Routledge's picture gift-book

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Material Information

Title:
Routledge's picture gift-book containing, Alphabet of trades, Nursery songs, "This little pig went to market" and Nursery tales
Uncontrolled:
Alphabet of trades
Nursery songs
This little pig went to market
Nursery tales
Physical Description:
1 v. (various pagings), 24 leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Melville, Harden Sidney, fl. 1837-1882 ( Illustrator )
Kronheim & Co ( Lithographer )
Leighton Bros. (Printer) ( Lithographer )
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Dalziel Brothers ( Engraver )
Publisher:
George Routledge and Sons
Place of Publication:
London (Broadway Ludgate) ;
New York (416 Broome Street)
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Alphabet books -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1875   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre:
Alphabet books   ( rbgenr )
Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
with twenty-four pages of illustrations printed in colours by Kronheim & Co. and Leighton Bros.
General Note:
Some illustrations signed: Dalziel or "H.S.M." (i.e. H.S. Melville).
General Note:
Baldwin Library copy imperfect: lacking illustrations of alphabets, D, F, & M.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002219901
oclc - 50637631
notis - ALG0090
System ID:
UF00026616:00001

Full Text
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ROUTLEDGE SPICTURE GIFT BOOKCONTAININGALPHABET OF TRADESNURSERY SONGSTHIS LITTLE PIG WENT TO MARKETANDNURSERY TALESWITHTWENTY FOUR PAGES OF ILLUSTRATIONSPRINTED IN COLQURS BY KRONHEIM CO AND LEIGHTON BROSLONDONGEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONSTHE BROADWAY LUDGATENEW YORK 416 BROOME STREET


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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONSTHE ALPHABET OF TRADESARTIST BLACKSMITH COBBLER DRESSMAKERENGINEER FLOWER GIRL GARDENER HATTERINNKEEPER JOINER KNIFEGRINDER LAMPLIGHTER MILKMAIDNEWSBOY ORGAN MAN POSTMAN QUARRYMANREAPER SHRIMPER TINKER VERGERWASHERWOMAN DRAYMAN YEOMAN ZOOLOGISTNURSERY SONGSQUEEN ANNETHE LION AND THE UNICORNTHE TAILOR AND THE CROWHUMPTY DUMPTYTHE BRAVE TAILORSLITTLE BOY BLUETHIS LITTLE PIG WENT TO MARKETMRS PIG AND HER FAMILYTHE PIG WHO WENT TO MARKETTHE PIG WHO STAYED AT HOME AND GOT INTO MISCHIEFTHE KIND LITTLE PIG WHO HAD ROAST BEEFTHE QUARRELSOME PIG WHO HAD NONETHE PIG WHO CRIED WEE WEE ALL THE WAY HOMENURSERY TALESJACK AND THE BEANSTALK FOUR PICTURESJACK AND THE BEANSTALK FOUR PICTURESNURSERY RHYMES FOUR PICTURESLITTLE BO PEEP FOUR PICTURESCINDERELLA FOUR PICTURESTHE THREE BEARS FOUR PICTURES


ALPHABET OF TRADES


A is an Artist who copies so wellThat likeness from sitter one scarcelycan tellB is a Blacksmith who hammersawayWith a clang and a clatter throughoutthe whole dayC is a Cobbler who sticks to his lastHis work strong and neat though hestitches so fastD is a Dressmaker whose workseems but playFor she s making a dress for her ownwedding day


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E an Engineer files and hammersawayMoulding iron and brass as thoughthey were clayF is a Flower girl fair and modestas wellWho with a sweet voice cries Flowersto sellG is a Gardener of such skill andcareThat no flowers or plants with his cancompareH is a Hatter who alters the brimsAnd crowns of his hats to suitfashion s whims


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I is an Innkeeper with flagon of aleWhich J the Joiner will drink without failK a Knife grinder sharpens allkinds of bladesRazors scissors and tools for all sortsof tradesL a Lamplighter nimbly skips upand downAnd lights in a twinkling the lampsof the townM is a Milkmaid whose heart is aslightAs her milk is pure and her cans arebright


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N is a Newsboy who plies well hiscallingAnd Latest Edition always isbawlingO an Organ man plays tunes graveand gayContent for his pains with very smallpayP is a Postman whose rat tat sosmartCauses sorrow and joy in many a heartQ a Quarryman splits up a massOf marble or granite as though itwere glassi


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XR is a Reaper before whose keenbladeFalls the ripe corn God s goodnesshas madeS is a Shrimper who gleans fromthe seaThe shrimps and the prawns that givezest to our teaT is a Tinker who when holes arefoundIn old pots or kettles will soon makethem soundV is a Verger courteous and graveWho points out the tombs of the piousand brave


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W a Washerwoman always is seenAt her tub hard at work rubbingdirty things cleanX stands for excellent when onbarrels of beerSo the more x s the better the cheerY is a Yeoman whose fields are welltill dHis men are well housed and hisbarns are well fill dZ stands for Zoologist also for ZanySo please take your choice that s ifyou have any


NURSERY SONGS


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QUEEN ANNEQUEEN ANNE Queen AnneYou sit in the sunAs fair as a lilyAs white as a wandI send you three lettersAnd pray read oneYou must read oneIf you can t read allSo pray Miss or MasterThrow up the ball


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THE LION AND THE UNICORNTHE Lion and the UnicornWere fighting for the crownThe Lion beat the UnicornAll round about the townSome gave them white breadAnd some gave them brownSome gave them plum cakeAnd sent them out of town


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THE TAILOR AND TIHE CROWA CARRION Crow sat on an oakFol de riddle lol de riddle hi ding doWatching a tailor shape his cloakSing heigh ho the carrion crowFol de riddle lol de riddle hi ding doWife bring me my old bent bowFol de riddle lol de riddle hi ding doThat I may shoot yon carrion crowSing heigh ho the carrion crowFol de riddle lol de riddle hi ding doThe Tailor he shot and miss d his markFol de riddle lol de riddle hi ding doAnd shot his own sow quite through the heartSing heigh ho the carrion crowFol de riddle lol de riddle hi ding deWife Wife bring brandy in a spoonFol de riddle lol de riddle hi ding doFor our old sow is in a swoonSing heigh ho the carrion crowFol de riddle lol de riddle hi ding do


HUMPTY DUMPTYHUMPTY DUMPTYSat on a wallHumpty DumptyHad a great fallAll the King s horsesAnd all the King s menCouldn t set Humpty Dumpty on the wall again


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THE BRAVE TAILORSFOUR and Twenty TailorsWent to kill a snailThe best man among themDurst not touch her tailShe put out her hornsLike a little Kyloe cowRun Tailors run orShe ll kill you all e en now


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LITTLE BOY BLUELITTLE Boy BlueCome blow up your hornThe sheep s in the meadowThe cow s in the cornWhere s the little boyThat looks after the sheepHe s under the haycock fast asleepWill you wake him No not IFor if I do he ll be sure to cry


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THIS LITTLE PIG WENT TO MARKET


THIS LITTLE PIG WENT TO MARKETFIRST PIGHERE was once a fa mi ly of five lit tle pigs andMrs Pig their mo ther lo ved them all ve rydear ly Some of these lit tle pigs were ve ry goodand took a great deal of pains to please their mo therBut the best of all was the el dest pig He was souse ful and ac tive that his mo ther and all his bro therscall ed him Mr Pig He was a fine strong broad backed fel low with a large smi ling face and ve ry longbrown ears One day his mo ther told him to go tomar ket with the don key and cart fill ed with ve geta bles She told him to be ve ry care ful with Rusty for that was the don key s name as he had ave ry bad tem per The cart was soon fill ed andRus ty ha ving been put in har ness a way went MrPig to mar ket at a gal lop Rus ty went on ve rywell for a bout a mile and a half but then his badtem per be gan to show it self First he drew himself up on his hind legs then he fix ed his fore legs1


firm ly in the ground and began kick ing a way atthe front of the cart When he had quite ti red himself out he made a great noise with his mouth andnos trils and came to a stand still All the coaxingand whip ping that Mr Pig gave him could not induce him to move a step Mr Pig saw a num berof lit tle pigs play ing in a field by the road side sohe went up to them and ask ed them to as sist himA rope was ti ed in front of Rus ty and the lit tlepigs drag ged him and the cart a long while Mr Piggave Rus ty a good whip ping from be hind At lastall the kind lit tle pigs who were so will ing to as sistMr Pig were ti red out One by one they werefor ced to quit their hold of the rope till at lastpoor Mr Pig found him self a lone and at a longdis tance from the mar ketAs per verse Rus ty would not drag the cart MrPig took him out of the shafts and sat down by theroad side think ing what he should do But he knewthat he would ne ver get to mar ket in that waySo he start ed up and plac ing him self in theshafts pull ed a way by him self and be ing a ve rystrong and brave pig he went a long in this man nertill with in sight of the mar ket placeWhen he got there all the big and lit tle pigsbe gan to laugh They call ed Mr Pig a great ma ny2


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He thought he would a muse him self with hisbro ther s toys so he took down his bro ther s finelarge kite and big drum and splen did horse withthe black and white spots on its back But he soongot ti red of mere ly play ing with them and then hisha bits of mis chief be gan to show them selves Hefor ced the drum sticks through the parch ment of thebig drum tore off the flow ing tail of the large kiteand broke one of the hind legs of the spot ted horseafter which he pull ed off its head from its bo dyThis ve ry naugh ty pig af ter this went to thecup board and find ing out his mo ther s jam potshalf emp ti ed most of them He did not e ven waitto look for a spoon but for cing his paws in to thejam ate it in that way E ven this was not e noughmis chief for him Ta king the po ker he made itred hot and with it burnt more than ten great holesin the hearth rug and al so burnt holes in his mother s fine new car pet When Mrs Pig came homefrom the mil ler s with the flour she sat down bythe fire and be ing ve ry ti red she soon fell a sleepNo soon er had she done so than this bad lit tle pigget ting a long hand ker chief ti ed her in her chairBut it was not ve ry long be fore she a woke Ve ryquick ly she found out all the mis chief that thislit tle pig had been do ing5


She soon saw all the dam age he had done tohis bro ther s play things Quick ly too she broughtout her thick est and hea vi est birch The naugh tylit tle pig ran all round the room and cri ed andbeg ged of his mo ther to for give himBut all this did not a vail him in the least hismo ther took him by the ear and ap pli ed the birchto his back and sides till they tin gled and smart edin such a way that he did not for get for a longtimeTHIRD PIGT HIS lit tle pig who had roast beef was a ve rygood and care ful lit tie fel low He gave hismo ther scarce ly any trou ble and hke his el destbro ther Mr Pig al ways took a plea sure in do ingwhat she bade him Here you see him sit ting downwith a clean face and well wash ed hands to somenice roast beef His bro ther who was i dle andwould not learn his les sons is cry ing on a stool inthe cor ner with the Dunce s cap on And this is therea son why the good lit tle pig had roast beef whilehis bro ther the i dle pig had none He sat down6


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qui et ly in the cor ner while he learn ed his les sonHav ing gone o ver it ma ny times say ing one lineafter an o ther to him self he ask ed his mo ther tohear him re peat it And he did so from the firstline to the ve ry last with out a sin gle mis takeMrs Pig stro ked him on the ears and fore head andcall ed him a good lit tle pig Af ter this he ask edher to al low him to as sist in mak ing the teaHe brought e ve ry thing she want ed and lift edoff the ket tle from the fire with out spill ing a dropei ther on his toes or the car petBy and by he went out af ter ask ing his mother to play with his hoop He had not gone farwhen he saw an old blind pig who with his hatin hand was cry ing at the loss of his dog Thatnaugh ty dog had bro ken the string by which hismas ter held him and had run a way He felt inhis pock et and found he had a half pen ny whichhe gave to the poor old pig like a kind andthought ful lit tle pig as he was Not ve ry longaf ter this he saw a great strong spite ful pig whowore a ve ry short jack et and had a large greencap on his head beat ing one of his lit tle bro thersGo ing up to the big pig he told him what ashame it was that he should so ill treat a poorlit tle pig so much small er than him self and who7


had done him no harm The great stu pid pig didnot seem quite a ble to make out what this wisepig said to him but he ran off His poor lit tlebro ther had been knock ed down and bruis ed andone of his eyes was red and swol len So he tookout his hand ker chief and ti ed it o ver his bro ther sface Then he in the most care ful and ten der manner led the beat en lit tle pig home to his mo ther shouse He pla ced one of his paws under his ownarm and so they went a long They were a long timeget ting home for the poor pig who had been sosad ly treat ed was lame and cri ed a great deal withthe pain his eyes caus ed himBut when they got home the care ful lit tle pigmade him some nice hot mut ton broth and took itup to his bed for him to sip it It was for suchgood kind thought ful con duct as this that hismo ther almost ev e ry week gave this lit tle pigroast beefFOURTH PIGTNLIKE his bro ther the lit tle pig who hadroast beef this was a most per verse and wilful lit tle pig No won der then that while his good8


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would ra ther spend the day with him than en joyit a lone each one by him self They all a greed togo with him All but one at least this lit tle pigthat you see cry ing Wee wee all the way homeThis lit tle pig had bought a new fish ing rod andtac kle and he was anx i ous to try to fish for thefirst time He had made up his mind to fish in astream that was close by and so he said he wouldspend his ho li day by him self Ve ry well saidMrs Pig but you must not go in to Far mer Grumpey s grounds for he is a ve ry se vere man andhe car ries a great hea vy whip The lit tle pig toldhis mo ther that he did not in tend to fish in thisfar mer s part of the ri ver A way he went but hetold his mo ther a sto ry he did in tend to go in toFar mer Grum pey s grounds When he got there hethrew his line in to the wa ter and watch ed the floatfor a long time Af ter a while he saw the floatbob bing a bout un der the wa ter and ve ry soonaf ter he drag ged an im mense fish to land Pig gytook him up in to his arms and start ed to wardshome with him But he soon found the fish wastoo hea vy to be car ried in that way So he satdown to re fresh him self and to think how he wasto get the fish a long He had on ly been thusthink ing a short time when he heard a great gruff11


voice shout ing out and soon af ter he saw thedread ful Far mer Grum pey with his hea vy whipin his hand on a hill ve ry near him So he jump edup caught the great fish in his arms and ran offas fast as he could Far mer Grum pey ran toocrack ing his whip and shout ing out fol low ed byone of his men Pig gy found that they were o vertak ing him so he drop ped his fish and ran fast erBut it was no use poor Pig gy was caught by thestrong and rough far mer who said he would cuthis back for fish ing in his grounds with out hiscon sent So he laid his strong whip o ver Pig gy sback for some time af ter which this poor Pig gyran off cry ing out in great pain Wee WeeWee all the way home12


NURSERY TALES


LITTLE BO PEEPT H I S is Little Bo Peep who lost her sheepAnd couldn t tell where to find themTill she sat herself down and went to sleepA great deal too tired to mind themWhile little Bo Peep was fast asleepShe dreamed that she heard a bleatingBut when she jumped up those naughty sheepWere all of them still retreatingSo little Bo Peep ran after her sheepBut alas she couldn t find themTill they d all through a thorn bush tried to leapAnd left their tails behind them


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CINDERELLAANDTHE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPERPOOR Cinderella had to light the fires and do all the workof the house while her two sisters in law took theirpleasure One night they went to a ball at the King s palaceand after she had helped them to dress in their fine clothesCinderella sat down to cry A little old woman came in andsaid I am a fairy and you shall go to the ball for you area good girl The old woman told her to go into the gardenand fetch a pumpkin and behind the pumpkin were twoshining green lizards When she came back six rats came outof a hole in the floor Then the fairy waved her crutch stickover them all and turned the pumpkin into a fine coach thetwo lizards into green coated footmen and the six rats intobeautiful horses After this she gave Cinderella a rich dressand a pair of charming little glass slippers which just fitted herMind you don t stay after the clock strikes twelve said theold fairy or all these things will change again Cinderella wentto the ball where nobody knew her though everybody admiredher beauty and the young Prince fell in love with her Whileshe was talking the clock began to strike twelve and she wasobliged to run away so fast that she left one of her slippers onthe steps of the palace The next day the Prince sent everywhere to find the owner of the little glass slipper but it wouldfit nobody but Cinderella and so the Prince himself came tosee her They were married soon after and the good gentlegirl became a kind and beautiful Queen


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THE THREE BEARST HERE was once a little girl who was called SilverlocksJI because her hair was so bright and shiny and though shewas a pretty child she was always in mischief and meddlingwith what did not belong to her till the neighbours said shewas more trouble than she was worth One day she wentinto a wood a long way from home and saw a little cottagewith the door left open In she went directly hoping to be ableto play some pranks there Now the cottage belonged to twoBears named Mr and Mrs Bruin and to their little Bearwhose name was Tiny and they had all three gone for a walkleaving some soup on the table to cool As soon as Silverlocks smelt the soup she took the little pipkin that had beenplaced for Tiny and being hungry very soon emptied it thenshe sat down on a nice little chair and began to rock backwards and forwards till she broke it and at last went upstairsand lay down on a soft little white bed that she found thereShe was fast asleep when the Bears came home and did nothear them growling and crying Who has been at my soupWho has sat on my chair It was only when the TinyBear was just going to spring on to the bed that she wokeand managed to jump out of window She had a sad tumblebut she was quite cured of meddling


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JACK AND THE BEANSTALKA POOR woman who lived in a little cottage in the countryhad an only son His name was Jack and though hewas rather idle and fond of play he was a kind good temperedboy They were so poor that as Jack could only earn a littlemoney now and then by frightening birds away from the cornor by picking up stones and weeds out of the fields the poorwoman was forced to sell her cow and sent her son with itto market where he met a butcher who offered him a hatfull of beautiful coloured beans for it Jack was so pleasedwith this bargain that he went dancing home to show hismother the beans and she was so angry that she threw themout of the window and after sending the boy to bed withouthis supper sat down to cry Early in the morning whenJack looked out of window he saw that the beans had takenroot and that a great beanstalk had grown in the night sohigh that he could not see the top of it He was out of bed ina minute and began to climb the beanstalk but it took him along time to get to the top where he met an old woman whotold him that a giant lived in a great house not far from wherethey were near the mountains and that if he would be carefuland had the courage to go to the house he might get back thewealth of which that very giant had robbed his father


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Jack went up to the great gate of the house and theresaw the Giant s wife of whom he begged a little food and anight s lodging The woman told him that she dared not lethim in for her husband ate human flesh and had alreadykilled two or three travellers but Jack begged so hard that atlast she took him in fed him and hid him in the oven Whenthe Giant came home he roared out Wife I smell freshmeat but the woman said it was only a cat that had caughta bird After supper the Giant called for his hen and Jackpeeping out of the oven saw that whenever her master saidlay the hen laid a golden egg Presently when the Giantfell asleep and shook the room with his snoring Jack came outsoftly and escaped with the hen His mother was delightedto see him but Jack was impatient to be up the beanstalkagain and the second time after a great deal of trouble hepersuaded the Giant s wife who had forgotten him to hidehim in a closet After supper the Giant amused himself withcounting two great bags of money and Jack contrived to takethese away although a little dog barked so loudly that he wasafraid the Giant would awake On his third visit Jack whowas disguised hid in the copper and saw the Giant s fairyharp which would play by itself It played the Giant to sleepand Jack ran off with it but not before the Giant was afterhim Before he was half down the bean stalk Jack was at thebottom and cutting the roots with a hatchet let the Giant tothe ground where he was killed with the fall


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JACK HORNER S STORIESW HEN little Jack Horner who sat in the cornerHad eaten his Christmas pieHe looked up and said Before I go to bedA story to tell you I ll tryAbout Jack and Jill who their bucket to fillWent up the steep path to the wellTill Jack tumbled down and almost cracked his crownWhile Jill quickly after him fellThen there s a nice story about Jack a noryWho met with the old Goosey GanderAs well as another about Jack s own brotherWho couldn t tell which way to wanderOr about the old woman who lived in a shoeAnd had forty children so what could she doBut give them some gruel without any breadWith a nice rod in pickle to whip them to bed


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Full Text

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THE LION AND THE UNICORN. THE Lion and the Unicorn Were fighting for the crown; The Lion beat the Unicorn All round about the town. Some gave them white bread, And some gave them brown; Some gave them plum-cake, And sent them out of town.



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THE TAILOR AND TIHE CROW. A CARRION Crow sat on an oak, Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do, Watching a tailor shape his cloak; Sing heigh ho, the carrion crow, Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do. Wife, bring me my old bent bow, Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do, That I may shoot yon carrion crow; Sing heigh ho, the carrion crow, Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do. The Tailor he shot and miss'd his mark, Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do, And shot his own sow quite through the heart Sing heigh ho, the carrion crow, Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding de. Wife, Wife, bring brandy in a spoon, Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do; For our old sow is in a swoon; Sing heigh ho, the carrion crow, Fol de riddle, lol de riddle, hi ding do.



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JACK AND THE BEANSTALK. A POOR woman, who lived in a little cottage in the country, had an only son. His name was Jack, and though he was rather idle and fond of play, he was a kind, good-tempered boy. They were so poor that as Jack could only earn a little money now and then by frightening birds away from the corn or by picking up stones and weeds out of the fields, the poor woman was forced to sell her cow, and sent her son with it to market, where he met a butcher, who offered him a hat full of beautiful coloured beans for it. Jack was so pleased with this bargain that he went dancing home to show his mother the beans, and she was so angry that she threw them out of the window, and after sending the boy to bed without his supper, sat down to cry. Early in the morning, when Jack looked out of window, he saw that the beans had taken root, and that a great beanstalk had grown in the night so high that he could not see the top of it. He was out of bed in a minute, and began to climb the beanstalk; but it took him a long time to get to the top, where he met an old woman, who told him that a giant lived in a great house not far from where they were, near the mountains, and that if he would be careful and had the courage to go to the house, he might get back the wealth of which that very giant had robbed his father.



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E an Engineer, files and hammers away, Moulding iron and brass as though they were clay. F is a Flower-girl, fair and modest as well, Who with a sweet voice cries "Flowers to sell." G is a Gardener, of such skill and care, That no flowers or plants with his can compare. H is a Hatter, who alters the brims And crowns of his hats, to suit fashion's whims.





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NURSERY SONGS.



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firm-ly in the ground, and began kick-ing a-way at the front of the cart. When he had quite ti-red himself out, he made a great noise with his mouth and nos-trils, and came to a stand-still. All the coaxing and whip-ping that Mr. Pig gave him could not induce him to move a step. Mr. Pig saw a num-ber of lit-tle pigs play-ing in a field by the road-side, so he went up to them, and ask-ed them to as-sist him. A rope was ti-ed in front of Rus-ty, and the lit-tle pigs, drag-ged him and the cart a-long, while Mr. Pig gave Rus-ty a good whip-ping from be-hind. At last all the kind lit-tle pigs, who were so will-ing to as-sist Mr. Pig, were ti-red out. One by one, they were for-ced to quit their hold of the rope, till at last poor Mr. Pig found him-self a-lone, and at a long dis-tance from the mar-ket. As per-verse Rus-ty would not drag the cart, Mr. Pig took him out of the shafts, and sat down by the road-side think-ing what he should do. But he knew that he would ne-ver get to mar-ket in that way. So he start-ed up, and plac-ing him-self in the shafts, pull-ed a-way by him-self, and be-ing a ve-ry strong and brave pig, he went a-long in this man-ner till with-in sight of the mar-ket place. When he got there, all the big and lit-tle pigs be-gan to laugh. They call-ed Mr. Pig a great ma-ny 2



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HUMPTY DUMPTY. HUMPTY DUMPTY Sat on a wall; Humpty Dumpty Had a great fall. All the King's horses, And all the King's men, Couldn't set Humpty Dumpty on the wall again!



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CINDERELLA AND THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER. POOR Cinderella had to light the fires and do all the work of the house, while her two sisters-in-law took their pleasure. One night they went to a ball at the King's palace, and after she had helped them to dress in their fine clothes, Cinderella sat down to cry. A little old woman came in and said, "I am a fairy, and you shall go to the ball, for you are a good girl." The old woman told her to go into the garden and fetch a pumpkin, and behind the pumpkin were two shining green lizards. When she came back six rats came out of a hole in the floor. Then the fairy waved her crutch stick over them all and turned the pumpkin into a fine coach, the two lizards into green coated footmen, and the six rats into beautiful horses. After this she gave Cinderella a rich dress, and a pair of charming little glass slippers which just fitted her. Mind you don't stay after the clock strikes twelve," said the old fairy, "or all these things will change again." Cinderella went to the ball where nobody knew her, though everybody admired her beauty, and the young Prince fell in love with her. While she was talking the clock began to strike twelve, and she was obliged to run away so fast that she left one of her slippers on the steps of the palace. The next day the Prince sent everywhere to find the owner of the little glass slipper, but it would fit nobody but Cinderella, and so the Prince himself came to see her. They were married soon after, and the good, gentle girl became a kind and beautiful Queen.



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IN X SOOTIBO



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She soon saw all the dam-age he had done to his bro-ther's play-things. Quick-ly, too, she brought out her thick-est and hea-vi-est birch. The naugh-ty lit-tle pig ran all round the room, and cri-ed and beg-ged of his mo-ther to for-give him. But all this did not a-vail him in the least: his mo-ther took him by the ear, and ap-pli-ed the birch to his back and sides till they tin-gled and smart-ed in such a way that he did not for-get for a long time. THIRD PIG. T HIS lit-tle pig, who had roast beef, was a ve-ry good and care-ful lit-tie fel-low. He gave his mo-ther scarce-ly any trou-ble, and hke his el-dest bro-ther, Mr. Pig, al-ways took a plea-sure in do-ing what she bade him. -Here you see him sit-ting down, with a clean face, and well wash-ed hands, to some nice roast beef. His bro-ther, who was i-dle, and would not learn his les-sons, is cry-ing on a stool in the cor-ner, with the Dunce's cap on. And this is the rea-son why the good lit-tle pig had roast beef, while his bro-ther the i-dle pig had none. He sat down 6



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I is an Innkeeper, with flagon of ale, Which J the Joiner will drink without fail. K a Knife-grinder, sharpens all kinds of blades, Razors, scissors, and tools for all sorts of trades. L a Lamplighter, nimbly skips up and down, And lights in a twinkling the lamps of the town. M is a Milkmaid, whose heart is as light As her milk is pure and her cans are bright.



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"rr~ii;`77 Now, LEIGHTO, BROI



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NURSERY TALES.



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ROUTLEDGE'S PICTURE GIFT-BOOK CONTAINING ALPHABET OF TRADES NURSERY SONGS "THIS LITTLE PIG WENT TO MARKET" AND NURSERY TALES WITH TWENTY-FOUR PAGES OF ILLUSTRATIONS PRINTED IN COLQURS BY KRONHEIM & CO. AND LEIGHTON BROS. LONDON GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS THE BROADWAY, LUDGATE NEW YORK: 416, BROOME STREET



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would ra-ther spend the day with him, than en-joy it a-lone, each one by him-self. They all a-greed to go with him. All but one at least, this lit-tle pig that you see cry-ing "Wee! wee!" all the way home. This lit-tle pig had bought a new fish-ing rod and tac-kle, and he was anx-i-ous to try to fish for the first time. He had made up his mind to fish in a stream that was close by, and so he said he would spend his ho-li-day by him-self. "Ve-ry well," said Mrs. Pig, "but you must not go in-to Far-mer Grumpey's grounds, for he is a ve-ry se-vere man, and he car-ries a great hea-vy whip." The lit-tle pig told his mo-ther that he did not in-tend to fish in this far-mer's part of the ri-ver. A-way he went, but he told his mo-ther a sto-ry; he did in-tend to go in-to Far-mer Grum-pey's grounds. When he got there he threw his line in-to the wa-ter, and watch-ed the float for a long time. Af-ter a while he saw the float bob-bing a-bout un-der the wa-ter, and ve-ry soon af-ter he drag-ged an im-mense fish to land. Pig-gy took him up in-to his arms, and' start-ed to-wards home with him. But he soon found the fish was too hea-vy to be car-ried in that way. So he sat down to re-fresh him-self and to think how he was to get the fish a-long. He had on-ly been thus think-ing a short time, when he heard a great gruff 11



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had done him no harm. The great stu-pid pig did not seem quite a-ble to make out what this wise pig said to him, but he ran off. His poor lit-tle bro-ther had been knock-ed down, and bruis-ed, and one of his eyes was red and swol-len. So he took out his hand-ker-chief, and ti-ed it o-ver his bro-ther's face. Then he, in the most care-ful and ten-der manner, led the beat-en lit-tle pig home to his mo-ther's house. He pla-ced one of his paws under his own arm, and so they went a-long. They were a long time get-ting home, for the poor pig who had been so sad-ly treat-ed was lame, and cri-ed a great deal with the pain his eyes caus-ed him. But when they got home, the care-ful lit-tle pig made him some nice hot mut-ton broth, and took it up to his bed for him to sip it. It was for such good, kind, thought-ful con-duct as this that his mo-ther almost ev-e-ry week gave this lit-tle pig roast-beef. FOURTH PIG. UNLIKE his bro-ther, the lit-tle pig who had roast beef, this was a most per-verse and wilful lit-tle pig. No won-der, then, that while his good 8



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qui-et-ly in the cor-ner while he learn-ed his les-son. Hav-ing gone o-ver it ma-ny times, say-ing one line after an-o-ther to him-self, he ask-ed his mo-ther to hear him re-peat it. And he did so from the first line to the ve-ry last, with-out a sin-gle mis-take. Mrs. Pig stro-ked him on the ears and fore-head, and call-ed him a good lit-tle pig. Af-ter this he ask-ed her to al-low him to as-sist in mak-ing the tea. He brought e-ve-ry-thing she want-ed, and lift-ed off the ket-tle from the fire, with-out spill-ing a drop, ei-ther on his toes or the car-pet. By-and-by he went out, af-ter ask-ing his mother, to play with his hoop. He had not gone far, when he saw an old blind pig, who, with his hat in hand, was cry-ing at the loss of his dog. That naugh-ty dog had bro-ken the string by which his mas-ter held him, and had run a-way. He felt in his pock-et, and found he had a half-pen-ny, which he gave to the poor old pig, like a kind and thought-ful lit-tle pig as he was. Not ve-ry long af-ter this, he saw a great, strong, spite-ful pig, who wore a ve-ry short jack-et, and had a large green cap on his head, beat-ing one of his lit-tle bro-thers. Go-ing up to the big pig, he told him what a shame it was that he should so ill-treat a poor lit-tle pig so much small-er than him-self, and who 7



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QUEEN ANNE. QUEEN ANNE, Queen Anne, You sit in the sun, As fair as a lily, As white as a wand. I send you three letters, And pray read one: You must read one, If you can't read all; So pray, Miss or Master, Throw up the ball.



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THIS LITTLE PIG WENT TO MARKET. FIRST PIG. HERE was once a fa-mi-ly of five lit-tle pigs, and Mrs. Pig, their mo-ther, lo-ved them all ve-ry dear-ly. Some of these lit-tle pigs were ve-ry good, and took a great deal of pains to please their mo-ther. But the best of all was the el-dest pig. He was so use-ful and ac-tive that his mo-ther and all his bro-thers call-ed him Mr. Pig. He was a fine, strong, broad-backed fel-low, with a large, smi-ling face, and ve-ry long brown ears. One day his mo-ther told him to go to mar-ket, with the don-key and cart fill-ed with ve-geta-bles. She told him to be ve-ry care-ful with Rusty-for that was the don-key's name-as he had a ve-ry bad tem-per. The cart was soon fill-ed, and Rus-ty ha-ving been put in har-ness, a-way went Mr. Pig, to mar-ket, at a gal-lop. Rus-ty went on ve-ry well for a-bout a mile and a half, but then his bad tem-per be-gan to show it-self. First, he drew himself up on his hind legs; then he fix-ed his fore-legs 1



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A is an Artist, who copies so well, That likeness from sitter one scarcely can tell. B is a Blacksmith, who hammers away With a clang and a clatter throughout the whole day. C is a Cobbler, who sticks to his last, His work strong and neat, though he stitches so fast. D is a Dressmaker, whose work seems but play, For she's making a dress for her own wedding day.



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-i; 44 .; a6



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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. THE ALPHABET OF TRADES: ARTIST-BLACKSMITH-COBBLER-DRESSMAKER. ENGINEER-FLOWER-GIRL-GARDENER-HATTER. INNKEEPER-JOINER-KNIFEGRINDER-LAMPLIGHTER-MILKMAID NEWSBOY-ORGAN-MAN-POSTMAN-QUARRYMAN. REAPER-SHRIMPER-TINKER-VERGER. WASHERWOMAN-DRAYMAN-YEOMAN-ZOOLOGIST. NURSERY SONGS: QUEEN ANNE. THE LION AND THE UNICORN. THE TAILOR AND THE CROW. HUMPTY DUMPTY. THE BRAVE TAILORS. LITTLE BOY BLUE. "THIS LITTLE PIG WENT TO MARKET." MRS. PIG AND HER FAMILY. THE PIG WHO WENT TO MARKET. THE PIG WHO STAYED AT HOME AND GOT INTO MISCHIEF. THE KIND LITTLE PIG WHO HAD ROAST BEEF. THE QUARRELSOME PIG WHO HAD NONE. THE PIG WHO CRIED "WEE WEE" ALL THE WAY HOME. NURSERY TALES: JACK AND THE BEANSTALK-FOUR PICTURES. JACK AND THE BEANSTALK-FOUR PICTURES. NURSERY RHYMES-FOUR PICTURES. LITTLE BO-PEEP-FOUR PICTURES. CINDERELLA-FOUR PICTURES. THE THREE BEARS--FOUR PICTURES. /



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THIS LITTLE PIG WENT TO MARKET.



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XR is a Reaper, before whose keen blade Falls the ripe corn God's goodness has made. S is a Shrimper, who gleans from the sea The shrimps and the prawns that give zest to our tea. T is a Tinker, who, when holes are found, In old pots or kettles, will soon make them sound. V is a Verger, courteous and grave, Who points out the tombs of the pious and brave.



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Jack went up to the great gate of the house, and there saw the Giant's wife, of whom he begged a little food and a night's lodging. The woman told him that she dared not let him in, for her husband ate human flesh, and had already killed two or three travellers;. but Jack begged so hard that at last she took him in, fed him, and hid him in the oven. When the Giant came home he roared out, "Wife, I smell fresh meat;" but the woman said it was only a cat that had caught a bird. After supper the Giant called for his hen, and Jack peeping out of the oven saw that whenever her master said, lay," the hen laid a golden egg. Presently, when the Giant fell asleep and shook the room with his snoring, Jack came out softly, and escaped with the hen. His mother was delighted to see him; but Jack was impatient to be up the beanstalk again; and the second time, after a great deal of trouble, he persuaded the Giant's wife (who had forgotten him) to hide him in a closet. After supper, the Giant amused himself with counting two great bags of money; and Jack contrived to take these away, although a little dog barked so loudly that he was afraid the Giant would awake. On his third visit Jack, who was disguised, hid in the copper, and saw the Giant's fairy harp, which would play by itself. It played the Giant to sleep, and Jack ran off with it; but not before the Giant was after him. Before he was half down the bean-stalk Jack was at the bottom, and cutting the roots with a hatchet let the Giant to the ground, where he was killed with the fall.



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&ZIHTNBRS



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AV -O EL.0G ITQN



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He thought he would a-muse him-self with his bro-ther's toys: so he took down his bro-ther's fine large kite, and big drum, and splen-did horse with the black and white spots on its back. But he soon got ti-red of mere-ly play-ing with them, and then his ha-bits of mis-chief be-gan to show them-selves. He for-ced the drum-sticks through the parch-ment of the big drum, tore off the flow-ing tail of the large kite, and broke one of the hind legs of the spot-ted horse, after which he pull-ed off its head from its bo-dy. This ve-ry naugh-ty pig af-ter this went to the cup-board, and find-ing out his mo-ther's jam-pots, half emp-ti-ed most of them. He did not e-ven wait to look for a spoon, but for-cing his paws in-to the jam, ate it in that way. E-ven this was not e-nough mis-chief for him. Ta-king the po-ker, he made it red-hot, and with it burnt more than ten great holes in the hearth-rug, and al-so burnt holes in his mother's fine new car-pet. When Mrs. Pig came home from the mil-ler's with the flour, she sat down by the fire, and be-ing ve-ry ti-red, she soon fell a-sleep. No soon-er had she done so, than this bad lit-tle pig, get-ting a long hand-ker-chief, ti-ed her in her chair. But it was not ve-ry long be-fore she a-woke. Ve-ry quick-ly she found out all the mis-chief that this lit-tle pig had been do-ing. 5



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LEIGHTON, BROS. i: :





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voice shout-ing out, and soon af-ter he saw the dread-ful Far-mer Grum-pey, with his hea-vy whip in his hand, on a hill ve-ry near him. So he jump-ed up, caught the great fish in his arms, and ran off as fast as he could. Far-mer Grum-pey ran too, crack-ing his whip, and shout-ing out, fol-low-ed by one of his men. Pig-gy found that they were o-vertak-ing him, so he drop-ped his fish and ran fast-er. But it was no use, poor Pig-gy was caught by the strong and rough far-mer, who said he would cut his back for fish-ing in his grounds with-out his con-sent. So he laid his strong whip o-ver Pig-gy's back for some time, af-ter which this poor Pig-gy ran off, cry-ing out in great pain, "Wee! Wee!! Wee!!!" all the way home. 12



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LITTLE BO PEEP. T H I S is Little Bo Peep, who lost her sheep, And couldn't tell where to find them; Till she sat herself down and went to sleep, A great deal too tired to mind them. While little Bo Peep was fast asleep, She dreamed that she heard a bleating; But when she jumped up those naughty sheep, Were all of them still retreating. So little Bo Peep ran after her sheep, But, alas! she couldn't find them; Till they'd all through a thorn bush tried to leap, And left their tails behind them.



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LITTLE BOY BLUE. LITTLE Boy Blue, Come, blow up your horn, The sheep's in the meadow, The cow's in the corn; Where's the little boy That looks after the sheep? He's under the haycock, fast asleep. Will you wake him? No, not I; For if I do, he'll be sure to cry.



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W a Washerwoman, always is seen At her tub, hard at work, rubbing dirty things clean. X stands for excellent, when on barrels of beer, So the more x's the better the cheer. Y is a Yeoman, whose fields are well till'd, His men are well housed and his barns are well fill'd. Z stands for Zoologist, also for Zany; So please take your choice, that's if you have any.



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X77 7i d-rRAW 77,P



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ALPHABET OF TRADES.



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N is a Newsboy, who plies well his calling, And "Latest Edition" always is bawling. O an Organ-man, plays tunes grave and gay, Content for his pains with very small pay. P is a Postman, whose rat-tat so smart Causes sorrow and joy in many a heart. Q a Quarryman, splits up a mass Of marble or granite as though it were glass. i



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THE THREE BEARS. T HERE was once a little girl who was called Silverlocks JI because her hair was so bright and shiny, and though she was a pretty child, she was always in mischief and meddling with what did not belong to her; till the neighbours said she was more trouble than she was worth. One day she went into a wood a long way from home and saw a little cottage with the door left open. In she went directly, hoping to be able to play some pranks there. Now the cottage belonged to two Bears, named Mr. and Mrs. Bruin, and to their little Bear whose name was Tiny, and they had all three gone for a walk leaving some soup on the table to cool. As soon as Silverlocks smelt the soup, she took the little pipkin that had been placed for Tiny, and being hungry very soon emptied it; then she sat down on a nice little chair and began to rock backwards and forwards till she broke it; and at last went upstairs and lay down on a soft little white bed that she found there. She was fast asleep when the Bears came home, and did not hear them growling and crying, Who has been at my soup ? Who has sat on my chair?" It was only when the Tiny Bear was just going to spring on to the bed, that she woke and managed to jump out of window. She' had a sad tumble, but she was quite cured of meddling.





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THE BRAVE TAILORS. FOUR and Twenty Tailors Went to kill a snail, The best man among them Durst not touch her tail; She put out her horns Like a little Kyloe cow: Run, Tailors, run, or She'll kill you all e'en now.



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471 4Vjo T7\ I AIN& \LEIGHTON, Biw.



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JACK HORNER'S STORIES. W HEN little Jack Horner, who sat in the corner, Had eaten his Christmas pie, He looked up and said, "Before I go to bed, A story to tell you I'll try, About Jack and Jill, who, their bucket to fill, Went up the steep path to the well, Till Jack tumbled down and almost cracked his crown, While Jill quickly after him fell. Then there's a nice story about Jack-a-nory, Who met with the old Goosey Gander; As well as another about Jack's own brother, Who couldn't tell which way to wander; Or about the old woman, who lived in a shoe, And had forty children-so what could she do But give them some gruel without any bread, With a nice rod in pickle, to whip them to bed?