Vea and her cousins, or, Kind words awaken kind echoes

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Material Information

Title:
Vea and her cousins, or, Kind words awaken kind echoes a tale for the young
Portion of title:
Kind words awaken kind echoes
Physical Description:
72 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 16 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Cupples, George, 1839-1898
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Dalziel Brothers ( Engraver )
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Place of Publication:
London ;
Edinburgh ;
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Kindness -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bashfulness -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1872
Genre:
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Mrs. George Cupples.
General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors and illustrations engraved by Dalziel.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002225125
notis - ALG5397
oclc - 59006989
System ID:
UF00026598:00001

Full Text
O 14N iJNL U i i


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VEA AND HER COUSINSC t1


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K8SUCH PRETTY NEW SHOES


VEA AND HER COUSINSORKIND WORDS AWAKEN KIND ECHOESZ alc for the oun gBYMRS GEORGE CUPPLESAUTHOR OF THE STORY OF OUR DOLL THE LITTLE CAPTAIETC ETCLONDONT NELSON AND SONS PATERNOSTER ROWEDINBURGH AND NEW YORK1872


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VEA AND HER COUSINST is very strange Dollie said Vea Campbell to her doll as they sat together inthe arbour one day I really cannothelp being nervous and shy beforestrangers Are you listening to memiss she continued Well you ought to forlet me tell you our happy days are very sobn to beat an end Yes you may stare with these greatblue eyes of yours but how will you like to feelyourself neglected and forsaken Mamma oftensays I am getting such a great girl I must bethinking of something else than dolls but ohDollie you and I have been such good friends Ido feel sorry to give you upAfter sitting silent for a few minutes she started


6 IN TIIE ARISOURA FRIENDLY CHATas if from a revefie to say Oh but I am forgetting to tell you all about it Dollie and you knowwe never had a secret in our lives I ve always


THE WHOLE STORY 7told you everything There now I ll take offyour hat it is so hot and then I shall tell you thewhole story Well then Dollie you must knowthat when mamma sent for me this morning afterbreakfast instead of giving me my French lessonas usual she made me get my work and whileshe was preparing it she told me a piece of newsVEA AND HER MAMMIAI had asked you know Dollie why I wasn t toget my French grammar and mamma said withsuch a funny look in her eyes Guess why VeaOf course you know Dollie what a badguesser I am and so I said Please do tell memamma but instead of telling me there and then


8 MAMMA S PIECE OF NEWSshe asked me if I never felt dull and did I neverwish to have any companions of my own age littlegirls like myself Then Ianswered Oh no mammaI am quite happy with my Dollie I don t everwant to have any one else to play with Nowdon t you think that was very good of memissI would greatly prefer to see you less fondof your Dollie Vea said mamma then Being somuch alone with her just adds to your bashfulnessPapa was remarking the other day you get shyerand shyer We must get you cured of it somehowThat was what papa said Dollie Listennow while I tell you mamma s piece of newsPapa has a brother in India he is my UncleCharles you know who sent the pretty Indian toysto me and a few days ago he sent a letter telling papa he meant to send all his children homeand asking papa to meet them when the shiparrived in London That was where you weremade Miss Dollie for don t you remember whenUncle Sam took me to buy you the shopkeepersaid you were not a common doll Uut a Londonone and that was why you were so expensiveWhat a beautiful doll you were then to be sure


CHOOSING A DOLL 9CHOOSING A DOLLAnd how frightened I was Uncle Sam wouldchoose the other one for though it was all ready


10 EXPECTED VISITORSdressed and you had only a night gown on I fellin love with you the first moment I saw youI really think you loved me too my pet for youlooked up in my face so sweetly when I said 0Uncle Sam I should like to have this one somuch But oh dear me Dollie I am quite forgetting to tell you mamma s story Well thenit is arranged that both mamma and papa aregoing to London the beginning of next week andwe are to be left all alone for ever so many daysThen Dollie mamma and papa are to return butguess what they are going to bring with themOh I forgot you are as bad at guessing as I amWell then listen mamma is going to bring allmy little cousins with her We shall have thehouse quite full and it s all because I am so shyfor papa thinks they will be nice company forme But you know Dollie I should much ratherlive quietly all my life with youAt this moment Vea s mamma called to herfrom the open drawing room window and theinteresting conversation was interrupted Wehave heard enough of it however to understandthat Vea s life was about to be changed in a verydecided mannerVea Campbell was about ten years of age at


A SELFISH WISH 11this time and as they lived in the country andtheir house was at a considerable distance from anyvillage or even any house whatever her shynesswas quite perceptible to all and she shrank fromtalking to any one and made her escape whenany strangers came to call as speedily as possibleShe was a sweet dispositioned child however andtroubled no one for as one of the old servantssaid Just give Miss Vea a book or what wasstill better even her doll she was perfectly contentVea dear said Mrs Campbell when theformer entered the drawing room I want youto sew tapes to that new set of pillow casesWe must have everything ready for our littlefriends when they comeI am so sorry you are going away mammasaid Vea the tears rising to her eyes It willseem such a long time till I see you I shallbegin and count the hours the moment you andpapa leave the house Oh dear I do wish thesechildren were not comingVea my darling said Mrs Campbell a littlesternly you are surely not going to be a selfishchild Would you rather have papa send yourpoor little cousins to live among strangers If you


12 WELCOME IS THE BEST CHEERfeel the separation of a week from us very muchthink of your poor cousins losing their mammaand papa for years0 mamma do forgive me for being so crosssaid Vea I quite forgot that It must have beenvery sad indeed for them to part with their mammaand the little boy Charley isn t he quite a babyPoor little boy I shall try to get over my shyness mamma and be very kind to them CanI do anything do you think mamma to makethem happyWell my child said her mamma I haveno doubt we shall find a good many things byand by in the meantime try and think kindlyof your cousins so that when they come theymay feel that they are welcome Rememberdear that welcome is the best cheerFor ever so many days both before her mamma sdeparture for London and after Vea while atwork or with her favourite companion Miss Dolliekept planning all sorts of things she meant to dofor them when they arrived And so busy wasshe that the time slipped away quite imperceptibly and very much surprised indeed was sheto receive a letter from her papa addressed toherself all the way from London to tell her


PPAPAS LETTER 13that they would all be home the next afternoonWhy Dollie dear did you ever hear the likeof that They are all to be at homn to morrownight And hear what papa says about you missI hope Dollie is well Give her my love Tellher there is at this moment a little girl sitting onmy knee by name Mary and she is as fond ofdolls as a certain young lady I know very wellPapa means me you know Dollie But isn tthat very good news I was always afraid theywouldn t like dolls that they would be abovesuch playthingsA very happy little girl was Vea the next afternoon when standing on the doorstep watchingfor the carriage it came at last and in a momentafter she found herself first in her father s armsand then in her two cousins Jessie and Anna whospoke so kindly to her just as if they had knownher all their lives long Vea quite forgot to beshy and was shaking hands with Jack and Freddieand helping them to carry up the baskets andportmanteaus And they seemed such nice wellbehaved boys that Vea over and over again keptthinking to herself Oh I am so glad they havecome Then when little Mary who was con


14 THE ARRIVAL OF THE VISITORSstantly expecting to see her mamma again afterrunning out and in all the rooms came to herand with trembling lips said Me want mammaMary no can find mamma she just flung herarms round the child and fairly cried Poorlittle Mary she kept saying I shall let mammabe your mamma as much as she is mine and ICONSOLING LITTLE MIA Ywon t be the least jealous of you and papa saysyou like dolls as much as I do so you shall havemy Dollie to play with whenever you likePerhaps little Mary did not understand all thatVea said but she knew she meant to be kind andwas much interested about the doll never resting


RENDERING SERVICE 15till she had dragged Vea up to the nursery to seeMiss Dollie It was quite evident little Marycould be trusted with Vea s precious doll for shelifted her up so carefully and stroked down herpretty white dress that had been put on to receive the expected guests that very morningand so Vea left the two together and ran downstairs again to see if Jessie and Anna requiredany assistance in unpacking their clothes or anything of that kind When Vea entered the roomwhere they were finding her mamma was notthere she could not help blushing and lookingvery shy and confused but Jessie cried out at onceOh come in Cousin Vea Could you help meto open this bag I cannot do it by myself Ohthank you so much dear said Jessie myhead aches so that I am scarcely able to do athing I suppose it is the long journeyIt s just that said Anna I m sure Ithought that train would have us all shaken topieces I d like to give the man who made itgo a good scoldingWhat good would that do Anna said JessielaughingWhy it would teach him to drive more carefully another time But I say cousin she ex


16 WORK FIRST PLAY AFTERclaimed will there be time to see your poultrybefore dinner Auntie was telling us about themand baby was so anxious to see the little yellowducklingsThey are not yellow now said Vea and shecontinued laughing they are not little eitherDickson was just saying this morning mammawould scarcely know them they have grown sofatCouldn t we run down just now and seethem said Anna beginning to stuff some ofher clothes into her box againNow Anna said Jessie that will neverdo You know you said yourself to aunt thatyou wduld put those things into the drawer andyou must finish them before going out If youdon t do it now you will forget all about it afterwardsOh no I won t said Anna do let me rundown now Jessie I won t stay a moment andseizing Vea by the hand he hurried away dragging her cousin with herWhen they reached the poultry yard howeverthey found the ducks were all away down to themill pond and even Anna was forced to admit itwould not do to follow them so far But just358


ALL ALONE 17when they were turning to run in again Veaspied a duckling sitting all alone by itself in avery disconsolate condition winking its brighteyes and opening its yellow bill as if it weregasping for airOh what a dear fat little thing cried AnnaWhat is it doing there all by itself VeaI am afraid it has taken too much dinnerA GREEDY DUCKLINGsaid Vea Ducks are such greedy things theynever know when to stopI should like to see it swim so much saidAnna Don t you think it would do it a greatdeal of good if we poked it into the water witha stickPerhaps it would said Vea but shecontinued timidly we are forgetting we promised85ss 2


18 UNPACKINGto be back to the unpacking in a minute Thedinner bell will be ringing very soonWell perhaps we had better go in said AnnaIt is a little provoking that we cannot stay justa few minutes longer I am certain I can finishthe unpacking in a very short time Jessie isalways in such a hurry and she is so particularWe can come out after dinner said VeaThe ducks are always very late in returninghome just now and if you like I will help youto unpackOh thank you very much said Anna Weshall run in at once then and perhaps this greedyduckling will have recovered somewhat when wecome backThough Anna had said her unpacking could bedone in a very few minutes she never would havemanaged it without Vea s help and indeed Jessiehad to lend her assistance also for somehow thedrawer could not be got to hold the contents ofMiss Anna s boxI m sure Jessie I laid in everything as smoothas possible said Anna a little wofully Ireally cannot understand it unless your drawer isarger than mine


WE SHOULD HELP OURSELVES 19No dear it is just the same said Jessiegood naturedly coming forward to helpThen perhaps I have got more clothes saidAnna Oh no I haven t we have both thesameUnder the careful fingers of Jessie the clotheswere made to go into less bulk and order wasbrought out of chaosI really don t understand how you get thingsto fold so small Jessie said Anna admiringlyand nothing ever attempts to go into a crease ora crumple with you Oh there the drawer shutsand am I not glad it is done I m sure I m verymuch obliged to both of you and now I shall beable to go out after dinner without a thought onmy mindVea could not help thinking that Jessie mustbe a very good natured girl indeed She neversaid Ah didn t I tell you that or Whydidn t you listen to me sooner as Vea knewother sisters did All Jessie did say was YesI m glad too our work is done Aunt will bepleased to see we can help ourselves a good dealYou know Anna we must help as much aspossible because aunt will have so much to dolooking after so many of us


20 GETTING ON FAMOUSLYOh yes of course I shall replied Anna Itwas so good of aunt to let us come here insteadof sending us away from the little ones to a schoolBut there goes the dinner bell so come alongVeaAfter dinner Vea and Anna hastened out to lookfor the ducks but somehow they were nowhereto be found so Vea having proposed to bring outher new fairy tale book ran into the house for itwhile Anna waited by the side of the little streamin case the ducks should come up during theirabsenceYou re not a bit shy said Anna abruptlyas Vea came back with the book Uncle saidyou were very shy but I can t see it and theboys were telling Jessie when you were out ofthe room that you had been so kind to themoffering them the loan of all your pretty booksI think we shall all get on famously don t youYes I hope so said Vea earnestly I amvery shy but I don t feel half so frightened foryou as I expected to beHalf frightened exclaimed Anna WhyCousin Vea you surely don t mean to say youare frightened in the tiniest bit for us You arenot afraid of me Vea surely


NO ONE TO PLAY WITH 21Oh no not now said Vea blushing scarletI was frightened before you came because Ihave always lived alone you know and havehad no one to play with but my DollieHow dull you must have been said AnnaTHE COUSINSAh but we will keep you cheery enough nowJack and Freddie are such capital playfellowsand they can do all sorts of thingsI like them very much said Vea Theyare not like some boys who came to spend the


22 UNKIND THREATSday with us not long ago They did nothing butfrighten me all the time and once when mammawas out of the room they rose up and took anapple each off the plate and hid them in theirpockets and then they said if I told upon themthey would ask a great ugly goblin to come downthe chimney to eat me upWhat horrid wicked boys said Anna Ifever they come again we must get Jack andFred to give them a good fright But you surelydid not believe they could send a goblin downthe chimneyOh no said Vea but when Martha tookaway the candle after I was in bed I couldn thelp being nervous and so I used to take mydoll into bed to keep me company and that iswhy the colour came out of her cheeksI never cared for dolls somehow saidAnna but she added kindly that was inIndia I think I shall like them here and yoursespeciallyA few days after Vea s cousins had arrivedMrs Campbell said at breakfast Now childrenthe mail leaves here to morrow for India I thinkyou must all write a letter to mamma


THE LETTER TO INDIA 23Oh yes auntie said Jessie we mustmanage to get a nice long letter written somehowBut I can write very little said Annaand Fred can only do half text and Mary andbaby can t do it at allMe can said little Mary me can writeYou leave it all to me Miss Anna said herbrother Jack We shall get one large sheet ofpaper and every one must write something on itand as Anna has made the first objection I thinkshe ought to be made to write her portion firstOh no no I really can t exclaimed Annabut Jack had the paper and everything ready ina few minutes and was so kind holding her handsteady all the time He said it was to preventthe pen from spelling wrong for he was sureAnna could do it better by herself and he suggested such funny things to tell their mammathat every one was quite anxious for their turnto come to put in their shareNow said Jack when Anna had signed hername all by herself we must drop a little bit ofsealing wax just here and make baby kiss it thatwill do for him and then comes Mary s turnWhat are we to say to mamma poppet


24 LITTLE MARY S SHARETHE LETTEr TO MAMMACousin Vea has a big doll and she love Maryand me got a pussy cat said little MaryIs it Vea who loves you or the doll saidJack laughingIt s Dollie replied little Mary Now holdMary s hand Jack me write to mammaIt was no easy matter to manage this part ofthe letter for Mary wanted not only to guidethe pen much quicker than was possible but also


LETTER WRITING UNDER DIFFICULTIES 25kept suggesting all sorts of things long before thefirst had been written down With difficultycould she be induced to leave off and only consented to do this on the condition that she had adrop of sealing wax appended to her signature tosend a kiss to her mamma also Even then shewas not satisfied but insisted upon another dropbeing added for a kiss to papaAs everybody was busy with this letter insome way Vea noticed that little Charley was leftwithout a playmate and was therefore ratherfretful which threw the letter writers into a stateof discomposure Oh dear said Fred lookingup from the letter where he had been for the lastfive minutes vainly endeavouring to spell outMy dearest mamma Oh if somebody wouldonly keep baby quiet I would get on I feelalways on the point of writing horse instead ofmamma he keeps saying it so oftenCome with me baby darling said Vea andthough she would have preferred staying in theroom for the letter writing was not only excitingbut interesting she coaxed him out of the roomand played with him and his horse for ever soIbng Then when he was tired she knockedgently at the library door and asked permission


26 IN THE LIBRARYto bring baby in there explaining that theschoolroom was required entirely for the letterwriters I shall keep him very quiet papadear she said He is very fond of picturesand especially my book with the animals in itmay I have it papaAMUSING COUSIN CHARLEYOh certainly dear said Mr Campbellwhen such a great piece of business is afootwe must do our best to amuse CharleyVery patient was Vea with little Charley Ifhe insisted upon turning back to the picture of theboy on the pony she looked it up for him quitepleasantly and went through the same amount of


BEING KIND AND COURTEOUS 27surprise each time when Charley exclaimed Ohdere it is baby pony Then nurse came forhim to put him to bed for his forenoon s rest andVea was free to run back to the schoolroom Asshe was slipping away on tiptoe her papa whohad been listening to her remarks called her tohim and said I m glad to see my little daughtertrying to make herself useful That is rightmy darling be kind and courteous to yourlittle friends and they will not only love youbut respect and esteem youYou may be sure Vea felt very happy andwas quite in the humour to enter into any gameor sport her cousins might suggest Some heavyshowers had fallen in the morning so that till theground dried a little they could not go out andas Fred had finished his portion of the letter heand Anna were a little at a loss what to do withthemselvesWe might have a game at puss in the cornersaid Anna but then it will disturb Jack andJessieOh don t mind us said Jack I thinkJessie you and I had better go up stairs to thenursery baby is asleep I daresay so he won tdisturb us


28 PUSS IN THE CORNERWhen they were gone Fred and Anna setabout clearing the room a little for puss in thecorner and a very hearty game they had butjust when they had fixed to play for only fiveminutes longer Fred tripped over something andfalling struck his eye a severe blow on the edgeof a chair Vea ran for water to bathe it andAnna for a large handkerchief to bind it up andthey were glad to see though his eye watered agood deal it was not so much hurt as they hadfancied When the handkerchief was tied onVea said that as they could not play very wellnow she and Anna would take turns in readinga story Fred said he would like to hear one ofthe fairy tales and Vea was in the very middleof it when Jack came running in to show themthe letter finished Doesn t it look a jolly longone he exclaimed Look it s all coveredwith writing all but this little space at thebottom Won t mamma be pleasedBut Jack said Anna Vea must writesomething she can write quite beautifully allby herself tooCertainly said Jack seeing that VeY s eyessparkled and that she evidently liked the ideaJust wait a moment till I run up for the ink


WHAT VEA WROTE 29The space was rather small but Vea managedto get in what would make her aunt in Indiavery happy My dear aunt she wrote I amso glad my cousins are here but I am sorry youTHE FINISHED LETTERare not with them I will try to make themhappy because I was so very dull when mammawent up to London Papa and mamma too sayI could make people much happier if I was not


30 LOVE BEGETS LOVEso shy but I am trying not to be shy with mycousins as I want them to love me very muchAnd I am sure we not only will love yousaid Anna when she had read the letter butwe do At least I do with all my might andas for Mary I never saw her take such a fancy toany one before Jack you must hold my handwhile I write under Vea s name We do loveCousin Vea very very much mammaWell then you must write it very smallsaid Jack for there is scarcely room for itVea felt so happy that when she sat readingher chapter that same evening she could hardlyunderstand what it was about for thinking hercousins really loved her Oh dear I must payattention What would Uncle Sam think if heknew that I am reading my chapter so carelesslywhen I promised him I would always pay greatattention if he gave me the velvet Bible insteadof the plain brown one Now I mustn t think ofmy cousins any moreJessie had her practising to attend to in theforenoon so that Anna and Vea were thrown agood deal together and very many happy hoursthey spent If Anna did not care for dolls she


MAKING THE ROCKERY 81certainly had a strong liking for birds and flowersand soon became such a famous gardener that oldMatthew the gardener gave her an extra plot ofground all to herself and though it was quite arough piece she was not long in converting itinto a beautiful garden It was not exactly aUNCLE SAM S PRESENTgarden but a rockery as she thought she couldmake more of the small space by that means andas she was always most obliging and good naturedhelping her brothers to hem the sails for theirships or make paste for their kites they werequite ready to carry any number of stones for


82 MANY HANDS MAKE LIGIT WORIKthe purpose of building it Then Jack foundsome fantastically shaped roots of trees and Fredwheeled the soil from the wood so that with somany willing hands to help the rockery wassoon ready for the roots to be put in At thispoint Vea was able to be very useful because shehad seen a lovely rockery in the Hall garden andremembered exactly how the flowers were put inWe must get Matthew to give us some of theplant I call summer snow for the very top saidVea It is always pretty but when it is inbloom it looks like a beautiful crown Then thescarlet Tom Thumb geraniums they look so wellbeside it and the blue lobellia hanging down isset off with the white alsoThat s the national colours said FredOf course we must have it arranged so Threecheers for the red white and blue Do you remember how Dick the tall sailor used to sing thatsong of a Saturday evening Wasn t he a jollyfellowYes he was said Jack but I liked Chipsthe carpenter best To be sure he was a littlesurly at times but he soon got over his crossnessAnd such yarns as he could tell why I dobelieve he had been all round the world


GETTING ROOTS FOR THE ROCKERY 33Why that isn t much to boast about saidFred Dick had been twice round the worldhad sailed in every sea was shipwrecked fivetimes lived on a desert island for seven monthsand was tattooed by savagesOh do stop to take a breath said Annalaughing We all know that Dick was themost wonderful sailor on board our ship Ofcourse Chips was very nice too but then liewouldn t always tell his stories to every onewhich you must own Jack was scarcely goodnatured But Vea dear she continued wemust go away now to look for some wild flowersI should like to have some poppies and bluecorn flowers they do look so pretty among thecornI scarcely think they will grow if we liftthem just now said Vea but we can takethem up with plenty of earth round the rootsWe shan t get many of the wild flowers tillspring but then I know where to find heaps ofthemWhen the little basket was filled with as manyroots as they could find Vea and Anna sat downat the edge of the corn field to make a wreath ofthe wild flowers they had collected How fast358 3


34 A HARVEST HOME IN PROSPECTthe corn is ripening said Vea Uncle Sam willbe having his harvest home very soon now Whata large party he will have this seasonMAKING THE WREATHBut will he invite us too said Anna heis not our uncle you knowOh yes of course he will said Vea andhe is your uncle though he is mamma s brotherhe means to be at anyrate because he said whenhe was here last and after I had told him youwere coming Dear me what a rich old uncle Ishall be so you see he expects you to call him


A DELIGHTFUL UNCLE 35Uncle Sam and I hope you will else he may bevexedOh of course I shall for he must be a verynice uncle said Anna who was never long inmaking up her mind about a thing but whyhasn t he been here to see usBecause he has gone to London on businessreplied Vea but mamma had a letter from himthis very morning and he says he expects to beback in a few days When he does come Isuppose the very first thing he will do is to comeover to see us He is going to bring me a newwork box when he returnsWhat a delightful uncle he must be saidAnna I hope he will come very soonSo do I said Vea The hay is almostready for taking home and Uncle Sam said wemust all go over and help the people to carry itin It is such fun haymakingSo I have heard said Anna I shall liketo make hay very much because we never cando such things in India you know But I thoughthay was made much earlier in the seasonOh so it is said Vea but this is the secondcrop Uncle Sam had such a large quantity madeever so long ago


36 VERY RUDE BEHAVIOURAt this moment Fred came running up to seewhat had become of them for Jack was waitingto put in the roots if they had succeeded in getting any So they retraced their steps homewards As they were going up the lane Annacried out 0 Vea do look through this gap inthe hedge there s such a funny looking littlegirl and she is driving such big ducks beforeherThat is Polly replied Vea and these aregeese not ducks Would you like to speak toher she is a very nice little girlYes I should like it very much said Annacreeping through the gap followed by Vea andFred but no sooner did the geese spy them thanthey set up such a gobbling and hissing andquacking that Fred was so frightened he creptback into the lane calling out Oh do comeback I have been told geese are dangerous birdsLittle Polly however ran forward and gavethe gander a sharp tap on the bill with her stickand her little brother Joseph valiantly slappedthe geese and scolded them very severely Whenthe geese discovered the young ladies were friendsthey became quiet but every time Fred poppedhis head through the gap they began to hiss and


THE SURLY GANDER 875rOLLY HERDINC HER GEESEgobble at him so that he was forced to remainin the lane Polly was quite vexed at their be


38 A VERY BRAVE BOYhaviour but explained that the gander and thewhite goose were strangers her mother havingbought them the week before at the marketI was quite afraid of them myself miss saidPolly and so was Joseph he is a little afraidof the gander even yet because the first morningmother let it out it flew over to where Josephwas standing and he got such a fright that hefell downHim hurt all my nose said little Josephpointing to a scar on the point of his nose butJoseph strike gander now and gander is afraidI m sure you are a very brave boy said Vealaughing Oh Polly do you know when Jamesis to take in Uncle Sam s hayWell miss I heard him say to mother shehad better be ready to morrow or next daybecause master had written to tell him he wouldbe home to morrowOh I am so glad said Vea We are allcoming down to help please tell James thatPollyThat same afternoon Mrs Campbell sent Veawith some soup and wine to a poor woman andon her return she called in to see her Uncle Sam shousekeeper kind old Martha To her great


AN UNEXPECTED PLEASURE 39surprise and delight as she was passing the librarywindow on her way round to the door whoshould come out but Uncle Sam himselfHollo he called is that my little lettercarrier Why then here s a letter to be deliveredimmediately What a good thing you happenedto pass this way else it would have been ever solong of reaching its destinationOh I shall be so glad to take it unclesaid Vea but who is it forAh that s the question he said shakingthe letter at her Now I think I shall not giveit to you at all but send little Joseph over withit to the post officeOh no Uncle Sam do give it me pleasesaid Vea laughing I feel sure it is somethingvery nice and I know it is to mammaWell now who would have expected thatlittle puss to be such a clever guesser said UncleSam There take it and be off with you elseI ll never get all the letters I have to writefinished in timeBut Uncle Sam please tell me have youbrought my work box said VeaWell miss if I said No would you be disappointed said Uncle Sam trying to look grave


40 A DISAPPOINTMENTTHE LITTLE LETTER CARRIERI think I should be uncle said Vea shylyI thinki I should be uncle said Vea shvly


A DIFFICULT QUESTION 41Now then I want to know this When Iwent into the shop I looked round and I saw agreat many beautiful things said Uncle Samsuch lovely work boxes included Then my eyefell upon a very handsome set of croquet and Idiscovered that the work box and the croquet setwere both the same price I can t afford both soI have been wondering which you would choosethe croquet set or the work boxVea sat down on the step by the window andturned the matter over in her mind She hadbeen very anxious to have the work box and hadearned it by saying ever so many French exercisesquite correctly and if the truth were told shewas a good deal disappointed that the work boxwas not produced without further trouble Thenas for the croquet set she did not care particularlyfdo it she would greatly prefer the work boxbut then it came into her mind that if she chosethe former it would be a source of amusement toall her cousins After all the work box was rathera selfish thing to choose and besides the old oneshe had might be mended up and made to serve alittle longer Having come to this conclusion shesaid at once I think Uncle Sam I shall havethe croquet set


42 UNSELFISH VEABut I thought you wanted a work box verymuch what has made you change your mindsaid sly Uncle SamI have been thinking we could all play atthe game said Vea I really think the boyswill be delighted to have itAnd so you have got to be very friendly withyour cousins said Uncle Sam I thought yousaid you wished they were not coming and thatyou were sure you never would get on with themWhy have you changed your mindOh please Uncle Sam don t speak of mynaughty words any more said Vea earnestlyI am so sorry but mamma says if I am kind tothem now she will not speak of it I do lovethem ever so much and I am trying to makethem feel quite at home Mamma says Kindwords awaken kind echoes and you know uncleif I make them welcome to all my toys and booksand everything they will perhaps like to stay withus and be able to bear the separation from theirmamma better They feel very dull sometimesand I know both Jessie and Anna cry in theirbeds and want to have her near them again verymuchThen I suppose I shall order the croquet


DAME HODSON S SCHOOL 43set said Uncle Sam after he had kissed littleVea I knew somehow you would choose themindeed so sure was I that I brought them withme Stop stop I won t answer another wordBe off with you this moment dear me I wasforgetting to ask you to call in at the dame sschool with this letter as you pass Tell theworthy Dame Hodson I shall look in upon herto morrowNAUGHTY PETERAway went Vea and she was not long inreaching the cottage where Dame Hodson kepther school As she entered she nearly burst outlaughing at the sight of a little boy standingon a stool with a dunce s cap on his head Itwas not often that the kind dame punished her


44 HOW PETER WAS FOUND OUTpupils so Vea knew it must be something very badindeed and was quite shocked to hear that Peterhad not only taken the eggs out of a robin redbreast s nest but he had said he never hadtouched them Alas when sitting down aftersaying his lesson somebody had pressed a littletoo close to his pocket the eggs which werehidden away in a corner of it got smashed andthe contents ran down on the floor Of course afterthat the dunce s cap had to be put on and Peterhad to stand with the eyes of all his companionsfixed on him Oh shame shame to take theeggs from a pretty robin redbreast the worthydame was just saying when Vea entered Whatdid the kind robins do to the poor little orphanchildren in the woodCovered them with warm leaves said a littlegirl the tears standing in her eyes Miss Vearead the storyFinding they remembered it so well Veapromised to come the next Thursday and readthem another and as the naughty Peter lookedvery sorry and as he promised never to touchbirds eggs again Vea begged him off from furtherpunishment and the cap was hung carefully upon its accustomed peg


UNCLE SAM S INVITATION 45When Vea reached home and had delivered theletter to her mamma she discovered it was aninvitation to her and all her cousins to go over toUncle Sam s the next day to help the haymakersThat was a very joyful piece of news and Vea lostno time in telling her cousins about it We areto spend the whole day said Vea and have dinnerwith Uncle Sam and mamma and papa are coming there too and we will have such fun Andoh dear I was almost forgetting to tell you UncleSam has brought a lovely croquet set from Londoninstead of my work box and I m so gladWell I must say it is very kind and jolly ofhim said Jack I was just thinking if we hadcroquet we could play on that piece of wastegrass near the wood It s rather rough at presentbut we could level it Fred very soonThe next morning was as sunshiny as a morningcould well be and the little girls dressed in hasteand hurried the taking of their breakfast so thatnot a moment should be lost What fun theyhad tossing the hay and when Uncle Sam cameout and began his acquaintance by taking up agreat armful of hay and pitching it over his littleguests they fairly screamed with laughterWe must give it him back again said Vea


46 GIVING IT 111 BACK AGAINUNOLE SAMand forthwith every oneseized a bundle of hayand began to fling itat him determined tobury him under a great


THE PRISONER AND HIS RANSOM 47pile Indeed he was forced to lie down andbe covered up completely before the warfarewas at an end and then he only escaped afterhe had cried for quarter and offered a dozen ofhis best plums as a ransom This having beensettled they marched him away to the gardenstill holding him as a prisoner till his ransom waspaidI thought he must be the very nicest unclepossible for any one to have said Anna as shemunched up her share of the plums but he iseven nicer than I expected I feel as if I hadknown him all my life longYou won t have any difficulty in calling himuncle said Vea slylyOf course not said Anna it is so good ofyou to let us have a bit of himOh do you hear this boys cried UncleSam who had overheard the last two sentenceshere s a pair of little cannibals they are proposing to eat me up I throw myself upon yourprotection Miss Jessie I am quite unable to lookafter myselfThen when they had eaten as many plums asthey pleased and had seen the prize poultryMartha was famed for rearing and had visited


48 A VISIT TO THE RUINED CHAPELthe last brood and had admired them so muchas to delight Martha immensely they went withMARTHA S 1 ET BROODUncle Sam to see an old ruined chapel in theneighbourhood They were a little tired whenthey reached the spot where the ruin stood andwere glad to sit down and rest under some shadytrees there No sooner were they seated thanVea cried out 0 Uncle Sam do tell us astoryWhat miss ask me for a story in thepresence of such experienced travellers No nowe must get Miss Anna here to tell us oneOh but I really am a very bad story tellersaid Anna yet feeling a little flattered that Uncle


JESSIE S STORY 4Sam should choose her Jessie will tell us oneshe knows ever so many because she used to getDick and a number more of the sailors to tell herstoriesVery well then Miss Jessie we will take onefrom you if you please said Uncle SamShall I tell how Dick went to sea saidJessie I don t recollect another just nowOh yes do cried Anna I have almostforgotten it and it was so funny that partaboutStop Anna cried Jessie we must nottell the end before the beginningCertainly not said Uncle Sam choosing acomfortable tuft of grass and taking little Maryon his knee begin at the beginning by allmeansWell then began Jessie when Dick was alittle boy he lived with his grandmother and hisfather because his mother was dead He had nolittle sisters or brothers because they were alldead too but he had ever so many boys to playwith and went to school and was very happyThen his father married a second time and histep mother was very unkind to him and used tomake him work very hardi s 4


50 AN INTERRUPTIONNo no Jessie interrupted Anna she waskind to him at first you knowStop Anna don t interrupt me please saidJessie Yes just at first she was kind to himand to the old grandmother too but when Dick sfather went away any long journey then she wasalways finding fault with Dick and scolding thepoor old grandmother till she could hardly bear itShe was in the very middle of her scolding onevery windy rainy night when the door openedand in walked Dick s father He was not tohave been home till the next night but there hestood at the open door looking quite astonishedand very sorry to hear his wife saying suchunkind things to the poor old grandmother whowas such a kind and gentle creatureAt this point of the story Fred s sharp eyesobserved a young rat sitting not very far friomwhere they were quietly nibbling away at an earof corn Oh you little thief cried Fred flinging a stone at it which sent it scampering awayamong the cornFred don t interrupt the story said Annacouldn t you have let the poor thing have itsdinner in peace Do go on Jessie pleaseWell standing at Dick s father s back was a


COMING BACK FROM THE SEA 51man Dick just caught a glimpse of his facebut he knew in a moment it was his UncleRichard come back from sea so he ran forwardand got hold of his hand and cried Oh I m soglad you have come you will take me and grandmother with you and nobody will scold us anymore Of course Uncle Richard couldn t doYOU LITTLE THIEFthat because he hadn t a ship of his own but hepromised to send money home very soon to enablethe old grandmother to take a house all to herselfand Dick was to live with her Uncle Richardwanted Dick to go with him when he left butDick knew if he did his step mother would becrosser with his old grandmother so he said he


52 FRIGHTENING THE CRUEL STEP MOTHERwould stay and Uncle Richard was so pleased hegave him half a crown all to himselfNo Jessie it was a two shilling piece saidAnna because youStop Anna stop said Jessie waving herhand Well after Uncle Richard and Dick sfather had gone away the step mother was crosserthan ever and the old grandmother was so miserable that she was very glad when some ladies gother admission into an alms house She would havetaken Dick with her but it was against the rulesfor her to have him but he used to go as oftenas he could to help her Well Dick was determined to run away to sea and find out his UncieRichard so he let some boys into the secret andthey determined that before he left they shouldgive the step mother a good fright So one daywhen she was out they hoisted a great bucket ofwater on to the top of the bed Dick got hisclothes tied up in a bundle and hidden away ina friend s house Then when his step motherwas asleep Dick tied the clothes with a stringto the bed somehow and fastened the clothes toa string and that again to the bucket Then hegot a piece of paper and set it on fire in themiddle of the room where it made a great blaze


ALL S WELL THAT ENDS WELL 53but couldn t do any harm and then Dick slippedout by the back door and locked it calling Fire Ifire Up got the step mother in a fright andseeing the light thought the house was on fireand jumped out of bed when down came thebucket of water upon her nearly drowning herDick got his clothes and made his escape andgot to the sea side and into a ship and sailedawayWell all s well that ends well said UncleSam laughing not that it ended so well forthe step mother though but I think we are allagreed in thinking that the ducking she gotserved her rightAfter dinner Uncle Sam got the man James tofasten a rope to two trees to make a swing of itfor them and there they stayed till tea timeindeed so delighted were some of them that evenup to the last moment they were at it and madeUncle Sam promise to let it stay till their returnThe next time they came however kind UncleSam had got a beautiful swing put up a realone with a wooden seat and a rope at each sidefor the boys to pull And he was never doneplanning all sorts of nice games to make thechildren happy


54 UNCLE SAM S GARDENTIE SWINGBut it was not all play with Vea and hercousins When they had somewhat recoveredfrom the effects of their long voyage a governess arrived for the girls and a tutor came fbrthe boys and a dancing master came twice aweek Vea was very fond of their governess


VEA DISLIKES HER DANCING LESSONS 55and tried hard to please her but in presence ofMonsieur Bounce all her old shyness returnedand she could hardly keep from crying when sheheard his name announcedOh I wish mamma would let me stop thesehorrid dancing lessons said Vea one day toJessie I know I shall never be able to pleaseM Bounce I get so nervous when he begins todance himself and stretches up his arms andTHE DANCING LESSONputs out his toes I feel ready to drop downwith frightIt s because you dance better than any ofus said Jessie laughing M Bounce is evidentlydelighted with your performance especially when


56 THE GARDIEN PARTYhe is dancing himself It is so funny to see youyour very nervousness forces you to do exactlyas he wants you to do and when he cries Upup mees on de toes you make me think you aregoing to fly up to the ceilingI really do not see the use of dancing saidVea with a sigh And yet I like it too whenM Bounce is not thereOh you know we must learn dancing saidJessie Every young lady dances and you willget to like it in time But what was that auntwas saying to uncle about a partyMamma gives a garden party every year tothe school children said Vea and she wasfixing with papa to have it next Friday if theweather was fineAnd what do you do at t inquired JessieThe children get tea on the lawn and thenwe have all sorts of games and afterwards whenthey are gone Mr Fairley the rector and hischildren stay to supper and we have more gamesindoorsI suppose Uncle Sam will be there too saidJessieOh yes we couldn t get on at all withoutUncle Sam


PREPARING FOR TIE HOLIDAY 57Every one had to be diligent that week becauseMrs Campbell asked the governess to give herpupils a whole holiday on the FridayIt is for a selfish motive said Mrs Campbelllaughing I want your young folks Miss Taylorto help me with my preparationsOh delightful cried Anna may we setthe tea things and may we cut up the cake andmay we do all sorts of thingsCertainly said Mrs Campbell while everybody laughed at Anna s enthusiasm I shall havelots of things for all of you to do Many handsmake light work so I expect to have nothing todo but direct I shall feel quite like a queenwith so many fairy princesses to work for meOh do be the Princess Gudoloup said VeaShe was such a dear good creature and everybody loved her and were so glad to help her andsheYes interrupted Anna and no wondereverybody loved her she was so unselfish and Iam sure auntie is thatWell well I m sure I feel highly flatteredsaid Mrs Campbell laughing So if I am to bea princess I command you all to get your lessonscorrectly that you may be at liberty to help me


58 MARY S PRETTY NEW SHOESYou may be sure every one did their best toearn the holiday so that they might help theirkind aunt And they did help her too and lefther so little to do that instead of feeling fatiguedbefore the school children arrived as had been thecase on former occasions she was as she said asfresh as a rosePerhaps the happiest little girl present waslittle Mary Nurse had put such beautiful bluerosettes on her slippers to match her gay sashthat for ever so long she could do nothing butshow them off to every person See my prettynew shoes she cried Nurse made them forMary And when Uncle Sam arrived happeningto be at the head of the stairs she popped herfoot through the railings calling out See UncleSam my pretty new shoesOh dear what am I to do said Uncle Samwhen she had come down and he had her on hisknee I haven t got any pretty shoes like thatand he pretended he was cryingLittle Mary looked wistfully at her preciousshoes but her soft heart couldn t stand the ideaof poor Uncle Sam having none so slipping offhis knee she began tugging off his boot to theamusement of everybody while she said No


THE EVENING OF THE PARTY 59cry Uncle Sam Mary give you her p retyshoesFor the first time in Vea s remembrmnce UncleSam looked angry and that was when Fred saidOh you little goose your shoes won t fit UncleSamYou mind your own business sir he saidrather sharply Keep your pretty shoes mylittle pet you re not a goose but a dear kindlittle MaryWhen the school children came and had theirtea immediately after the things were clearedaway the games were commenced They ranraces for sixpences and played at hide and seekand puss in the corner and ever so many moretill it was time to go home Then they sang ahymn and after receiving some fruit went homeshouting and hurrahing at the top of their voicesThen the rectory children were left and it wasdiscovered there was plenty of time for a game athunt the slipper before supper The Campbellsseldom quarrelled among themselves They werealways so accommodating the one to the otherbearing and forbearing as their mamma had madethem promise to be before they parted from herBut it is very odd how a little discord once it


60 DISCORD DESTROYS HARMONYis allowed to slip in destroys harmony andwithers up real pleasureI say that s not fair cried James Fairleywho had been hunting for the slipper for ever soH1UNT THE SLIPPERlong without success You shouldn t pitch itabout that way I won t play I tell you it scheatingOh no it isn t said Vea we played itjust as we are doing now at your house lastChristmas Don t you remember what raps yougave me on the fingers and then when I tried


UNKIND WORDS 61to catch hold of it you flung it over to TomRiddleOh that s just nonsense said James rudelyI have no recollection of playing it in any suchmanner whichever way we played it we nevercheatedCome come we had better stop said Jacksomewhat hotly Cheat is a hard word and Ifor one don t like it to be laid at my doorThere was a feeling of discomfort among themafter this speech and for a time no one seemedinclined to propose any new game or to do anything to wipe out of recollection the unkind wordsVea however remembered it lay with her morethan any one to restore peace and good will soshe said Oh couldn t we play at something elseWe have a few minutes yetWell I shall be glad for one to join saidJack wishing to show that he was ready to begood natured for oneWe might have blind man s buff said JessieCome Master Jack you must be the first blindman so come along and let me tie your eyes upvery carefullyAway went Jack first to one side and thento another groping about very cautiously while


62 A SAD ACCIDENTeverybody slipped about on tip toe or stolestealthily behind to give Jack s hair or his jacketa twitch Everything was getting on smoothlyand joyfully when James Fairley went down onhis knees and before any one could stop himJack hearing the sound made a dash in thatu ijr T f F I I P IBLIND MAN S BUFFdirection and stumbling over James s back fellwith such force on the floor that his nose beganto bleed That was not the only evil for ingetting up again James ran against Vea andknocked her over also and though she onlyslipped down on her knees she sprained her ankle


A WONDERFUL PEACEMAKER 63Really everybody was very glad when the hourcame for the Fairleys to go home and as Annasaid she hoped they would not come back in ahurry again for a more disagreeable boy thanJames she never remembered seeingHe didn t seem a bit sorry for hurting Vea sfoot said Fred and as for Jack s nose helaughed outright He is a very mean fellowWell we won t play at blind man s buff againwith him at all events said Anna The ideaof telling us we were cheating at hunt the slipperand then behaving so badly afterwards to usWe won t say any more about them saidVea I think it would vex mamma so ifyou please we won t speak of the accident Ihope my foot will be all right in the morningIt was not right in the morning but a greatdeal worse and poor Vea had to lie on the sofafor ever so many days It was very astonishinghow much her cousins missed her They had noidea till then that she had been so helpful shewas so quiet and shy but now they felt that shewas a wonderful peacemaker and that it must beowing to her gentle loving disposition that somuch harmony was maintained in the school roomor at their games in the nursery


64 WILLING HELPERSWhen she was able to move about again Jessieinsisted upon her leaning on her and as for Jackhe would have liked to have carried her on his backto any distance if she had only allowed himWILLING IELPERSWhen Uncle Sam invited them down the nextSaturday to spend the day Vea s mamma was alittle afraid she would not be able to walk so farbut Jack had said at the time Oh yes we llmanage it somehow auntie Do say we may goand Vea s foot won t suffer a bit


VEA IN HER PALANQUIN 65After this speech Jack disappeared and thenFred followed and nowhere could Anna find themAfter they had been gone for some hours shethought she heard a sound of hammering andsawing coming from the direction of the tool houseand was running to open the door when Fredcame slipping out and asked her not to come neaithem for some time He was so earnest aboutit that though Anna was a little inquisitive bynature she good naturedly consented to keep outof their wayYou shall know about it the very first saidFred if you will only have patience for a veryfew minutesWhen the children came down ready to setout for Uncle Sam s there stood at the door alittle miniature palanquin It was rough lookingno doubt but quite strong enough to bear Vea sweight She was seated in it in great state andthe boys clapped the long poles on their shouldersand carried her off amidst much laughter Ofcourse they didn t carry her all the way for shewas able to walk a good bit but the momentthe boys saw her walking a little stiffly they insisted upon her getting in again You can imaginethe astonishment of Uncle Sam better than I358 5


66 THE DISTINGUISHED VISITORScan describe it to see the cavalcade coming up theavenueAn Indian princess from the Punjaub I dodeclare Salaam salaam bobita bee Mahara jaSing That s excellent Hindustani isn t itMaster JackJack and Fred made it Uncle Sam saidVea Wasn t it clever of them And they vecarried me almost all the wayUncle Sam made them all laugh by declaringhe was not prepared to receive such distinguishedvisitors and if he had only known sooner hewould have ordered Martha to send for an elephantor two from the zoological gardens in London forhe was afraid such grand people couldn t get onwithout an elephantUnfortunately it came on a very wet afternoonbut as they happened to be in the wood at thetime wvith Maggie Martha s grand daughter sheshowed them a nice sheltered place under a greatbeech hedge where they sat quite sheltered fromthe rain and listened to her delightful storiesOh dear what a happy day we have hadsaid Vea and oh how kind of you two boysto help meKind said Fred that is a joke Why


UNDER TIE BEECH ILEDGE 7UJ SLELTIRED FROM THE SLIOWEIRif we hadn t helped you itwould have been a shameHaven t you been doingeverything in your power tohelp us ever since we cameI do declare I haven t


68 JESSIE S TESTIMONY TO VEA S KINDNESSthought of India for the last week I do feel sohappy hereYou may be sure Vea was pleased to hear Fredsay this but if she had seen the letter Jessie sentto her mamma a few days after she would havebeen more soYou have no idea what a nice girl CousinVea is wrote Jessie Aunt told us before wewent down that she was very shy and greatlypreferred living alone but though we can seeshe is terribly afraid of strangers she received usso kindly and she is so good to Mary and babyEven yesterday when baby pushed out herfavourite doll s eyes she did not scold him in theleast but tried to get Mary not to be angry withhim saying he was only a baby and a boy andof course couldn t love Dollie so much as theydid But afterwards I found her in her own roomcrying and though she tried to hide it from me Iknow she was crying about her doll s eyes forshe was so very fond of it We are so veryhappy here dear mamma as happy as we evercould be away from you and dear papa but if itwasn t for Vea I think we would cry very muchand if aunt had sent us to school away from babyand Mary we really would have broken our hearts


BIRTH DAY PRESENTS 69On Vea s next birth day any one could haveseen she was a great favourite with manypeople There was the long promised work boxfrom Uncle Sam pretty books from her mammaand papa and a nice present from each of hercousins Baby who had really been sorry aboutpoking out the poor doll s eyes had insistedupon getting another and in case anybody stoleit away through the night had slept with it inhis arms It is true the poor doll s face wasrather the worse of her bed fellow for baby wassuch a fat boy and always very hot in his bedso that the wax nose was somewhat melted beforethe morning came but so eager was he to presenthis gift that he never noticed itSee tousin Vea said the little fellow hergot two eyes pretty doll now Baby no hurtthis doll Oh no baby be dood to this dollThough Vea had made up her mind to give updolls for the future you may be sure she wasvery kind to baby s doll and whenever sheplayed with Mary and baby it was always madethe mistress of the doll s house to his great satisfactionAs for Mary she was never happy when longaway from her Cousin Vea and often in the


70 YEA S BED FELLOWmorning nurse would find her snugly tucked upin Vea s bed instead of in her own little crib shehaving crept slyly out during the night and poppedinto Vea s bed while nurse slept Sometimesnurse would give a loud snore and Mary wouldpause in sudden fright but after waiting a littleMary knew she had gone off to sleep again andthat the coast was clearI am not going to allow you to do this anymore Miss Mary said nurse You will begetting cold some night getting out of your warmbed And if you do it again I must speak to youraunt about itThen you will be a cross unkind nurse saidMary and I won t love youYou mustn t say that Mary dear said VeaNurse is anything but unkind and you knowif it isn t right you mustn t do itBut I don t like to sleep in my crib saidMary I m frightened in my crib and I ll cryoh ever so much if I can t sleep with youVea was so sorry for her little cousin that shewent away and asked her mamma s permission tohave Mary to sleep with her After hearing thatMary was still frightened for goblins an undernurse maid having cruelly told her they lay under


THE BEST FOR VEA 71her crib ready to pounce out upon her if she wasnaughty Mrs Campbell agreed to the request andever after Mary and Vea shared the same bedVery grateful was little Mary for the permission and if it was possible she loved her cousineven more than beforeI ll give this red one to Vea she said oneday as she and Jack returned together fromS Ai AlTHE BEST FOR VEAvisit to Uncle Sam and Mary insisted upon taking a peep at the apples she had got from himWhy that s the one Uncle Sam gave to yousaying it was the very nicest one said Jack


72 CONCLUSIONBut little Mary looked up with a look of greatindignation to reply Vea must have the veryprettiest one Jack not Mary and not anybodyelseYou are quite right poppet said Jacklaughing If every one of us gave her thebest of everything it would only be the rightthing to do for she is the most hospitable andkind little thing that ever lived I do believeWe are happy to say that Vea still lives withher cousins in the greatest harmony becauseshe tries to make her guests happy thinking ofthem always before herself as I hope you domy little readers when you have any littlefriends with you and she finds her mamma wasquite correct in saying Kinds words awakenkind echoes


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18 UNPACKING. to be back to the unpacking in a minute. The dinner-bell will be ringing very soon." Well, perhaps we had better go in," said Anna. "It is a little provoking that we cannot stay just a few minutes longer. I am certain I can finish the unpacking in a very short time. Jessie is always in such a hurry, and she is so particular." "We can come out after dinner," said Vea. "The ducks are always very late in returning home just now; and, if you like, I will help you to unpack." Oh, thank you very much," said Anna. We shall run in at once then; and perhaps this greedy duckling will have recovered somewhat when we come back." Though Anna had said her unpacking could be done in a very few minutes, she never would have managed it without Vea's help; and, indeed, Jessie had to lend her assistance also, for, somehow, the drawer could not be got to hold the contents of Miss Anna's box. "I'm sure, Jessie, I laid in everything as smooth as possible," said Anna, a little wofully. "I "really cannot understand it, unless your drawer is : arger than mine."



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66 THE DISTINGUISHED VISITORS. can describe it, to see the cavalcade coming up the avenue. "An Indian princess from the Punjaub, I do declare! Salaam! salaam bobita bee, Mahara*ja Sing. -That's excellent Hindustani; isn't it, Master Jack ?" Jack and Fred made it, Uncle Sam," said Vea. Wasn't it clever of them ? And they've. carried me almost all the way." "Uncle Sam made them all laugh, by declaring he was not prepared to receive such distinguished visitors; and if he had only known sooner, he would have ordered Martha to send for an elephant or two from the zoological gardens in London, for he was afraid such grand people couldn't get on without an elephant. Unfortunately it came on a very wet afternoon; but as they happened to be in the wood at the time wvith Maggie, Martha's grand-daughter, she showed them a nice sheltered place under a great beech hedge, where they sat quite sheltered from the rain, and listened to her delightful stories. "Oh dear, what a happy day we have had!" said Vea; "and, oh, how kind of you two boys to help me "Kind !" said Fred; "that is a joke. Why,



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WE SHOULD HELP OURSELVES. 19 "No, dear, it is just the same," said Jessie, good-naturedly coming forward to help. "Then perhaps I have got more clothes," said Anna. Oh no, I haven't; we have both the same." Under the careful fingers of Jessie the clothes were made to go into less bulk, and order was brought out of chaos. "I really don't understand how you get things to fold so small, Jessie," said Anna admiringly; and nothing ever attempts to go into a crease or a crumple with you. Oh, there the drawer shuts ; and am I not glad it is done! I'm sure I'm very much obliged to both of you ; and now I shall be able to go out after dinner without a thought on my mind." Vea could not help thinking that Jessie must be a very good-natured girl indeed. She never said, "Ah, didn't I tell you that!" or, "Why didn't you listen to me sooner!" as Vea knew other sisters did. All Jessie did say was, Yes, I'm glad too our work is done. Aunt will be pleased to see we can help ourselves a good deal. You know, Anna, we must help as much as possible, because aunt will have so much to do looking after so many of us."



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62 A SAD ACCIDENT. everybody slipped about on tip-toe, or stole stealthily behind to give Jack's hair or his jacket a twitch. Everything was getting on smoothly and joyfully, when James Fairley went down on his knees; and before any one could stop him, Jack, hearing the sound, made a dash in that u ijr T f F I I P I BLIND-MAN'S-BUFF. direction, and stumbling over James's back, fell with such force on the floor, that his nose began to bleed. That was not the only evil, for, in getting up again, James ran against Vea, and knocked her over also; and though she only slipped down on her knees, she sprained her ankle.



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16 WORK FIRST, PLAY AFTER. claimed, "will there be time to see your poultry before dinner ? Auntie was telling us about them, and baby was so anxious to see the little yellow ducklings !" "They are not yellow now," said Vea; and she continued, laughing, "they are not little either. Dickson was just saying this morning mamma would scarcely know them, they have grown so fat." "Couldn't we run down just now and see them ? said Anna, beginning to stuff some of her clothes into her box again. "Now, Anna," said Jessie, "that will never do. You know you said yourself to aunt that you wduld put those things into the drawer, and you must finish them before going out. If you don't do it now, you will forget all about it afterwards." "Oh no, I won't," said Anna; "do let me run down now, Jessie. I won't stay a moment;" and seizing Vea by the hand, ,he hurried away, dragging her cousin with her. When they reached the poultry-yard, however, they found the ducks were all away down to the mill-pond, and even Anna was forced to admit it would not do to follow them so far. But, just (358)



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NO ONE TO PLAY WITH. 21 Oh no, not now," said Vea, blushing scarlet. "I was frightened before you came, because I have always lived alone, you know, and have had no one to play with but my Dollie." How dull you must have been !" said Anna. THE COUSINS. Ah, but we will keep you cheery enough now. Jack and Freddie are such capital playfellows, and they can do all sorts of things." "I like them very much," said Vea. "They are not like some boys who came to spend the



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50 AN INTERRUPTION. "No, no, Jessie," interrupted Anna; "she was kind to him at first, you know." "Stop, Anna; don't interrupt me, please," said Jessie. "Yes, just at first she was kind to him, and to the old grandmother too; but when Dick's father went away any long journey, then she was always finding fault with Dick, and scolding the poor old grandmother till she could hardly bear it. She was in the very middle of her scolding one very windy, rainy night, when the door opened. and in walked Dick's father. He was not to have been home till the next night; but there he stood at the open door, looking quite astonished, and very sorry to hear his wife saying such unkind things to the poor old grandmother, who was such a kind and gentle creature.' At this point of the story, Fred's sharp eyes observed a young rat sitting not very far friom where they were, quietly nibbling away at an ear of corn. Oh, you little thief! cried Fred, flinging a stone at it, which sent it scampering away among the corn. "Fred, don't interrupt the story," said Anna; couldn't you have let the poor thing have its dinner in peace?-Do go on, Jessie, please." "Well, standing at Dick's father's back was a



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CHOOSING A DOLL. 9 CHOOSING A DOLL. And how frightened I was Uncle Sam would choose the other one; for though it was all ready



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VEA AND HER COUSINS. T is very strange, Dollie," said Vea Campbell to her doll, as they sat together in the arbour one day,-" I really cannot help being nervous and shy before strangers.-Are you listening to me, miss ? she continued. Well, you ought to, for, let me tell you, our happy days are very sobn to be at an end. Yes, you may stare with these great blue eyes of yours; but how will you like to feel yourself neglected and forsaken ? Mamma often says I am getting such a great girl, I must be thinking of something else than dolls; but oh, Dollie, you and I have been such good friends, I do feel sorry to give you up After sitting silent for a few minutes, she started



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RENDERING SERVICE. 15 till she had dragged Vea up to the nursery to see Miss Dollie. It was quite evident little Mary could be trusted with Vea's precious doll, for she lifted her up so carefully and stroked down her pretty white dress that had been put on to receive the expected guests that very morning; and so Vea left the two together, and ran downstairs again to see if Jessie and Anna required any assistance in unpacking their clothes, or anything of that kind. When Vea entered the room where they were, finding her mamma was not there, she could not help blushing and looking very shy and confused; but Jessie cried out at once, "Oh, come in, Cousin Vea. Could you help me to open this bag ? I cannot do it by myself. Oh, thank you so much, dear," said Jessie; "my head aches so, that I am scarcely able to do a thing. I suppose it is the long journey." It's just that," said Anna. "I'm sure I thought that train would have us all shaken to pieces. I'd like to give the man who made it go, a good scolding." "What good would that do, Anna ? said Jessie, laughing. "Why, it would teach him to drive more care-fully another time. But, I say, cousin," she ex-



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30 LOVE BEGETS LOVE. so shy; but I am trying not to be shy with my cousins, as I want them to love me very much." And I am sure we not only will love you," said Anna, when she had read the letter, but we do. At least I do, with all my might; and as for Mary, I never saw her take such a fancy to any one before. Jack, you must hold my hand while I write, under Vea's name, 'We do love Cousin Vea very, very much, mamma.' "Well, then, you must write it very small," said Jack, for there is scarcely room for it." Vea felt so happy, that when she sat reading her chapter that same evening she could hardly understand what it was about for thinking her cousins really loved her. Oh dear I must pay attention. What would Uncle Sam think if he knew that I am reading my chapter so carelessly, when I promised him I would always pay great attention, if he gave me the velvet Bible instead of the plain brown one. Now I mustn't think of my cousins any more." Jessie had her practising to attend to in the forenoon, so that Anna and Vea were thrown a good deal together,-and very many happy hours they spent. If Anna did not care for dolls, she



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BIRTH-DAY PRESENTS. 69' On Vea's next birth-day any one could have seen she was a great favourite with many people. There was the long-promised work-box from Uncle Sam, pretty books from her mamma and papa, and a nice present from each of her cousins. Baby, who had really been sorry about poking out the poor doll's eyes, had insisted upon getting another; and in case anybody stole it away through the night, had slept with it in his arms. It is true the poor doll's face was rather the worse of her bed-fellow; for baby was such a fat boy, and always very hot in his bed, so that the wax nose was somewhat melted before the morning came; but so eager was he to present his gift, that he never noticed it. See, tousin Vea," said the little fellow, "her got two eyes; pretty doll now. Baby no hurt this doll Oh no, baby be dood to this doll!" Though Vea had made up her mind to give up dolls for the future, you may be sure she was very kind to baby's doll; and whenever she played with Mary and baby, it was always made the mistress of the doll's-house, to his great satisfaction. As for Mary, she was never happy when long away from her Cousin Vea; and often in the



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22 UNKIND THREATS. day with us not long ago. They did nothing but frighten me all the time; and once, when mamma was out of the room, they rose up and took an apple each off the plate and hid them in their pockets, and then they said if I told upon them, they would ask a great ugly goblin to come down the chimney to eat me up." What horrid wicked boys," said Anna. If ever they come again, we must get Jack and Fred to give them a good fright. But you surely did not believe they could send a goblin down the chimney ? " Oh no," said Vea; but when Martha took away the candle after I was in bed, I couldn't help being nervous, and so I used to take my doll into bed to keep me company, and that is why the colour came out of her cheeks." I never cared for dolls, somehow," said Anna; but," she added kindly, "that was in India. I think I shall like them here, and yours especially." A few days after Vea's cousins had arrived, Mrs. Campbell said at breakfast, "Now, children, the mail leaves here to-morrow for India; I think you must all write a letter to mamma."



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UNCLE SAM'S INVITATION. 45 When Vea reached home, and had delivered the letter to her mamma, she discovered it was an invitation to her and all her cousins to go over to Uncle Sam's the next day to help the haymakers. That was a very joyful piece of news, and Vea lost no time in telling her cousins about it. We are to spend the whole day," said Vea, "and have dinner with Uncle Sam; and mamma and papa are coming there too, and we will have such fun Andoh dear, I was almost forgetting to tell you, Uncle Sam has brought a lovely croquet set from London instead of my work-box, and I'm so glad " Well, I must say it is very kind and jolly of him," said Jack. I was just thinking if we had croquet we could play on that piece of waste grass near the wood. It's rather rough at present, but we could level it, Fred, very soon." The next morning was as sunshiny as a morning could well be, and the little girls dressed in haste and hurried the taking of their breakfast, so that not a moment should be lost. What fun they had tossing the hay and when Uncle Sam came out, and began his acquaintance by taking up a great armful of hay and pitching it over his little guests, they fairly screamed with laughter. "We must give it him back again said Vea;



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a;srcss



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A SELFISH WISH. 11 this time; and as they lived in the country, and their house was at a considerable distance from any village, or even any house whatever, her shyness was quite perceptible to all, and she shrank from talking to any one, and made her escape, when any strangers came to call, as speedily as possible. She was a sweet dispositioned child, however, and troubled no one; for, as one of the old servants said, "Just give Miss Vea a book, or, what was still better even, her doll, she was perfectly content." Vea dear," said Mrs. Campbell, when the former entered the drawing-room, "I want you to sew tapes to that new set of pillow-cases. We must have everything ready for our little friends when they come." "I am so sorry you are going away, mamma," said Vea, the tears rising to her eyes. It will seem such a long time till I see you. I shall begin and count the hours the moment you and papa leave the house. Oh dear, I do wish these children were not coming!" Vea, my darling," said Mrs. Campbell a little sternly, "you are surely not going to be a selfish child! Would you rather have papa send your poor little cousins to live among strangers ? If you





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GETTING ROOTS FOR THE ROCKERY. 33 "Why, that isn't much to boast about," said Fred. Dick had been twice round the world, had sailed in every sea, was shipwrecked five times, lived on a desert island for seven months, and was tattooed by savages." Oh, do stop to take a breath," said Anna, laughing. "We all know that Dick was the most wonderful sailor on board our ship. Of course Chips was very nice too; but then lie wouldn't always tell his stories to every one,which you must own, Jack, was scarcely goodnatured.-But, Vea dear," she continued, "we must go away now to look for some wild-flowers. I should like to have some poppies and blue corn-flowers, they do look so pretty among the corn." "I scarcely think they will grow if we lift them just now," said Vea; "but we can take them up with plenty of earth round the roots. We shan't get many of the wild-flowers till spring ; but then I know where to find heaps of them." When the little basket was filled with as many roots as they could find, Vea and Anna sat down at the edge of the corn-field to make a wreath of the wild-flowers they had collected. "How fast (358) 3



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)6 IN TIIE ARISOUR. A FRIENDLY CHAT. as if from a revefie, to say, Oh, but I am forgetting to tell you all about it, Dollie; and you know we never had a secret in our lives. I've always



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THE WHOLE STORY. 7 told you everything. There, now, I'll take off your hat, it is so hot, and then I shall tell you the whole story. Well, then, Dollie, you must know that when mamma sent for me this morning after breakfast, instead of giving me my French lesson as usual, she made me get my work, and while she was preparing it, she told me a piece of news. VEA AND HER MAMMIA. I had asked, you know, Dollie, why I wasn't to get my French grammar; and mamma said, with such a funny look in her eyes, 'Guess why, Vea.' "Of course you know, Dollie, what a bad guesser I am, and so I said, 'Please do tell me, mamma; but instead of telling me there and then,



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34 A HARVEST-HOME IN PROSPECT. the corn is ripening," said Vea. "Uncle Sam will be having his harvest-home very soon now. What a large party he will have this season !" MAKING THE WREATH. But will he invite us too ? said Anna; "he is not our uncle, you know." Oh yes, of course he will," said Vea; and he is your uncle, though he is mamma's brotherhe means to be, at anyrate, because he said when he was here last, and after I had told him you were coming, 'Dear me, what a rich old uncle I shall be !' so you see he expects you to call him



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VEA IN HER PALANQUIN. 65 After this speech Jack disappeared, and then Fred followed, and nowhere could Anna find them. After they had been gone for some hours, she thought she heard a sound of hammering and sawing coming from the direction of the tool-house, and was running to open the door, when Fred came slipping out, and asked her not to come neai them for some time. He was so earnest about it, that though Anna was a little inquisitive by nature, she good-naturedly consented to keep out of their way. "You shall know about it the very first," said Fred, "if you will only have patience for a very few minutes." When the children came down, ready to set out for Uncle Sam's, there stood at the door a little miniature palanquin. It was rough-looking, no doubt, but quite strong enough to bear Vea's weight. She was seated in it in great state, and the boys clapped the long poles on their shoulders, and carried her off amidst much laughter. Of course, they didn't carry her all the way, for she was able to walk a good bit; but the moment the boys saw her walking a little stiffly, they insisted upon her getting in again. You can imagine the astonishment of Uncle Sam, better than I (358) 5



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42 UNSELFISH VEA. "But I thought you wanted a work-box very much; what has made you change your mind? said sly Uncle Sam. "I have been thinking we could all play at the game," said Vea; "I really think the boys will be delighted to have it." "And so you have got to be very friendly with your cousins," said Uncle Sam. I thought you said you wished they were not coming, and that you were sure you never would get on with them. Why have you changed your mind ? " Oh, please, Uncle Sam, don't speak of my naughty words any more," said Vea earnestly. I am so sorry; but mamma says if I am kind to them now, she will not speak of it. I do love them ever so much, and I am trying to make them feel quite at home. Mamma says, 'Kind words awaken kind echoes;' and you know, uncle, if I make them welcome to all my toys, and books, and everything, they will, perhaps, like to stay with us, and be able to bear the separation from their mamma better. They feel very dull sometimes; and I know both Jessie and Anna cry in their beds, and want to have her near them again very much." "Then I suppose I shall order the croquet



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VEA AND HER COUSINS. C"t €1



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44 HOW PETER WAS FOUND OUT. pupils, so Vea knew it must be something very bad indeed; and was quite shocked to hear that Peter had not only taken the eggs out of a robin redbreast's nest, but he had said he never had touched them. Alas! when sitting down after saying his lesson, somebody had pressed a little too close to his pocket; the eggs, which were hidden away in a corner of it, got smashed, and the contents ran down on the floor. Of course after that, the dunce's cap had to be put on, and Peter had to stand with the eyes of all his companions fixed on him. "Oh, shame, shame, to take the eggs from a pretty robin redbreast!" the worthy dame was just saying when Vea entered. "What did the kind robins do to the poor little orphan children in the wood ? " Covered them with warm leaves," said a little girl, the tears standing in her eyes; "Miss Vea read the story." Finding they remembered it so well, Vea promised to come the next Thursday and read them another; and as the naughty Peter looked very sorry, and as he promised never to touch birds' eggs again, Vea begged him off from further punishment, and the cap was hung carefully up on its accustomed peg.



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THE LETTER TO INDIA. .23 "Oh yes, auntie," said Jessie; "we must manage to get a nice long letter written somehow." "But I can write very little," said Anna, and Fred can only do half-text, and Mary and baby can't do it at all." Me can," said little Mary; me can write !" You leave it all to me, Miss Anna," said her brother Jack. We shall get one large sheet of paper, and every one must write something on it; and as Anna has made the first objection, I think she ought to be made to write her portion first." Oh no, no, I really can't!" exclaimed Anna; but Jack had the paper and everything ready in a few minutes, and was so kind holding her hand steady all the time. He said it was to prevent the pen from spelling wrong, for he was sure Anna could do it better by herself; and he suggested such funny things to tell their mamma, that every one was quite anxious for their turn to come, to put in their share." Now," said Jack, when Anna had signed her name all by herself, "we must drop a little bit of sealing-wax just here, and make baby kiss it, that will do for him; and then comes Mary's turn. What are we to say to mamma, poppet ?"



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VEA DISLIKES HER DANCING-LESSONS. 55 and tried hard to please her; but in presence of Monsieur Bounce all her old shyness returned, and she could hardly keep from crying when she heard his name announced. "Oh, I wish mamma would let me stop these horrid dancing-lessons," said Vea, one day, to Jessie. "I know I shall never be able to please M. Bounce. I get so nervous when he begins to dance himself, and stretches up his arms, and THE DANCING-LESSON. puts out his toes. I feel ready to drop down with fright." "It's because you dance better than any of us," said Jessie, laughing. "M. Bounce is evidently delighted with your performance, especially when



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THE EVENING OF THE PARTY. 59 cry, Uncle Sam; Mary give you her p-rety shoes." For the first time in Vea's remembrmnce, Uncle Sam looked angry; and that was when Fred said, "Oh, you little goose, your shoes won't fit Uncle Sam." "You mind your own business, sir," he said, rather sharply. "Keep your pretty shoes, my little pet; you're not a goose, but a dear, kind little Mary." When the school children came, and had their tea, immediately after the things were cleared away the games were commenced. They ran races for sixpences, and played at hide-and-seek, and puss-in-the-corner, and ever so many more, till it was time to go home. Then they sang a hymn, and after receiving some fruit, went home shouting and hurrahing at the top of their voices. Then the rectory children were left, and it was discovered there was plenty of time for a game at hunt-the-slipper before supper. The Campbells seldom quarrelled among themselves. They were always so accommodating, the one to the other, bearing and forbearing, as their mamma had made them promise to be before they parted from her. But it is very odd how a little discord, once it



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40 A DISAPPOINTMENT. THE LITTLE LETTER-CARRIER, I think I should be, uncle," said Vea shyly. "I thinki I should be, uncle," said Vea shvly.



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JESSIE'S STORY. 4) Sam should choose her. "Jessie will tell us one : she knows ever so many, because she used to get Dick and a number more of the sailors to tell her stories." Very well, then, Miss Jessie, we will take one from you, if you please," said Uncle Sam. "Shall I tell how Dick went to sea ? said Jessie; "I don't recollect another just now." "Oh yes, do," cried Anna; "I have almost forgotten it, and it was so funny, that part about-" Stop, Anna! cried Jessie; we must not tell the end before the beginning." "Certainly not," said Uncle Sam, choosing a comfortable tuft of grass, and taking little Mary on his knee; "begin at the beginning, by all means." "Well, then," began Jessie, "when Dick was a little boy he lived with his grandmother and his father, because his mother was dead. He had no little sisters or brothers, because they were all dead too; but he had ever so many boys to play with, and went to school, and was very happy. Then his father married a second time, and hi. step-mother was very unkind to him, and used to make him work very hard-" (:i:,s 4



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46 GIVING IT 111 BACK 'AGAIN. UNOLE SAM. and forthwith every one seized a bundle of hay, and began to fling it at him, determined to bury him under a great



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20 GETTING ON FAMOUSLY. Oh yes, of course I shall," replied Anna. It was so good of aunt to let us come here, instead of sending us away from the little ones to a school. But there goes the dinner-bell, so come along, Vea." After dinner, Vea and Anna hastened out to look for the ducks, but, somehow, they were nowhere to be found; so Vea, having proposed to bring out her new fairy-tale book, ran into the house for it, while Anna waited by the side of the little stream in case the ducks should come up during their absence. "You're not a bit shy," said Anna abruptly, as Vea came back with the book. Uncle said you were very shy, but I can't see it; and the boys were telling Jessie, when you were out of the room, that you had been so kind to them, offering them the loan of all your pretty books. I think we shall all get on famously-don't you ? " Yes, I hope so," said Vea earnestly. I am very shy; but I don't feel half so frightened for you as I expected to be." Half frightened !" exclaimed Anna. Why, Cousin Vea, you surely don't mean to say you are frightened in the tiniest bit for us. You are not afraid of me, Vea, surely ?



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BEING KIND AND COURTEOUS. 27 surprise each time when Charley exclaimed, Oh, dere it is, baby pony!" Then nurse came for him to put him to bed for his forenoon's rest, and Vea was free to run back to the schoolroom. As she was slipping away on tiptoe, her papa, who had been listening to her remarks, called her to him and said, I'm glad to see my little daughter trying to make herself useful. That is right, my darling; be kind and courteous to your little friends, and they will not only love you, but respect and esteem you." You may be sure Vea felt very happy, and was quite in the humour to enter into any game or sport her cousins might suggest. Some heavy showers had fallen in the morning, so that till the ground dried a little they could not go out; and as Fred had finished his portion of the letter, he and Anna were a little at a. loss what to do with themselves. We might have a game at puss-in-the-corner," said Anna; "but then it will disturb Jack and Jessie." Oh, don't mind us," said Jack. "I think, Jessie, you and I had better go up-stairs to the nursery; baby is asleep, I daresay, so he won't disturb us."



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THE SURLY GANDER. 87 5 rOLLY HERDINC! HER GEESE. gobble at him, so that he was forced to remain in the lane. Polly was quite vexed at their be-



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36 VERY RUDE BEHAVIOUR. At this moment Fred came running up to see what had become of them, for Jack was waiting to put in the roots, if they had succeeded in getting any. So they retraced their steps homewards. As they were going up the lane, Anna cried out, "0 Vea, do look through this gap in the hedge; there's such a funny-looking little girl, and she is driving such big ducks before her " That is Polly," replied Vea; "and these are geese, not ducks. Would you like to speak to her?-she is a very nice little girl." "Yes, I should like it very much," said Anna, creeping through the gap, followed by Vea and Fred; but no sooner did the geese spy them than they set up such a gobbling, and hissing, and quacking, that Fred was so frightened he crept back into the lane, calling out, "Oh, do come back; I have been told geese are dangerous birds." Little Polly, however, ran forward and gave the gander a sharp tap on the bill with her stick; and her little brother Joseph valiantly slapped the geese, and scolded them very severely. When the geese discovered the young ladies were friends they became quiet; but every time Fred popped his head through the gap, they began to hiss and



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ALL ALONE. 17 when they were turning to run in again, Vea spied a duckling sitting all alone by itself in a very disconsolate condition, winking its bright eyes, and opening its yellow bill as if it were gasping for air. Oh, what a dear, fat little thing," cried Anna. What is it doing there all by itself, Vea ? "I am afraid it has taken too much dinner," -" A GREEDY DUCKLING. said Vea. Ducks are such greedy things, they never know when to stop." "I should like to see it swim so much," said Anna. "Don't you think it would do it a great deal of good if we poked it into the water with a stick ? "Perhaps it would," said Vea; "but," she continued timidly, "we are forgetting we promised (85ss 2



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72 CONCLUSION. But little Mary looked up with a look of great indignation to reply, "Vea must have, the very prettiest one, Jack,-not Mary, and not anybody *else." "You are quite right, poppet," said Jack, laughing. "If every one of us gave her the best of everything, it would only be the right thing to do; for she is the most hospitable and kind little thing that ever lived, I do believe." We are happy to say that Vea still lives with her cousins in the greatest harmony, because she tries to make her guests happy, thinking of them always before herself,-as I hope you do, my little readers, when you have any little friends with you; and she finds her mamma was quite correct in saying,-Kinds words awaken kind echoes.



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70 YEA'S BED-FELLOW. morning nurse would find her snugly tucked up in Vea's bed instead of in her own little crib, she having crept slyly out during the night and popped into Vea's bed while nurse slept. Sometimes nurse would give a loud snore, and Mary would pause in sudden fright; but, after waiting a little, Mary knew she had gone off to sleep again, and that the coast was clear. "I am not going to allow you to do this any more, Miss Mary," said nurse. "You will be getting cold some night, getting out of your warm bed. And if you do it again, I must speak to your aunt about it." "Then you will be a cross, unkind nurse," said Mary, and I won't love you." "You mustn't say that, Mary dear," said Vea. Nurse is anything but unkind--and, you know, if it isn't right, you mustn't do it." "But I don't like to sleep in my crib," said Mary. "I'm frightened in my crib, and I'll cry -oh, ever so much !-if I can't sleep with you Vea was so sorry for her little cousin that she went away and asked her mamma's permission to have Mary to sleep with her. After hearing that Mary was still frightened for goblins-an under nurse-maid having cruelly told her they lay under



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THE BEST FOR VEA. 71 her crib ready to pounce out upon her if she was naughty-Mrs. Campbell agreed to the request, and ever after Mary and Vea shared the same bed. Very grateful was little Mary for the permission, and, if it was possible, she loved her cousin even more than before. I'll give this red one to Vea," she said one day, as she and Jack returned together from ; S'Ai 'Al THE BEST FOR VEA. visit to Uncle Sam, and Mary insisted upon taking a peep at the apples she had got from him. Why, that's the one Uncle Sam gave to you, saying it was the very nicest one !" said Jack.



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48 A VISIT TO THE RUINED CHAPEL. the last brood, and had admired them so much as to delight Martha immensely, they went with MARTHA'S 1'ET BROOD. Uncle Sam to see an old ruined chapel in the neighbourhood. They were a little tired when they reached the spot where the ruin stood, and were glad to sit down and rest under some shady trees there. No sooner were they seated than Vea cried out, "0 Uncle Sam, do tell us a story." "What, miss! ask me for a story in the presence of such experienced travellers. No, no; we must get Miss Anna here to tell us one." "Oh, but I really am a very bad story-teller," said Anna, yet feeling a little flattered that Uncle



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38 A VERY BRAVE BOY. haviour, but explained that the gander and the white goose were strangers, her mother having bought them the week before at the market. "I was quite afraid of them myself, miss," said Polly, "and so was Joseph; he is a little afraid of the gander even yet, because the first morning mother let it out, it flew over to where Joseph was standing, and he got such a fright that he fell down." "Him hurt all my nose!" said little Joseph, pointing to a scar on the point of his nose ; "but Joseph strike gander now, and gander is afraid." "I'm sure you are a very brave boy," said Vea, laughing. Oh, Polly, do you know when James is to take in Uncle Sam's hay ? "Well, miss, I heard him say to mother she had better be ready to-morrow or next day, because master had written to tell him he would be home to-morrow." "Oh, I am so glad said Vea. We are all coming down to help; please tell James that, Polly." That same afternoon Mrs. Campbell sent Vea with some soup and wine to a poor woman, and on her return she called in to see her Uncle Sam's housekeeper, kind old Martha. To her great



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WHAT VEA WROTE. 29 The space was rather small, but Vea managed to get in what would make her aunt in India very happy. My dear aunt," she wrote, I am so glad my cousins are here; but I am sorry you THE FINISHED LETTER. are not with them. I will try to make them happy, because I was so very dull when mamma went up to London. Papa, and mamma too, say I could make people much happier if I was not:



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VEA AND HER COUSINS; OR, KIND WORDS AWAKEN KIND ECHOES. Z alc for the ]oung. BY MRS. GEORGE CUPPLES, AUTHOR OF THE STORY OF OUR DOLL," THE LITTLE CAPTAI," ETC., ETC. LONDON: T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW; EDINBURGH; AND NEW YORK. 1872.



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ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL. 53 but couldn't do any harm; and then Dick slipped out by the back-door and locked it, calling, 'Fire I fire !' Up got the step-mother in a fright, and seeing the light, thought the house was on fire, and jumped out of bed, when down came the bucket of water upon her, nearly drowning her. Dick got his clothes, and made his escape, and got to the sea-side, and into a ship, and sailed away." "Well, all's well that ends well," said Uncle Sam, laughing; "not that it ended so well for the step-mother, though; but I think we are all agreed in thinking that the ducking she got served her right." After dinner Uncle Sam got the man James to fasten a rope to two trees, to make a swing of it for them, and there they stayed till tea-time; indeed, so delighted were some of them that even up to the last moment they were at it, and made Uncle Sam promise to let it stay till their return. The next time they came, however, kind Uncle Sam had got a beautiful swing put up-a real one with a wooden seat, and a rope at each side for the boys to pull. And he was never done planning all sorts of nice games to make the children happy.



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60 DISCORD DESTROYS HARMONY. is allowed to slip in, destroys harmony, and withers up real pleasure. "I say, that's not fair," cried James Fairley, who had been hunting for the slipper for ever so H1UNT-THE-SLIPPER. long without success. "You shouldn't pitch it about that way. I won't play; I tell you it's cheating." "Oh no, it isn't," said Vea; "we played it just as we are doing now at your house last Christmas. Don't you remember what raps you gave me on the fingers; and then, when I tried



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s-



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28 PUSS-IN-THE-CORNER. When they were gone, Fred and Anna set about clearing the room a little for puss-in-thecorner, and a very hearty game they had; but just when they had fixed to play for only five minutes longer, Fred tripped over something, and, falling, struck his eye a severe blow on the edge of a chair. Vea ran for water to bathe it, and Anna for a large handkerchief to bind it up; and they were glad to see, though his eye watered a good deal, it was not so much hurt as they had fancied. When the handkerchief was tied on, Vea said that, as they could not play very well now, she and Anna would take turns in reading a story. Fred said he would like to hear one of the fairy-tales, and Vea was in the very middle of it, when Jack came running in to show them the letter finished. "Doesn't it look a jolly long one? he exclaimed. "Look, it's all covered with writing-all but this little space at the bottom. Won't mamma be pleased "But, Jack," said Anna, Vea must write something; she can write quite beautifully,--all' by herself, too." Certainly," said Jack, seeing that VeY's eyes sparkled, and that she evidently liked the idea. "Just wait a moment till I run up for the ink."



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12 WELCOME IS THE BEST CHEER. feel the separation of a week from us very much, think of your poor cousins losing their mamma and papa for years." 0 mamma, do forgive me for being so cross," said Vea. "I quite forgot that. It must have been very sad indeed for them to part with their mamma -and the little boy Charley, isn't he quite a baby? Poor little boy I shall try to get over my shyness, mamma, and be very kind to them. Can I do anything, do you think, mamma, to make them happy? "Well, my child," said her mamma, "I have no doubt we shall find a good many things byand-by; in the meantime, try and think kindly of your cousins, so that when they come they may feel that they are welcome. Remember, dear, that welcome is the best cheer." For ever so many days, both before her mamma's departure for London and after, Vea, while at work or with her favourite companion, Miss Dollie, kept planning all sorts of things she meant to do for them when they arrived. And so busy was she, that the time slipped away quite imperceptibly; and very much surprised indeed was she to receive a letter from her papa, addressed to herself, all the way from London, to tell her



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52 FRIGHTENING THE CRUEL STEP-MOTHER. would stay; and Uncle Richard was so pleased, he gave him half-a-crown all to himself." "No, Jessie, it was a two-shilling piece," said Anna, "because you-" "Stop, Anna, stop," said Jessie, waving her hand. "Well, after Uncle Richard and Dick's father had gone away, the step-mother was crosser than ever; and the old grandmother was so miserable that she was very glad when some ladies got her admission into an alms-house. She would have taken Dick with her, but it was against the rules for her to have him; but he used to go as often as he could to help her. Well, Dick was determined to run away to sea and find out his Uncie Richard; so he let some boys into the secret, and they determined that before he left they should give the step-mother a good fright. So one day when she was out they hoisted a great bucket of water on to the top of the bed. Dick got his clothes tied up in a bundle, and hidden away in a friend's house. Then, when his step-mother was asleep, Dick tied the clothes with a string to the bed somehow, and fastened the clothes to a string, and that again to the bucket. Then he got a piece of paper, and set it on fire in the middle of the room, where it made a great blaze,



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A DELIGHTFUL UNCLE. -35 Uncle, Sam; and I hope you will, else he may be vexed." Oh, of course I shall, for he must be a very nice uncle," said Anna, who was never long in making up her mind about a thing; but why hasn't he been here to see us ? " Because he has gone to London on business," replied Vea; but mamma had a letter from him this very morning, and he says he expects to be back in a few days. When he does come, I suppose the very first thing he will do is to come over to see us. He is going to bring me a new work-box when he returns." "What a delightful uncle he must be," said Anna ; "I hope he will come very soon." "So do I," said Vea. "The hay is almost ready for taking home, and Uncle Sam said we must all go over and help the people to carry it in. It is such fun, haymaking!" "So I have heard," said Anna. "I shall like to make hay very much, because we never can do such things in India, you know. But I thought hay was made much earlier in the season." Oh, so it is," said Vea; but this is the second crop. Uncle Sam had such a large quantity made ever so long ago."



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PPAPAS LETTER. 13 that they would all be home the next afternoon. Why, Dollie dear, did you ever hear the like of that! They are all to be at homn to-morrow night! And hear what papa says about you, miss, -'I hope Dollie is well. Give her my love. Tell her there is at this moment a little girl sitting on my knee, by name Mary, and she is as fond of dolls as a certain young lady I know very well.' Papa means me, you know, Dollie. But isn't that very good news I was always afraid they wouldn't like dolls; that they would be above such playthings." A very happy little girl was Vea the next afternoon, when, standing on the doorstep watching for the carriage, it came at last, and in a moment after she found herself first in her father's arms and then in her two cousins', Jessie and Anna, who spoke so kindly to her, just as if they had known her all their lives long. Vea quite forgot to be shy, and was shaking hands with Jack and Freddie, and helping them to carry up the baskets and portmanteaus. And they seemed such nice, wellbehaved boys, that Vea, over and over again, kept thinking to herself, "Oh, I am so glad they have come!" Then, when little Mary, who was con-



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82 MANY HANDS MAKE LIGIT WORIK. the purpose of building it. Then Jack found some fantastically-shaped roots of trees, and Fred wheeled the soil from the wood; so that, with so many willing hands to help, the rockery was soon ready for the roots to be put in. At this point Vea was able to be very useful, because she had seen a lovely rockery in the Hall garden, and remembered exactly how the flowers were put in. We must get Matthew to give us some of the plant I call summer-snow for the very top," said Vea. It is always pretty, but when it is in bloom it looks like a beautiful crown. Then the scarlet Tom-Thumb geraniums, they look so well beside it, and the blue lobellia hanging down is set off with the white also." That's the national colours!" said Fred. "Of course we must have it arranged so. 'Three cheers for the red, white, and blue !' Do you remember how Dick the tall sailor used to sing that song of a Saturday evening ? Wasn't he a jolly fellow " Yes, he was," said Jack; "but I liked Chips the carpenter best. To be sure he was a little surly at times, but he soon got over his crossness. And such yarns as he could tell! why, I do believe he had been all round the world."



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O 14 N iJNL U! ~i i



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58 MARY'S PRETTY NEW SHOES. You may be sure every one did their best to earn the holiday, so that they might help their kind aunt. And they did help her too, and left her so little to do, that instead of feeling fatigued before the school children arrived, as had been the case on former occasions, she was, as she said, as fresh as a rose. Perhaps the happiest little girl present was little Mary. Nurse had put such beautiful blue rosettes on her slippers to match her gay sash, that for ever so long she could do nothing but show them off to every person. "See my pretty new shoes," she cried. "Nurse made them for Mary." And when Uncle Sam arrived, happening to be at the head of the stairs, she popped her foot through the railings, calling out, See, Uncle Sam my pretty new shoes." "Oh dear, what am I to do ? said Uncle Sam, when she had come down, and he had her on his knee; I haven't got any pretty shoes like that!" and he pretended he was crying. Little Mary looked wistfully at her precious shoes, but her soft heart couldn't stand the idea of poor Uncle Sam having none ; so slipping off his knee, she began tugging off his boot, to the amusement of everybody, while she said, "No



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AN UNEXPECTED PLEASURE. 39 surprise and delight, as she was passing the library window on her way round to the door, who should come out but Uncle Sam himself. "Hollo !" he called, "is that my little lettercarrier ? Why, then, here's a letter to be delivered immediately. What a good thing you happened to pass this way, else it would have been ever so long of reaching its destination." "Oh, I shall be so glad to take it, uncle," said Vea; "but who is it for? " Ah, that's the question," he said, shaking the letter at her. Now I think I shall not give it to you at all, but send little Joseph over with it to the post-office." "Oh no, Uncle Sam; do give it me, please," said Vea, laughing. "I feel sure it is something very nice, and I know it is to mamma!" "Well now, who would have expected that little puss to be such a clever guesser," said Uncle Sam. "There, take it, and be off with you, else I'll never get all the letters I have to write finished in time." "But, Uncle Sam, please tell me, have you brought my work-box ? said Vea. "Well, miss, if I said 'No,' would you be disappointed ? said Uncle Sam, trying to look grave.



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PREPARING FOR TIE HOLIDAY. 57 Every one had to be diligent that week, because Mrs. Campbell asked the governess to give her pupils a whole holiday on the Friday. "It is for a selfish motive," said Mrs. Campbell, laughing. "I want your young folks, Miss Taylor, to help me with my preparations." "Oh, delightful! cried Anna; may we set the tea-things, and may we cut up the cake, and may we do all sorts of things ? " Certainly," said Mrs. Campbell; while everybody laughed at Anna's enthusiasm. "I shall have lots of things for all of you to do. Many hands make light work, so I expect to have nothing to do but direct. I shall feel quite like a queen, with so many fairy princesses to work for me." Oh, do be the Princess Gudoloup," said Vea. She was such a dear good creature, and everybody loved her, and were so glad to help her; and ;she-" "Yes," interrupted Anna; "and no wonder everybody loved her, she was so unselfish,-and I am sure auntie is that." Well, well, I'm sure I feel highly flattered," said Mrs. Campbell, laughing. "So if I am to be a princess, I command you all to get your lessons .correctly, that you may be at liberty to help me"



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A DIFFICULT QUESTION. 41 "Now, then, I want to know this. When I went into the shop I looked round, and I saw a great many beautiful things," said Uncle Sam; such lovely work-boxes included. Then my eye fell upon a very handsome set of croquet, and I discovered that the work-box and the croquet set were both the same price. I can't afford both, so I have been wondering which you would choose -the croquet set or the work-box." Vea sat down on the step by the window, and turned the matter over in her mind. She had been very anxious to have the work-box, and had earned it by saying ever so many French exercises quite correctly; and if the truth were told, she was a good deal disappointed that the work-box was not produced without further trouble. Then as for the croquet set, she did not care particularly fdo it,-she would greatly prefer the work-box; but then it came into her mind, that if she chose the former it would be a source of amusement to all her cousins. After all, the work-box was rather a selfish thing to choose; and besides, the old one she had might be mended up, and made to serve a little longer. Having come to this conclusion, she said at once, "I think, Uncle Sam, I shall have the croquet set."





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UNDER TIE BEECH ILEDGE. 7 UJ SLELTIRED FROM THE SLIOWEIR. if we hadn't helped you, it would have been a shame. Haven't you been doing ,, everything in your power to help us ever since we came -I do declare, I haven't



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DAME HODSON'S SCHOOL. 43 set," said Uncle Sam, after he had kissed little Vea. I knew, somehow, you would choose them; indeed, so sure was I, that I brought them with me. Stop, stop, I won't answer another word: Be off with you, this moment;-dear me, I was forgetting to ask you to call in at the dame's school with this letter as you pass. Tell the worthy Dame Hodson, I shall look in upon her to-morrow." NAUGHTY PETER. Away went Vea, and she was not long in reaching the cottage where Dame Hodson kept her school. As she entered she nearly burst out laughing at the sight of a little boy standing on a stool, with a dunce's cap on his head. It was not often that the kind dame punished her



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64 WILLING HELPERS. When she was able to move about again, Jessie insisted upon her leaning on her; and as for Jack, he would have liked to have carried her on his back to any distance, if she had only allowed him. WILLING IELPERS. When Uncle Sam invited them down the next Saturday to spend the day, Vea's mamma was a little afraid she would not be able to walk so far; but Jack had said at the time, "Oh yes, we'll manage it somehow, auntie. Do say we may go, and Vea's foot won't suffer a bit."



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UNKIND WORDS. 61 to catch hold of it, you flung it over to Tom Riddle !" Oh, that's just nonsense," said James rudely. "I have no recollection of playing it in any such manner; whichever way we played it, we never cheated." Come, come, we had better stop," said Jack, somewhat hotly. "Cheat is a hard word, and I for one don't like it to be laid at my door." There was a feeling of discomfort among them after this speech, and for a time no one seemed inclined to propose any new game, or to do anything to wipe out of recollection the unkind words. Vea, however, remembered it lay with her more than any one to restore peace and good-will; so she said, Oh, couldn't we play at something else? We have a few minutes yet." Well, I shall be glad, for one, to join," said Jack, wishing to show that he was ready to be good-natured, for one. We might have blind-man's-buff," said Jessie. "Come, Master Jack, you must be the first blindman; so come along, and let me tie your eyes up very carefully." Away went Jack, first to one side and then to another, groping about very cautiously, while



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68 JESSIE'S TESTIMONY TO VEA'S KINDNESS. thought of India for the last week, I do feel so happy here." You may be sure Vea was pleased to hear Fred say this; but if she had seen the letter Jessie sent to her mamma a few days after, she would have been more so. "You have no idea what a nice girl Cousin Vea is," wrote Jessie. "Aunt told us before we went down, that she was very shy, and greatly preferred living alone; but though we can see she is terribly afraid of strangers, she received us so kindly,-and she is so good to Mary and baby. Even yesterday, when baby pushed out her favourite doll's eyes, she did not scold him in the least, but tried to get Mary not to be angry with him; saying he was only a baby, and a boy, and, of course, couldn't love Dollie so much as they did. But afterwards I found her in her own room crying, and though she tried to hide it from me, I know she was crying about her doll's eyes, for she was so very fond of it. We are so very happy here, dear mamma,-as happy as we ever could be away from you and dear papa; but if it wasn't for Vea, I think we would cry very much; and if aunt had sent us to school away from baby and Mary, we really would have broken our hearts."



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26 IN THE LIBRARY. to bring baby in there, explaining that the schoolroom was required entirely for the letterwriters. "I shall keep him very quiet, papa dear," she said. "He is very fond of pictures, and especially my book with the animals in it; may I have it, papa ? AMUSING COUSIN CHARLEY. "Oh certainly, dear," said Mr. Campbell; when such a great piece of business is afoot, we must do our best to amuse Charley." Very patient was Vea with little Charley. If he insisted upon turning back to the picture of the boy on the pony, she looked it up for him quite pleasantly, and went through the same amount of



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8 MAMMA'S PIECE OF NEWS. she asked me if I never felt dull, and did I never wish to have any companions of my own age, little girls like myself. Then Ianswered, 'Oh no, mamma, I am quite happy with my Dollie. I don't ever want to have any one else to play with.' Now, don't you think that was very good of me, miss ? I would greatly prefer to see you less fond of your Dollie, Vea,' said mamma then. 'Being so much alone with her just adds to your bashfulness. Papa was remarking the other day you get shyer and shyer. We must get you cured of it somehow.' "That was what papa said, Dollie. Listen, now, while I tell you mamma's piece of news. Papa has a brother in India,-he is my Uncle Charles, you know, who sent the pretty Indian.toys to me,--and a few days ago he sent a letter telling papa he meant to send all his children home, and asking papa to meet them when the ship arrived in London. That was where you were made, Miss Dollie; for, don't you remember when Uncle Sam took me to buy you, the shopkeeper said you were not a common doll, Uut a London one, and that was why you were so expensive. What a beautiful doll you were then, to be sure!



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14 THE ARRIVAL OF THE VISITORS. stantly expecting to see her mamma again, after running out and in all the rooms, came to her, and with trembling lips said, "Me want mamma. Mary no can find mamma," she just flung her arms round the child and fairly cried. "Poor little Mary," she kept saying, "I shall let mamma be your mamma as much as she is mine, and I CONSOLING LITTLE MIA.Y. won't be the least jealous of you; and papa says you like dolls as much as I do, so you shall have my Dollie to play with whenever you like." Perhaps little Mary did not understand all that Vea said, but she knew she meant to be kind, and was much interested about the doll, never resting



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A WONDERFUL PEACEMAKER. 63 Really everybody was very glad when the hour came for the Fairleys to go home; and as Anna said, she hoped they would not come back in a hurry again; for a more disagreeable boy than James she never remembered seeing. "He didn't seem a bit sorry for hurting Vea's foot," said Fred; "and as for Jack's nose, he laughed outright. He is a very mean fellow." Well, we won't play at blind-man's-buff again with him, at all events," said Anna. "The idea of telling us we were cheating at hunt-the-slipper, and then behaving so badly afterwards to us !" "We won't say any more about them," said Vea; "I think it would vex mamma; so, if you please, we won't speak of the accident. I hope my foot will be all right in the morning." It was not right in the morning, but a great deal worse; and poor Vea had to lie on the sofa for ever so many days. It was very astonishing how much her cousins missed her. They had no idea till then that she had been so helpful, she was so quiet and shy; but now they felt that she was a wonderful peacemaker, and that it must be owing to her gentle, loving disposition that so. much harmony was maintained in the school-room, or at their games in the nursery.



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LETTER-WRITING UNDER DIFFICULTIES. 25 kept suggesting all sorts of things long before the first had been written down. With difficulty could she be induced to leave off, and only consented to do this on the condition that she had a drop of sealing-wax appended to her signature, to send a kiss to her mamma also. Even then she was not satisfied, but insisted upon another drop being added for a kiss to papa. As everybody was busy with this letter in some way, Vea noticed that little Charley was left without a playmate, and was, therefore, rather fretful, which threw the letter-writers into a state, of discomposure. Oh dear," said Fred, looking up from the letter, where he had been for the last five minutes vainly endeavouring to spell out" My dearest mamma." Oh, if somebody would only keep baby quiet, I would get on. I feel always on the point of writing horse instead of mamma, he keeps saying it so often." Come with me, baby darling," said Vea; and though she would have preferred staying in the room, for the letter-writing was not only exciting but interesting, she coaxed him out of the room, and played with him and his horse for ever so Ibng. Then, when he was tired, she knocked gently at the library door, and asked permission



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K8 ,SUCH PRETTY NEW SHOES /



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10 EXPECTED VISITORS. dressed, and you had only a night-gown on, I fell in love with you the first moment I saw you. I really think you loved me too, my pet, for you looked up in my face so sweetly when I said, '0 Uncle Sam, I should like to have this one so much!'-But, oh dear me, Dollie, I am quite for.. getting to tell you mamma's story. Well, then, it is arranged that both mamma and papa are going to London the beginning of next week, and we are to be left all alone for ever so many days. Then, Dollie, mamma and papa are to return-but guess what they are going to bring with them. Oh, I forgot, you are as bad at guessing as I am. Well, then, listen; mamma is going to bring all my little cousins with her. We shall have the house quite full, and it's all because I am so shy; for papa thinks they will be nice company for me. But you know, Dollie, I should much rather live quietly all my life with you." At this moment Vea's mamma called to her from the open drawing-room window, and the interesting conversation was interrupted. We have heard enough of it, however, to understand that Vea's life was about to be changed in a very decided manner. Vea Campbell was about ten years of age at



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56 -THE GARDIEN-PARTY. he is dancing himself. It is so funny to see you, your very nervousness forces you to do exactly as he wants you to do; and when he cries, 'Up, up, mees, on de toes,' you make me think you are going to fly up to the ceiling." "I really do not see the use of dancing," said Vea, with a sigh. And yet I like it too, when M. Bounce is not there." Oh, you know, we must learn dancing," said Jessie. "Every young lady dances, and you will get to like it in time. But what was that aunt was saying to uncle about a party ? "Mamma gives a garden-party every year to the school children," said Vea; "and she was fixing with papa to have it next Friday, if the weather was fine." "And what do you do at t ? inquired Jessie. "The children get tea on the lawn, and then we have all sorts of games; and afterwards, when they are gone, Mr. Fairley, the rector, and his children stay to supper, and we have more games indoors." "I suppose Uncle Sam will be there too," said Jessie. "Oh yes; we couldn't get on at all without Uncle Sam."



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THE PRISONER AND HIS RANSOM. 47 pile. Indeed, he was forced to lie down and be covered up completely before the warfare was at an end ; and then he only escaped after he had cried for quarter, and offered a dozen of his best plums as a ransom. This having been settled, they marched him away to the garden, still holding him as a prisoner till his ransom was paid. I thought he must be the very nicest uncle possible for any one to have," said Anna, as she munched up her share of the plums, "but he is even nicer than I expected. I feel as if I had known him all my life long! "You won't have any difficulty in calling him uncle ? said Vea slyly. "Of course not," said Anna; it is so good of you to let us have a bit of him." "Oh, do you hear this, boys?" cried Uncle Sam, who had overheard the last two sentences; "here's a pair of little cannibals, -they are proposing to eat me up I throw myself upon your protection, Miss Jessie; I am quite unable to look after myself! Then when they had eaten as many plums as they pleased, and had seen the prize poultry Martha was famed for rearing, and had visited





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24 LITTLE MARY'S SHARE. THE LETTEr TO MAMMA. Cousin Vea has a big doll, and she love Mary; and me got a pussy cat," said little Mary. "Is it Vea who loves you, or the doll ?" said Jack, laughing. It's Dollie! replied little Mary. "Now hold Mary's hand, Jack; me write to mamma." It was no easy matter to manage this part of the letter, for Mary wanted not only to guide the pen much quicker than was possible, but also



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MAKING THE ROCKERY. 81 certainly had a strong liking for birds and flowers, and soon became such a famous gardener, that old Matthew the gardener gave her an extra plot of ground all to herself; and though it was quite a rough piece, she was not long in converting it into a beautiful garden. It was not exactly a UNCLE SAM'S PRESENT. garden, but a rockery, as she thought she could make more of the small space by that means; and as she was always most obliging and good-natured, helping her brothers to hem the sails for their ships, or make paste for their kites, they were quite ready to carry any number of stones for



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COMING BACK FROM THE SEA. 51 man. Dick just caught a glimpse of his face, but he knew in a moment it was his Uncle Richard come back from sea; so he ran forward and got hold of his hand, and cried, 'Oh, I'm so glad you have come; you will take me and grandmother with you, and nobody will scold us any more.' Of course Uncle Richard couldn't do YOU LITTLE THIEF. that, because he hadn't a ship of his own; but he promised to send money home very soon to enable the old grandmother to take a house all to herself, and Dick was to live with her. Uncle Richard wanted Dick to go with him when he left; but Dick knew if he did, his step-mother would be crosser with his old grandmother; so he said he



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54 UNCLE SAM'S GARDEN. TIE SWING, But it was not all play with Vea and her cousins. When they had somewhat recovered from the effects of their long voyage, a governess arrived for the girls, and a tutor came fbr the boys, and a dancing-master came twice a week. Vea was very fond of their governess,