Tom could not have waited on him more
devotedly; and herself little used, and less
willing to take. trouble, Mrs. Jones did not
interfere. The boy brought up his mattress
and bed-clothes, and lay down beside the sick
man of a night, that he might be at hand
to give him his food or physic at proper hours;
and he hurried through his work down stairs,
that he might be able to sit in the room
during the day, and beguile the long hours




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


with reading


or chat.


In fact, he


proved


himself such a comfort,
hardly liked him out of
ring for him impatiently w
away a little longer than u
the sense of being loved i
have made him so happy,


that
sigh
then
visual
and
but


Mr. Fenton
t, and would
he had been
SPoor Tom!
valued would
that just as


he was beginning to realize his master's grate-
ful affection, the conviction forced itself upon
him, that the poor man had not long to live.
Day by day he grew weaker, able to take
less and to do less than the day before; but
oh, if he was really dying, how was it with
his soul ?
Our village Tom was not as sharp as many
lads of his age, but he was clear-sighted
enough to perceive that his poor master had
been living altogether for this world, without
a thought of the next, and he knew who has
said, What shall it profit a man if he gain
the whole world and lose his own soul ?" He


81





82 TOM CARTER; OR,

always read the Bible to his master. Partly
from hearing so many chapters in church,
partly from having studied it a good deal by
himself, he could read God's book with tolera-
ble ease, though he would have stuttered and
stammered over any other; and Mr. Fenton
did not seem much to care what was read, so
long as he was not left to his own thoughts.
When it first dawned. upon him, while sitting
book in hand at the bedside, that his master
could not recover, poor Tom burst into tears.
What ails you, my lad?" inquired his
listener, kindly.
It was several moments before the boy
could answer, then he, sobbed out, with a burst
of honest, irrepressible feeling, Oh, sir, I
doubt you bees very bad, and that you bain't
ready to go."
Mr. Fenton was strangely moved; he had
not a thought that any one would ever shed a
tear for. him, and he answered, "It's very




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE. 83

kind of you, Tom; I don't deserve it of you,
my poor fellow; I fear I've never shown you
the feeling I ought to have done."
Tom wept aloud, I'm sure you've always
done the fair thing by me, sir. I dare say I
aggravated you a goodish deal at the first, but
oh, sir, won't you think of yourself now ? "
Mr. Fenton put his hand over his eyes.
" If you knew you were dying, I suppose you
would not be afraid, Tom ?"
No, sir, bless God I hope I wouldn't."
You have been kind and good, as far as
you knew," continued Mr. Fenton, musingly.
Oh, sir, it bain't that, it bain't that, one
bit. It is that I've got One to speak for me
up above."
Mr. Fenton repeated these words in simple
wonder, adding, "And who may that be,
Tom ? "
The Lord Jesus, sir; the One as died in
our stead; He will undertake for us, you
know, if we put all into his hands."




84 TOM CARTER; OR,

SUndertake what ?" said Mr. Fenton; "I
don't understand."
Undertake to make all right for us with
God, you know, sir. All the filth of sin that's
on us, He will wash it white for us in his
blood, if we bring it to Him. All the work
we've left undone He will do it for us, and let
his doings be reckoned to our account."
Ay, Tom, but it isn't only what I've done,
but what I am, that troubles me. I am no
more fit to go and live with God in heaven
than a chimney-sweep is fit to keep company
with the Queen, nor so much, by a long way."
I know, sir, the best man as ever lived
would have to say that; but bless God, we
needn't go as we are. There is One who can
change us inwardly, and altogether, and make
us just as fit to live with God as we were unfit
before. The Holy Spirit, sir, that's the very
thing He comes down to do upon the earth.
If you ask Him to come into your heart and
make an alteration in it, sir, He will."




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


85


"1 wish I'd given my mind to these things
before," cried the sick man, bitterly.
But it's better late than never, sir, isn't
it ?" pleaded poor Tom, fervently. Oh, Mr.
Fenton, sir, if you would but seek Him now,


you would find Him, for we have his
promise, that they who seek shall find
those that knock it shall be opened."
The sufferer prayed in deepest earnest;


I


sure
, to


and


though we know that a late repentance is
seldom a true one, may we not hope that with
him a true repentance was not too late ? Bit-
terly regretting the past, blaming himself as
no others blamed him, for his folly in leading
a godless life, when he might have led a life
of joy and peace, he yet died in humble hope,
clinging to the Saviour, who has promised
that those who come to Him, He will in no
wise cast out. Resting fully on this glorious
promise, For God so loved the world, that


he gave his only begotten Son,


that whosoever





TOM CARTER.


believeth


in him, should


not perish


but have


everlasting life."


86













trati


)anges





C COMMIT thy way to God -
The weight that makes thee faint;
Worlds are to Him no load!
To Him breathe thy complaint.
He who for winds and clouds
Maketh a pathway free,
Thro' wastes or hostile crowds,
Can make a way for thee.

"Father! thy faithful love,
Thy mercy, wise and mild,
Sees what will blessings prove,
Or what will hurt thy child
And what thy wise foreseeing
Doth for thy children choose,
Thou bringest into being,
Nor sufferest them to lose.

"Hope, then, tho' woes'be doubled,
Hope and be undismay'd;
Let not thine heart be troubled,
Nor let it be afraid.
This prison where thou art,
Thy God will break it soon,
And flood with light thy heart
And his own blessed noon.

SUp, up! the day is breaking,
Say to thy cares 'Good-night!'
Thy troubles from thee shaking,
Like dreams in day's fresh light.
Thou wearest not the crown,
Nor the best course can tell;
God sitteth on the throne,
And guideth all things well."
88













CHAPTER VII.


T was a wonderful change that which the
death of his late master, Mr. Fenton,
wrought in the lot of his young servant,
Tom Carter. He remained with Mrs. Jones,
at her request, until a few days after the
funeral, to see the sale of the furniture over;
and then, by Mr. Brown's advice, came home
for a few days, before seeking another place.
When he found himself once more in the
railway, whirling smoothly back again towards
all he loved at Hazlewood, after this his first
and most eventful absence, he felt as if he
had lived there six years, instead of one and
ten months, since he left. He seemed an old
man, in the experience he had to look back
89 .





90 TOM CARTER; OR,

upon; and painful as much cf it had been at
the time, he felt now that it had turned out
in every way for his good. Thanks to Mrs.
Jones' strictness, perhaps in part to her many
scoldings, he felt himself tolerably master
of his work; he had a first-rate character in
his pocket, written for him by poor Mr. Fen-
ton on his death-bed, and the goodly sum of
12 in his box--2, as we have seen, he
had saved from his wages, and 10 his mas-
ter had left him in his will, by a clause in-
serted after the robbery, in token of the value
he had set upon Tom's faithful and affection-
ate services. This was all to go into the
bank; Tom's little presents for those at home
had come out of his last quarter's wages,
which he had received in advance. Yes, even
if he could have changed the past, there
seemed nothing now that he would have liked
to have been otherwise. It brought back his
mother's favorite remark to his mind, Don't

































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THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


91


you fret, my son, when things seem to go
contrary; be sure o' this, God, Almighty,
orders everything for the best. There can't
be a good thing He will deny us, when He
did not hold back from us his own only
Son."
We might be tempted to linger too long
over the delights of that July holiday at his
home. The untold sweetness of his mother's
welcome, his father's blessing, and long, long
talks with the brothers and sisters, with whom
from babyhood, he had had every thought in
common. True, they were a little in awe of
him at first; he seemed to them so much
older, and wiser, and graver than he used to
be, and grown so much too, quite London-
fled," as they expressed it. But it needed
very few days together to convince them that
it was their own merry brother Tom after all,
who loved a bit of play as much as ever,
though, to be sure, he was a little out of
pr-actice both at cricket and marbles.





92 TOM CARTER; OR,

Then the neighbors' hearty kindliness.
Tom declared he felt as rich as a king in
friendship and good will, as he wandered from
cottage to cottage, finding a pleasant welcome
in all. This would not have been everybody's
case; but Tom had left no enemies behind him
when he went.
Ay, Lucy," he said to his sister, you'll
have to go where there's millions of people,
but none of them as knows you, before you'll
find out half how sweet it is to be at home."
He went to tea once with the minister's
servants, and then more than once, he got
such beautiful talks and prayers with Mr.
Brown, in the study. Tom valued them now,
as he had never half done before. He saw
his former master, too, the farmer, and he
patted him on the shoulder, and gave him
half-a-crown, to encourage him, because he
said he had heard he had done them all
credit where he had been.




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


93


Then the glory of the summer-time, to one
shut up for almost two years in the smoky
London streets-the ripening harvest fields,
the music of the singing birds, from trees and
hedges on every side, the fragrance of the
flowers, and the delicious fruit, gathered from
the trees in our own garden." Tom was


ready to thi
the earth!
One little


nk it all a sort of Paradise upon


fortnight


of unmingled


delights,


and the]
provide
thought
him int(
which as
at dinner
footman
Calvert,
home in


n his time was up. Mr. Brown had
.tially secured him a place which he
would be very valuable, as drilling
) the details of domestic service, of
yet he knew nothing, such as waiting
wr-parties, etc.; it was to be under-
in the family of the Honorable Miss
of Calvert Park. It was a religious


all t


he


one in which the
in a week than he


household


arrangements, but


boy would see more
could have done in


of life
a year





94 TOM CARTER; OR,

at No. 5. Mr. Brown warned him that lie
would find many more temptations in such an
establishment than he could possibly have to
struggle with in a household of two people,
like Mr. Fenton's; but Tom was in high
feather about it, made sure he should do well,
and told all his friends they had nothing to
fear for him.
His father gave him two verses out of the
book of Joshua, that he begged that he would
lay earnestly to heart; it would have been
well for Tom if he had done so. I may as
well copy them out, for it is a golden rule for
young fellows who, like our young friend,
are going to plunge into new, untried
situations: -
This book of the law shall not depart out
of thy mouth; but thou shall meditate therein
day and night, that thou mayest observe to do.
according to all that is written therein: for
then thou shalt make thy way prosperous, and




THE UPS AND DOWNS OF LIFE.


then thou shalt have
I commanded thee?


good success. Have not
Be strong and of good


courage; 'be not
mayed: for the
whithersoever tho
There were el(
Caliert's eight
cluding Tom. Tl


afraid, neither
Lord thy God


be
is


thou
with


u goest."
even indoor servants at Mr.
females and three males, in-
he housekeeper, Mrs. Wilton,


and Mr. Thomas, the butler, were engaged
to be married to each other some day! and
an excellent couple they were a very great
lady and gentleman, in Tom's estimation, with
their fine manners, and finer dress, but equally
faithful to their employers, and considerate
for those placed under their authority. They
might have been stricter with advantage, but
of course the younger servants looked upon
--- v ~r N V11V J ~10


this as quite a fault on the right side.
amount of innocent pleasure arranged for
Calvert's household, at least deprived
servants of all excuse, if they sought
which was hurtful.


The
Mr.
the
that


95


dis-
thee


1


I





96 TOM CARTER; OR,

John, the upper footman, was certainly not
the character Mr. Brown would have chosen
for his young* friend's chief companion and
guide. He loved a little fun" better than
anything else, and he never stayed to think
what the consequences might be, before he
indulged in it. He had not been many weeks
at the Park before Tom arrived, and so far
had had little chance of going the wrong
way; but he was ripe and ready for a spree,"
as he called it, whenever a fair opportunity
might occur. The female servants, well
selected by Lady Calvert, and little exposed
to temptation by their indoor- duties, were
steady and blameless almost without excep-
tion.
The house stood in a park in one of the
most beautiful suburbs of London, and Tom's
heart bounded with joy as, walking up with
his box from the station, he gazed at the
stately trees overhead, and watched the




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