The pipits

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The pipits
Physical Description:
28 p., 15 leaves of plates : ill. ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
R. M
Maclehose, James ( Publisher )
Blackburn, Jemima, 1823-1909 ( Illustrator )
Hamilton, Adams, & Co ( Publisher )
Macmillan & Co ( Publisher )
Edmonston & Douglas ( Publisher )
W.H. Smith & Son ( Publisher )
Publisher:
James Maclehose
Hamilton, Adams & Co.
Macmillan & Co.
Edmonston & Douglas
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Glasgow
London
Cambridge
Edinburgh
Dublin W.H. Smith & Son
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Birds -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Pride and vanity -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Eggs -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Husband and wife -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Death -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1872   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1872
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Scotland -- Glasgow
England -- London
England -- Cambridge
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Ireland -- Dublin

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by the author of Caw! Caw! ; illustrated by JHB.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002222703
notis - ALG2949
oclc - 59007019
System ID:
UF00026601:00001

Full Text
EDIrvGLASGOWJAMVES MACLEHOSE PUBLISHER TO THE UJIVERSITY187 2iri Tct l KL e Nt TI dJEe I 4 aCP CT t vf i L1 L AW CAWFatGLASGOWFE ALJISPBLSI1I OT UE5U


The Baldwin LibraryFluids


THE PIPITS


PUBLISHED BYJAMES MACLEHOSE GLASGOWLondon Hamilion Adams CoCambridge Macmillan CoEdinburgk Edmonston DouglasDublin W H Smith SonWI D CCCLXXI 1


N AS AW CAW WGLASGOWJAMES MACLEHOSE PUBLISHER TO THE UNIVERSITY1872


THE PIPITSTHE summer sun was settingIn the golden western seasBehind the purple summitsOf the distant HebridesThe little birds had hushed their songsAnd everything was stillExcept the gentle babbleOf the lonely mountain rill


4 THE PIPITSWithin the bay the ocean bayAll tranquil and at restWith scarce a murmur on the sandOr a ripple on its breastBut out beyond the sheltering islesAlong the rocky shoreWhere oft before the winter galeAtlantic billows roarThe gentle swell was heavingWith an even ebb and flowAnd kiss d the rocks to make amendsFor many an angry blowTwo little Pipits in the fernHad made their little bedsAnd in a tuft of wither d grassHad hid their little heads


7rAnd in a tuft of witherid grassHad hid their l itte adTwAnd in a tuft of i witherd grassK Had hid ther little heads


THE PIPITSIn Mistress Pipit s busy brainGreat thoughts began to riseAs she laid her head beneath her wingAnd softly closed her eyesIf all the eggs were one large eggThat would a grand one beAnd oh how happy should I feelIf it were laid by meStill thinking as she fell asleepOf eggs both great and smallShe dreamed that she herself had laidThe largest egg of allShe saw it lying in her nestHerself a Pipit proudWith all the other birds aroundIn an admiring crowd


6 THE PIPITSAnd as she smoothed her plumageAt the early dawn of dayShe told her husband what an eggShe certainly would laySaid Mr Pipit wiselyIt surely will be bestBefore you think of laying eggsThat we should build our nestHigh in a tree then let it beFor really I must sayNo lower place is worthy ofThe egg which I shall layNo no replied her husband ThatWere much above our stationThe neighbours round would laugh at usOn such an elevation


4 fShe dreamed ttat she erself had laid JWith all the other birds aroundIn an admiring crowadSS demdta ie esl a ai SI


THE PIPITS 7Think what would be your feelingsUpon a stormy dayTo see the branches waving whereYour precious young ones layStill on the ground our nest we ll foundBut if you like it highWe ll try the top of yonder rockThat will be smooth and dryThe egg was laid when after allIt only proved to beLike any other Pipit s eggAh sad indeed was sheBut try again for better luckSaid Mr Pipit boldAnd I am sure you ll lay an eggOf magnitude untoldB


8 THE PIPITSSo Mrs P cheered up againIn hopes that she might layThe egg she dreamed of all the nightAnd thought of all the dayShe laid the second egg twas smallThe third and fourth the sameHer tears no longer could she stayIn torrents forth they camePoor Mr P was in despairAnd knew not what to doHis favourite song of Home sweet HomeShe would not listen toHe caught a large grasshopperWhich he wished her to consumeShe said it was a burdenAnd she left him in a fume


He caught a large GrasshopperWhich he wished her to consumeSie said it was a burdenAnd she left him in a fumei


Now Mr Pifii set to workSl iull 11 Now Mr Pipit set to workAnd wished to warm the eggsBut in the nest he vainly triedTo stow away his legsAnd he pushed out two little eggsO er rock and stones and grassAnd sadly then he shook his headAnd sighed and said AlasK


THE PIPITSNow Mr Pipit set to workAnd wished to warm the eggsBut in the nest he vainly triedTo stow away his legsAnd he pushed out two little eggsO er rocks and stones and grassAnd sadly then he shook his headAnd sighed and said AlasFor he had had a former wifeWho did her duty wellWhere was the present Mrs PHe really could not tellThere s nae luck aboot the hooseAt length he hopeless saidAnd went to hide in distant fieldsHis poor deserted head


io THE PIPITSHe left the rock and nest behindAnd in a sheltered daleAmong the blue forget me notsHe made his little wailThe idle Cuckoo leaves her workFor other birds to doShe lays her egg but cannot rearOr teach the young CuckooShe cares for nought but gaietyFor balls and visitingAnd seldom long at home is sheBut ever on the wingAs Mr Pipit left the eggsMadam Cuckoo came pastShe sought an unprotected nestAnd here it was at last


17Al NIntothewarmandwell uilt ouseWhic our good Pipits madeSke pofed down speedily and soonS A Cuckoo egg was laidSII 1


THE PIPIT SInto the warm and well built houseWhich our good Pipits madeShe popped down speedily and soonA Cuckoo egg was laidAnd then she travelled off againAnd left the Pipits nestAmusement was the thing she soughtAnd that she loved the bestTears won t warm eggs said Mr PAnd my poor nest is coldSo I will seek my grieving wifeAnd see if she s consoledNow Mrs Pipit all aloneFor food began to pineAnd wondered if her husband wouldWithout her go and dine


12 THE PIPIZSSo when she saw him seeking herHer heart began to meltShe went to meet him and expressedThe sorrow that she feltTogether they went home againWhen to their great surpriseThere lay the longed for dreamed of eggBefore their wondering eyesNow Mr P was very gladAnd hurried quick awayIn order that his wife might dineOn this most happy dayBut with excitement joined to hasteHe changed his favourite songAnd called it Worm sweet worm which madeThe sense of it all wrong


7 YxV 7Together they went home againWhen to their great surpriseThere lay the longed for dreamed of eggBefore their wondering eyes


THE PIPITS 13Nor knew he was mistakenAs he hastened on his wayTill he heard the mocking laughterOf the sea birds in the bayNow Mrs P got very tiredOf sitting all the dayBesides said she I want to hearWhat all the gossips sayI d like to show it to our friendsAnd feathered neighbours allIf no one knows I ve got it hereIt might as well be smallAnd so I think if you ll permitMy dearest Mr PWe ll have a little party itShall small and early be


14 THE PIPIISBut Mr P was not so sureOf this unusual thingTwas not the season the best birdsWere not yet on the wingHowever he allowed his wifeTo ask her friends to teaAnd afterwards I ll show them allMy handsome egg said sheNow all who had the time to comeAppeared at four o clockAnd when the last one had arrivedThey were a merry flockThe tea was good the talk was loudThere was a deal of mirthAnd of good things to eat and drinkThere was indeed no dearth


Oh How magnifcently largeExclaimed the little WrenHow did you lay it Mrs PDo tell me where and when7Tis speckled very strangely tooSaid spiteful Mrs OwlAnd as for size tis like the eggOf the domestic fowlUCl Mx


7HYE PIPITS 15And then her monstrous speckled eggGood Mrs P displayedAnd speeches complimenting herBy every one were madeOh How magnificently largeExclaimed the little WrenHow did you lay it Mrs PDo tell me where and whenTis speckled very strangely tooSaid spiteful Mrs OwlAnd as for size tis like the eggOf the domestic fowlBut no one listened to her wordsFor all were occupiedAnd Mrs Pipit s praisesResound on every sideC


16 THE PIPITSWhen all had said their say and goneAnd left our pair aloneThen Mr Pipit said aloudIn his most joyful toneOh dear How glad I am tis doneAnd with such credit tooTis time we had some tea ourselvesI m hungry are not youThe other birds were talking ofThe party where they d beenAnd all their different thoughts aboutThe egg which they had seenThe Wren said certainly twas largeIt took her by surpriseBut then I don t admire it forI don t think much of size


Oh blow the egg the Petrel saidAs he went of in hasteTo hoist the stormy signalFor the wind was rising fastThe herring boats are setting sailAnd putting out to seaIf any of them coni to grtefThey ll lay the blame on me


THE PIPITS 17Perhaps there s nothing in that eggThings that are large and roundAre very often empty tooAt least so I have foundThe Wren was fond of talkingShe d have chattered on all nightBut the great Owl said solemnlyI think eggs should be whiteOh blow the egg the Petrel saidAs he went off in hasteTo hoist the stormy signal forThe wind was rising fastThe herring boats are setting sailAnd putting out to seaIf any of them come to griefThey ll lay the blame on me


I8 THE PIPITSI rather think the Goldfinch saidStroking his brilliant wingIf you go in for fashionSpeckled eggs are quite the thingThe Wheat ear sported on the turfHe said he d bet a poundAs many white as speckled eggsWould in the world be foundThe Raven said I wish small birdsWould lay such eggs I knowI d like to pick a hole in itReplied the Hoodie CrowThe Gull who passed above the pairWas tickled at the wishAnd as he gaped to laugh aloudHe dropped his precious fish


r VThe Raven said I wish small birdsWould lay such eggs I knowI d like to pick a hole in itReplied the Hoodie crowj


THE PIPITS 19He tried to pick it up againAnd said it was not fairOf the Tern who saw it fallingTo catch it in the airThat egg is addled said the DuckIt s a very ugly eggAnd she waddled past the Heron whoWas standing on one legHe asked her why she thought soAnd looked uncommon wiseHe was always asking questionsOr wishing to adviseFor divers reasons she repliedAnd splashed into the seaThe Gull had lost his supper andAn angry bird was he


20 THE PIPITSAnd so he said the joke was oldHe d heard it long beforePerhaps for sundry causes sheWould come again to shoreAt last one day the egg was hatchedAnd what a monstrous birdPoor Mrs Pipit had to hearHer darling called absurdBut Never was so fine a childShe in reply would sayAnd as for appetite it couldJust sit and eat all dayAh that it can said Mr PWith such a weary sighFor ever since the dawn of dayHe d heard its hungry cry


7 I IBut Never was so fine a childShe in refily would sayAnd as for apfetite it couldS7ust sit and eat all day


THE PIPITS 21He brought it food from morn till eveUntil the setting sunImpressed on his exhausted mindHis daily task was doneBut Mrs Pipit still was proudOf her young beauty s sizeShe told her husband that they mustAgain display their prizeWe ll have a ball dear Mr PLike Mrs ButterflyShe gave it for her children s sakeAnd pray why should not IAh no my dear he sadly saidWe can t afford it nowJust look at me I m skin and boneYou really must allow


22 THE PIPITSYour precious infant eats so muchI scarce can find him foodIndeed I think you ll have to helpOh how I wish you wouldNext morning when his parentsHad both of them gone outYoung Cuckoo told his sisterHe d carry her aboutSo off they cantered round the nestUpon the narrow ledgeUntil the wicked Cuckoo castHis sister o er the edgeAnd then he turned himself aroundAnd said to little brotherYour sister was a silly thingYou are not such another


Come jump upon my back and IWill show you how to rideAnd then the naughty selfsk birdThrew kim too o er the sideSo at the bottom of the rockThese two poor Pipits layS Until the Robin Redbreasts cameAnd covered them next day77


THE PIPITS 23Come jump upon my back and IWill show you how to rideAnd then the naughty selfish birdThrew him too o er the sideSo at the bottom of the rockThese two poor Pipits layUntil the Robin Redbreasts cameAnd covered them next dayThe Cuckoo soon began to thinkHis parents rather slowHe saw the swallows flying southAnd longed with them to goHe heard them talk of foreign landsOf palaces and towersHow warm and bright the southern sunHow beautiful the flowersD


24 THE PIPITSThey told him charming storiesOf the countries where they d beenThe great Egyptian PyramidsAnd temples they had seenThe Pipits were so tired at nightWith bringing food all dayThey would not listen to his talkNor have a game at playHe saw the leaves were turning brownThe winds were getting chillIf I stay here much longerI shall certainly be illBut dearest Mother you to meHave been so very goodYou ve always kept me nice and warmAnd brought me lots of food


The Cuckoo soon began to thinkHis parents rather slowHe saw the swallows flying southSAnd longed with them to go7


When summer time came back againTo Holyrood came heThe wedding of Cock RobinAnd yenny Wren to seeThe bride was given away we knowBy Scotland s noble kingIn guerdon for that sweet yule songRobin came far to sing


THE PIPITS 25When I come back again next springIf I your nest can findMy wife shall leave her egg with youYou are so very kindThen Mrs Pipit sighed and sobbedSo sad a bird was sheAnd Heaven forbid that this should comeTo pass said Mr PWhen summer time came back againTo Holyrood came heThe wedding of Cock RobinAnd Jenny Wren to seeThe bride was given away we knowBy Scotland s noble kingIn guerdon for that sweet yule songRobin came far to sing


26 THE PIPITSThe young Cuckoo was fond of wineAnd drank a deal too muchAnd soon to little Jenny WrenHis impudence was suchThat our brave Sparrow s fury roseHe speedily gave ventTo sudden wrath and from his bowAn arrow swift he sentWhich like the shafts of which we hearIn verse we all have readFound mark the archer little meantAnd shot Cock Robin deadThe dirge was sung the bell was rungWith sighing and with sobbingSad that his ill timed jest had causedThe death of poor Cock Robin


The dirge was sung the bell was rungWith sighing and with sobbing j7f ICi rNThUc y flLi lC


THE PIPITS 27The Cuckoo swore an oath to goAnd live in the Black ForestAnd vowed to give advice to thoseThat needed it the sorestOff then he flew and built a hutIn a high belfry towerAnd chose it for his penanceTo record each passing hourSo every time the clock strikes oneOr two or three or fourHe just appears and sings a songFrom out his open doorA song of comfort to the sickThe weary and the sadOf warning to the idleThe careless and the bad


28 THE PIPITSHe gives advice to all alikeAnd praise and blame to someAnd tells each child that task or playOr dinner time is comeAnd even at the dead of nightWhen all may be asleepThe honest Cuckoo never failsOut of his door to peepPerhaps he preaches to the miceTo mend their evil waysPerhaps he tells them mournfullyHow very short their daysBut he repeats his sermon stillAlike by night and dayAnd any one can listenTo what he has to say


But he repeats his sermon stillAlike by night and dayAnd any one can listenTo what he has to sayIi


ftI sBJ kB5LK


Rexently Published in Imperial 4to Cloth Pri 1 1 6dS DBAW FBM N tATITBEBY MR1 HUGH BLACKBURNAlong with the Plates there is descriptive LetterpressThe Bi rd figured arn1 Heron s Nest 14 The Blackbird Pied Specimen 30 The Land Rail2 Soan Goose or Gannet 15 The Ring Ousel 31 The Common Snipe3 Solan Geese Fishing 16 The Hedge Sparrow 32 The Cuckoo4 ads of Ringed Guillemot Corn 17 The Whinchat 33 The Young CuckooMon Guillemot and Young 18 The Willow Warbler 34 Young flooded CrowRazorbill 19 The Golden Crested Wren 3 Crossbills5 The Comon Guillemot 20 The Blue Tit 36 The Yellow Ammer6 The Black Guillemot 21 he Mountain Finch or Brambling 7 The LongTailed Tit7 The Black Guillemot in Winter 22 The Common Heron 38 The Wood WarblerPluA iage 23 Gr1up of Herons 39 The Stone Chat8 The Black Guillemot Young and 24 Young null 40 The Redstartgg 25 Gull s Nest 41 The Redbreast9 The Sandpiper 26 Lesser Black backed Gull 42 The Tawny Owl10 The Fieldfare 27 Group of Seabirds 43 The Goshawk1j The Song Thrush 28 The Ringed Plover 44 Heads of Goshawk and Kestril12 Tbe Redwing 29 The Water RaiL 45 Young Kestrils13 The BlackbirdThese are amongst the most perfect and conscientiously executed works we have ever met with Mrs Blackburn has produced such a series as must mak Igd the eyes of every naturalist who sees them The AthewciumWe have seen no such birds since Bewick We say this not ignorant of the magnificent plates of SelbyAudubon Wilson and Gould The ScotsmanThere are two groups especially which you will never tire of lookng at a flock of gannets fishing for herringsin the blue sea off Ailsa Craig and a company of herons in Lochiel Cornhill lMagawineALSO BY MRS BLACKBUtRN J BQURTH THOUSANDIn 4to with 8ixtee r Page Engravings Price 2s 6dCAW CAWO THE CHRONICLE OF THE CROWSJust Published in Imperial 161mo PI ice 3s Illustrated with Wod cut sTE MAN IN THE MOON 00AND OTHER TALESJAMES MACLEHOSEPUBLISHER AND BOOKSELLER TO THE UNIVERSITY61 ST V N NT STREEcT GLASG OWT sU f B kt


Full Text

PAGE 1

The Baldwin Library Fluids



PAGE 1

THE PIPITS. 13 Nor knew he was mistaken, As he hastened on his way, Till he heard the mocking laughter Of the sea-birds in the bay. Now Mrs. P. got very tired Of sitting all the day; Besides," said she, I want to hear What all the gossips say; I'd like to show it to our friends And feathered neighbours all; If no one knows I've got it here, It might as well be small; And so I think, if you'll permit, My dearest Mr. P., We'll have a little party; it Shall small and early be."



PAGE 1

14 THE PIPIIS. But Mr. P. was not so sure Of this unusual thing, 'Twas not the season, the best birds Were not yet on the wing; However, he allowed his wife To ask her friends to tea; "And, afterwards, I'll show them all My handsome egg" said she. Now, all who had the time to come Appeared at four o'clock; And, when the last one had arrived, They were a merry flock; The tea was good, the talk was loud There was a deal of mirth, And of good things to eat and drink There was indeed no dearth.



PAGE 1

12 THE PIPIZS. So, when she saw him seeking her, Her heart began to melt, She went to meet him and expressed The sorrow that she felt. Together they went home again, When, to their great surprise, There lay the longed-for, dreamed-of egg Before their wondering eyes. Now Mr. P. was very glad, And hurried quick away, In order that his wife might dine On this most happy day; But, with excitement joined to haste, He changed his favourite song, And called it "Worm, sweet worm," which made, The sense of it all wrong:



PAGE 1

7HYE PIPITS. 15 And then her monstrous speckled egg Good Mrs. P. displayed; And speeches, complimenting her, By every one were made; "Oh! How magnificently large," Exclaimed the little Wren; How did you lay it Mrs. P. ? Do tell me where and when." "'Tis speckled very strangely too," Said spiteful Mrs. Owl; "And as for size! 'tis like the egg Of the domestic fowl." But no one listened to her words-For all were occupiedAnd Mrs. Pipit's praises Resound on every side. C



PAGE 1

8 THE PIPITS. So Mrs. P. cheered up again, In hopes that she might lay The egg she dreamed of all the night And thought of all the day. She laid the second egg-'twas smallThe third and fourth the same; Her tears no longer could she stay, In torrents forth they came. Poor Mr. P. was in despair, And knew not what to do; His favourite song of "Home, sweet Home," She would not listen to; He caught a large grasshopper, Which he wished her to consume; She said it was a burden, And she left him in a fume.



PAGE 1

THE PIPITS. In Mistress Pipit's busy brain Great thoughts began to rise, As she laid her head beneath her wing And softly closed her eyes"If all the eggs were one large egg, That would a grand one be, And oh! how happy should I feel If it were laid by me." Still thinking, as she fell asleep, Of eggs both great and small, She dreamed that she herself had laid The largest egg of all. She saw it lying in her nest--Herself a Pipit proudWith all the other birds around In an admiring crowd :



PAGE 1

THE PIPIT S. Into the warm and well-built house, Which our good Pipits made, She popped down speedily, and soon A Cuckoo egg was laid. And then she travelled off again, And left the Pipits' nest; Amusement was the thing she sought, And that she loved the best. Tears won't warm eggs," said Mr. P., "And my poor nest is cold; So I will seek my grieving wife, And see if she's consoled." Now Mrs. Pipit, all alone, For food began to pine, And wondered if her husband would, Without her, go and dine;



PAGE 1

THE PIPITS. 21 He brought it food from morn till eve, Until the setting sun Impressed on his exhausted mind His daily task was done. But Mrs. Pipit still was proud Of her young beauty's size; She told her husband that they must Again display their prize; "We'll have a ball, dear Mr. P., Like Mrs. Butterfly, She gave it for her children's sakeAnd, pray, why should not I ?" "Ah! no, my dear," he sadly said, "We can't afford it now; Just look at me-I'm skin and bone, You really must allow;



PAGE 1

16 THE PIPITS. When all had said their say and gone, And left our pair alone, Then Mr. Pipit said aloud In his most joyful tone; "Ohdear! How glad I am 'tis done-And with such credit too! 'Tis time we had some tea ourselves; I'm hungry-are not you ?" The other birds were talking of The party where they'd been, And all their different thoughts about The egg which they had seen; The Wren said certainly 'twas largeIt took her by surprise; "But then I don't admire it, for I don't think much of size.



PAGE 1

' Now Mr. Pifii' set to work, Sl/i ull \ 11 Now Mr. Pipit set to work, And wished to warm the eggs, But in the nest he vainly tried To stow away his legs; And he pushed out two little eggs, O'er rock, and stones, and grass, And sadly then he shook his head, And sighed and said, "Alas!" K'\



PAGE 1

7r "And in a tuft of witherid grass Had hid their l itte ad. / .--. -" -.._ TwAnd in a tuft of i witherd grass ""K Had hid ther little heads.



PAGE 1

THE PIPITS. 23 Come, jump upon my back and I Will show you how to ride;" And then the naughty selfish bird Threw him too o'er the side. So at the bottom of the rock These two poor Pipits lay, Until the Robin Redbreasts came And covered them next day. The Cuckoo soon began to think His parents rather slow; He saw the swallows flying south, And longed with them to go; He heard them talk of foreign landsOf palaces and towersHow warm and bright the southern sunHow beautiful the flowers. D



PAGE 1

6 THE PIPITS. And as she smoothed her plumage At the early dawn of day, She told her husband what an egg She certainly would lay. Said Mr. Pipit, wisely, It surely will be best, Before you think of laying eggs, That we should build our nest." High in a tree, then, let it be; For really, I must say, No lower place is worthy of The egg which I shall lay." "No, no!" replied her husband, "That Were much above our station; The neighbours round would laugh at us On such an elevation.



PAGE 1

-, 4' '"f She dreamed ttat she erself had laid J The largest egg of all. She saw it lying in her nest, With all the other birds around In an admiring crowad, S.... .. ... '-S/~demdta ie esl a ai S '~~I\ \'



PAGE 1

24 THE PIPITS. They told him charming stories Of the countries where they'd been; The great Egyptian Pyramids, And temples they had seen. The Pipits were so tired at night, With bringing food all day, They would not listen to his talk, Nor have a game at play. He saw the leaves were turning brown-The winds were getting chill" If I stay here much longer I shall certainly be ill; But, dearest Mother, you to me Have been so very good, You've always kept me nice and warm, And brought me lots of food.



PAGE 1

But he repeats his sermon still, Alike by night and day, And any one can listen To what he has to say. \ / Ii !'



PAGE 1

THE PIPITS.



PAGE 1

Rexently Published, in Imperial 4to, Cloth, Pri £1 1. 6d. S: DBAW -FBM N-tATITBE. BY MR1. HUGH BLACKBURN. Along with the Plates there is descriptive Letterpress. The Bi'rd figured arn 1. Heron's Nest. 14. The Blackbird (Pied Specimen). 30. The Land Rail. 2. Soan Goose or Gannet. 15. The Ring Ousel. 31. The Common Snipe. 3. Solan Geese Fishing. 16. The Hedge Sparrow. 32. The Cuckoo. 4. ads of Ringed Guillemot, Corn17. The Whinchat. 33. The Young Cuckoo. Mon Guillemot, and Young 18. The Willow Warbler. 34. Young flooded Crow. Razorbill. 19. The Golden Crested Wren. [ 3. Crossbills 5. The Comon Guillemot. 20. The Blue Tit. 36. The Yellow Ammer. 6. The Black Guillemot. 21.he Mountain Finch or Brambling 7. The LongTailed Tit. 7. The Black Guillemot (in Winter 22. The Common Heron. 38. The Wood Warbler. PluA iage). 23. Gr1up of Herons. 39. The Stone Chat. 8 The Black Guillemot-Young and 24. Young null. 40. The Redstart. gg 25. Gull's Nest. 41. The Redbreast. 9. The Sandpiper. 26. Lesser Black-backed Gull. 42. The Tawny Owl. 10. The Fieldfare. 27. Group of Seabirds. 43. The Goshawk. 1j The Song Thrush. 28. The Ringed Plover. 44. Heads of Goshawk and Kestril. 12. Tbe Redwing. 29. The Water RaiL 45. Young Kestrils. 13. The Blackbird. These are amongst the most perfect and conscientiously executed works we have ever met with. Mrs. Blackburn has produced such a series as must mak Igd the eyes of every naturalist who sees them."-The Athewcium, ""We have seen no such birds since Bewick*, We say this not ignorant of the magnificent plates of Selby, Audubon, Wilson, and Gould."-The Scotsman. ..There are two groups especially which you will never tire of lookng ata flock of gannets fishing for herrings in the blue sea off Ailsa Craig, and a company of herons in Lochiel."-Cornhill lMagawine. ALSO BY MRS. BLACKBUtRN (J. B.), (|QURTH THOUSAND ,In 4to, with 8ixteer Page Engravings, Price 2s. 6d. CAW! CAW! O THE CHRONICLE OF THE CROWS. Just Published, in Imperial 161mo, PI'ice 3s., Illustrated with Wod-cut.s, TE MAN IN THE MOON,00 AND OTHER TALES. JAMES MACLEHOSE, PUBLISHER AND BOOKSELLER TO THE UNIVERSITY, 61 ST. V N NT STREEcT, GLASG OW .• T ," ....... •,+. ...~sU •f B~~kt



PAGE 1

" Oh /! blow the egg," the Petrel said, As he went of in haste, --To hoist the stormy signal, For the wind was rising fast ; The herring-boats are setting sail "And putting out to sea, If any of them coni to grtef, "They'll lay the blame on me. ;



PAGE 1

THE PIPITS. 27 The Cuckoo swore an oath to go And live in the Black Forest, And vowed to give advice to those That needed it the sorest. Off then he flew and built a hut In a high belfry tower, And chose it for his penance To record each passing hour. So every time the clock strikes one, Or two, or three, or four, He just appears and sings a song From out his open door; A song of comfort to the sick, The weary, and the sad; Of warning to the idle, The careless, and the bad.



PAGE 1

" Oh! How magnifcently large," Exclaimed the little Wren; How did you lay it, Mrs. P. Do tell me where and when ? "'7Tis speckled very strangely too," Said spiteful Mrs. Owl; And as for size /'tis like the egg Of the domestic fowl." "UC "l;Mx^



PAGE 1

THE PIPITS. 19 He tried to pick it up again, And said it was not fair Of the Tern, who saw it falling, To catch it in the air. That egg is addled," said the Duck, It's a very ugly egg ;" And she waddled past the Heron, who Was standing on one leg. He asked her why she thought so, And looked uncommon wise; He was always asking questions Or wishing to advise. For divers reasons," she replied; And splashed into the sea. The Gull had lost his supper, and An angry bird was he;



PAGE 1

THE PIPITS. 25 When I come back again next spring, If I your nest can find, My wife shall leave her egg with you, You are so very kind." Then Mrs. Pipit "sighed and sobbed, So sad a bird was she; And "Heaven forbid that this should come To pass," said Mr. P. When summer time came back again, To Holyrood came he, The wedding of Cock Robin And Jenny Wren to see. The bride was given away we know, By Scotland's noble king, In guerdon for that sweet yule song Robin came far to sing.



PAGE 1

When summer-time came back again, To Holyrood came he, The wedding of Cock-Robin And yenny Wren to see; The bride was given away, we know, By Scotland's noble king, In guerdon for that sweet yule song Robin came far to sing.



PAGE 1

,7 Yx "" -.. V / 7 // Together they went home again, When, to their great surprise, There lay the longed-for, dreamed-of egg, Before their wondering eyes.



PAGE 1

26 THE PIPITS. The young Cuckoo was fond of wine, And drank a deal too much; And soon to little Jenny Wren His impudence was such, That our brave Sparrow's fury roseHe speedily gave vent To sudden wrath, and from his bow An arrow swift he sent; Which, like the shafts of which we hear In verse we all have read, Found mark the archer little meant And shot Cock Robin dead. The dirge was sung, the bell was rung, With sighing and with sobbing: Sad that his ill-timed jest had caused The death of poor Cock Robin,



PAGE 1

7 .) I/ I But, "Never was so fine a child," She in refily would say; "And as for apfetite it could S7ust sit and eat all day."



PAGE 1

4 THE PIPITS. Within the bay-the ocean bayAll tranquil and at rest, With scarce a murmur on the sand, Or a ripple on its breast; But out beyond the sheltering isles Along the rocky shore, Where oft before the winter gale Atlantic billows roar, The gentle swell was heaving With an even ebb and flow, And kiss'd the rocks to make amends For many an angry blow. Two little Pipits in the fern Had made their little beds And in a tuft of wither'd grass Had hid their little heads;



PAGE 1

N A S AW CAW' W GLASGOW, JAMES MACLEHOSE, PUBLISHER TO THE UNIVERSITY, 1872.



PAGE 1

20 THE PIPITS. And so he said the joke was old, He'd heard it long before; Perhaps for sundry causes she Would come again to shore. At last one day the egg was hatched-And what a monstrous bird! Poor Mrs. Pipit had to hear Her darling called absurd. But, Never was so fine a child," She in reply would say, And as for appetite! it could Just sit and eat all day." "Ah! that it can," said Mr. P., With such a weary sigh, For ever since the dawn of day, He'd heard its hungry cry;



PAGE 1

THE PIPITS. Now Mr. Pipit set to work, And wished to warm the eggs, But in the nest he vainly tried To stow away his legs; And he pushed out two little eggs O'er rocks and stones and grass, And sadly then he shook his head And sighed and said "Alas!" For he had had a former wife Who did her duty well; Where was the present Mrs. P. ? He really could not tell. There's nae luck aboot the hoose," At length he hopeless said, And went to hide in distant fields His poor deserted head;



PAGE 1

// The Cuckoo soon began to think His parents rather slow; He saw the swallows flying south, SAnd longed with them to go. 7



PAGE 1

io THE PIPITS. He left the rock and nest behind, And in a sheltered dale, Among the blue forget-me-nots, He made his little wail. The idle Cuckoo leaves her work For other birds to do, She lays her egg, but cannot rear, Or teach, the young Cuckoo: She cares for nought but gaietyFor balls and visiting,And seldom long at home is she, But ever on the wing. As Mr. Pipit left the eggs, Madam Cuckoo came past; She sought an unprotected nest, And here it was at last.



PAGE 1

" Come jump upon my back, and I Will show you how to ride;" And then the naughty, selfsk bird Threw kim too o'er -the side. So at the bottom of the rock These two poor Pipits lay, S\\Until the Robin Redbreasts came ^ And covered them next day. 7~~7/



PAGE 1

ED Irv GLASGOW, JAMVES MACLEHOSE, PUBLISHER TO THE UJIVERSITY, 187-2. iri -. T ct ~l-K L e N ;tTI~:dJE ~ e~~~. I,,~4 a~ CP CT t ~ .vf i, [L~ 1' L. AW!CAWF ~~at GLASGOW FE ALJISPBLSI1I OT{ UE5U



PAGE 1

The dirge was sung, the bell was rung, With sighing and with sobbing. j\'\ /7 f I "'C ___________ i -r / _


PAGE 1

28 THE PIPITS. He gives advice to all alike, And praise and blame to some; And tells each child that task, or play, Or dinner-time is come. And even at the dead of night, When all may be asleep, The honest Cuckoo never fails Out of his door to peep; Perhaps he preaches to the mice To mend their evil ways, Perhaps he tells them, mournfully, How very short their days; But he repeats his sermon still, Alike by night and day, And any one can listen To what he has to say. (



PAGE 1

ft I : s *BJ~kB5L^ K



PAGE 1

r/V The Raven said, "I wish small birds Would lay such eggs, I know." "I'd like to pick a hole in it," Replied the Hoodie-crow. ;j ~



PAGE 1

THE PIPITS. 7 Think what would be your feelings Upon a stormy day, To see the branches waving where Your precious young ones lay: Still on the ground our nest we'll found, But if you like it high, We'll try the top of yonder rockThat will be smooth and dry." The egg was laid-when, after all, It only proved to be Like any other Pipit's eggAh! sad indeed was she: But try again, for better luck," Said Mr. Pipit bold, "And I am sure you'll lay an egg Of magnitude untold." B



PAGE 1

17 Al N *, .,. Intothewarmandwell-uilt ouse i \\ ^ 'ii^ ;1,Whics M our good Pits t ade,ggs Ske pofped down speedily, and soon \ a A Cuckoo egg was laid. N KK '' i IK~ V 1



PAGE 1

I8 THE PIPITS. I rather think," the Goldfinch said, Stroking his brilliant wing, If you go in for fashion, Speckled eggs are quite the thing." The Wheat-ear sported on the turf, He said he'd bet a pound As many white as speckled eggs Would in the world be found. The Raven said I wish small birds Would lay such eggs, I know." I'd like to pick a hole in it," Replied the Hoodie Crow. The Gull, who passed above the pair, Was tickled at the wish; And as he gaped to laugh aloud, He dropped his precious fish;



PAGE 1

THE PIPITS. THE summer sun was setting In the golden western seas, Behind the purple summits Of the distant Hebrides; The little birds had hushed their songs, And everything was still, Except the gentle babble Of the lonely mountain rill;



PAGE 1

He caught a large Grasshopper, Which he wished her to consume; Sie said it was a burden, And she left him in a fume. i. ^. -;



PAGE 1

PUBLISHED BY JAMES MACLEHOSE, GLASGOW. London, ..Hamilion, Adams & Co. Cambridge, ..Macmillan & Co. Edinburgk, .Edmonston & Douglas. Dublin, ..W. H. Smith & Son. WI D CCCLXXI 1.



PAGE 1

THE PIPITS. 17 Perhaps there's nothing in that egg-Things that are large and round Are very often empty tooAt least so I have found." The Wren was fond of talking-She'd have chattered on all night; But the great Owl said, solemnly, I think eggs should be white." "Oh blow the egg," the Petrel said, As he went off in haste To hoist the stormy signal, for The wind was rising fast. The herring-boats are setting sail And putting out to sea, If any of them come to grief They'll lay the blame on me."



PAGE 1

22 THE PIPITS. Your precious infant eats so much I scarce can find him food; Indeed, I think you'll have to help-Oh! how I wish you would." Next morning, when his parents Had both of them gone out, Young Cuckoo told his sister He'd carry her about; So off they cantered round the nest, Upon the narrow ledge, Until the wicked Cuckoo cast His sister o'er the edge. And then he turned himself around, And said to little brother, "Your sister was a silly thingYou are not such another-