• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Dreaming and Doing
 Look At Your Copy
 "Take the Right Turning"
 The Lip of Truth
 Four Little Words
 The Lost Half-Crown
 The Name on the Rock
 Always Do Right
 The Story of the Cross
 Advertisement
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Dreaming and doing, and other stories : Uncle Rupert's budget.
Title: Dreaming and doing, and other stories
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026590/00001
 Material Information
Title: Dreaming and doing, and other stories Uncle Rupert's budget
Alternate Title: Uncle Rupert's budget
Physical Description: 64, 16 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Rupert
Knight, Edward ( Printer )
Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
Publisher: Religious Tract Society
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Edward Knight
Publication Date: [1870?]
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1870   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1870   ( rbbin )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1870   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026590
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002220333
oclc - 21832918
notis - ALG0522

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Table of Contents
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Dreaming and Doing
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Look At Your Copy
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    "Take the Right Turning"
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    The Lip of Truth
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Four Little Words
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    The Lost Half-Crown
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    The Name on the Rock
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Always Do Right
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    The Story of the Cross
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Advertisement
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Back Cover
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Spine
        Page 86
Full Text
Ap1


S 41 iSThc Baldwin Library


UNCLE RUPERT S BUDGET


Nittlz pot serimDREAMING AND DOINGAnd Other StoriesUNCLE RUPERT S UDGETTHE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY56 PATERNOSTER Row 65 ST PAUL S CHURCHYARD ANDAND 164 PICCADILLY


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CONTENTSPAG3I DREAMING AND DOING 5II LOOK AT YOUR COPY 12III TAKE THE RIGHT TURNING 20IV THE LIP OF TRUTH 26V FOUR LITTLE WORDS 31Vi THE LOST HALF CROWN 38VII THE NAME ON THE ROCK 5VIII ALWAYS DO RIGHT 5IX THE STORY OF THE CROSS 57


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DREAMING AND DOINGITHUR ARCHER and LUKE LINGERwere cousins and were both ofthe same age They went tothe same day school and beganto learn ciphering in the samequarter Two years passed awayby which time Arthur hadfinished the rule of three andwas ready to begin practicee Luke was scarcely able to work a sumivisionhen breaking up day came and the halfprizes were given Arthur Archer rea nicely bound volume of Naturaly while Luke Linger was so low in


6 Uncle Rupert s Budgetgood marks as not to be entitled to anyrewardHow vexing it is said Luke I meantto have got forward but somehow everythingis against meThat excuse will not do Master Lingersaid his tutor it is quite plain to me thatyou have not done your best While otherswere working you were idling away your timeYou must persevere Luke if you intend tobe a scholar Learning will not drop intoa dreamer s mouthArthur and Luke had an uncle farmerHodge who invited them to spend a week athis house in their midsummer holidays Asthey lived in a town they looked forward tothe expected visit in the country with greatdelightUncle Hodges was an old fashioned farmerHe wore a red waistcoat always rose with thelark worked as hard as any labourer in hisfields and never was absent from his pew onSunday And then too he was a kind heartedand truly Christian manOn the first morning of their visit at thefarm their uncle took them into his rick yardand orchard showed them his new barn l ii


Dreaming and Doing 7inted out the finest of his horses cows andeep He then promised that if they wouldt up early the next morning he would takeSto Brook Meadow where the haymakersre busy at work and then perhaps for aeto High top HillOn the morrow Arthur was up and readyre the clock struck six and was down infarm yard looking at the pigeons as theyaround the old elm trees until uncleodges joined him They waited some timeSLuke but as he did not make his appeare they set off without himLuke lay dreaming in bed till nearly sevend when he got up he seemed in no hurrymake his way down stairs At length heeared and went out into the cross road toe if he could find his uncle and Arthurut before he had walked one hundred yardshe saw them on their way home both mountedr on ponies They had first been to the hayields and afterwards for a pleasant ride LukeLinger at once saw that by his delay he hadst a treat while Arthur Archer had gotod appetite for his breakfast and a freshwof Leoalth on his cheeksi How vexed I am uncle cried Luke 1


8 Uncle Rupert s Budgetquite meant to have gone with you to thehayfieldsIt is all very well Luke said farmerHodges so far as it goes to intend doing athing but a bushel of good intentions isnot worth a penny unless they end in goodactionsThis was not the only time during the visitthat the farmer found out the failing andfolly of his nephew in wishing when he shouldhave been acting and dreaming when heshould have been doingOne afternoon farmer Hodges found Arthurand Luke on a seat in the garden talkingrather loudly Well my lads said hewhat is the matter nowWhy uncle replied Luke I was onlysaying that I wish I had a large farm of myown with a garden and orchard and sheepand horses and plenty of men to do the workfor meDreaming and wishing again said thefarmer that way won t do it Luke youmust try another Idle wishes are like weedswhich sometimes show their heads on myland but I root them out or they wouldsoon spoil my profits


Dreaming and Doing 9You see these hayricks Do you thinkt by wishing I could ever have got themre No the scythe the rake and thefork were set to work We were at ity and late and made hay while the sunne and here the ricks areLook at those piles of corn in the barnonder It is part of last year s crop Thereno better in the parish but how did itll come there It was not by dreamingut it I ploughed and sowed and in theper season set to work with the sicklein His goodness gave the shower andA nshine and the corn is now safe in thern and will soon be carried to marketLook at those peas at the bottom of theen If I had not sown them early in theng and seen well to them they would notve yielded such a supply for our table as1ey doThe path along the lane you see yonderWas nothing but mud and rubbish in wetther Some of the farmers said that ituld be a good thing if a few loads of stonesd gravel were thrown on it Others deSthat they had thought for a long timei ropose to the parish to have it put to


10 Uncle Rupert s Budgetrights And one or two said that they meantsome time or other to attend to the matterthemselves so that it might be no longra discredit to the village Thus it went onfor years yet nothing was lone it even gotworse and worse when one day I called mymen to follow me and to work we went andbefore the week was over the old lane lookedas clean and was A passable as the high roadalong which we took our morning rideI think then Luke that it is quite clearif anything is to be done it should be donewithout delay and we must be diligent whatever we have in hand whether we be schoolboys or farmersAs uncle Hodges spoke in his usual kindand cheerful way the heart of Luke wastouched and he as well as Arthur listenedto him with much attention They nowleft the garden and went into the houseto teaThat evening as the farmer opened hislarge print Bible at family worship he saidlooking at the same time at his nephews Ifwishing and intending be a bad plan for thethings of this world it is still worse for thegreat concerns of the world to come The


Dreaming and Doing 11toul of the sluggard desireth and hath nohing There are thousands who mean toIttend to the care of their souls before theyAi while they dream away life and at lastdie in their sins That way won t do wemust try another We must at once believein Jesus Christ and give Iim our heartswithout delay We must to day repent ofour evil doings and seek the grace of theSHoly Spirit to renew our hearts or wehall be in great danger of being for everostThere are others who are idle professors ofhe gospel and an idle one is worse than anle farmer They do nothing to serve andhonour their Lord and Master and they wille found unfaithful stewards at last I hopeny dear lads that you will not only be trueI hristians but active ones The sum of allShave to tell you is this Fall not into thebit of being idle either in earthly orvenly things Show that you belong notto the family of Dreamers but to the noblond of Doers of good thingsSPrey x i iL 4


12IILooh at Nour GopUjHE bees were among the flowers theSrooks were flying to and fro over theold barn and the haymakers were atwork in the fields but there was not a morebusy scene in the village than that beheld inthe school house on the greenIt was writing afternoon and the boys wereall at their lessonsLook at your copy William said MrAdams the schoolmaster as he stood by theside of one of the boys Take care to followyour copy said he again and do not let mesee any blots or mistakesMr Adams had written the first line in thefirst page of William Hart s new copy bookIt was in small hand and the words wereBe not wise in thine own eyesWilliam wrote the next line It was pretty


Look at your Copy 13done though some of the up strokesrather too thick and the down strokesa little too thin But when he came toe third line instead of looking at his copyeyes rested only on his own writing justve and we may guess what came of thatilliam copied all the faults and made moreH so that every line all the way down wasrse than the one before it there was notline that was like the copy at the top ofpageU Look at your copy said the schoolmasterce more but this time he spoke to Charlessp one of the youngest boys in the schoolst then Mr Adams had so much to do thate had told one of the elder scholars to writeStext hand copy for Charles This boy wentlut his work in such a careless way thattead of All are sinners he wrote AllAre siners so that Charles who kept closet his copy made a blunder in every lineAgain the sound was heard in the villagemhool Boys look to your copy Mr Adamsanow standing at the desk near to Andrewand noticing the care with which herote in a neat round hand the line Departevil and do good It was clear that


14 Uiwie Rupert s BudgetAndrew was taking pains and was doing hisbest There was not a blot to be seen in hisbook That is right Andrew said hismaster practice makes perfectThe writing lessons were at an end and thehoys came running out of school when whoshould they meet at the door but old Reubenthe gardener at the great house on the hillHe had been resting on a seat in front of theschool house and as the window was quiteopen he had heard all that had passedReuben and the boys were great friendsand when school was over and his work wasdone many a walk they took together in thewoods As he was a pious as well as a wiseman they seldom left him without a fewwords of advice In a moment the boys werestanding around him showing the copies theyhad just writtenWell Mr Reuben said they you lookquite serious please tell us what you arethinking aboutWhy replied the old gardener as hequietly turned over the leaves of one andanother of the copy books I was just thinking of what I heard Mr Adams say to youabout looking at your copy


Look at youi Copy 15Oh then you have been listening at ther they criedNot exactly so replied Reuben but assat to rest myself in the front of the windowheard what he said Look at your copyught I these words are a lesson for theman who sits without as well as for thoseung boys within You know that we notly learn to write by having copies beforebut we form our habits and character fore in much the same way If it is well forto have a goodcopy without blot or blurthe one case it is much more so in theThere are some like William Hart with arcopy before their eyes who yet managecopy their own faults day after dayso instead of improving they really getteThen there are others like little Charlesi who follow a bad copy and we needt wonder that they go wrong If it be wellus to take care that our copy is what itt to be when writing in a copy book ituch more needful to mind what examplehave before us in life There are tooy my boys who though a good pattern


16 Uncle Rupert s Budgetis set them do not attend to it while thenare still more I fear who have only a badexample before them which their wickedhearts make them too willing to imitateI suppose Reuben said William Hartyou have seen a great number of both sortsin your timeThat is quite true replied the gardenerbut it is not only those I have seen myselfthere are many others I have read of I havea book containing some good copies which Ialways keep by me and into which I lookevery dayWhy that must be the Bible ReubenTo be sure it is If you want some of thebest examples you must go to God s word forthem The meekness of Moses the faith ofAbraham the patience of Job the zeal ofPaul and the love of John should be copiedby us all But good and holy as they wereit is not safe to follow them in all their waysfor they did and said some things that werenot quite right There is only one perfectpattern one which shines above all the restOh yes it was the example of our LordJesus Christ said the boysRight again added Reuben Our Lord


Look at your Copy 17SChrist who is over all God blessed fork upon Him our nature to reconcileod and in that nature He left us anSe that we should follow in His stepsnd holy as He is He is a pattern for allSthe world to all people in every landrich and poor old and young alikenJesus must be a pattern for us alsourat is quite true for He was once of theage as you are now He knows how ad feels for He was once a little childht example lies before us in the pagesNew Testament and even the youngestmay learn from it See what a dutifulwas to a poor mother the blessed Maryver grieved her heart by His conducter showed a bad temper never spokeSword and never did a wrong act Hesin neither was guile found in HisF rom Him we may learn what wedo how we should speak what welove and what we should seek or shunmeek and lowly of heart and waso forgive all affronts and injuries Hehouse of God with its prayers andIndeed all that was pure and lovely


18 Uncle Rupert s Budgetand of good report was to be seen in HimIf we really want to be like Christ we neednot to be at any loss to find out what He woulddo if He were in our place There is no stepin all our path through life in which the lightof His bright example does not shineThen we must look to Him all our daysCertainly you must The best scholarsare always learners you may be learning ofJesus Christ as long as you live But if youwould be like Him there are two things youmust not forget First you mu3t believe inHim and love Him He is our SaviourThe apostle Peter says His own self bare outsins in His own body on the tree So againas I was reading in my Bible this morningChrist also hath once suffered for sins thejust for the unjust that He might bring us toGod 2 We imitate those we love and trustAnd what Reuben is the second thing weare to attend toYou must pray for the Holy Spirit to begiven to you If any of you feel that you arenot like Jesus go and kneel in some quietplace and ask that the Spirit of God maycreate within you a new heart RememberS1 Pet ii 24 s 1 Pet iii 18


SLook at your Copy 19s that Christ must be to us both aand a Pattern We are only truei ans when we believe in Him and strivelike Him There it is time for you tome Take care to look at your copyto follow iti


20IITake tih Right TurningY name is Job Joyce I live at thewhite cottage in the valley If youhave passed that way I am sure youhave stopped to look at my cottage for it hastWo white rose trees climbing round the doorand three beehives in the garden I havebeen a sad rover in my time and as I haveseen not a little of the world I ought to beab to tell you something worth hearingDays should speak and years should teachwisdom If I can say a few words to do yougood you are welcome to my adviceWhen I was young I was a very wilful sortof boy To many a kind word of counsel Ihave answered that I was old enough tojudge for myself You need not wonderthen that I often got myself into troubleJob said my father to me one afternoon


Tahce the Right Turning 21nter I want you to take these twoacks to Miller Brown s Now thelived in the next village about twoay Be sure you take the rightJob and as it will be quite darkyou can get back you had bettere lantern with youH I replied I can find my way backdark with my eyes shut there is noI My taking the wrong turningSvery foolish of me to answer innier as our family had not longSthat part of the country and I wasstranger to the places aro undy way home the night set in darka neither moon nor star to be seent walking in one way and then inSI was quite brought to a standB thinking what I should do I heardtateps They were those of a mangoing home from work but I couldwhether he were a robber or notwith a good deal of fear I calledow if I were in the right way forI house Why my lad he saidquite out of the way you havemng turning


22 Uncle Rupert s BudgetAs the man was going the same way asmyself I was glad to have him for a guideand by his friendly help I got safely homethough in rather a more humble temper ofmind than that in which I set out I wishthis had been the only time in my life whenI did not take the right turningShortly after this I went to work at theManor Farm It was agreed that I shouldlive in the house and sleep in the same roomover the stable along with a fellow servantthe carter Before I went to my place mypious mother said to me Job if you wouldhave the blessing of God rest upon you donot forget to pray to Him every night andmorning The first night I retired to restthe young carter was soon in bed but I satdown on an old chair in the room Whydon t you get ino bed Job said the carterAh why did I not The fact was I wasashamed to pray and yet afraid to lie downto sleep without prayer The fear that theyoung carter would laugh at me made mea coward I wished that I had slept inanother room or that my fellow servantwould fall asleep There was a struggle inmy heart My duty clearly was to kneel


Take the Right Turning 23to make a decided stand for whatto obey my mother and to seekther s God and Saviour But I gaveSI got into bed without prayer andshort time I was fast asleep It wasing point in my life and I failed toAe right turning11 would it have been for me if I hadSfirm to duty for I was soon thrownhe midst of snares and trials YouB be sure of this that if you give upSyou will get on to slippery places andthe highway of sin So I found itpious father and mother were soon laidgrave and I quickly forgot all theirI dvice and warnings Their Bible wasa few pence The house of God wasup and I got among those who toldat I might live as I liked and get ton at last There are alas many in thisSwho are ready to help on the young tor a time I got tired of farming andas a soldier to a sergeant who camer village with ribbons on his cap andon his breast but not liking theWof military life I ran away and getting


24 Uncle Rupert s Budgetto the sea shore I engaged myself as a sailorI thought it a fine thing to visit many landsand see the world A sailor s life may be allvery well in fine weather but storms willcome and the smoothest sea will be lashedby the winds into fury Certainly our shipmet with storms enough and in one of themshe was wrecked on a rock Of the wholecrew three only were savedThat was a dreadful night when I foundmyself on the top of a rock in the midst ofthe wide ocean The thunder roared thelightning flashed across the sky and thewaves rose like mountains you may supposethat I was filled with terror Though I hadbeen ashamed to pray before the carter in thelittle room over the stable I was not ashamedto call upon God before my two shipmateson the top of that rock I cast myself on myknees and prayed to God to save me bodyand soul for Jesus Christ s sake Well thedreary night passed away in the morningthe storm began to lull and to our joy aship hove in sight We made signal to itwhich was seen and a boat was sent to takeus on board I returned in due time to myown land a wiser man than I left it


Take the Right Turning 25w some time after I had given up alife that God by His Holy Spiritt me to see that I was in the broadt leads to death I felt that I waser but then I was taught that JesusSwas a Saviour able and willing to saveef of sinners I believed in Him withheart and through His grace was lednt of sin and to live as I hope a lifeto His servicenow sit in my old arm chair in frontcottage I think of days that are pastI cherish a good hope of heaventhe merits of my Saviour I wishSlittle good to others And so I saymy young friends Be sure that youSi ight turning T here are m any falsey enough to lead you in the wrongt if you have been trained as I wasiways of piety stand fast by your earlyions and they will stand fast by youtii


IVThe Lip of TrulhThe lip of truth shall be established for ever but alying tongue is but for a moment Prov xii 19S LITTLE boy named George Washington about six years old was walkingin his father s garden The flowerswere very beautiful and the birds sang sweetlyin the trees But neither flowers nor birdscould just now take the attention of GeorgeHe held in his hand a small hatchet whichhad been given him by a kind friend Hewas proud of his new gift and as he walkedabout the garden he looked at its nice handleand its sharp bright edge Now he gave aflourish with it and then he cut some loosesticks which lay at the side of the path Henext struck off the tops of s3me flowers andthought how cleverly he could bring down allthe treesThere was a fine cherry tree in the garden


The Lip of Truth 27bich his father had taken great careGeorge came to it he began to showl11 in cutting at the bark He strucke and again and then still harder untilwounded the tree so that it wouldfade and die He did not think of whatdone and went away to another placey and to show his playmates his fineatchetshort time after his father whenpg in the garden stopped to look atvourite cherry tree and soon saw thatbeen cut and ruined He was vexednt to the servants to ask who hadhe mischief No one could tell At8 met his son George and asked himknew about it George soon saw thather was displeased and that he mustto be punished But he knew it wouldng to deny the deed Father saidcannot tell a lie you know I cannotS lie I did it with my pretty hatchetto my arms cried his father youaid me for my tree and I hope myI always be brave enough to tell theilet come what will Little Georgee lip of truth and we do not wonder


28 Uncle Rupert s Budgetthat he grew up to be honoured and loved bythe people of the land in which he lived andover whom he ruled for many years as thechief and governorLying is a sin into which children oftenfall Many have begun with this vice andhave ended by being guilty of almost everysin which can be committed Even whenthey speak the truth who will believe liarsThey are like a bad clock whose wheels moveround but which no one trusts because ithas often been found not to tell the true timeIf the truth is not spoken at all times whowill credit what is said at any time Byfalsely speaking we lose the power to pleaseand of being useful We are shunned asthose with whom it is best to have nothingto do Or if we do succeed in deceivingothers we shall find that a lying tongue isbut for a moment Our sins will sooner orlater be found out to our sorrow confusionand shameThere are in the Bible some solemn accountsof those who had not the lip of truth Seethe case of the sons of Jacob when theybrought the coat of Joseph to their fatherttained with the blood of a kid and said


Ibrother hadl been slain Gehazi told aSthe Syrian captain and got by it twol ts of silver and two changes of gara How carefully he hid his wickedin a tower but he soon found thating tongue is but for a moment Hea second lie to his master and thenin was exposed and he was punishedis days with a painful disease Ananiaspphira who lied to the Holy GhostSsmitten with sudden death These allthat this sin brings sorrow disgracedeath The Bible declares that Goda lying tongue that the devil isfather of all liars that all lying shalld out and that those who are guiltyif they die unpardoned shall be casthellis hard for the young to say I haveSwrong but it is the next best thinging right We hope well of a boy whohis fault like George Washington andl s the courage to undeceive those tohe has spoken falsely but more thanshould confess our guilt before Godready to forgive all those who trulyi Prov vi 19 John viii 44 Rev xxi 8


30 Uncle Rupert s Budgetbelieve and confess and forsake their sinsMay the young reader through faith in theonly Saviour be delivered from the guiltand power of all sinJesus Lord we look to TheeMeek and truthful may we beFrom all paths of sin abstainLeading to eternal painCleanse our hearts our sins forgiveForm us new that we may liveLive to love Thee then ariseio Thy temple in the skies


VFour dittle WordsHE Jews in former times wrote texts ofScripture on parchment and tied themSon their foreheads and round theirThis was done they said that theyt have the word of God always beforeto keep them from trouble and sinJews do the same thing nowwish that children should have fourof Scripture written on their heartswith the blessing of God will trulye them from sin and danger If youto a short story you will learn whatarefather lived in a cottage As he was aman with a large family and but littleit was only a humble home that hecall his own In the garden a few rosespinks were to be seen in their season


32 Uncle Rupeit s Budgetthe iest of the ground was used for potatoescabbages and other useful things for thefamilyOne day my father s master gave him a fewstrawberry plants These were placed in thebest part of the garden and attended to withgreat care In due time there were signs offruit The plants promise very well saidmy father I think they will bear this yearJane my eldest sister had been for a longtime in bad health and my father said that hewished all the strawberries to be kept for herShe could take very little food and he wasglad to get anything to which she took a fancyif he could find the money to buy it As thestrawberries would cost nothing and as we allknew they would please my sister we agreedthat we would not taste a single one allshould be saved for herAs often as I came home from the fields inthe evening went to see how the strawberrieswere getting on and often looked at themwith a longing desire to taste them At lastthey were just ripe and father said that inabout two days they would be fit to be gatheredand that he was sure there would be enough tofill a saucer


Four Little Words 33in the morning of the day when theto be picked I got up before the restfamily were awake and the wickedtcame into my mind that I would goto the garden and taste them A fewt be missed said I to myself Slowlyly I passed down stairs and openingen door I stood by the side of theiries Oh how fresh and nice theyso early in the morning There weree twenty that were quite ripe Howuld I take without their being missedtwo or five As I gazed upon themSdesires grew until I was ready toleast half of themed up at the window of the roomy parents slept and then at the littlehere dear Jane lay there was no onen So stooping down my fingersa moment on one of the largest andr hen the thought darted into myuppose they should be missed and Iif I took them what could I sayy rose up and was about to returniouse when my evil heart said Oher will not suspect that you were thewill think that some strange boyD 22


381 U ncle Rupert s Budgetgot over the palings at night and stole thefruitThis bad thought made me bold and Iwent back to the strawberry bed Again Ifixed my eyes on the windows and lookedaround me There was no one moving Allwas quite silent except the twitter of thesparrows on the cottage thatch and the songof a lark as it flew upward to the sky Myhands once more touched the fruit whenthese four little words darted into my mindTHOU GOD SEEST METhese words saved me from the sin I wasabout to commit It was almost as though Ihad heard them spoken aloud My fatherdoes not see me but God does His eye isupon me now I sprang up on my feetand got back into my room without any onein the family having seen meIn about an hour after this time I saw myfather go into the garden to gather thestrawberries He took all that were quiteripe and when poor Jane came down stairsthey were placed before her in a pink saucerWhen she saw them a sweet smile came overher pale face My father looked happy Pollymy youngest sister looked happy we were


Four Little Wods 8bhappy as we saw how they pleased herrefreshed her parched lips Then howI was that I had not taken them andmy hands had been kept from stealingit was that thought Thou God seestthat held me back from doing wrong inhour of dangeriWhere are those words to be found Iid Are they the text of a sermon I haverd or a part of a Sunday school lesson Ie learned I was almost sure that theySin the Bible and I made up my mindnd themt day I had to look after Farmeron s sheep and I asked my sister Jane tome her Bible to take with me to the fieldt while the sheep were feeding I mightTn and seek for these four little wordsdo you know where I found themere in the sixteenth chapter of theGenesis in an account of Hagar whoher mistress into a desert placesat by the side of a well the angel ofd met her and told her to go back tostress Then she called the name ofwho spake to her Tiiou GOD SEESTe was out of the path of duty and


36 U wle Rupert s Budgetthese words kept her as they did me fromgoing farther in the way that was wrong andfull of dangerAt night when we all met at family prayermy father read a chapter from the NewTestament There was one part of it whichwas about a good man Nathanael to whomJesus said that He had seen him under afig tree Now the good man who perhapshad been praying under the shady branchesknew that he had been quite alone andwhen he heard what Jesus said he cried outMaster Thou art the Son of GodAfter my father had read the chapter hesaid to us Do not forget dear children thatGod our Saviour sees you always This isa sad thought to the sinner but not so tothose who love Jesus If we have gone toHim in faith for the pardon of our sins andif the grace of the Holy Spirit has changedour hearts leading us to repent of sin and tokeep His holy law it is a thought full ofcomfort He sees us in all our times oftrouble and danger and we know that Helooks upon us in love and will not forsakethose who trust in Him Let the wordsThou God seest me cheer you in duty


Four Little Words 37rage you in prayer and keep you fromw it did seem very strange to me thatther should use these words It howserved to fix them more deeply on myand many a time since then thet of the All seeing Eye of God hasme from the road that leads to deathll you reader think of them also Godsees you All things past presentto come everything that has been thatis and that shall be are seen by Him atSAll that are in heaven and all that arel earth are beneath His eye Somethat if they can get out of the sight ofthey may sin as they please but there iswhere they can hide themselves fromThe broad daylight and the dark nighte to Him In the deep forests andcaves and mines of the earth God isAll things are naked and openedhe eyes of Him with whom we haveSHeb iv I


VIThe Lost i alf crownORK was over for the week at theSfactory and two of the lads were ontheir way home from their laboursAs they went along they talked about a largesum of money that a gentleman in the nexttown had lost out of his pocketI should like to be the finder said one ofthe boysSo should I replied the other it wouldset me up in the world for life I would thensoon give up the factoryJust at this i oment they were overtakenby old Andrew Jones who worked with themat the factory He soon found out what theywere talking about and their wishes in thematter I once found some money onlya small sum it is true said Andrew butit taught me one of the b3st lessons I everlearnad in my life


The Lost Half crown 39Do tell us about it cried the boysWell said Andrew as we are going thesame road I have a mind to do so Andrewthen told them this storyIt is now fifty years ago since I first cameto the factory The foreman had a notionthat hard work was good for lads and fortwo or three years he certainly did not spoilte by letting me grow idleIt was early on a Monday morning when Iwe j3weeping the work room that I sawsomething lying on the ground wrapped in apiece of brown paper I took it up whena half crown fell out on the floorI took the money in my hand turned ittound and round and rung it on the step ofe door Yes said I it is a good one forrin So I slipped it into my pocket andnt on with my work but not without aie within saying It is not yours findt who has lost it But I tried to put awaythought with the answer It does belongme I found it Why should I go abouting Who has lost half a crown No indeedhave a right to keep it and mean to do soAll that day I was not quite easy in mynd I did not get on with my work so


40 Uncle Rupert s Budgetwell as I used to do I tried to sing butmy heart was not cheerful All my thoughtswere about the best way to spend the halfcrown Should I buy a smart breast pin orhave a feast of buns and tarts or save it tillmy next holiday I felt that I was richand the piece of money was in and out ofmy pocket all day longIn the afternoon I heard the sharp voice ofthe foreman calling to me I startled andtrembled and thought the next words wouldbe Where is the half crown you found andwhich you have kept from its owner Youare no better than a thief But he onlysaid I want you to go to widow Knight sdown by the turnpike and tell her that if shecomes to me in the morning there will besome more work ready for herThese words gave me great relief and soleaving the factory as soon as I could I tookthe road to the widow s As I went along Itook the money out of my pocket again andagain that I might feast my eyes upon itYet I almost wished I had not found it Tokeep it I said to myself is almost as badas if I had stolen it It is not just norhonest to co al what belongs to another


lhe Lost Half crozwn 41But then I replied if I do not knowho the loser is how can I give him theoney It is only because I am afraidebody would take it from me that I dot wish it to he known Nobody can sayat I ever stole a penny If the ownerould ask me for it why then I would giveto himThus I tried to make matters easy but itId not do The half crown was like aSupon my heart I wished that I couldSit down just where I had found it that itght get into other hands than mine Inot nearly so happy as when I had not aoy to call my own I wondered if everydy who got their money by wrong meansas uncomfortable as I washen I got to widow Knight s cottage shenot at home but the town constabled at her gate He looked me straight inface and I made sure he was going toSme up for being a thief but as he didV speak to me I left my message with onethe widow s six children and got back tofactory as soon as I couldt night too when I went home as it wasdark I felt quite a coward and looked


42 Uncle Rupert s Budgetupon every tree and bush and post as arobber who had come to take away the halfcrownEarly the next day I saw widow Knighttalking with our foreman about her greatloss The money she said was for her rentand though it was only a half crown it wasmuch more than she could afford to loseShe had only earned five shillings in all theweek for work was short and to lose halfof it would cause her much distress Shedeclared that it must have been lost as soonas she was paid at the factory and somebodymust have picked it upWho could be so dishonest as to keepit asked the foremanThat I am sure I cannot tell saidMrs Knight But I do not think it will dothem much good It is a cruel thing to robthe widow and the fatherlessThese words touched my heart No Icould not be dishonest though I was like aman brought to the edge of a deep pit andwas in danger of falling into itI have got the money Mrs Knight Icried at the same moment pulling the halfcrown out of my pocket here it is I found


The Lost Half crown 43it on the floor And then I went on to clearSmy breast of the whole afiair And I did notforget to tell her how I had been tempted tokeep the money but that I was truly glad Icould give it up to the person who had lost itYou have done quite right in restoringthe lost piece said the foreman Always beonest Andrew and remember the goldenrule as it is called to do unto others as wewould that they should do unto us If youwere to lose any part of your week s wages Ido not think you would say that the finderhad a right to keep it You would thinkthat he ought to try to find out the ownerAnd if so with yourself it must be properwith regard to others also To keep what wepick up without trying to find out to whomtbelongs is very much like robbery and isnjust in the sight of GodWhen I put the half crown into the widow sands tears came into her eyes May Godess you Andrew said she I am glad youve been kept from sin Here is sixpencer a rewardNo thank you Mrs Knight I said I dot wish to be paid for doing what is rightI Luke vi 31


44 Uncle Rupert 8 Budget1 then had the happiness of seeing the poorwidow return home to her six little children with a smile on her face and joy in herheartFifty years as I told you have passed awaysince this took place but never shall I forgetthe lesson I was then taught It was worthto me more than a pocketful of half crownsSince then I hope the grace of God hastouched my heart and that I have beenbrought to believe in Jesus Christ for thepardon of my sins When we truly love Himand hope in Him for eternal life we shall besure to seek to obey Him His holy gospelteaches us to live honestly and to do justlyand to do no wrong to our neighbour even inthe least matter I hope my boys that youwill give your hearts to Christ and throughfaith in His name live an upright and holylifeThe boys now came to the parting corner atthe finger post and having bade Andrewgood night they went home to tell the storyof the lost half crown


45S The lame on the RockOME listen to me and I will tell you astory of a boy who once tried to gta little honour for himself by writingSname higher than all others who had gonefore him There is in America what isled a great natural bridge It is tormedlarge pieces of rock which hang over froma hills and meet five hundred feet over ap valley below You may be sure thatHy people go to see this curious bridge0ne day several boys came to this rockyway to cut their names on its sidese put them towards the bottom andpe chose a higher place but one moreld than the rest looked up and saw thes of many visitors high above him Itry to outdo them all said he mye shall be the highest yet In a fewnts he was seen climbing the jutting


46 Uncle Rupert s Budgetcrag lie got on very well at first byholding the bushes and brambles until hewas beyond nearly all the names on the sideof the hillHe went up till he was above the tops ofthe highest trees which grew in the valleyand still upward he went till he came to aspot which those from below told him washigh enough But he yet saw at a shortdistance above him a name and in his pridehe shouted out I will beat that Againhe went on with his climbing He cutnotches on the sides of the arch and holdingon with one hand he worked away with theother At last he was at a point which noone before him had reached and there hecut his name on the limestone rockThe climber now thought of getting backto the ground But this was not so easy amatter as he at first took it to be If it washard to go up it was yet harder to get downHe saw the danger into which his pride hadled him and his head began to be dizzyBy this time a large number of people hadcome together His father mother brotherand sister had heard of his peril and werethere also You cannot descend cried


The Name on the Rock 47some of the crowd try to gain the topAnd this was all that could be done so stepby step he began to cut his way upward Atlength his strength was nearly gone and heclung to the sides of the rockIn the deepest agony of mind the fatherahouted to him William William do notlook down Your mother and Henry andearriet are all here we are praying for youo not look down Keep your eye towardsStop At the sound of his father s voicee boy grasped his knife again and upwarde was seen once more slowly to move untile found himself directly under the middle ofe arch The sight of ropes hanging fromove roused him to new effort The bladehis knife was now worn to the last half inchcut one notch more with it and it fellm his hands at his mother s feetWhat was now to be done to save himthis moment a man lay down at his fullrh with nearly half of his body hangingr the top of the bridge He lowered ad rope within reach of the faintingSwho was just able to place it over hisand then under each arm And nowseen swinging over the fearful height


48 Uncle Rupert s Budgetwhile those from above gently raised him tothe top As he came up one of the crowdseized him in his arms and held him up tothe view of the rest while the shout He issafe He is safe was heard above and belowThere you have listened to my story nowattend to what I have yet to say I have inmy time seen many climbers who have wishedto cut their names higher than others in theworld They have sought to reach some ofthe lofty places of earthly renown But Ihave seen them at last like the boy who cuthis name in the rock in places of danger andfrom whence some have slipped to rise nomoreInstead of cutting a name for yourself inthe world you should rather try to do a littlegood in a humble way as you pass through itI would rather have my name in letters oflove and gratitude on the heart of a poororphan child or afflicted widow than on theproudest statue or loftiest rock that standson the earthBut seek above all things to have yournames found written in the Lamb s bookot life 1 For what good will it do you ifRev xxi 27


Thie Name on the Rock 49ou have the wealth and honour of the worldnd your name placed on lofty statues andet have no place in Christ s church on earthnd no part in His glory in heaven May ityour desire and aim to believe in Jesus asur Saviour that through His merits yourns may be forgiven and to obey Himn asour Lord then you will surely have yourmes written in that book and there they11 remain when worlds and suns shall bemore


Ilwais do l ighti FIGHT I a fight cried Will Racketthe wheelwright s boy as lie threwdown his hammer and ran up thegreen laneFight him fight him shouted FredParker the baker s apprentice at the sametime placing his tray on the ground lierushed to join a crowd on the village greenWhat is it all about called out BenFrost the sawyer as he stood at the ale housedoor and the next moment pushed his waywith eager looks to the same spotI don t wish to figlt said John Smith ameek pale faced boy in black dress and aband of crape around his cap while beforehim stood Ned Brown with his jacket thrownoff and his shirt sleeves tucked up above hiselbows


Always do Right 51Why not fight him cried some of themen and boys he struck you and youhould hit him againBut my mother has told me that I mustot fight said John and I will not disobeyor I have not done Ned Brown any harmnd I don t see why he should wish me toNo sooner did John thus speak than therowd began to mock and shout aloud HeSa big coward that he is He is afraid toght because his mother says he must notd Ned Brown stamped with his foot andked fiercer than everJust at this instant Mr Morris the schoolster was drawn by the noise to the placequickly making his way through theng he stood between the two boys andto inquire what all the noise was aboutsoon saw how matters stood and turn1to Ned Brown he desired him to go atto his work in the mill while he gentlyJohn Smith aside from the noisy crowdie might ask him a few questionsy would you not fight with NedV said the schoolmasterH I were to fight him replied John


52 Uncle Rupert s BudgetSmith perhaps I should hurt him and I donot want to do him any harmVery good said Mr MorrisAnd if I did not hurt him added JohnI fear that he would hurt me as he is astronger boy than I amNo doubt of it said the schoolmasterI do not think sir that fighting is theright or best way of settling a quarrelThat is quite correct added Mr MorrisI wish everybody thought as you do theworld would be all the better for itThen sir I would rather be called acoward than do what I know to be wrongVery good again said the schoolmasteras he laid his hand on the head of the peaceloving boyAnd more than that sir to fight is notonly against what my mother has taught mebut also against the commands of our Saviourwho has told us to love one anotherThat is right said Mr Morris I seeJohn that you remember last Sunday s textLet all bitterness and wrath and anger andclamour and evil speaking be put away fromyou with all malice and be ye kind oi toanother tender hearted forgiving one anoter


Always do Right 53even as God for Chriet s satx hat forgivenIyou In the fear and love of God yourSaviour always do rightYes sir my mother tells me to keep loseothe Bible and then I shall be kept in theay in which I should goTrue quite true continued Mr MorrisHow shall a young man cleanse his wayy taking heed thereto according to Thyord 2 That holy book will teach you to doght in small things as well as great thingsd to do right not only when it is easy toSso but when it seems to be hardI think sir said John that if I once doSthing that is wrong I m ay soon do itTo be sure John there is great danger ofis If we begin to sin from fear of beingughed at there is no knowing where weay end Like a boy running down hill weay be unable to stop and rush on to ourn And one word more John Never fort that Jesus Christ came into the world noty to die for our sins on the cross but toI us from doing wrong and to teach usto do right If you look to Him in faith1 Eph iv 31 32 Pea cxix 9


54 Uncle Rupert s Budgetyou will find that He is a Saviour from thepower of sin as well as from its guilt And ifyou ask for the help of His Holy Spirit gracewill be given you to forsake what is evil andto follow that which is good then you willgrow up to be a brave manly ChristianJohn Smith went home with a light andhappy heart that day and was not ashamedto tell his mother all that had taken placeWhen she heard how her son had acted shethanked God who had enabled him to doright even when hoe had to bear with scornand mockery for so doingFor some days it was the talk of the rudeboys of the village that John Smith wasnothing better than a coward because he ladrefused to fight Ned Brown yet it was notlong before they had to change their mindsOne afternoon as John was going on anerrand for his uncle he came to the old stonebridge which crosses the river near to GafferWood s when he heard loud cries of distressOn looking along the bank towards the oldmill where the waters run strongly he sawa lad struggling in the stream The unhappy boy had tried in vain to reach thpshore and was now ready to sink


Always do Right 55In a mo nent John Smith cast off his coatand shoes and plunged into the water forie was a good swimmer He soon reachedhe drowning lad and with one hand c ajpedim firmly by the arm and with the otherstruck out for the shore With much skillFand courage he brought the lad to land ando his great joy found that he had been themeans of saving fighting Ned Brown from anearly deathNed was not a little touched at the conduct of John Smith and grateful for beingsaved from a watery grave He took hisdeliverer with both hands and as the tearsRell down his face thanked him over and overin Then he asked to be forgiven forving so often spoken unkindly to him andso wickedly trying to provoke him totYou will not strike me again said Johnl you Nedi No cried the penitent boy and I wille care that no one else does that I willIt was soon reported through the villageJohn Smith had at the risk of his ownsaved Ned Brown from being drownedtevor had been the opinion before among


56 Uncle Rupert s Budgetthe young men and boys there was now nodoubt in their minds who had shown truecourage They all agreed that John was abrave boy and when he passed the cottageswith Ned by his side many a kind and civilword was spoken to him both by old andyoung Even the wheelwright s boy and thebaker s apprentice now received him withmuch respect and thought that it was quiteplain that a lad mnight be truly brave at hearteven though he would not fightLet the conduct of John Smith said MrMorris just before the village school broke upone day be an exaniple to you all He whodares to obey his parents and who seeks tofear God though it draws upon him an illname proves that he has a truly brave spiritWhile he who is ashamed to walk in an upright course lest those who are around shpuldmock him is without true courage If allpeople were of John Smith s mind the worldwould be much happier than it is Mindwhat I say my boys and I would say thesame to girls also ALWAYS DO RIGHT inall things in all places and at all times


IXThe Story of the CrtssF all the true stories that have everbeen told there is none like thoStory of the Cross It is the sweetstory of old the story of the love ofJesus It moved the hearts of those wholived hundreds of years ago it touches thehearts of those who live in our days Littlechildren are glad to hear it old men andwomen who listened to it in infancy findSit still like sweet music to their souls Itwill be the joy of the church in every ageqnd the song of the redeemed for everHave you not heard how the simple storyof the cross has been blessed in our ownSland to those who have heard it Let usnow see how it has touched the hearts ofSthose who have listened to it among theheathen in the east the west the northand the south For true religion is the


58 Uncle Rupert s Budgetsame in every place and when the HolySpirit converts the hearts of the heathenthey are brought to trust in the same Saviourand to love Him above allI We look first to the East and find thatone of the earliest converts in Northern Indiawas a man named Krishnoo A native oncesaid to him Well you have left off all thecustoms of your forefathers what is thereasonHle replied Have patience with me andI will tell you I am a great sinner I triedIHindoo worship but got no good After awhile I heard of Christ and how He labouredmuch and laid down His life for sinnersI thought What love is this And here Imade my resting place Now tell me if anything like this love was ever shown by yourgods Did Doorga or Kalee or Krishna orany of the gods die for sinners You knowthat they are said only to seek their own easeand have no love for any oneThe man could not answer these words andquietly walked awayA school for girls was formed in China anda Christian lady was their teacher She taught


The Story of the Cros0 59them to read the Bible These little Chinesegirls did not soon forget what they learnedthey could repeat many portions of Scriptureby heart At length they came for the firsttime to a chapter which gave an account ofSthe death of Jesus Christ They had beforeheard their teacher tell of His sufferings butnow as the chapter was being read they beganto weep aloud and were so moved that forSsome time they could not go on with theirsorrowful lesson After this they alwaysheard the account of the death of Jesus withdeep feelingiI We will now turn to the West In oneof the islands of the West Indies a little blackgirl about ten years old was taken ill Shesent for a missionary to talk to her and praywith her When he came she told him thatshe had heard of the love of Jesus and hadfaith in Him as her Saviour Shortly beforeshe died she was asked How do you expectto be savedAll through ChristAre you afraid to dieNoWhy are you not afraid to dieL


60 Uncle Rupert s BudgetBecause I shall go to heaven and be withJesusDo you not wish to get betterNo for I think I then might fall into sinDo you love JesusYes with all my heart for He died forme a wicked sinnerWho told you the e good thingsI heard them from the minister at thehouse of God and I heard them in theSunday schoolA few hours after these words the littlenegro girl died truly happy in Jesusin Now let us go right up to the NorthMissionaries went to Greenland and foundthe people s hearts as cold and hard as the icearound them Some years passed withoutmuch success but a missionary one day satdown in a snow hut and read to some of thenatives of the agony of Jesus in the gardenwhen He sweat drops of blood and of thedeep sorrows of His soul as He hung uponthe cross As the word was read to them theSpirit of God began to work One of themen stepped forward and cried How wasthat Tell me once more for I would be


The Story of the Cros 61saved from my sins From that time manyin that land began to trust in Jesus as theirSaviourA North American Indian who had beenconverted to Christ met an European traderwho tried to persuade him that the missionaries were not true teachers To this theaged and honest Indian replied They maybe what they will but I know what theyhave told me and what has been done in meLook at my poor countrymen there lyingdrunk before your door why do you not savethem if you can Four years ago I alsolived like a beast and not one of you troubledyourself about me but when the missionariescame they preached the cross of Christ tome and I have felt the power of His bloodand through grace am free from the dominionof siniv Last of all we look to the South In oneof the islands of the South Seas a missionaryMr John Williams as he was passing alongheard the words Welcome servant of Godwho brought light to this dark island whobrought to us the word of salvation 1That was a pleasant sound and the mis


62 Uncle Rupert s Budgetsionary looked up and before him was a poolnative named Buteve whose hands and feethad been eaten away by a sad disease sothat he had to walk upon his kneesAnd what do you know of the word ofsalvation said Mr WilliamsOh Buteve replied I know about Jesuswho came into the world to save sinners anddied painfully on the cross to take away alltheir sins that they might go to heaven afterdeathDo all people then go to heavenNo none but they who believe in the LordJesus who put away their sins and who prayto GodThen do you prayOh yes while I weed my ground I prayand three times a day and in the morningand evening with my familyAnd what do you sayI say 0 Lord I am a great sinner mayJesus take away my sins and give me Hisrighteousness to adorn me and His Spirit toteach me renew my heart and take me toheaven when I dieWell Buteve that is very good but whotaught you this


The Story of the Cross 63Oh you taught me said he you broughtthe good wordAh but I never saw you listening when Ipreached how did you hearOh said the poor man I take my seatby the way side as the people pass by and Ibeg a bit of the word from them one givesme one piece and some one else anotherpiece I put all these in my heart and thinkabout them and then I pray to God and soHe teaches me to understand themHundreds of such true stories could be toldof the wonderful power of the preaching ofthe cross in all parts of the world but wemust now ask1 Do you pray for Christian missionsDo you pray that all the world may hear thestory of the cross2 Do you in any way help to publish thisstory to the heathen3 Have you felt in your own soul itssweet power in leading you to believe inJesusWhile you send the gospel to others youshould take care that you yourself believe init May you have grace to improve to yourown good the accounts you have now read


84 Uncle Rupert s Budgetand become wise unto salvation throughfaith in Christ Jesus For sad will it be foryou should you listen to it without any concern whilst the people of China and Indiaand Africa and Greenland and the SouthSeas give a welcome to it Are you willingthey should come from the east and the westand the north and the south and you becast outEDWARD KNIGHT PRINTER MDDLE STREET E C


ONE PENNY EACH MONTHThe Child s CompanionA MAAZIN O BOYS AND IRLSA A AINBFO BOY AN 7 2L


ONE PENNY EACH MONTHThe Child s Companion4The Child s Companion is noticeable for illustrationsabove the average in merit The SpectatorInteresting and instructive Sunday School ChronicleEqually bright inside and out There are stories of allsorts notes on natural history c and a profusion of cleverillustrative drawings The TimesThe Child s Companion needs no commendation Itis simply packed with pictures stories readings and verseswhich will be a source of great delight to young peopleRecordRich in stodes and pictures and puzzles ChristianWorldA bright book for boys and girls The ChristianA delightful book for young people Yorkshire PostHealthy reading for young bookworms Lincolnshi tEchoA narming little magazine Wilts StandardAn old and proved fireside friend BournemouthDirectoryAn excellent instructor for youth of both sexesChristian AdvocateAs charming a little penny magazine for children as onewould wish to see Gloucester StandardThe favourite of the writer s boyhood now more thanthirty five years ago Christian HeraldThe Child s Companion is an old friend It has gota new coat and better illustrations than of yore but it hasnot lost its old attractions Christian LeaderPUBLTSHED S THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY56 Paternoster Row LondonAnd ild hy all Newsaernts


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TWtOPEN IY BOOKSIn Limp Cloth CoversReduced from The Heroine of the FireTHE ROBIN S NEST By G H SARGENTTATER S CHOICE By GRACE STEBBINGNELL S ELDER BROTHER By LIZZIE KINGSAARON THE WOODMAN By HARRY DAVIESTHE HEROINE OF THE FIRE By GRACE STEBBINGLITTLE MARJORIE S SECRET By G NORWAYSTEPHEN OF THE RAG SHOP By IDA LEMON authorof The Professor s Masterpiece etcPHYLLIS AND HER SISTER By S M GRAYTHE RESCUE OF THE PRINCE By ANNA J BUCKLANDTEDDY S RIDE By M COURTOISTHE SMUGGLER S CA YE By SELINA BUNBURYHUGH S BURDEN BUNDLE By E H FOWLER authorof Vera s Holiday Task etcPUBLISHED BY THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY56 Paternoster Row London5


THfEEPEI4Y 6OOKSIn Limp Cloth CoversFrom Ski s Victoria CrossGOOD FOR NOTHING TOM By LIZZIE KINGSBELL S BIRTHDAY By ANNIE M BARTONLITTLE PENNY WYSE By MARY E ROPESTHE HAPPIEST THING By LENA TYACKDICK S DAISIES By LIZZ E KINGSTHE WHITE PRINCE By M B MANWELLSINK OR SWIM By M E ROPESDOROTHY S BURGLAR By M TYNDALESINGING JOE By Mrs COOPERSKIP S VICTORIA CROSS By M B MANWELLTHE FAIRY GODMOTHER By LENA TYACKHOW HARRY WAS LOST By W E LPUBLISHED BY THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY56 Pat rnoster Row London6


FOUrjENhNY BOOKSBound in Cloth BoardsUnlock the Gate By M B Watchman Halfdan and HisWHITING Little Grand daughter ByValentine the Castaway Mrs GEORGE GLADSTONEBy Mrs KERR Katie s Resolution By JENNIEBrown Jack By JESSIE M E PERRETTSAxsY Fisherman Niels By MrsWinnie the Rose Girl By GEORGE GLADSTONEM S COMRIE Susie Wood s Charge ByLittle Coster By L SLADE MARY E ROPESThe Children of the City TPapped on the Rocks orBy L KINGS Only a WordBob Wynter s Folly By Winnie s Golden Key orSYDNEY GREY The Right of Way By JESSIEVera s Holiday Task By Made a Man ofE H FOWLER MDo To F nds By LEN Cal s Secret A Story of LifeDon s Two Friends By LENA in ViennaTYACK in ViennaThe Picture Lady By Mrs Lily s AdventueCOOPER Chrissy s Glad News or ATh r Little Child shall Lead ThemThe Marked Handkerchiefand Only a Beggar By Mrs Made Clea at Last or TheHENRY CRSWE Story of a Ten Pou d NoteLittle Meg and the Lodger By MARY E ROand the Haunted Ruin By Tony the Tramp or GoodMARY E ROPES tor Nothing By MARY EROrESBirdie s Twelfth Birthday Lily of the Valleyor What it Meant By ELA e BellsPRATT The Message of the BellsThe Sliding Panel or The The Village Shoemaker andMiser of Raynham Farm By other htoriesMARY R JARVIS Jessie s Roses andother StoriesA Summer Holiday By E E Andy and his Book or TheGREEN Orphan Frie ds By G HThe Old Apple Tree SARGENTPaul and His Friends or The Princess in the CastleThe Lilies of the Vailey and other StorieJob and Viper By Mrs Edith s Second Thought andCOOPER other StoriesThe Lady Elfrlda s Escape Barbara s RevengeBy ALICE KING A Sprig of HollySprats Alive 01 By H E ASotBURCH Father s Joy and other StoriesIn Golden London or Raised By the Rev B POWEfrom the Dead By MARY E I Never Thought of itRoPES Short and SweetPUBLISHED BY THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY56 Paternoster Row London7


SIXPENNY BOOKSLITTLE DOT SERIBSEach with Frontispiece and bound in cloth boardsSAPPHIRE By MARY ROWLE THE ESCAPE OF THEJARVIS FUGITIVES A Story ofSedgmoor By E A CAMPTHE OLD PIT A Story of a BELLHoliday Adventure ByHARRY DAVIES EDDIE S BIRTHDAY PREBRAVE DICK By LENA SENTS or Rub a dub dubTYACK By Mrs AUSTIN DOBSONTHE INDIAN CHIEF By HOW ROSIE HELPEDHE INDIAN CHIETTA KN By MABEL or The Story of aHENRIETTA KNIGHT Birthday Doll By MMAPETER THE FISHERMAN LESLIEBy CHARLOTrE MASON HARRY THE HERO or ForCHAPPIE By A M BROWN venss Wins By JESSETHE RESCUE ON TEMPESTREEF By MARY ROWLES JIM By MARY E ROPESJARVISTHREE LITTLE TRAVEL TWO BUSY BEES By EMILIELERS By D MARTIN SEARCHFIELDPOLLY S FATHER By E FRITZ AND HIS WORKS1OOKE A Tale for Boys and GirlsBy MAUD MADDICKTHE BOATMAN S DAUGHTER By F M ROBERTSON LILY AND HER PONY orOne Too Many By MARYHERO CHARLIE By MARY E Many By MAHAMPDENJUDSON S COURT A Story HARRY S HOLIDAYS By Efounded on Fact By LIZZIE M WATERWORTHKINGS TOM By Mrs COOPERCAMERON S KEEP or The TALE OF A SIGN POST ByCourse and the Crown By P A BLYTHMARGARET S COMRIEMARTIN S MISTAKE ByA BUNCH OF SEALS By HARRIETT BOULTWOODMARY ROWLES JARVISADVENTURES OF JACKCHRISTY S MISSION By POMEROY By P WLENA TYACK DARNTONPUBLISHED BY THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY56 Paternoster Row London8


SIXPE1NY BOOKSJOE DAVY S TRADE MARK THE STORY HE WAS TOLDor Where s the Light By By NELLIE HELLISE M WATER ORTHE M WATERWORTH THE CAPTAIN OF THEUNDER THE STANDARD SCHOOL and other Storiesor The Fight he Fought ByIDA J LEMON TOM S BENNIE By MARY EWILLIE WILLS S WINGS RoiESBy Mrs G S REANEY MAY LYNWOOD A Tale ofSchool LifeSALLIE A LITTLE SISTER SILVERLEIGH SBy EDITH CORNFORTH JACK SILVERLEIGH STEMPTATION By theKEZIAH TAYLOR S DONKEY Author of Hubert s TempBy Mrs F OSBORNE tation CMABEL S WHITE KITTEN THE RUNAWAYS Byor Out of the Heart SYDNEY GREYDAISY S TRUST By E STHE PILGRIM BOY and other DAISY S TRUST By E SStories of the Early Mission PRATTaries By the athor of I THE BLACKSMITH SThink when I Read that DAUGHTER or TheSweet Story of Old Little ComforterHOW ARTHUR FOUND OUT STORY OF A YELLOWTHE SECRET or AStrange ROSE Told by Itself ByIeson Book By ANNETTE JESSE PAGELYSTER PRETTY MISS VIOLETTHE LITTLE MIDSHIPMAN HUBERT S TEMPTATION ABy EVELYN E GREEN Story from Real Life ByA TRUE STORY OF LONG the Author of Under FireAGO By ANNETTE LYSTER CGRATEFUL PETER S NEW MY BROTHER AND IYEAR S GIFT By RUTH A TALE OF THREE WEEKSLAMB By EGLANTON THORNEGRANNY S DARLING By TWO WEEKS WITH THEMARY E ROPES GREYS A Story ofAmeriTHE MISSING JUG By F A can Home LifeBLYTH PATTY AND BROWNIE orGERTY S TRIUMPH A The Lord will ProvideCornish Story By M B THE EMPTY JAM POTMANWELLMISS PR S By E A CAMP HIS OWN ENEMYBELL SIX CHINA TEACUPSPUBLISHED BY THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY56 Paternoster Row London9


LITTLE TENPENNY What OLIVE CROWHURST AShe Did and How She Did it Story for GirlsTHE TWO ROSES PAT RILEY S FRIENDSTHE CHILDREN IN THE SETTING OUT FOR HEAVENVALLEY By MAaY KimBLE MARTINBLE MARTIN ALWAYS TOO LATE andAMY S SECRET By Lucy other StoriesBYERLEYLESSONS OUT OF SCHOOLJESSIE S VISIT TO THESUNNY BANK RACHEL RIVERS or What aSQUIRE BENTLEY S TREAT Child may doMANY WAYS OF BEINGLITTLE ANDY S LEGACY USEFULLUCY MILLER S GOOD DREAMING AND DOINGWORKISAAC GOULD THE WAGTHE PATCHED FROCK GONERTALKS WITH UNCLE LITTLE LOTTIE or TheMORRIS By OLD HUM Wonderful ClockPHR EYLIGHTBEARERS ANDCOSMO AND HIS MARMOSET BEACONSLISETTA AND THE BRIG THE TRAVELLING SIXANDS or Saved by a Mute PENCETALES FROM OVER THE THE HOLY WELL An IrishSEA StoryMARY SEFTON THE GAMEKEEPER STILL THE SUGAR MELTS DAUGHTERBy MAkY E ROPES FANNY ASHLEY and otherTHE RAVEN S FEATHER StoriesJOHI THOMSON S NURSERYCOTTAGE LIFE its Lights JOHN THOMSON S NURSERYand Shadows LITTLE DOT By Mrs WALTONANGEL S CHRISTMAS ByMrs WALTON SPRINGFIELD STORIESSTEENIE ALLOWAY S AD THE BOOK OF BOOKS TheVENTURES Story of the English BiblePUBLISHED BY THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY56 Paternoster Row Londono1


viFrom The Secret of thCave SEE NEXT PAGE11


NINEPEN4IY BooKsIllustrated Well printed and bound in cloth boardsTHE LITTLE GIRL FROM LONDON By M TOMLINSONJACK AND GILL By FI ORENCE E BURCHTHE SECRET OF THE CAVE By CHARLES COURTENAY M ATHE BROTHERS PROMISE By Mrs CHALLACOMBETHE OCIEUS AT SANDY HOLLOW By Lucy TAYLORARCHIE S SEORET or Side by Side By M KEMBLE MARTINGATES OF GOLD By MAGGIE FEARNWHAT OAME OF A TIGER HUNT By E L OXLEYJESSIE S OLD MAN By M E ROPESMBS MARTIN S LITTLE BOY By FLORENCE E BURCHTHE STRANGE ADVENTURES OF WILLIE NORMAN ByC J HAMILTONTHE TWO BIRTHDAYS By Mrs FORSAYTaTHE ADVENTURES OF TOMMY ROSIE AND SPOT ByM B CoxNEESBY COURT By E S CANNLIFE AT PEAR TREE FARM By EMMAs LESLIENILS REVENGE A Tale of Swedish LifeBEN HOLT S GOOD NAME By the Author of Basil orHonesty and Industry etcCALEB GAYE S SUCCESS By EGLANTON THORNEBOB S TRIALS AND TESTS By MARY E ROPESTWO LITTLE FINNS By M E ROPESJOE S FISET EABNINGS By RUTH LAMBTHE ONE TALENT By M S COMRIELIZZIE S EXPERIMENT By EMMA LESLIESEEDY MIKE By M E ROPESWILLIE AND HIS FRIENDS By MAUD MADDICKMY BROTHER S LIFE By R B WAINWRIGHTTHE GREAT SHOW By EVELYN EVERETT GREENWALTER STEPHEN S CROWN By A L SKARL S ADVENTURES By L HERMANNTHE MERRY GO ROUND By C J HAM LTONKATIE BRIGHTBIDE and how she Made the Best of EverythingBy RUTH LAMBKATHLEEN S VIOTORY By MAUD MADDICKJEM S STRUGGLE FOR LIFE By ALICE J JANVRINPUBLISHED BY THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY56 Paternoster Row LondonIS


Hesba Stretton s StoriesEach Illustrated and nicely bound in clothSIXPENCE EACHA Christmas Child Only a DogHow Apple Tree Court wasWon Pilgrim StreetLeft Alone Sam Franklin s Savings BankMichel Lorio s Cross The Worth of a BabyNINEPENCE EACHA Xiserable Christmasand a Happy New YearA Night and a DayFriends till DeathONE SHILLINC EACHJessica s First PrayerNo Place Like HomeTwo Secrets and A Manof His WordUnder the Old RoofFron Yessica d First PrayerPUBLISHED BY THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY56 Paternoster Row London13


MRS WALTON S BOOKSs dANGEL S CHRISTMAS Illustrated x6mo o 6AUDREY OB CHILDREN OF LIGHT Illustrated Cr 8vo I oCHRISTIE S OLD ORGAN or Home Sweet Home Illustrated Crown 8vo 1 0CHRISTIE THE KING S SERVANT A Sequel to Christie sOld Organ Illustrated Crown 8vo 1 oELTSHA THE MAN OF ABEL MEHOLAH IllustratedCrown 8vo 2 6THE EING S CUPBEABEB Illustrated Crown 8vo oLAUNCH THE LIFEBOAT With 44 Coloured Pictures orVignettes 4to coloured boards 3 0LITTLE DOT Coloured Frontispiece o 6LITTLE FAITH or The Child of the Toy Stall Illu tratedRoyal x6mo 1 oMY LITTLE COBINER A Book for Cottage Homes Illustrated Crown 8vo 6MY MATES AND L Illustrated Crown 8vo x 6THE MYSTERIOUS HOUSE Illustrated Crown 8vo I oNEMO OB THE WONDERFUL DOOR Illust Crown 8vo 2 oSNOBODY LOVES ME Illustrations Crown 8vo 1 oOLIVE S STORY or Life at Ravenscliffe Illustrated Crown8vo gilt edges 2 0OUR GRACIOUS QUEEN Pictures an Stories from HerMajesty s Life With many Pictures I oA PEEP BEHIND THE 80ENES Illustrated Large Cr 8vo 3 6Cheap Edition in crown 8vo 2 0POPPIE S PRESENTS Illustrated Crown 8vo I oSAVED AT SEA A Lighthouse Story Illustrated oSHADOWS Scenes in the Life of an Old Arm Chair Illustrated Imp i6mo gilt edges 3 6TAKEN OR LEFT Illustrated Crown 8vo 1 oWAS I RIGHT Illustrated Large Crown 8vo 3 6WINTER S FOLLY With Illustrations Crown 8vo 2 oPUBLISHED BY THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY56 Paternoster Row London14


POPULAR ILLUSTRATED STORIESBy AMY LE FEUVREFrom Proba sSonsmrAn excellentlittle storyS Gecato rOne of thebest and tenderest stories ofits kind LifeeJ aft FaithBULBS AND BLOBBOMS Illustrated Small 4to elegantlybound 6 6DWELL DEEP or Hilda Thorn s Life Story IllustratedCrown 8vo 3 oBIO Se GOOD NEWS Illustrated Crown 8vo s oODD Illustrated Crown avo oTHE ODD ONE Illustrated by M A LATHBURY Small 4toDecorated cloth boards 3 6ON THEEDGE OF A MOOR Illustrated Crown 8 o 3PROBAEBE B80N Illustrated Crown 8vo oA PI G ZL G PAI With r44 Illustrations Imp 16moDecorated cloth boards 3 6Crown 8vo Edition Illustrated 2 oTEDDY 8 BUTTON Illustrated Crown 8vo z oA THOnUHTLEBS SEVEN With 27 Illustrations Fcap 4to 1 6PUBLISHED BY THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY56 Paternoster Row Londoni5


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