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 Front Cover
 Sleeping Beauty in the Wood
 Back Cover






Group Title: Routledge's shilling toy books,, 59
Title: The Sleeping Beauty in the wood
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026626/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Sleeping Beauty in the wood
Series Title: Routledge's shilling toy books
Uniform Title: Sleeping Beauty
Physical Description: 6 l. : ill. ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Kronheim & Co ( Printer )
Publisher: George Routledge & Sons
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Kronheim & Co.
Publication Date: <187->
 Subjects
Subject: Fairy tales -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre: Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Publisher's advertisement, p. <4> of paper cover.
General Note: Printed on one side of the page; mounted on cloth.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026626
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002337029
oclc - 38927575
notis - ALU0794

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Sleeping Beauty in the Wood
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Back Cover
        Page 13
Full Text
ONE SHILLING O MOUNTED ON CLOTH TWO SHILLINGSrING7EO GRE IOI UIDGE SONS


THESLEEPING BEAUTY IN THE WOODONCE upon atime there was a King and Queen who were sovexed at not having any children so vexed that one cannotexpress it At length however a little girl was born There wasa splendid christening For godmothers they gave the youngPrincess all the Fairies they could find so that by each makingher a gift she might become possessed of every virtue and graceAfter the christening all the company returned to the King s palacewhere a great banquet was set out for the Fairies Covers werelaid for each consisting of a magnificent plate with a massive goldcase containing a spoon a fork and a knife of fine gold enrichedwith diamonds and rubies But as they were all taking their placesat the table there was seen to enter an old Fairy who had not beeninvited because for upwards of fifty years she had nev r quitted thetower she lived in and it was supposed she was either dead orenchantedThe King ordered a cover to be laid for her but there wasno possibility of giving her a massive gold case such as the othershad The old lady thought she was treated with contempt andmuttered some threats between her teeth One of the young Fairiesoverheard her and thinking she might cast some misfortune onthe little Princess went as soon as they rose from table and hidherself behind the hangings in order to have the last word and beable to repair as far as possible any mischief the old woman mightThe Baldwin LibraryRm1 Uniwajity5 E I


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2 The Sleeping Beauty in the Wooddo In the meanwhile the Fairies began to endow the PrincessThe youngest as her gift decreed that she should be the mostbeautiful person in the world the next Fairy that she should havean amiable mind the third that she should evince the most admirable grace in all she did the fourth that she should dance to perfection the fifth that she should sing like a nightingale and thesixth that she should play on every instrument in the most exquisitemanner possible The turn of the old Fairy having arrived shedeclared that the Princess should pierce her hand with a spindle anddie of the wound This terrible fate made all the company trembleand weep At this moment the young Fairy issued from behind thetapestry and said Comfort yourself King and Queen yourdaughter shall not die of it The Princess will pierce her hand witha spindle but instead of dying she will only fall into a deepslumber which will last one hundred years at the end of which aKing s son will come to wake herThe King in hope of avoiding the misfortune predicted bythe old Fairy immediately caused an edict to be published by whichhe forbade any one to spin with a spindle or to have spindles in theirpossession under pain of deathAt the end of sixteen years it happened that the Princesswhile running one day about the castle came to the top of a towerand entered a little garret where an old woman was sitting by herselfspinning with her distaff and spindle This good woman had neverheard of the King s edict about the spindles What are you doingthere asked the Princess I am spinning my fair childanswered the old woman who did not know her Oh how prettyit is rejoined the Princess How do you do it Give it to me


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3 The Sleeping Beauty in the Woodthat I may see if I can do it as well She had no sooner takenhold of the spindle than she pierced her hand with the point of itand fainted away The good old woman very much frightened calledfor help People came from all quarters they threw water in thePrincess s face they unlaced her stays they slapped her hands theyrubbed her temples with eau de Cologne but nothing would bringher to The King who had run upstairs at the noise then remembered the prediction of the Fairies and wisely concluding thatthis must have occurred as the Fairies said it would had the Princessconveyed into the finest apartment in the palace and placed on a bedof gold and silver embroidery Her eyes were closed but theycould hear her breathe softly which showed that she was not deadThe King commanded them to let her sleep in peace until the hourarrived for her waking The good Fairy who had saved her life wasin the Kingdom of Mataquin twelve thousand leagues off when thePrincess met with her accident but she was informed of it instantlyby a little dwarf who had a pair of seven league boots which enabledhim to take seven leagues at a stride The Fairy set out at onceand an hour afterwards they saw her arrive in a fiery chariot drawnby dragons The King advanced to hand her out She approvedof all he had done but as she had great foresight she consideredthat when the Princess awoke she would feel very strange at findingherself all alone in that old castle so this is what the Fairy didShe touched with her wand everybody that was in the castle exceptthe King and Queen governesses maids of honour women of thebedchamber gentlemen officers stewards cooks scullions boysguards porters pages footmen she touched also the horses thatwere in the stables with their grooms the great mastiffs in the court


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The Sleeping Beauty in the Wood 4yard and little Dash the tiny dog of the Princess that was on thebed beside her As soon as she had touched them they all fellasleep not to wake again until the time arrived for their mistress todo so in order that they might be all ready to attend upon her whenshe should want them Even the spits that had been put down tothe fire laden with partridges and pheasants went to sleep and thefire itself alsoAll this was done in a moment the Fairies never lost muchtime over their work After which the King and Queen havingkissed their dear daughter without waking her quitted the Castleand issued a proclamation forbidding any person whomsoever toapproach it But in a quarter of an hour the Fairy caused to growup around the Park so great a quantity of trees large and small andof brambles and thorns that neither man nor beast could get throughthem so that nothing more was to be seen than the tops of theCastle turretsAt the end of a hundred years the son of the King at thattime upon the throne who was of a different family to that of thesleeping Princess having been hunting in that neighbourhoodinquired what towers they were that he saw above the trees of a verythick wood Each person answered him according to the story hehad heard Some said that it was an old haunted castleThe more general opinion was that it was the abode of an ogreThe Prince did not know what to believe about it when an oldpeasant spoke in his turn and said to him Prince it is more thanfifty years ago since I heard my father say that there was in thatCastle the most beautiful Princess that ever was seen That she wasto sleep for a hundred years and would be awakened by a King s son


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The Sleeping Beauty in the Wood 5for whom she was reserved The young Prince at these words felthimself all on fire He believed without doubt that he was destinedto accomplish this famous adventure and impelled by love andglory resolved to see what would come of it upon the spot Scarcelyhad he approached the wood when all those great trees all thosebrambles and thorns made way of their own accord for him to passHe walked towards the Castle which he saw at the end of a longavenue he had entered and what rather surprised him was that hefound none of his people had been able to follow him the trees havingclosed up again as soon as he had passed He entered a large forecourt where everything he saw was enough to freeze his blood withterror A frightful silence reigned around Nothing was to be seenbut the bodies of men and animals stretched out apparently lifelessBut he soon found by the shining noses and red faces of the portersthat they were only asleep and their goblets in which were still lefta few drops of wine proved that they had dosed off while drinkingHe passed through a large courtyard paved with marble he ascendedthe staircase He entered the guard room where the guards stooddrawn up in line their carbines shouldered and snoring their loudestHe traversed several apartments with ladies and gentlemen all asleepsome standing others seated He entered a chamber covered withgold and saw on a bed the curtains of which were open on eachside the most lovely sight he had ever looked upon a charmingPrincess who seemed to be about fifteen or sixteen He approachedtrembling and admiring and knelt down beside her At that momentthe spell being broken the Princess awoke and gazing uponthe Prince with more tenderness than a first sight of him seemed toauthorize Is it you Prince said she you have been long


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The Sleefing Beauty in the Wood6 6waited for The Prince delighted at these words and still more bythe tone in which they were spoken knew not how to express to herhis joy and gratitude He assured her he loved her better thanhimself His language was not very plain but it pleased themore The Princess had had time enough to consider what sheshould say to him for during her long nap the good Fairy had givenher the pleasure of very agreeable dreams In short they talked forfour hours without having said half what they had to say to each otherIn the meanwhile all the Palace had been roused at the sametime as the Princess Everybody remembered their duty and asthey were not all in love they were dying with hunger The lady inwaiting as hungry as any of them became impatient and announcedloudly to the Princess that the meat was on the table The Princeassisted the Princess to rise she was full dressed and mostmagnificently but he took good care not to hint to her that she wasattired like his grandmother She looked however not a morsel lesslovely They passed into a hall of mirrors in which they suppedattended by the officers of the Princess The violins and hautboisplayed old but excellent pieces of music notwithstanding it was ahundred years since they had been performed by anybody and aftersupper to lose no time the grand Almoner married the royal loversin the chapel of the Castle


No firm surpasses Messrs ROUTLEDGE in Sixpenny and Shilling Picture Story Books Could not be better drawnprinted or coloured if they cost twenty shilings instead of twelve pence The Standard Dec 23 187oaQeTLEgMS SSHILLING TOY BOOKSWith large illustrations by H S MARKS J D WATSON H WEIR and F KEYLPrinted in Colours by KRONHEIM Co AND LEIGHTON BROTHERSIN DEMY 4TO STIFF WRAPPER is EACH OR MOUNTED ON LNEN 28 EACHx NURSERY RHYMES 32 TOM THUMB2 ALPHABET OF TRADES 33 BABES IN THE WOOD3 CINDERELLA 34 JACK AND THE BEANSTALK4 ALPHABET OF PRETTY NAMES 35 THE LAUGHABLE A B C5 OLD TESTAMENT ALPHABET 36 WILD ANIMALS First Series6 THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS 37 Ditto Second Series7 THIS LITTLE PIG WENT TO MARKET 38 Ditto Third Series8 TOM THUMB S ALPHABET 39 TAME ANIMALS First Series9 NURSERY SONGS 40 Ditto Second Series1o NEW TESTAMENT ALPHABET 41 Ditto Third Series12 OUR FARMYARD ALPHABET 42 Ditto Fourth Series13 THE HISTORY OF MOSES 43 WILD ANIMALS Fourth Series14 THE HISTORY OF JOSEPH 44 MY MOTHER15 THE ALPHABET OF FLOWERS 45 THE DOG S DINNER PARTY16 NURSERY RHYMES 46 LITTLE DOG TRUSTY17 NURSERY GAMES 47 THE WHITE CAT18 THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT 48 THE UGLY DUCKLING21 THE LIFE OF OUR LORD 49 LITTLE SNOW WHITE22 THE THREE BEARS 5o DASH AND THE DUCKLINGS23 LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD 5r REYNARD THE FOX24 NEW TALE OF A TUB 52 ALPHABET OF FAIRY TALES25 NURSERY TALES 53 TITTUMS AND FIDO26 OLD MOTHER HUBBARD 54 ANN AND HER MAMMA27 PICTURES FROM ENGLISH HISTORY 55 THE CAT S TEA PARTY28 Ditto Second Period 56 BABY29 Ditto Third Period 57 HENNY PENNY30 Ditto Fourth Period 58 THE PEACOCK AT HOME31 PUSS IN BOOTS 59 THE SLEEPING BEAUTY IN THE WOODTHOSE MARKED WITH AN ASTERISK ARE NOT KEPT ON LINENGEORGE ROUTLEDGE SONS


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