The holiday album

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The holiday album a book of easy reading for children
Series Title:
Little folks library
Cover title:
Holiday album one hundred and sixty illustrations
Physical Description:
vii, 369 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Baker, Sarah S ( Sarah Schoonmaker ), 1824-1906
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Scribner, Welford and Co ( Publisher )
Camden Press ( Printer )
Dalziel Brothers
Publisher:
Frederick Warne and Co.
Scribner, Welford, and Co.
Place of Publication:
London
New York
Manufacturer:
Camden Press ; Dalziel Brothers, Engravers & Printers
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Alphabet books -- 1870   ( rbgenr )
Readers -- 1870   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1870   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1870   ( local )
Bldn -- 1870
Genre:
Alphabet books   ( rbgenr )
Readers   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Aunt Friendly ; with one hundred and eighty page illustrations.
General Note:
Frontispiece is hand-colored.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002218653
oclc - 12396829
notis - ALF8830
System ID:
UF00026576:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


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CHILDREN. Oh, how delightful! here's a pretty book !
Oh, what splendid pictures !-look here !-pray look!
Were there ever seen so many in a book before?
Are you the man who made it ? and have you any more ?
ARTIST. Tell you who's the maker of it ? That I will not say:
Be content with your gift-run away and play!
B ~r;-~t ICBB"Bi~ et~LI_7

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CHILRENOhhow elihtfu hee's prtty ook
Oh watspedi pctrs -lokhee-paylok






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pOOIDAYALBUM.


SA BOOK OF



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EASY READING. FOR CHILDREN.




BY

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AUTHOR THE NURSERY tEPSA 8 "THE GIFT B ," ETC.

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W1ITH ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY PAGE ILL USTRATIONS.

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BEDEORDI STREET, COVENT GARDEN.
SNiw YORK: SCRIBNER, WELFORD, AND CO.
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PREFACE.



HE "Holiday Album" contains pictures
of Child Life of every description, from
babyhood upwards.
The letterpress, beginning with the Alphabet,
is graduated from one syllable to many, aid
will therefore be found useful, not only for the
amusement but for the instruction of the little
ones; whose pleasure, however, has been chiefly
consulted in this little Volume.
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THE- BABY 26 DOGS ................ 64
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THE ITT HOUSEKEEPER- 34 PLAYING AT VISITING










DUSTING THE' BOOKS ......4p1 36 A SAD MISFORTUNE .......... 74#
ELPING TO WASH ....... 38 GOOD BYE ...................... 76
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HAN GING OUT THE CLOTHES 40 ALONE ................. ......... ...... 78
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CONTENTS.,
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RESTING ....... . 46 NUTTING . ..................... '
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SSALEXANDRA ALPHABETHE 2 THE GOOD BOY ................... 62




















"LION ............... 2 ..................HE KIND BOYS.................. 694
THE NAUGHTY BOY .......... 30 THE SCHOOL FEAST............ 63
KIND WILLIE ................... '32 THE LITTLE PLAYFELLOWS 70
THE S PLITTLHERD E KING-R 4 THEPLA G AT ISI G ...T..IF
DUSTING THE BOOKS ........ 36 H SAD MISFORTUNE............ 7
HELPING TO WASH ............ 38 GOOD BYE .... ...................... 76
HANGING OUT THE CLOTHES 40 ALONE ................. 78............ 73
MARY'S IRONING -......... 42 THE WELL..................... 80
E QUARRENING ..................... 58 KINDNESS ............ ........... 00
BESTING ...... 46 NUTTINGHE ...................... 84
BED-TIME ........................... 48 THE FIG SEILLER ............ 86
STORY TOLD BY jMARY'S CIHARITY............................... 88
MAMMA ........................... 50 GERTY'S MISFORTUNE........ 90
'THE SHEPHERD AND THE WILD GOATS...... ..........,....... 92
LION ..;5;.......***....*..*.... 52 THE KIND BOYS 9*
,'HE SHEPHERD MADE KING 54 THE OLD ENGLISH MASTIFF 96
'THE UNDUTIFUL SON......... 56 HAROLD'S BIRTHDAY ....... 983
oTHE QUARREL .................. .58 SUNDAY .......................... 100
THE DOVE .......,... .... ..... 60 THE ROCKING-HORSE ......... 102




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vi Contents.
PAGE PAGE
SARAH AND JOHNNY ........ 104 JANE'S STORY OF A QUINCE 182
SNOWBALLING.................... 106 THE WALNUT-SHELL FLEET 184
THE SICK CHILD ............... 108 THE CAREFUL LITTLE GIRL 186
VAIN LIZZY ....................... 110 BESSIE AND MAUD ............ 18
THE CUBBY-HOUSE IN THE THE DOLLS ....................... 190
CORNER ........................... 112 GOING TO MARKET ............ 192
FATHER COMING HOME...... 114 THE TENT ........................... 194
OWEN'S SQUIRREL .......... 116 THE PEARS ................... 196
THE ROYAL HARPER ......... 132 THE FARMYARD ................ 198
THE CHILDREN'S BOX ......134 THE YOUNG VOLUNTEER ... 200
MIRIAM AND MOSES ......... 136 LITTLE JANE .................... 202
THE HAPPY CHILDREN ...... 138 THE HARVEST .................... 204
ORANGES............................. 140 LAZY ROGER ...................206
EDITH AND THE CHICKENS 142 THE GLEANER .................... 208
PEEPING ........................144 THE KERNEL ...............210
LITTLE JANE ................ 146 GRANDFATHER..................... 212
THE LITTLE MATCH GIRL... 14S THE CHURCHYARD ............ 214
THE CONCERT .................... 150 IN CHURCH ....................... 216
MAUD'S SECRET ................. 152 SUNDAY IN THE TOWN...... 218
FIDO .. ........................ 154 NEEDLEWORK ................ 20
THE BURNING MOUNTAIN THE GOOD WIFE ............... 222
OR VOLCANO..................... 156 OLD GRANNY ..................... 224
THE ITALIAN GIRL ........... 158 STRAWBERRY GATHERING... 226
THE FRENCH MELON SELLER 160 THE HIPPOPOTAMUS ......... 228
THE VINTAGE .................... 162 THE CHILDREN'S GARDEN... 230
THE RHINE MAIDEN ......... 164 THE SEA ......................... 232
GATHERING CURRANTS ...... 166 THE ROCKS' ................... 234
BLACKBERRYING .............. 168 LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD 236
MOUNT ST. BERNARD DOG... 170 THE WREATH OF ROSES...... 238
THE WATER SPRINGS ......... 172 THE PIGEONS ..................... 240
THE LITTLE GARDENER ... 174 NAUGHTY TOM.................... 242
THE FERN-SEEKERS ............ 176 THE NAUTILUS ................. 246
MOONLIGHT ......................178 THE ORCHARD.............. 248
COWS ............................... 180 THE LITTLE FRIENDS........ 250







Con en ts. vii
PAGE PAGE
THE PEACHES ..................... 252 PRINCESS BLUE-EYES ......... 312
"DICK WHITTINGTON ......... 254 MARTHA'S FIRST PLACE...... 314
THE GIRAFFES..................... 256 THE PALMS ........................ 316
THE TERRIBLEPLAYFELLOW 258 THE FIRST PRAYER ............ 318
CLAUDIA AND THE BRITONS 260 THE CHILD CHRIST ........... 320
THE LITTLE GIRL'S CHOICE 262 WILLIE'S SCRAP-BOOK......... 322
THE FAIRY GIFT ............... 264 THE LITTLE CARRIAGE ...... 324
LOST IN THE WOOD ......... 266 BURIED IN THE SNOW ...... 326
PLEASE TO RING THE BELL 268 RUDE TOM.......................... 328
THE SNOW-STORM ............... 270 FEEDING PUSSY .................. 330
LONG AGO ........................... 272 WHITE SURREY .................. 332
THE PROUD BOY ............... 274 THE YOUNG CRICKETERS... 334
BABY AND THE ANGEL...... 276 MILLY AND LILY .............. 336
THE BOY'S REQUEST ......... 278 JOHNNIE AND JANET ......... 338
STORY OF COLUMBUS......... 280 WHY AN APPLE FALLS...... 340
THE NEWFOUNDLAND DOG 284 THE BOOKWORM ............... 342
SW INGING ........................... 286 THE SEA-KING ..................... 344
THE LITTLE DANES............ 288 THE RETRIEVERS ............... 346
LITTLE GOLDENHAIR ......... 290 THE EASTERN PRINCESS ... 348
FEEDING THE CHICKENS... 292 THE ARAB HORSE............... 350
FANNY'S BIRTHDAY ............ 294 THE LARGE FAMILY............ 352
AMY'S COPY ......................... 296 SAYING GRACE.................... 354
COOKING ........................ 298 THE BRAVE BOY.................. 356
THE GREAT MISFORTUNE... 300 A PAGE OF RIDDLES ......... 358
WASHING DAY..................... 302 TOO LATE FOR SCHOOL...... 360
THE DRYING-GROUND......... 304 THE DREAMER ................. 362
THE NEW DOLL AND THE TH & INDOLENT CHILD ...... 364
BOOKS ............................ 306 GOING TO SCHOOL ............ 366
THE POOR SWISS FAMILY... 308 GOOD NIGHT! ..................... 368
JOEY AND TOMMY............. 310



























































































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2 Warne's Holiday Album.
Am an as at
Ba be bo by
Co do fy go
He it me my
No on so to
we ye

Act all any awe
Add and ape axe
Aim ant ass aye
Bad bat big bow
Bag bee bit but
Bay beg boy bun

I am to go; and so is he. It is to
be. So it is. An ox; to an ox. It
is I. It is he.






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4 Warne's Holiday Album.
Cat, cap cot cub
Car cow cry cut
Can cod cup cur

Dan dig dot dry
Dane din dog dun
Den dine doe due
Dew dip don done

Ten tent can camp

I see a camp and a tent. Here
are some Danes; a boy and a girl.
They stand near their home. It is
that house with trees near it. I like
the Danes.






























































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6 Warne's Holiday Album.
Eat eel elk emu
Ear egg ell end
Ebb elm elf eye

Fan fen fin fog
Fat fed fir fun
Far fit fly fur

Gad gag gap gay
Get got God gum
Gin grow gig gun

I go with Anne to find the eggs in
the nest. Hens lay eggs. All birds
lay eggs.
Do you like fish? Yes, I do. Fish
live in the sea, and in ponds and
streams.
This is a gull. A gull is a bird
which lives by the sea, and eats fish.





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8 Warne's Holiday Album.

Hat hen hit hot
Ham her hip hop
Hay hid him hap

Ice icy inn ink

Hay is grass made dry by the heat
of the sun. It is first cut by men
with a scythe, and left to dry for a
day or two, and then the men turn
it over with a fork. Cows and horses
eat hay.
Do you like to help make it, and
to sit down in it, and roll in it?
How sweet the hay smells.
There is a place called Iceland.
It is very cold there. This boy and
girl live in Iceland. They look very
good, and I dare say they work very
hard.






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10 Warne's Holiday Album,

Jar jam jig jot
Jag jaw jog jug
Jay jet joy jut
Ken kegs kit kind
Key kid kill kilt
Knife know known knee
Keep kept knoll kine

A jay is a pretty bird. Have you
ever seen one? John is very fond
of birds. He has a lark in a cage.
I wish he would let it fly. It sings
in its cage, poor bird.
We live in a house. Once upon a
time, a long while ago, little boys
and girls lived in castles. The part
of the castle they lived in was called
the KEEP. This is a picture of the
keep of a castle.








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12 Warne's Holiday Album.

Lad law lip lop
Lass led lid log
Lap let low lot
Lamb lame lamp lump
Large long love lost
Land light link loop

Mad made mat mate
Man mane mow mown
Mar mare mop mope
Mean main mast most

This is a lamp to light us to bed.
Do you like the shape of it ? It is
not the same shape that our lamp is.
I like it very much. Please, Nurse,
let me hold it in my own hand.
I like music. I like to hear my
Aunt sing. She has a sweet voice.
I try to sing too. I hope the man
in the picture plays a nice tune








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14 Warne's Holiday Album.
Nag net now nor
Nap new nod nut'
Nay nip not nun
None nine nest nose

Oak ode one out
Oat oil orb owe
Oar old ore owl
Our once ounce own

This blue bird has laid five eggs
in the nest. She will sit on them
and-keep them warm, and by-and-
bye five small birds will come out of
them, and sit and sing on the tree.
The hen bird tries to hide her nest
under the leaves of the tree, for fear
"a boy or man should see it, and take
it from her. It is cruel to take
birds' nests.
Did you ever go in an omnibus?
Yes, I have, with Nurse. It is nice
to ride in an omnibus.






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16 Warne's Holiday Album.

Pain prance prince purse
Pan pet pig pod
Pat peg pin put
Pad pen pit pot

Queen queer quench quince

"A Prince is the son of a King.
This Prince is the son of the Queen
of England. His name is Albert
Edward, and he is Prince of Wales.
This. lady is the Queen of Den-
mark. Once there was a very brave
Queen of Denmark, who was as wise
and bold as any King. Her name
was Margaret. We have had very
good Queens in England too. Our
dear Queen who rules us now is just,
and kind, and good.












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18 Warne's Holiday Album.
Ran ram row rum
Rat red rag run
Rap roe rut rub
Read roll rose round

Sad say see sop
Sat saw sip sow
Sap sew sit sup
Save sell same safe

These roses are very sweet. Do
you like a red or white rose best ?
Most roses have thorns which prick.
Some have no thorns on their stems.
Can you skate ? No, not yet. I
am not old enough to wear skates,
but I can slide, and I like to make
nice long slides on the ice, when it
is hard and strong. John and Mary
can skate very well.





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20 Warne's Holiday. Album.
Tar tag top tun
Tap tit toe tug
Tan tip try tub

Urn use vat van

Tom has shot an arrow at the
target, and has hit it. I wish I
might have a bow and arrows also.
This flag is called the Union Jack,
because it was made by joining toge-
ther the flags of England, Ireland,
and Scotland.
Victoria is our Queen. We must
honour and serve her. She was
Queen when I was born. I hope
she will be Queen for a long time.
God save the Queen.






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S2 Warne's Holiday Album.
Wag way wave wove
Went won will with
This waggon is carrying home
some sheaves of wheat. We make
bread of wheat; but first the chaff
is threshed from the ears, and then
the small seeds are ground to flour
in the mill. Flour mixed with water
and yeast makes dough. Dough is
baked in an oven, and is then called
bread.
The Danes are very kind people.
At Christmas they are very merry,
just as we are in England. But they
like all creatures to share their joy.
So on Christmas Eve they hang up
a whole sheaf of wheat on a pole,
for the birds to feast as well as them-
selves. These Danes are going to
hang up the Christmas sheaf. Jut-
land is in Denmark. It is very cold
there in winter.






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24 Warne's Holiday Album.

Yea yet yes you
Your young youth yacht'

A yacht sails on the sea and wins
races sometimes. It is very nice to
sail in a yacht, for the wind fills the
sails, and carries the boat along.
Zodiac is a very hard word. It
means the band of stars which lie
along the sun's path in the sky; or
I should say the earth's path, for it
is the earth which goes round the
sun, not the sun round the earth.


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26 The Baby.
What a little thing Baby is! Was
I ever as small as Baby, Mamma ?
Don, our dog, is very fond of
Baby. He jumps up, and wants
Baby to play with him, or, at least,
to say, "Poor Don, good dog!" as I
do. But Baby cannot talk. He must
learn, Nurse says. That is very
strange! Why can he not talk
without learning ? He looks so
wise; just as if he knew all we are
doing. He only came to our house
last Christmas, but that is now six
months ago, and I hoped he would
be able to talk English by this time.
Though he cannot talk, he can cry,
and crow, and laugh. He has such
pretty little arms, and hands, and
feet, and dear little pink toes. I
love Baby very much, he is so soft
and tiny. Do you think he loves
me ? If he does not now he will by-
and-bye.





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28 The Baby.
Baby is more than a year old now;
one month more than a year. But
he cannot walk yet. He can only
crawl on the grass. Nurse washes
Baby's clothes. She is busy hanging
them up on a line, to dry in the sun.
So she has put Baby on the pillow
in the basket, and told Don to take
care of him. She may trust Don;
he will not let any one come near
Baby. I have lent Baby my old doll.
I think he likes it better than my
new one, for he can pull the head
off and look inside it. Baby likes
to break his toys, and look inside
them. I think he wants to find out
how they are made. He talks to the
doll in his little words. He can only
say Papa! Mamma! He is a long
time learning to -talk! I wish he
would make haste, for I think he
has a great deal to say to me, and to
Nurse, and Mamma.







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30 The Naughty Boy.
John is a cross, unkind boy. One
day he was angry with poor little
May, and he snatched her doll out
of her hand, and threw it on the
floor. Its nice wax face was broken.
May sat down and began to cry.
Kind little Annie ran to comfort
her; she kissed her, and said, "Do
not cry, my dear May; here is my
ball to play with instead; and I will
buy you a new doll with my six-
pence."
John was sorry when he saw what
he had done; but he was ashamed
to say so, and to ask May to forgive
him. How silly that was!
When we are sorry for having
been naughty, we should say so at
once. A brave boy is never ashamed
to own that he has done wrong.
How cross and vexed John looks.
He is more angry with himself than
with May.




























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32 Kind Willie.
Willie is a very kind little boy.
One day he went with his Mamma
to see a poor old woman who lived
near them. It was a very cold day,
but she had scarcely any fire. She
was boiling her kettle over two or
three sticks, and they were not dry
enough to burn well. Willie remem-
bered that there were a great many
better sticks under the trees in the
shrubbery; so, as they walked home,
he asked his Mamma if he might pick
them up and give them to Nancy.
His Mamma was pleased at the
kind wish, and gave him leave. She
said also that he might pile then
in the wheelbarrow, and the gar-
dener should wheel them to Nancy's
cottage.
Here is a picture of Willie busy
at his kind work. Old Nancy will
have a good fire to-night, thanks to
him.





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34 The Little Housekeeper.
Mary is a very good little girl. She
likes to try and help the maid do her
house-work, and her mother lets her,
because it will make the child-useful
by-and-bye. In the morning Mary
helps to get the breakfast. She
grinds the coffee in a funny little
mill, which her father once bought
from a poor German. Look at it
in the picture. Mary chatters all
the time to Ann, asking her if when
she was a child, she had a tiny coffee
mill of her own. And Ann tells her
that the coffee mill in her mother's
house was screwed on to the kitchen
dresser, and that she had to kneel
upon a chair to reach the handle.
And Mary says,
"Oh, that was not half as nice as
mine is! Mine is just like the
wooden toy in my German box.
You will see how small this will
grind the coffee."






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36 Dusting the Books.
When Mary had eaten her break-
fast, she asked her mother to let
her help to dust the rooms. "Very
well," said her mother, "you may
go and dust Papa's books with the
dusting brush." "Oh, thank you,
Mamma," said Mary; so she dusted
the books, one by one, and gave
them to Ann to put up on the shelf.
" I wish I could read all these books,"
said the child; "I dare say they are
full of pretty stories." "You must
make haste and learn to read, and
then you will know," said her mo-
ther, who was in the room. "When
you can read without spelling, I
will give you a pretty story book to
keep." "I shall try hard to learn
fast, then," said Mary, "for I love
stories very much, and when I can
read myself, I shall not have to wait
until you or Papa have time to read
to me."

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38 Helping to Wash.
"Mamma," said Mary, "Jane says
she is going to wash some fine
things; may I help her ?"
"I do not think you can help Jane,
my dear, but you may wash Dolly's
clothes at the same time, if you like,"
said her mother.
Mary trotted off, and soon she was
standing at a tub full of hot water
and soap-suds, washing her doll's
frocks; soaping and rubbing just
as she had seen Jane do. The tub
stood on a low stool in the garden,
and a blackbird sang a sweet song
to Mary all the while from a bough
close by. But, Jane," said the child,
"where are your 'fine things?' I
want to see them." "These are fine
things, Miss Mary; the collars, and
cuffs, and handkerchiefs." "These
things!" cried Mary, "I don't call
them fine at all. I thought fine things
were red, and blue, and gold."





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40 Hanging out the Clothes.
When all the clothes looked clean
and white, Jane said they must be
hung out to dry. Mary went with
her to hang them up on the line, but
she could not reach to do that her-
self; so she helped by handing Jane
the pegs which fastened them on the
rope, singing all the time,
"The maid was in the garden,
Hanging out the clothes,
Along came a jackdaw
And pecked off her nose."
"I hope the jackdaw won't peck
off your nose, Jane," she said.
"No fear of that, Miss Mary; it
must have been a very old-fashioned
jackdaw that you sing about."
"Yes, indeed," said Mary, "and a
very rude one, I think. Birds know
better now, Jane." Jane laughed.
"We have washed the clothes very
well," added Mary; "the linen shines
quite white in the sun."





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42 Mary's Ironing.
"Mamma says that I may help
you with the ironing, Jane," said
Mary; "but you must not give me
too hot an iron, please, for fear I
should burn my fingers."
"Then here is one which will just
do for you," replied Jane, "for it is
quite cool now."
Mary seated Dolly on the floor,
and Jane taught her how to hold an
iron, and how to press it on the frock
she was to make smooth. Mary did
her very best, and learned how to
use a flat iron as well as if she had
been a tall girl. She thought it great
fun to use the cool iron, but it was
a little heavy for such a tiny hand,
and she could not use it long. When
she was tired, she took up Dolly,
and sat down and watched Jane
iron, which was very amusing, and
taught her almost as well as trying
herself to iron.





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44 Gardening.
Mary had, a little garden of her
own, in which she loved to work.
Close by it there was a garden seat
and a table, and when she had been
a very good child all day, her Mamma
used to let her have tea or a cup of
coffee with her there. Mary had
made friends with a Robin that
lived in a tree close by, and when
she drank tea in the garden, Robin
would come and sit on the wall, and
wait for a few crumbs. When he
had eaten those which Mary gave
him, he used to sing her a sweet
song of thanks. After tea, Mary
would say, "Now the sun is low in
the sky, and the flowers want their
tea, too, Mamma. Let us give them
something to drink. They must be
thirsty after looking up so long at
the sunshine." Then Mamma let
her water them, while she gathered
a few heads of lettuce.






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46 Resting.
"Now, Mary," said her Mamma,
when the flowers were watered,
"you may bring your knitting, and
sit in the bower with me and rest."
Mary was very glad; she loved to
ef, with her Mamma and work, for
then very often Mamma would tell
her a story. She ran into the house
and put on her warm jacket, for the
sun was nearly gone down, and she
brought out the cage in which she
kept a canary bird, that he might
enjoy the air as well as herself.
And her Mamma told her a pretty
story about a good little shepherd
boy who became a great king; and
the bees boomed by on their way
home to their hive, and the birds
sang softly, as if they were sleepy;
and the sun went down like a red
ball of fire, till she could not see
him any longer. And the sky turned
to a soft grey.





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4"MARY IN THE ARBOUR.
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48 Bed-time.
The birds and the bees are gone
to rest; the sun is set; the moon is
in the sky; Mary must go to bed.
She puts her arms round her dear
Mamma, and looks up in her face,
and asks, "Mamma, have I been
good to-day ?" Mamma is so happy
that she is able to say, "Yes, my
darling. Now you must kneel down
and thank GOD for making you a
good girl, and ask Him to take care
of you in the night." Mary has a
pretty bedroom. At the foot of her
bed stands an old spinning-wheel,
which once upon a time belonged to
her great-grandmamma. Nobody
uses it now. Steam spins now in-
stead of women and girls, and it
can do a great deal more work in a
shorter time. Mary often thinks.
that she would like to spin; but she
has been told not to touch the wheel,
and she never disobeys.









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50 Story told by Mary's M iamma.
"Once there was a very good
young man, whose name was David.
His father kept sheep, and David
was their shepherd. He took care
of them, and watched them on the
high hills and in the green pastures.
And as he sat under a large old tree,
he used to play on his harp, and sing
sweet songs in praise of GOD, who
made the green fields, and the cool
quiet streams, and the trees which
give us shade. And GOD loved the
young shepherd, and made him
good and happy. David wrote down
his songs, and they have been kept
ever since. They are called Psalms.
We read them every Sunday in
church. You can say one, I think,
all through, Mary; I mean, 'The
Lord is my Shepherd."' "Oh, yes,
Mamma, I know that Psalm very
well. Did David make it ?" "Yes,
he did."
























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THE YOUNG SHEPHERDD'





52 The Shepherd and the Lion.
"But David could not always sit
singing. He had to take care that
no wild beasts came to eat up his
poor sheep and lambs, and there
were many wild beasts in that land.
One day, when he was with the flock,
there came a lion and a bear; and
the lion took a lamb from the flock;
but the brave shepherd ran after
him, and 'smote him,' and took the
lamb out of his mouth; and when
the great lion 'rose up against him,'
David took him by the beard, and
killed him. There came a bear close
behind the lion, but he also was
slain by the brave shepherd boy."
"Oh, Mamma," said Mary, "how
could a young boy kill two great
wild beasts like a lion and a bear ? "
"Because GOD helped him, Mary.
Soon afterwards this brave shepherd
boy fought with a great giant called
Goliath, and killed him."






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DAVID SLAYING THE LION
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54 The Shepherd made King.
"The people were glad David
had killed the giant; but King
,Saul was jealous of him, for he knew
that GOD had said He would give
Saul's crown to one who was better
than he was, and he feared this
brave lad might be the man. Saul
was quite right; for long before,
holy Samuel had put oil on David's
head, and told him that God meant
him to be king. But David did not
want to be a king. When Saul was
cruel to him, and wanted to kill
him, David bore it meekly, and hid
away from Saul, and would never
hurt him. He knew that it is right
to honour the king. But by-and-
bye Saul was killed in battle, and
then the people came and made
David king in his stead. They put
a crown on his head and a sceptre
in his hand, and cried, 'God save
the King.'"







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56 The Undutiful Son.
David was not so happy when
king as when he had been a poor
shepherd boy, though he was rich
and grand. He had many sons, but
he loved one best of all, and spoiled
him by letting him do everything
he pleased. This son was called Ab-
salom. He had very long beautiful
hair, and was very proud of it. He
grew so wicked that at last he made
war on his own father, that he might
get David's crown, and be king him-
self. David did not like to fight
with his own son, and told his men
not to hurt the young man. But
GoD did not let Absalom escape
punishment, for, as he was riding
through a wood, his hair caught in
the branch of an old oak tree, and
pulled him off his horse, which gal-
loped away and left him hanging.
A friend of David killed Absalom
with a spear or dart."





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58 The Quarrel.
These two little girls are very fool-
ish; they both want to play with the
same doll. It is a very large doll
with blue eyes, and wax hands and
feet. Bessie says she ought to play
with it, and be its Mamma, because
she is the elder, and it is her own
doll; but Maud says that she will
have it, because she is "company,"
and company have the best things
given to them. So she pulls poor
Dolly by the frock, and Milly pulls
her back again. Between them I
am afraid they will break her to
pieces. Now as Maud is a visitor,
Bessie ought to let her play with the
large -doll. It is unkind not to let
her have it for a little while; but
Maud ought not to pull it away from
her cousin; that is not right at all.
Both these children are selfish; that
is, they like to please themselves bet-
ter than to please anybody else.






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60 The Dove.
Little Willie had a pet dove of
which he was very fond. One day
he opened the door of the cage, and
let the bird out. "My dove shall
not be shut up in a cage," said Willie,
"he shall fly and be free. I should
not like to be shut up in a cage, and
I do not think he can like it." But
as the dove flew away, Willie's eyes
filled with tears. He could not part
with his bird without pain; but he
was not selfish, and he wished it to
be happy. By-and-bye Willie heard
the gentle fluttering of wings, and
the moment afterwards his dove
perched on his shoulder, and said,
"Coo, coo !" meaning "Thank you,
dear master, for my freedom." Willie
kissed his dove. "So you are come
back to me," he said; "you love me
and will stay with me? I am so
glad! You shall have a nice flight
every day when the sun shines."












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62 The Good Boy.
"Tom," said a poor woman to her
little son, as she sat down under a
tree to rest; "Tom, my dear, do not
go near those bad boys who are
fighting by the inn door. If you
make friends or play with wicked
children, you will be sure to grow
bad yourself."
Tom was a good boy. He loved
his mother, and always tried to obey
her. So he said, "I will not go,
mother. I was very thirsty, and I
was going to beg for a draught of
water, but I won't go if you wish me
to stay here." His mother was very
glad to hear him speak thus; but at
that moment a woman with a milk-
pail came by; she had heard Tom's
words, and she stopped. "You are
a good boy," she said; "here is a nice
cup of fresh milk for you; that is
better than water, and here is a little
for baby too."
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TOM, THE GOOD BOY.
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64 Dogs.
Dogs are very clever animals.
The dog at the top of the picture
hunts foxes. He can run very fast.
The little fat looking dog below is
called a truffle dog, because he digs
up nice round balls or roots, which
are good to eat, from the earth. Poor
people find this dog a good friend to
them. He finds where these balls
(called truffles) are, and then they
dig them up, and sell them for a great
deal of money.
How wonderful it is that GOD
should have given men such a kind
good loving friend in the dog! He
watches our houses to keep them
safe from thieves; he will swim and
save a child from being drowned;
he will do all he can to help us; and
he is never unkind to his master, or
disobedient. We should try to be
as faithful and kind to one another
as the dog is to man.













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66 The Good Children.
George and Fanny are very good
children. "Mother" cannot go to
church in the morning every Sun-
day: she has to wash and dress the
children, and cook the dinner; but
she knows that George can be trust-
ed to take care of Fanny, and that
both will be very quiet and good in
church. These little ones love the
good GOD who made them, and try
to please Him. When they are in
His house they do not play and look
about them; they know that "GOD
is in His holy temple," and that He
looks on them, and listens to their
words, and that they would be very
wicked if they did not reverence the
great and good Father who made
them. They kneel down and think
of the words they say, and when the
Psalms are read, they read together,
and their sweet voices are heard by
GOD, who loves holy children.











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GEORGE AND FANNY AT CHURCH
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68 The School Feast.
The school children have been
good for a long time, and the clergy-
men, and the ladies and gentlemen
who teach them on Sundays, have
given them a feast. Now, Emma
and Amy have some raspberry trees
of their own, and they asked their
Mamma if they might give the fruit
of them to the poor children. Mam-
ma said, "Yes," and they have been
all the morning gathering the rasp-
berries in a large brown dish, which
cook lent them: it is quite piled up
with fruit. Emma is helping Amy
to carry it, and set it on the tea-
table, which they are getting ready
while the children play. They will
be so pleased to see the little ones
eat them; much better pleased than
if they had eaten them themselves.
"It is more blessed to give than to
receive," especially if one denies
one's self to do so.





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AMY AND EMMA SETTING THE TEA-T THINGS. ,)
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111
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70 The Little Playfellows.
Bessie and Maud are two little
cousins. Maud's Mamma lives in
London; Bessie's in the country.
But when the summer comes Maud's
Mamma brings her to stay with
Bessie, and they are both so happy,
it is quite pleasant to see them.
Maud is delighted to play in the
garden, and she likes best of all to
sit in the great wheel-barrow, and
pretend it is their carriage, that they
are going on a long journey, and that
Puss and Dolly are going with them.
Sometimes Bessie's Papa comes that
way, and then he gives them a real
ride in the barrow, all round the
paths of the lawn, and under the old
oak trees. Look at Maud: she sees
her Uncle coming now, and looks
delighted. She knows she will have
a ride, for Uncle John dearly loves
little Maud, though she is rather
mischievous at times,


















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A RIDE IN THE WHEELBARROW













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72 Playing at Visiting.
"It rains, and we cannot go into
the garden," said Bessie: "let us play
at ladies."
Maud was quite willing. Bessie
sat up with her doll, with Trim at
her feet, and Maud knocked at the
door, and came in, and walked up to
Bessie, and said,
"How do you do, Mrs. Brown? I
hope you are quite well."
"Quite well, and delighted to see
you, Mrs. Pink," said Bessie.
Trim looked very wise at Maud;
he could not quite understand why
she talked in that funny voice, for
Maud put on a make-believe tone.
"I hope all your children are very
well," said Bessie.
"No: I am sorry to say that Rosa-
lind has scarlet fever, and Clorinda
the measles, and Julia has whooping
cough; but except all that, they are
quite well, thank you."
















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74 A Sad Misfortune.
Poor little Maud! The wheel has
come off the doll's carriage, and she
is crying loudly. Bessie forgets her
dignity as a fine lady, and runs to
console her dear little cousin.
"Never mind, Maud, Papa will
mend it; he knows how to do every-
thing. We will take it to him di-
rectly he comes home."
But I want it now," sobbed Maud.
We can play at something else,"
said Bessie. "Let us pretend to take
the dolls to the sea-side and bathe
them."
"But then I shall want the car-
riage to take them there," said Maud,
and she cried still louder.
Then let us pretend to be gipsies.
Don't cry, Maud dear. We will tie
our babies on our backs, and we can
sit and dine under the trees."
Maud was comforted, anrd they
played at gipsies merrily.







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76 Good bye.

But friends we love cannot stay
with us for ever. Maud's Mamma
was obliged to go home; and the lit-
tle playmates had to say good bye. I
really cannot tell you how often they
both hugged and kissed each other.
Trim, too, was very sorry, and said
so as well as he could.
"You must come and see me in
London, dear Bessie," said Maud,
"and we will show you the pretty
things, and take you to the Christ-
mas Fair held at the Crystal Palace."
"But Christmas will be so long
coming," said Bessie. "Oh, dear,
what shall I do when you are gone?"
"Bow-wow, bow-wow!" said Trim,
jumping up, as much as to say, "I
shall be here ready to play with you.
Don't cry, my little mistress. Good
bye, little Maud."
And so the loving cousins parted,
but they would meet again.








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78 Alone.
Maud is gone, and Bessie is very
lonely. She does not care for Dolly
at all. There is no Maud to play with
her, and pretend all sorts of amusing
things. It is Bessie's first sorrow.
Poor child! She does not know
what to do, she is so dull; but kind
Mamma thinks of her, and of her
little troubles, and calls her by-and-
bye, and takes her for a nice walk
to the farmyard to see the animals.
And when tea-time comes, she has
tea with Mamma, and after tea Papa
tells her a story; and Bessie is so
well amused that she forgets to be
sad till she is once more in the nur-
sery. But time goes on very fast;
Christmas will soon come, and then
'the little playfellows will be together
again. In the meantime Bessie
must learn her lessons well, and
work hard at her sums and writing,
that she may enjoy her holiday.






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80 The Well.
Alice is a kind girl, very civil and
obliging. She never refuses to give
a drink of cold water to anyone who
asks her, though the well is deep,
and it is hard work to draw it. You
recollect the fairy tale of the girl
who spoke kindly to an old woman
at a well, and gave her a drink of
water; how the old woman (who
was a Fairy) told her that from that
time, whenever she spoke, she should
drop a diamond or a pearl from her
lips. I have always thought there
was a very pretty moral in that story.
Good words, gentle words, kind
words are as precious as pearls and
diamonds. Kind actions too, shown
even to little children, please GoD.
Our LORD has said that those who
give only a cup of cold water to
others because they love Him, and
wish to be kind to one another, shall
not lose their reward.







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82 Kindness.
Here are two more kind little
children. Old Goody Jones cannot
stoop long now. Her back is stiff,
and she gets tired. It is a great help
to her when Nancy and Susan pick
up sticks for her. The dry sticks
will make a nice fire to boil her
kettle on; for she is very poor, and
cannot buy wood, and has only a few
coals. Susan, the youngest child, is
only five years old, yet she is able to
do a kind action and be of use. She
likes to pick up the sticks for Goody,
and sometimes she will take a few
home for her, and fill her needle for
her when the old woman is doing
needlework, for her young eyes can
see much better than Goody's old
ones.
One is never too little to be kind.
A good child is like sunshine to old
people. Try what you can do to help
the old.















II -












17
-IN - -------
















,ii






NANCY AND SUSAN GATHER STICKS FOR GOODY JONES.






84 Nutting.
Lucy, and Jane, and John are gone
to gather nuts.
In the lane near their father's farm
they have found a great many trees
quite covered with ripe filberts. John
holds down the bough for Lucy to
pick them, because she cannot reach
those which grow at the top. He
would like to gather them himself
instead, and for Lucy to hold the
bough; but he gives up his own
wishes to please his sister.
Jane has filled her lap full of nuts,
and the basket is nearly full also.
Nut gathering is very nice play.
I hope the children will leave a few
for the merry little squirrels, who
like nuts as much as they do.
Did you ever see a squirrel crack
a nut ?
He will make a little hoard of them
if he can; he likes a full store-room
for the winter.
















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tUCY; JANE)AND JHN NUTING*






86 The Fig Seller.
This is an Italian girl. She is now
going to market to sell figs-ripe
green figs, very sweet and juicy.
She is smartly dressed. This is the
way the poor young girls in her
country always dress themselves;
nearly always alike. Her home is
under beautiful orange trees; far off
she can see the Alps all covered with
snow. Her country is very beautiful
indeed, and the sun shines there very
bright; but we love old England best.
Nut-gathering and blackberry pick-
ing are just as pleasant as gathering
figs and oranges; and we have our
warm fire-side, which is, after all,
nearly as nice as sunshine. And if
it does rain and blow sometimes, we
have gleams of sunshine in between.
And nothing can be more delightful
than an English spring, when we
have beautiful days; and daisies and
buttercups bloom in the meadows.







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p 4






88 Charity.

Charity means love.
Giving away things is one way of
showing charity. There is not much
charity in giving to others that which
you do not want, and will not miss.
To go without something in order to
help one's neighbour is true charity.
This young woman, who is giving
a loaf to some poor wanderers, can-
not very well spare it. She has to
work hard for her bread, and she
does not earn many loaves; but she
has a tender heart, and she cannot
see them looking so tired and hungry
and not help them. Her little son,
too, brings some water for them.
Children like to imitate their elders.
So he will be charitable as well as
"MMother" when he grows up. GoD
has said, "Blessed be he who provides
for the sick and needy."
Let us do our best to be charitable
and kind to our poor neighbours.