Old nurse's book of rhymes, jingles, and ditties

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Material Information

Title:
Old nurse's book of rhymes, jingles, and ditties
Series Title:
Mother Goose's melodies
Physical Description:
31 p. : col. ill. ; 17 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Bennett, Charles H ( Charles Henry ), 1829-1867 ( Illustrator )
Porter & Coates ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Porter & Coates
Place of Publication:
Philadelphia
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1872   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1872   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1872   ( local )
Genre:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
as written by Mother Goose ; with thirty original designs, by Charles H. Bennett.
General Note:
Date from inscription.
General Note:
Illustrations are hand-colored.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002250859
notis - ALK2617
oclc - 59007001
System ID:
UF00026603:00001

Full Text
This page contains no text.


The Baldwin Libry"0" 1


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THE CHEAPEST EDITION OF MOTHER GOOSE'S XELODIES.RHYMES, JINGLES, AND DITTIES,AS WRITT BYMOT^ QoossE.w rttb lrtg eistgaul bignfs, be 6badles I* onnmt.PHILADELPHIA:PORTER & COATES.


A LONG-tailed pig, or rhr pig,Or a pig without a tail;A young pig, or an old pig,Or a pig with a curly tail.A BBACE,Daffagee, LL of a row,Kellamenoppekew, C Bend the bow,Rustyvee, Shot at a pigeon,Doubleyou, And killed a crow.X, Y, Z.A B, 0, and D, pray, playmates, agree.E, F, and G, well so it shall be.J, K, and L, in peace we will dwell.M, N, and 0, to play let us go.P, Q, and S, love may we poses.W, X, and Y, will not quarrel or die.Z, and ampherse-and, go to school at command., ------ ------


B ELL horses, bell horses, what time of day?One o'clock, two o'olook, off and away.B ARBER, barber, shavea pig;How many hairs will makea wig?"Four and twenty; that'senough."Give the poor barber apinch of snuff."B LOW, wind, blow and go, mill, golThat the miller may grind his corn;That the baker may take it,And into rolls make it,And send us some hot in the morn.5


SATI, bah, black sheep, have yo,- any wool?SYes, marry have I, three bags full:One for my master, and one for my dame,But none for the little boy who cries in the lane.' TRROW, brow, brinkie;"e Eye, eye, winkie; "YE, baby, bunting,"Nose, nose, nopper; L Daddy's gone a hunting,Mouth, mouth, merry; To get a little rabbit skinCheek, cheek, cherry; To wrap his baby bunting in.Chin, chin, chopper


SING, dong bell,SPussy's in the well IWho put her in ?Little Tommy Greea.Who pul'd her out?Little Johnny Stout.What a naughty boy was that,To try and drown poor pussy cat,Who never did him any harm,But kilP'd the mice in his father's bamrn"f"OME, let's to bed,"I says Sleepy-head."Tarry a while," saysSlow."Put on the pot," saysGreedy-gut,d"We'll sup before wego?E LIZABETH, Lizzy, and Betsy and Bess,They all went together t6 seek a bird's nest.They found a bird's nest with five eggs in.They all took one and left four in.


EEDLE, deedle, dumpling, my son JohnWent to bed with his stockings Mn;One shoe off, the other aboo on,Deedle, deedle, dumplig, my Son John.F FOR fig, J for jig,I IDDLETY, diddlety, dumpty,SThe cat ran up the plum tree;Half a-crown, to fetch her down,~~%~;E ~"iZ S


"H EY diddle diddle, TIOKORY, diccory, dock,The cat and the fiddle, IL The mouse ran up theThe cow jump'd over the moon; clock,The little dog laugh'd The clock struck one,To see such sport, And down the mouse run,While the dish ran after the Hickory, diocory, dook.spoon.H ARK, hark,The dogs do bark,The beggars are coming to town;Some in rags, and some in jag,And some in velvet gowns.


H UMPTY Dumpty, sat on' a wall;Not all the king's hora or all the king's men,shall I sing? And here we go down,How many holes in a skimmer? down, downy;Four and twenty-my stomach's /ere we go backwards and for-empty; wards,:Pray, Mamma, give me some And here we go round, round,dinner. roundy.:r *~nd0 a *~ : """"'""" **-**"" -'*- *..' -'*


FOUR and twenty tailors went to kill a snail,SThe best man among them durst not touch her tail.She put out her horns, like a little Kyloe cow;Run, tailors, run, or shell kill you all just now.TACK and Jill went -p the hill,To fetch a pail of water;SJack fell down and broke his crown,And Jill came tumbling after.LITTLE Te Wee, ITTLE Mary Ester,He went to sea, Sat upon a tester,In an operi boat; Eating curds and whey;And while afoat There came a large spider,The little boat bended, And sat down beside her,SAnd my story's ended. And frighten'd poor Mary away.11


SUSH-A-BYE, baby, on the tree top,When the wind blows the cradle will rock;When the bough breaks, the cradle will fall,Down comes hush-a-bye, baby, and all.JACK SPRAT could eat no fat,SHiswife could eat no lean;And so betwixt them both,They lick'd the platter clean.I'LL tell you a story, T ITTLE boy blue, comeSAbout Jack a Nory blow up your horn,And now my story's begun: The sheep's in the meadow, theI'll tell you another, cow's in the corn.About Jack and his brother, Where is the little boy mind-And now my story is done. ing the sheepUnder the haycock, fast asleep.1 l


M ARY, Mary, quite contrary,How does your garden grow ?"With silver bells and cockle-shells,And pretty maids all of a row.LITTLE Robin Red-breast sat upon a tree,Up went Pussy-cat, and down went he;Down came Pussy-cat, and away Robin ran;Says little Robin Red-breast, " Cath me if you can."Little Robin Red-breast jumped upon a spade,Pussy-cat jumped after him, and made him afraid;Little Robin chirp'd and sung, and what did Pussy say?Pussy-cat said "Mew, mew, mew," and Robin flew away.18


(NE-ERY, two-ery, ziccaryLITTLE Jack Horner sat in 0 zan;te Hollow bone, crack a bone,the corner, ninery ten*Eating a Christmas pie: i it must b doneHe put in his thumb and pll'd t, it be doneout a plum, tWAndsaid "What a goodboy O, UT, on tam 1 U, T, spl outSUsed by children to decide whois to begin a game.]-ONE misty, loisty morning,When cloudy was the weather,I anced to et an old man cloted all m leather,He began to compliment, and I began to grin,How do you do? and how do you do?And how do you do again ?14


P ETER PIPER picke4 a peck of pepperS A peck of pepper Peter Pipei picked.If Peter Piper picked a peck of pepper,Where's the peck of pepper Peter Piper picked?DPAT-A-CAKE, pat-a-1.cake, baker's man;So I will, master, as fast asI can;Pat it, and prick it, andmark it with B,Put it in the oven for Babyand me.TITTY Patty Polt,L Shoe the wild colt,Here a nail,And there a nail,I frighten'd a little mouse under the chair.


IDE, ba*y, ride IPretty baby shall ride,And have a little puppy-dog tied to her side,And a little pussycat tied to the other,And away she shall ride to see her grandmother,To see her grandmother,To see her grandmother.S UIXOTE QUICKSIGHT quiz'd a queerish quidbox.If Quixote Qu ight quiz'd a queeris uidbWhere's the qeerish quidbox Quixote Quickght quiz'd?


"D OBIN and Richard were two pretty men;" They lay in bed tillthe clock struck ten;Then up starts Robin and looks at the sky,0, brother Richard the sun's very high.You go first with bottle and bag,And I11 come after on little Jack Nag;You go first and open the gate,And I'll come after and break your pate.S UB a dub dub,J Three men-in a tub.;The butcher, the baker,The candlestick-maker;All jumped out of a rotten potato.T HREE wise men of GothamW ent to sea in a bowl,If the bowl had been stronger,My song had been longer.AIN, rain,Go away,Come againAnother day;Little JohnnyWants to play.17


P IDE a cock-horse to Ban-bury Cross,To see an old wo-man ride on awhite horse;With rings on herfingers, and bellson her toes,She shall have mu-sic wherever shegoes."0NE, two, buckle my shoc; Fifteen, sixteen, maids in theEhree, four, shut the door; kitchen;Five, six, pick up sticks; Seventeen, eighteen, maids aSeven, eight, lay them straight; waiting;Nine, ten, a good f hen; Nineteen, twenty, iy stomach'sleven, twee, who will delve? empty,Thirteen, fourteen, maids a Please, mamma, give me somecourti g; dinner.18


THERE was a crooked man, and he went a crooked mile;He found a crooked sixpence against a crooked stilo;He bought a crooked cat, which caught a crooked mouse,And they all lived together in a little crooked house.EE saw, Margery Daw, One foot up, the other foot down,K. Johnny shall have a new That is the way to London town.master;fHe shall have but a penny aday,dayHE man in the moon,Because he can't work any .HE man idn the moon,faster. Came dw too soon,______ And ask'd his way to Norwich;E, saw, sacradown, He went by the south,Which i* the way to Lon. And burnt his mouth,don town? With eating cold pease-porridge.19


NAIL, snail, come out of your hole,Or else I will beat you as black as a coal.ING a song of sixpence, The king was in his countingA pocket full of rye; house,Four and twenty blackbirds Counting out hisInoney;Baked in a pie; The queen was in the parlor,"Eating bread and honey.When the pie was open'd,he birds began tosing; The maid was in the garden,as not that a dainty dish, Hanging out ,the clothes;To set befre the king? Down came a blackbird,Q And pecked off her nose.S20


TAFFY was a Welchman, Taffy was a thief;.Taffy came to my house, and stole a piece of beef:I went to Taffy's house, Taffy was not at home;Taffy came to my house, and stole a marrow-bone:I went to Taffy's house, Taffy was in bd,I took the marrow-bone, and beat about his head.T HE lion and the-- unicornWere fighting forthe crown;Sme gave themwhite bread,And some gavethem brown;Some gave themplum-cake,And sent them outof the town.THE north wind doth'blow, Ile'll sit in a barn,And we shall have snow, To keep himself warm,And what will poor Robin do And hide his head under histhenI wing,Poor thing! Poor thing21


T HERE was an old woman called Nothing-at-all,SWho rejoiced in a dwelling exceedingly small: -A man stretched his mouth to its utmost extent,And down at one gulp house and old woman went.-1rT ERE was an old woman who lived in a shoe,JL She had so many children she didn't know what to do;She gave them some broth without any bread,She whipp'd them all soundly, and sent them to bed.22


THERE was an old woman, and what do you think.She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink:Victuals and drink were the chief of her diet;This plaguy old woman could never be quiet.She went to the baker to buy her some bread,And when she came home her old husband was dead;She went to the clerk to toll the bell,"And when she came back her old husband was well.[A Song set to fingers and toes.]ST HIS g went to market;2. This pig staid at home8. This pig had plenty to eat,4. But this pig had none;5. And this little pig said, Wee,wee, wee!All the way home.AL. 91% r ,"


ING, sing, what shall I sing? THERE was an old womanPuss has stolen the pud- Lived under a hill;ding-string! I nd if she's not gone,Do, do. what shall I do? Sh lives there still.Puss has bit it quite in two IHERE was a fatman of Bombay,Who was smoking onesunshiny day,When a bird, called a"| snipe,Flew away with his-a pipe,/ Which vex'd the fatman of Bombay.THE man in the wilderness ask'd of me,How man strawberries grew in the sea?I answer'd him, as I thought good,As many red herrings as grew in the wood.24


SHEE were two birds sat on a stone,Fa, ]a, la, la, lal, de;One flew away, and then there was one,Fa, la, la, l al, de;The other flew after, and then tr was none,Fa, la, la, la, lal, de;And so the poor stone was left all alone,SW legs satupon threelegs,With one leg inhi lap;comes fourAnd runs awaywith one leg;Up jumps twolegs,Catches up threeThrows it afterbring backone legTCried gobble, gobble, gobble:The man on the hill, that couldn't stand stillWent hobble, hobble, hobble.S25


TrOM, Tom, the piper's son,1 Stole a pig and away he runThe pig was eat, and Tom was beat,And Tom went roaring down the street.THREE blind mice, see howSthey run Ithey run HERE was an old man,They all ran after the farmer's IAnd he had a calf,. And he had a calf,wife, And that's half;Who cut off their tails with acarving knife: He took him out of the stall,carving knife:carin knifAnd put him on the wall,Did you ever see such fools int h n th allyour life? And that's alLyour life?Three blind mice.HIRTY days hath September,April, June, and November:February has twenty-eight alone,All the rest have thirty-one,Excepting leap-year, that's the timeWhen February's days are twenty-nine.26


CROSS patch, draw the latch, 0OCK a doodle doo ISit by the fire and spin; C. My dame has lost her shoe;Take a cup, and drink it up, My master's lost his fiddle stick,Then call your neighbors in. And don't know what to do.THE sow came in with the saddle;The little pig rock'd the cradle;The dish jump'd up on the table,To see the pot swallow the ladle.The spit that stood behind the door,Threw the pudding-stick on the floor.Oh! said the gridiron, can't you agree?I'm the head constable, bring them to me.27


TO market, to market, to buy a fat pig,Home again, home again, dancing a jig;Ride to the market to buy a fat hog,Home again, hpme again, jiggety-jog;To market, to market, to buy a penny bun,Home again, home again, market is done.T IELL tale, tiYour tonshall be slit,And all the dogsin the townShall have a littlebit.TWO little dicky birds sat upon a hill,L One nam'd Jack, the other nam'd Jill;Fly away Jack I fly away, Jill!Come again, Jack I come again, Jill28


T HERE was a man, and his name was Dob,SAnd he had a wife, and her name was Mob,And he had a dog, and he called it Cob,And she had a cat, called Chitterabob.Cob, says Dob,Chitterabob, says Mob.Cob was Dob's dog,Chitterabob Mob's oat.IU P she goes and down she comes,S V If you haven't got apples, I'll give you some plums.TPON my wordand honor,As I was going toBonner,I met a pigWithout a wig,Upon. my word andhonor.'1JINEGAR, veal, and venison,V Are very good victuals, I vow.29


W HEN I wa6 a bachelor, I lived all by myself,And'all the bread and cheese I got I put upon the shelfThe rats and the mice they made such a strife,I was forced to go to London to buy me a wife.The roads were so bad, and the lanes were so narrow,I was forced to bring my wife home in a wheel-barrow.The wheel-barrow broke, and my wife had a fall,Down came wheel-barrow, wife, and all.Y OU shall have an apple,You shall have a plum, AYou shall have a rattle-basket,When your dad comes home.80


X shall stand for playmates Ten;V for Five stout stalwart men;I for but One, as I'm alive;C for one Hundred, and D for Five;M for a Thousand soldiers true;And all these figures Ive told to you."W HAT shoe-maker makes shoes without leatherWith all the four elements put together?Fire and water, earth and air;Ev'ry customer has two pair.[A orse-shoe-er.]W ASH, hands, wash,Daddy's gone toplough,If you want your handswash'd,Have them wash'd now."WTASH on Friday,Wash in need;Wash on Saturday,Slut indeed.. ANY, Zany, ZaddleL pate,Go to bed early andget uplate.THE END.


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The Baldwin Libry "0" 1



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TAFFY was a Welchman, Taffy was a thief; .Taffy came to my house, and stole a piece of beef: I went to Taffy's house, Taffy was not at home; Taffy came to my house, and stole a marrow-bone: I went to Taffy's house, Taffy was in bd, I took the marrow-bone, and beat about his head. T HE lion and the -unicorn Were fighting for the crown; Sme gave them white bread, And some gave them brown; Some gave them plum-cake, And sent them out of the town. THE north wind doth'blow, Ile'll sit in a barn, And we shall have snow, To keep himself warm, And what will poor Robin do And hide his head under his thenI wing, Poor thing! Poor thing 21



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T HERE was an old woman called Nothing-at-all, SWho rejoiced in a dwelling exceedingly small: A man stretched his mouth to its utmost extent, And down at one gulp house and old woman went. -1 rT ERE was an old woman who lived in a shoe, JL She had so many children she didn't know what to do; She gave them some broth without any bread, She whipp'd them all soundly, and sent them to bed. 22



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THERE was a crooked man, and he went a crooked mile; He found a crooked sixpence against a crooked stilo; He bought a crooked cat, which caught a crooked mouse, And they all lived together in a little crooked house. EE saw, Margery Daw, One foot up, the other foot down, K. Johnny shall have a new That is the way to London town. master; fHe shall have but a penny a day, dayHE man in the moon, Because he can't work any .HE man idn the moon, faster. Came dw too soon, ______ And ask'd his way to Norwich; E, saw, sacradown, He went by the south, Which i* the way to Lon. And burnt his mouth, don town? With eating cold pease-porridge. 19



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ING, sing, what shall I sing? THERE was an old woman Puss has stolen the pudLived under a hill; ding-string! I nd if she's not gone, Do, do. what shall I do? Sh lives there still. Puss has bit it quite in two I HERE was a fat man of Bombay, Who was smoking one sunshiny day, When a bird, called a "| snipe, Flew away with his -a pipe, / Which vex'd the fat man of Bombay. THE man in the wilderness ask'd of me, How man strawberries grew in the sea? I answer'd him, as I thought good, As many red herrings as grew in the wood. 24



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SUSH-A-BYE, baby, on the tree top, When the wind blows the cradle will rock; When the bough breaks, the cradle will fall, Down comes hush-a-bye, baby, and all. JACK SPRAT could eat no fat, SHiswife could eat no lean; And so betwixt them both, They lick'd the platter clean. I'LL tell you a story, T ITTLE boy blue, come SAbout Jack a Nory blow up your horn, And now my story's begun: The sheep's in the meadow, the I'll tell you another, cow's in the corn. About Jack and his brother, Where is the little boy mindAnd now my story is done. ing the sheep Under the haycock, fast asleep .1 l



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EEDLE, deedle, dumpling, my son John Went to bed with his stockings Mn; One shoe off, the other aboo on, Deedle, deedle, dumplig, my Son John. F FOR fig, J for jig, I IDDLETY, diddlety, dumpty, SThe cat ran up the plum tree; Half a-crown, to fetch her down, ~~%~;E ~"iZ S



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P IDE a cockhorse to Banbury Cross, To see an old woman ride on a white horse; With rings on her fingers, and bells on her toes, She shall have music wherever she goes. "0NE, two, buckle my shoc; Fifteen, sixteen, maids in the Ehree, four, shut the door; kitchen; Five, six, pick up sticks; Seventeen, eighteen, maids a Seven, eight, lay them straight; waiting; Nine, ten, a good f hen; Nineteen, twenty, iy stomach's leven, twee, who will delve? empty, Thirteen, fourteen, maids a Please, mamma, give me some courti g; dinner. 18



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SHEE were two birds sat on a stone, Fa, ]a, la, la, lal, de; One flew away, and then there was one, Fa, la, la, l al, de; The other flew after, and then tr was none, Fa, la, la, la, lal, de; And so the poor stone was left all alone, SW legs sat upon three legs, With one leg in hi lap; comes four And runs away with one leg; Up jumps two legs, Catches up three Throws it after bring back one leg TCried gobble, gobble, gobble: The man on the hill, that couldn't stand still Went hobble, hobble, hobble. S25



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(NE-ERY, two-ery, ziccary LITTLE Jack Horner sat in 0 zan; te Hollow bone, crack a bone, the corner, ninery ten* Eating a Christmas pie: i it must b done He put in his thumb and pll'd t, it be done out a plum, tW Andsaid "What a goodboy O, UT, on t am 1 U, T, spl out SUsed by children to decide who is to begin a game.] -ONE misty, loisty morning, When cloudy was the weather, I anced to et an old man cloted all m leather, He began to compliment, and I began to grin, How do you do? and how do you do? And how do you do again ? 14



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SING, dong bell, SPussy's in the well I Who put her in ? Little Tommy Greea. Who pul'd her out? Little Johnny Stout. What a naughty boy was that, To try and drown poor pussy cat, Who never did him any harm, But kilP'd the mice in his father's bamrn "f"OME, let's to bed," I says Sleepy-head. "Tarry a while," says Slow. "Put on the pot," says Greedy-gut,d "We'll sup before we go? E LIZABETH, Lizzy, and Betsy and Bess, They all went together t6 seek a bird's nest. They found a bird's nest with five eggs in. They all took one and left four in.



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"H EY diddle diddle, TIOKORY, diccory, dock, The cat and the fiddle, IL The mouse ran up the The cow jump'd over the moon; clock, The little dog laugh'd The clock struck one, To see such sport, And down the mouse run, While the dish ran after the Hickory, diocory, dook. spoon. H ARK, hark, The dogs do bark, The beggars are coming to town; Some in rags, and some in jag, And some in velvet gowns.



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H UMPTY Dumpty, sat on' a wall; Not all the king's hora or all the king's men, shall I sing? And here we go down, How many holes in a skimmer? down, downy; Four and twenty-my stomach's /ere we go backwards and forempty; wards,: Pray, Mamma, give me some And here we go round, round, dinner. roundy. :r .*~nd0 a *~ : """"'""" **-**"" -'**..' -'*



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TrOM, Tom, the piper's son, 1 Stole a pig and away he run The pig was eat, and Tom was beat, And Tom went roaring down the street. THREE blind mice, see how Sthey run I they run HERE was an old man, They all ran after the farmer's IAnd he had a calf, .„ And he had a calf, wife, And that's half; Who cut off their tails with a carving knife: He took him out of the stall, carving knife: carin knifAnd put him on the wall, Did you ever see such fools int h n th all your life? And that's alL your life? Three blind mice. HIRTY days hath September, April, June, and November: February has twenty-eight alone, All the rest have thirty-one, Excepting leap-year, that's the time When February's days are twenty-nine. 26



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THERE was an old woman, and what do you think. She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink: Victuals and drink were the chief of her diet; This plaguy old woman could never be quiet. She went to the baker to buy her some bread, And when she came home her old husband was dead; She went to the clerk to toll the bell, "And when she came back her old husband was well. [A Song set to fingers and toes.] ST HIS g went to market; 2. This pig staid at home 8. This pig had plenty to eat, 4. But this pig had none; 5. And this little pig said, Wee, wee, wee! All the way home. AL. 91% r ,"



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W HEN I wa6 a bachelor, I lived all by myself, And'all the bread and cheese I got I put upon the shelf The rats and the mice they made such a strife, I was forced to go to London to buy me a wife. The roads were so bad, and the lanes were so narrow, I was forced to bring my wife home in a wheel-barrow. The wheel-barrow broke, and my wife had a fall, Down came wheel-barrow, wife, and all. Y OU shall have an apple, You shall have a plum, A You shall have a rattle-basket, When your dad comes home. 80



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NAIL, snail, come out of your hole, Or else I will beat you as black as a coal. ING a song of sixpence, The king was in his counting A pocket full of rye; house, Four and twenty blackbirds Counting out hisInoney; Baked in a pie; The queen was in the parlor, "Eating bread and honey. When the pie was open'd, he birds began tosing; The maid was in the garden, as not that a dainty dish, Hanging out ,the clothes; To set befre the king? Down came a blackbird, Q And pecked off her nose. S20



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SATI, bah, black sheep, have yo,any wool? SYes, marry have I, three bags full: One for my master, and one for my dame, But none for the little boy who cries in the lane. TRROW, brow, brinkie; "e Eye, eye, winkie; "YE, baby, bunting, "Nose, nose, nopper; L Daddy's gone a hunting, Mouth, mouth, merry; To get a little rabbit skin Cheek, cheek, cherry; To wrap his baby bunting in. Chin, chin, chopper



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A LONG-tailed pig, or rhr pig, Or a pig without a tail; A young pig, or an old pig, Or a pig with a curly tail. A BBACE, Daffagee, LL of a row, Kellamenoppekew, C Bend the bow, Rustyvee, Shot at a pigeon, Doubleyou, And killed a crow. X, Y, Z. A B, 0, and D, pray, playmates, agree. E, F, and G, well so it shall be. J, K, and L, in peace we will dwell. M, N, and 0, to play let us go. P, Q, and S, love may we poses. W, X, and Y, will not quarrel or die. Z, and ampherse-and, go to school at command. -----.------



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X shall stand for playmates Ten; V for Five stout stalwart men; I for but One, as I'm alive; C for one Hundred, and D for Five; M for a Thousand soldiers true; And all these figures Ive told to you. "W HAT shoe-maker makes shoes without leather With all the four elements put together? Fire and water, earth and air; Ev'ry customer has two pair. [A orse-shoe-er.] W ASH, hands, wash, Daddy's gone to plough, If you want your hands wash'd, Have them wash'd now. "WTASH on Friday, Wash in need; Wash on Saturday, Slut indeed. .ANY, Zany, Zaddle L pate, Go to bed early andget up late. THE END.



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P ETER PIPER picke4 a peck of pepper S A peck of pepper Peter Pipei picked. If Peter Piper picked a peck of pepper, Where's the peck of pepper Peter Piper picked? DPAT-A-CAKE, pat-a1.cake, baker's man; So I will, master, as fast as I can; Pat it, and prick it, and mark it with B, Put it in the oven for Baby and me. TITTY Patty Polt, L Shoe the wild colt, Here a nail, And there a nail, I frighten'd a little mouse under the chair.



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IDE, ba*y, ride I Pretty baby shall ride, And have a little puppy-dog tied to her side, And a little pussycat tied to the other, And away she shall ride to see her grandmother, To see her grandmother, To see her grandmother. S UIXOTE QUICKSIGHT quiz'd a queerish quidbox. If Quixote Qu ight quiz'd a queeris uidb Where's the qeerish quidbox Quixote Quickght quiz'd?





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T HERE was a man, and his name was Dob, SAnd he had a wife, and her name was Mob, And he had a dog, and he called it Cob, And she had a cat, called Chitterabob. Cob, says Dob, Chitterabob, says Mob. Cob was Dob's dog, Chitterabob Mob's oat. IU P she goes and down she comes, S V If you haven't got apples, I'll give you some plums. TPON my word and honor, As I was going to Bonner, I met a pig Without a wig, Upon. my word and honor. '1JINEGAR, veal, and venison, V Are very good victuals, I vow. 29



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FOUR and twenty tailors went to kill a snail, SThe best man among them durst not touch her tail. She put out her horns, like a little Kyloe cow; Run, tailors, run, or shell kill you all just now. TACK and Jill went -p the hill, To fetch a pail of water; SJack fell down and broke his crown, And Jill came tumbling after. LITTLE Te Wee, ITTLE Mary Ester, He went to sea, -Sat upon a tester, In an operi boat; Eating curds and whey; And while afoat There came a large spider, The little boat bended, And sat down beside her, SAnd my story's ended. And frighten'd poor Mary away. 11



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"D OBIN and Richard were two pretty men; They lay in bed tillthe clock struck ten; Then up starts Robin and looks at the sky, 0, brother Richard the sun's very high. You go first with bottle and bag, And I11 come after on little Jack Nag; You go first and open the gate, And I'll come after and break your pate. S UB a dub dub, J Three men-in a tub.; The butcher, the baker, The candlestick-maker; All jumped out of a rotten potato. T HREE wise men of Gotham W ent to sea in a bowl, If the bowl had been stronger, My song had been longer. AIN, rain, Go away, Come again Another day; Little Johnny Wants to play. 17



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TO market, to market, to buy a fat pig, Home again, home again, dancing a jig; Ride to the market to buy a fat hog, Home again, hpme again, jiggety-jog; To market, to market, to buy a penny bun, Home again, home again, market is done. T IELL tale, ti Your ton shall be slit, And all the dogs in the town Shall have a little bit. TWO little dicky birds sat upon a hill, L One nam'd Jack, the other nam'd Jill; Fly away Jack I fly away, Jill! Come again, Jack I come again, Jill 28



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B ELL horses, bell horses, what time of day? One o'clock, two o'olook, off and away. B ARBER, barber, shave a pig; How many hairs will make a wig? "Four and twenty; that's enough." Give the poor barber a pinch of snuff. "B LOW, wind, blow and go, mill, gol That the miller may grind his corn; That the baker may take it, And into rolls make it, And send us some hot in the morn. 5



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M ARY, Mary, quite contrary, How does your garden grow ? "With silver bells and cockle-shells, And pretty maids all of a row. LITTLE Robin Red-breast sat upon a tree, Up went Pussy-cat, and down went he; Down came Pussy-cat, and away Robin ran; Says little Robin Red-breast, Cath me if you can." Little Robin Red-breast jumped upon a spade, Pussy-cat jumped after him, and made him afraid; Little Robin chirp'd and sung, and what did Pussy say? Pussy-cat said "Mew, mew, mew," and Robin flew away. 18



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THE CHEAPEST EDITION OF MOTHER GOOSE'S XELODIES. RHYMES, JINGLES, AND DITTIES, AS WRITT BY MOT^ QoossE. w rttb lrtg eistgaul bignfs, be 6badles I* onnmt. PHILADELPHIA: PORTER & COATES.



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CROSS patch, draw the latch, 0OCK a doodle doo I Sit by the fire and spin; C. My dame has lost her shoe; Take a cup, and drink it up, My master's lost his fiddle stick, Then call your neighbors in. And don't know what to do. THE sow came in with the saddle; The little pig rock'd the cradle; The dish jump'd up on the table, To see the pot swallow the ladle. The spit that stood behind the door, Threw the pudding-stick on the floor. Oh! said the gridiron, can't you agree? I'm the head constable, bring them to me. 27