Little Bo Peep

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Little Bo Peep
Series Title:
Dame Trot series
Alternate Title:
Little Bo-Peep
Physical Description:
12 p. (incl. wrappers) : col. ill. ; 20 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Place of Publication:
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Sheep -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Human-animal relationships -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Fairy tales -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Fables -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) -- 1875   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre:
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
Fables   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Summary:
Elements of fairy tale and fable are blended together to create an imaginary gloss of the traditional nursery rhyme, Little Bo Peep. The first stanza of the rhyme appears at head of text.
General Note:
Title and imprint from cover.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002243105
oclc - 50599882
notis - ALJ4063
System ID:
UF00026618:00001

Full Text
... .. ..."SERIESA O UG1U Ll BR O's ON,


LITTLE BO-PEEP.The Baldwin LibraryUniversityFlo ida


LITTLE BO-PEEP."Little Bo-Peep she lost her sheep,And didn't know where to find them,Let them alone, and they'll come home,And bring their tails behind them !"So runs the Nursery Rhyme. Little Bo-Peep was avery nice little girl. Her cheeks had a bloom onthem like a lovely peach, and her voice sounded likea sweet silver bell.But though Little Bo-Peep was as good as she wasbeautiful, she sometimes met with misfortunes thatmade her very sad. Once, when she lost her sheep,she was very doleful indeed. And this is how ithappened.One summer evening, when the sun was setting,Little Bo-Peep, who had to rise very early in themorning, felt tired, and sat down on a bank coveredwith daisies. Being very weary, she soon fell fastasleep. Now the Bell-wether of Bo-Peep's flock was3


77...... ............. ..... ............-LLITTLE BO-PEP DREAMING


&4ALITTLE BO-PEEP MEETS A RAVEN.


LITTLE BO-PEEP.a most stupid and stubborn fellow. I dare say youknow that all the sheep in a flock will follow the Bell-wether, and that he always wears a bell round hisneck. It was a great pity, but the Bell-wether ofBo-Peep's flock was very wild, and was much givento wandering far away into the wood, where of coursethe rest of the sheep would follow him. $Finding Little Bo-Peep asleep, the tiresome fellowbegan by standing on his hind legs, and making agreat bow to his shadow before him on the grass.After this he whirled himself round like a top,shaking his head all the time, and ringing his bell.Very soon the rest of the flock began to dance andcaper too. And when they had wheeled round theirleader for a time, they ran off after him with a boundinto the wood. Away they went, till they were quitetired out; and then they came to a stand-still, staringat their leader with very blank faces. But the Bell-wether looked foolish enough now, and did nothingbut shake his head slowly and ring his bell, whichseemed to say quite clearly, "You are lost, you arelost!"6


LITTLE BO-PEEP."When Little Bo-Peep awoke she found her sheepgone, and hardly knowing what she did, she walked onand on, far into the wood. She met some people withhoes and rakes in their hands, and asked them if theyhad seen her sheep. But they only laughed at her,and said, No. One man was very cross, and threat-ened to beat her. At last she came to a stile, onwhich an old Raven was perched. He looked so wisethat Little Bo-Peep asked him whether he had seena flock of sheep. But he only cried, "Caw, cawcaw;" so Bo-Peep ran on again across the fields.She wandered on till night-fall, and being faint withhunger, was very glad to see a light just before her.As she went on, she saw that it shone from a cottagewindow. But when she came to the door, it looked sodark and dismal that she was afraid to go in, and wasjust going to run away, when a cross-looking oldwoman came out, and dragged her into the cottage.She made her sit by the side of her son, who was avery ugly youth, with a great red face and red hair.The old woman told him that she had brought Bo-Peep to be his wife, so Bo-Peep, who did not like him7


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Aba~' ~ ,'~u- ", I f/Y, i"` i~s 17'r~.~~LXM-LITT E B -PE P A D T E E VES


LITTLE BO-PEEP.at all, ran away while they were asleep. But she didnot know where to go, and gave herself up for lost,when she heard something cry, "tu-whit-tu-whoo,"in the tree above her. It was a great owl, whichbegan flapping its wings with joy. Bo-Peep wasfrightened at first, but as the owl seemed very kind,she followed it. It took her to a cottage where therewas plenty to eat and drink, and then, to Bo-Peep'sgreat surprise, it began to speak, and told her thisstory:-"Know, dear Maiden," said the owl, "that I am thedaughter of a King, and was a lovely Princess; but Iwas changed into an owl by the old woman at the cot-tage, because I would not marry her ugly son. ButI have heard the fairies say that one day a lovelymaiden, who would come into this wood to find herlost sheep, should be the means of my gaining myown form again. You are that pretty maid, and Iwill take you to a spot where you will find your sheep,but without their tails. The elves will play withthem for this night, but in the morning every sheepwill have its tail again, except the stupid Bell-10


LITTLE BO-PEEP.wether. You must then wave his tail three times overmy head, and I shall resume my shape again."The owl flew off, and led Bo-Peep into the wood,and said, "Sleep, maiden, I will watch." How longshe was asleep she could not tell, but the charmedspot was suddenly lighted up, and she saw the Queenof the Fairies seated on a bank. The Queen said thesheep should be punished for running away. She thensaw all her sheep come trooping into the place, andon every sheep there was an Elf, who held in his handa sheep's tail. After riding them about for some time,and having great fun with them, the mad sportceased, and each Elf restored the tail to his sheep-allbut the Bell-wether's, which their leader hid in a tree.When Bo-Peep awoke, she saw the owl flapping itswings as if to remind her of her promise ; so she fetchedthe tail, and waved it three times over its head, whenup started the most charming Princess that ever wasseen. The Princess gave Bo-Peep a beautiful cottage,and her sheep never ran away from their kind mistressagain.11


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Full Text

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LITTLE BO-PEEP. The Baldwin Library University Flo ida



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Aba~' ~ ,'~ u", I f/ Y, i "` i~s 17' r~.~~LXMLITT E B -PE P A D T E E VES



PAGE 1

iiiA I JJ THE OLEWMA'SUG r THE OLO WOMAN'S UGLY SON.



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LITTLE BO-PEEP. at all, ran away while they were asleep. But she did not know where to go, and gave herself up for lost, when she heard something cry, "tu-whit-tu-whoo," in the tree above her. It was a great owl, which began flapping its wings with joy. Bo-Peep was frightened at first, but as the owl seemed very kind, she followed it. It took her to a cottage where there was plenty to eat and drink, and then, to Bo-Peep's great surprise, it began to speak, and told her this story:"Know, dear Maiden," said the owl, "that I am the daughter of a King, and was a lovely Princess; but I was changed into an owl by the old woman at the cottage, because I would not marry her ugly son. But I have heard the fairies say that one day a lovely maiden, who would come into this wood to find her lost sheep, should be the means of my gaining my own form again. You are that pretty maid, and I will take you to a spot where you will find your sheep, but without their tails. The elves will play with them for this night, but in the morning every sheep will have its tail again, except the stupid Bell10



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LITTLE BO-PEEP. wether. You must then wave his tail three times over my head, and I shall resume my shape again." The owl flew off, and led Bo-Peep into the wood, and said, "Sleep, maiden, I will watch." How long she was asleep she could not tell, but the charmed spot was suddenly lighted up, and she saw the Queen of the Fairies seated on a bank. The Queen said the sheep should be punished for running away. She then saw all her sheep come trooping into the place, and on every sheep there was an Elf, who held in his hand a sheep's tail. After riding them about for some time, and having great fun with them, the mad sport ceased, and each Elf restored the tail to his sheep-all but the Bell-wether's, which their leader hid in a tree. When Bo-Peep awoke, she saw the owl flapping its wings as if to remind her of her promise ; so she fetched the tail, and waved it three times over its head, when up started the most charming Princess that ever was seen. The Princess gave Bo-Peep a beautiful cottage, and her sheep never ran away from their kind mistress again. 11



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LITTLE BO-PEEP. "Little Bo-Peep she lost her sheep, And didn't know where to find them, Let them alone, and they'll come home, And bring their tails behind them !" So runs the Nursery Rhyme. Little Bo-Peep was a very nice little girl. Her cheeks had a bloom on them like a lovely peach, and her voice sounded like a sweet silver bell. But though Little Bo-Peep was as good as she was beautiful, she sometimes met with misfortunes that made her very sad. Once, when she lost her sheep, she was very doleful indeed. And this is how it happened. One summer evening, when the sun was setting, Little Bo-Peep, who had to rise very early in the morning, felt tired, and sat down on a bank covered with daisies. Being very weary, she soon fell fast asleep. Now the Bell-wether of Bo-Peep's flock was 3



PAGE 1

LITTLE BO-PEEP. "When Little Bo-Peep awoke she found her sheep gone, and hardly knowing what she did, she walked on and on, far into the wood. She met some people with hoes and rakes in their hands, and asked them if they had seen her sheep. But they only laughed at her, and said, No. One man was very cross, and threatened to beat her. At last she came to a stile, on which an old Raven was perched. He looked so wise that Little Bo-Peep asked him whether he had seen a flock of sheep. But he only cried, "Caw, caw caw;" so Bo-Peep ran on again across the fields. She wandered on till night-fall, and being faint with hunger, was very glad to see a light just before her. As she went on, she saw that it shone from a cottage window. But when she came to the door, it looked so dark and dismal that she was afraid to go in, and was just going to run away, when a cross-looking old woman came out, and dragged her into the cottage. She made her sit by the side of her son, who was a very ugly youth, with a great red face and red hair. The old woman told him that she had brought BoPeep to be his wife, so Bo-Peep, who did not like him 7



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&4A LITTLE BO-PEEP MEETS A RAVEN.



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... .. ... "SERIES A O UG1U Ll BR O's ON



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r-~;T f4: -f; K33L Irflo A swf I A



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LITTLE BO-PEEP. a most stupid and stubborn fellow. I dare say you know that all the sheep in a flock will follow the Bellwether, and that he always wears a bell round his neck. It was a great pity, but the Bell-wether of Bo-Peep's flock was very wild, and was much given to wandering far away into the wood, where of course the rest of the sheep would follow him. $ Finding Little Bo-Peep asleep, the tiresome fellow began by standing on his hind legs, and making a great bow to his shadow before him on the grass. After this he whirled himself round like a top, shaking his head all the time, and ringing his bell. Very soon the rest of the flock began to dance and caper too. And when they had wheeled round their leader for a time, they ran off after him with a bound into the wood. Away they went, till they were quite tired out; and then they came to a stand-still, staring at their leader with very blank faces. But the Bellwether looked foolish enough now, and did nothing but shake his head slowly and ring his bell, which seemed to say quite clearly, "You are lost, you are lost!" 6



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77 ...... ........ ..... .... .............-L LITTLE BO-PEP DREAMING