The toy book keepsake

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The toy book keepsake twenty-four coloured engravings
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (col.) ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
Kronheim & Co ( Lithographer )
Westleys & Co ( Binder )
Publisher:
Religious Tract Society
Place of Publication:
London
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Dolls -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Flowers -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Mice -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1872   ( lcsh )
Westleys & Co -- Binders' tickets (Binding) -- 1872   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1872
Genre:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Binders' tickets (Binding)   ( rbbin )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations lithographed by Kronheim & Co. in colors.
General Note:
Bound by Westleys & Co.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002225049
notis - ALG5321
oclc - 10834220
System ID:
UF00026573:00001

Full Text
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TOT BOOKTWENTY FOUR COLOURED ENGRAVINGSLONDONTHE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY56 PATERNOSTER Row 65 ST PAUL S CHURCHYARD AND 164 PICCADTLLYBRIGHTON 31 WESTERN ROADMANCHESTER 31 CORPORATION STREET1872


CONTENTSMY BIRTHDAYTHE LITTLE MOUSE AND OTHER FABLESPILGRIM CHILDRENTHE LORD S PRAYER


MY BIRTHDAY


WHAT makes the dear children so gayWhat is it the little ones sayMany happy returns of the dayThe long weeks of waiting are pastThe long looked for day come at lastAnd the little tongues run and run fastAh early to day they must wakeFor Lily their queen they will makeAnd dear Lily herself cuts the cakePlay away play away make the best of the dayHow swiftly the seasons have flownThe months and the years have rolled onAnd our Baby to childhood has grownShe scarcely could lisp her own nameNor stand when her FIRST birthday cameShe could play just one merry wee gameWhen not in her cradle asleepBrother Harry beside her would creepAnd hiding his face cry Bo peepOh how Baby would crow when Harry cried BoAh then she was helpless as fairShe needed our tenderest careAnd our love met her wants everywhereDear mother with sweet lullabyWould sing her to sleep and be nighQuick to hear if her Baby should cryBy mother the Baby was dressedBy mother so fondly caressedAnd if Baby were hurt or distressedIn her dear mother s arms she was safe from alarms


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We loved her and quickly she grewThe white pearly teeth all came throughAnd she gave us smiles many tears fewShe soon learned to throw the soft ballTo know us and come at a callTo come running and tripping to fallTo stand high on tip toe to seeWhat things on the table might beTo climb on her dear father s kneeClasp and pull at his chain to hear tick tick againFull well I remember the dayWhen Lily first ran quite awayFather lured her from mother to strayCome Lily sweet roses come takeAnd sure of her treasure to makeShe trotted away by mistakeThen stopping in wonder and fearPlump she fell but her father was nearAnd for Lily we all gave a cheerNever mind little maid try don t be afraidThe flowers we gathered with careLeaf by leaf from the stem she would tearThe roses no better would fareLily knew not that summer must goShe thought not of cold frost and snowWhen the flowers sleep the dark earth belowBut to summer the autumn succeedsAnd autumn to winter quick leadsThen spring oh how fast the year speedsWhen next the spring smiled Two years old was our child


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The wise little woman of THREESet off to the toy shop with meAnd back she came bringing with gleeA Dolly her first all her ownA Dolly to nurse all aloneTo sing to in soft and sweet toneA Dolly to make believe feedTo carry in arms or to leadTo teach how to spell and to readWe dressed the Doll gay and we called her Miss MayA cradle was bought where at nightMiss May could lie snugly and tightBut her mistress awoke with the lightAnd Doll she must fetch to her bedFor Doll must quite early be fedWhen we bought her Miss May s cheeks were redBut petting so much made her paleAnd her nose wore away oh sad taleLily wondered what Dolly could ailSo carried Miss May to the doctor one dayDear doctor she said I supposeYou can tell me what ails Dolly s noseAnd why so much paler she growsBrother Harry the doctor looked wiseWell Madam said he I adviseThat she eat no more puddings or piesGive her rest and fresh air and be sureHer pale cheeks I cannot well cureTill your kisses be drier and fewerHer poor nose to restore give bread pills three or four


Happy childhood its joys pass awayHappy children enjoy while you mayIts innocent pleasures and playStep by step life s long journey we takeDay by day we to wisdom awakeOne by one childish pastimes forsakeThus Lily the Babe full of gleeGrew apace and the Babe ceased to beFor her birthdays passed one two and three JThe Babe lost in the child our fond hearts beguiledShe was FOUR and was promised a rideArthur said he would walk by her sideAnd she mounted the Donkey with prideThe joy of the children was greatHarry eagerly opened the gateAnd the little queen rode out in stateNow off down the lane and awayWhat is it the singing birds sayMany happy returns of the dayLily heard their sweet song as Ned trotted alongUp and down in the saddle she goesAnd Arthur his arm round her throwsFor Lily is timid he knowsOn the grass lay the glittering dewOn the bank the pale primroses grewAnd violets in shade not a fewThe sun sparkled glad through the treesThe leaves whispered low in the breezeAnd all things united to pleaseOh how full of delight was that morning so bright


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Dear mother when Lily was FIVEA party was asked to contriveAnd as little bees buzz round a hiveLittle voices in concert of soundMurmured sweetly our tea table roundWhat pleasure in friendship is foundThence gaily they troop to the hallWhere loudly for Lily they callFor Lily is loved by them allAnd to give her the choice of the game they rejoiceBlind Man s Buff So for Arthur they soughtTo be Blind Man and Arthur soon caughtLittle Lily and poor Lily thoughtThe game so much better would beIf only the Blind Man could seeFor she could not catch one Oh what gleeAs little girls round Lily dancedAnd little boys round Lily prancedAnd Lily impatient once glancedThe handkerchief under Who saw her I wonderYoung Harry played Blind Man so wellHe caught two together and fellAnd the children rushed round him pell mellThen the bell rung a knock at the doorAnother then two or three moreAnd the play for the evening was o erGood bye now to each little friendThe happiest day has its endMay Lily when cares shall descendAnd life opens anew find friendships as true


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As older our dear Lily grewShe could read easy words not a fewAnd this her kind grandfather knewAnd on her SIXTH birthday he broughtA Bible for Lily who thoughtA more beautiful could not be boughtShe peeped the gilt edges betweenWhere the clear and large letters were seenAnd great must her pleasure have beenWhen her grandfather next bade her read him a textOf a verse of a psalm it was partThy word have I hid in mine heartMy darling he said you must startOn your journey through life with this guideGod s word in your heart you must hideAnd there let its precepts abideYou will read of the Saviour hereinHow he died to atone for our sinHow he loves little children to winHow all who believe he will surely receiveSearch the Scriptures again and againSeek the Spirit the truth to make plainIf you ask it shall not be in vainRead the wonderful message of loveWhich Jesus brought down from aboveWith his blessing your Bible shall proveA light to your path day by dayA lamp to your feet lest you strayAnd as birthdays and years pass awayMay its life giving page be the joy of your age


THE LITTLE MOUSE ANDOTHER FABLES


J WONDER now what can the little ones doSOf what use can the little folk beThus said Uncle Fred as he drew little NedAnd Alice and Tom to his kneeCome listen to me while a story I tellOf one who was little and useful as wellTHE MOUSE AND THE LIONA wee little Mouse with his sisters and brothersHis father and mother his cousins and othersWhen out for a ramble one hot summer s dayFrisked over a Lion as sleeping he layThe Lion was heated with hunting and tiredAnd roused thus untimely his anger was firedQuick lifting his paw the intruder he seizedAnd poor captive Mouse he to death would have squeezedThen hard the Mouse pleaded its pitiful fateOh spare me he cried I am small you are greatAnd the noble old beast like a true forest kingRaised his foot and let go the poor wee little thingSoon after the Mouse met the Lion againCaught fast in a net where he struggled in vainLion king said the Mouse you were gracious to meNow I in my turn may to you useful beThen with sharp tiny teeth he nibbled and toreTill the Lion broke through and was free once more


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ANNoriT E


Well done little Mouse cried the children with gleeThen listen again said their Uncle to meWhile you praise this wee Mouse in its plain suit of greyTake a lesson from one clad in brighter arrayTHE BIRDS IN COUNCILNow only think of such a funny thingThe birds one day desired to have a KingThe Magpie Jackdaw Peacock Wren and OwlThe Robin Parrot and the barn door FowlTogether met upon the sunny plainTo choose a king who over them should reignThe Peacock spread his tail of feathers gayThe silly birds admired the vain displayThe Peacock they proclaimed they clapped their wingsBut then the Magpie spoke just a few thingsHe thought the Birds if wise ought first to knowHe begged to ask the king what he could doHow he would help them if in warlike flightThey saw descend the Eagle Vulture KiteAlas he could not help his splendid tailHis plumage gay would be of no availThe birds began to think the Magpie wiseThe Peacock looked quite foolish in their eyesHis feathers certainly they much admiredBut more than beauty in their king desired


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Fine actions far more than fine feathers adornAnd I think said their Uncle this story should warnAll vain little people when proud of their dressAre you ever vain Now Alice confessThe children all laughed Not that which we wearBut that which we do should be our chief careTHE DOG IN THE MANGERNow hear of the Dog in a Manger who layReposing his bones on a bed of sweet hayBy and by came a poor hungry Ox from the fieldOh what a good dinner this nice hay should yieldHe knew very well that Dogs never eat hayHe did not think Rover would bark a Nay nayNor would he deprive the poor Dog of his bedFor that would be greedy and very ill bredEnough for them both he believed to be thereSo he stooped down to take his own rightful shareThen up jumped the Dog with an ungracious howlAnd drove back the Ox with a bark and a growlQuite true he himself could not eat if he wouldThe Ox he resolved should not eat if he couldOh shame on the ill natured Dog Alice saidA shame indeed Alice replied Uncle FredBut greater the shame if selfishly weGood manners forget and ungenerous be


And children he added bear this too in mindBe as humble and modest as helpful and kindKeep always your place and of folly bewareWhich would make you pretend to be more than you areTHE ASS IN LION S SKIN6 An Ass once wandered through the forest wideWith long ears listening for what might betideWhen in the path he found a Lion s skinAnd fastened it around his body thinThe beasts who saw him trembled in alarmAnd ran to hide themselves lest he should harmThe Ass was charmed that he so mean a thingShould be mistaken for the Forest KingA Fox approached when thinking to affrightHe vainly tried to roar with all his mightThe hideous sound made Reynard draw more nearMy eye played false he said but not my earThe while you held your tongue I was deceivedYour noisy braying has my fears relievedAn Ass indeed you are as Ass by nameWho but an Ass would play so mean a gamePut off that skin and know that vain pretenceIs wanting both in honesty and senseWhat matters it how lowly be our stateIt matters more that we be true than great


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And now in another short story we seeHow obedience a safeguard to children may beTHE WOLF AND THE KIDBy bye my kid an old Goat said one dayDo just as you are bid whilst I m awayThe door see bolted keep it so till ICome back to you again by bye by byeThen off the mother set upon her wayAnd soon a cunning Wolf who near by layLifted the knocker with a rat tat tatSays Kiddy from within Pray who is thatChild says the Wolf in voice as like the GoatAs he could bring from out his husky throatChild open quick your mother is outsideI know my mother s voice the kid repliedThe door is bolted I am safe withinLoud you may knock no entrance will you winThe old Goat soon returned Dear kid I m comeAnd glad the Kid her mother welcomed homeI saw my child she said a Wolf beforeMy heart misgave me for he left our doorOh had you opened it or disobeyedYou would my pretty kid have now been deadI peeped from out the window said the KidThought of your words and did as I was bid


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The children all listened with silent delightThen declared in a breath the little Kid right6 Once more learn how those who do selfishly wrongAre sure to find out their mistake before longTHE BEAR AND THE BEESA Bear too fond of honey sweetThought once to give himself a treatHe climbed a garden fence where stoodA row of hives in order goodWith lifted paw the sweets to getThe Hives he in a trice upsetThen buzzed the Bees like angry foesThey stung his eyes they pierced his noseHe tried to beat them down but toreHis own ears smarting all the moreAnd now little people said Uncle t one wordMy meaning is grave though my stories absurdWould you seek to be useful and humble and kindAnd fill wisely the place by your Maker designedWould you learn true obedience and evil avoidLest the hope of your life by its sting be destroyedBelieve me the good and the true and the justAre those God has taught in themselves not to trustNo heart is so happy as that He makes pureNo hope is like that which in Jesus is sureMay He pardon your sins and his Spirit bestowThat as years pass away you in wisdom may grow


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LONG ago in olden storyWhen I was a child I readOf some little pilgrim childrenWho upon a journey spedEver onward ever upwardBy a tender mother ledChildhood s home they left behind themWith its folly mirth and dinThere destruction frowned upon themSorrow there abode with sinAnd they sought the Golden CityWith its light and joy to winMatthew Samuel James and JosephWalking bravely side by sideWith the gentle maiden MercyFearless all what should betideFor the King himself had called themAnd for all he would provideSo they entered on their journeyPassing through the wicket gateReading there sweet words of welcomeWhile they knock and patient waitWords of welcome to the childrenWho had chosen path so straitFrom within the door was openedAnd the keeper bade them comeLittle children with the motherAnd for Mercy there was roomAnd he rested them and blest themEre he sent them from his home


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Then again they journeyed onwardReaching at the close of dayStately mansion built for pilgrimsBy the Lord who owned the wayWhere the simple gain instructionLest from out the path they strayPictures here and sights most wondrousHeld the children s eager eyesAnd from room to room they followedFinding ever new surpriseAs their host the truth unfoldedClearing it from strange disguiseHere they saw a man who gatheredDust and straws with busy careBending over him an angelGave him golden crown to wearBut he would not leave the earthlyFor the heavenly treasure rareSo they learned these youthful pilgrimsMany a lesson for their needHere a little there a littleTruth on which the heart might feedHere was many a precept givenLine on line for all to heedAnd the Master bade brave Great heartBe the pilgrims trusty guideAnd the children s hearts grew strongerFor in him they could confideGreat heart with his spear and helmetAnd his sheath d sword at his side


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So he led them onward onwardLed them where in years beforeChristian walked their pilgrim fatherTold them of the load he boreShowed the Cross where fell the burdenCross uplifted evermoreAnd they followed upward upwardWhere the hill side was so steepThey with toiling panting strivingFoot hold steady scarce could keepTill the youngest child faint heartedSat him sadly down to weepCourage children do not falterDo not mind a little painRest is sweeter after labourThey who fail must strive againDifficulty we must conquerIf we would the prize obtainFair the Palace BeautifulGlistens now within their sightComfort for the fainting childrenRest and shelter for the nightWhy does Great heart stand before themWhy unsheath his sword for fightQuick his eye the guide discoversDanger lurking in the wayTwixt the pilgrims and the PalaceLions waiting for their preyFear not children faithful Great heartWill their nearer coming stay


But the little ones are cryingAs they to each other clingRound about their anxious motherTrembling hands they wildly flingSaying Will the lions keep usFrom the City of the KingChained the lions are but blindedBy their tears no chains they seeAnd the giant Grim advancesFast to set the lions freeAh the guide has slain the giantWho so brave a guide as heSoon they reach the lordly PalaceEnter at its lofty doorThere they rest them and its treasuresDaily with delight exploreThen with hope and courage strengthenedStart upon their way once moreNow they speed adown the valleyWhere the babbling streamlet springsHearken to the little shepherdAs he tends his flock he singsHappier there in his contentmentThan the mightiest of kingsOnce the Lord in pilgrim fashionTrod that valley all aloneBearing there sin s bitter burdenFor His children to atoneHumbly walking through the darknessTo the glory of His throne


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Now the valley deepens downwardAnd the skies all gloomy growTis the Valley of the ShadowAnd with trembling feet they goFor the air is thick with vapourAnd strange shapes move to and froGreat heart bravely speaks and cheers themAnd they kneel and pray for lightAnd the sunshine comes in answerAnd the end appears in sightGlad they press upon their journeyTill the fall of dewy nightMorning shows a thronging cityFull of Vanities they sayCrowds are buying cheating swearingAt its Fair from day to dayAnd the idlers tempt the pilgrimsIf within its walls they stayOnward pass they where a riverBroadens through the meadows fairBut a by path leads where yonderStands the Castle of DespairAnd a giant fierce and cruelWaits to drag them to his lairBoldly to the gate ascendingGreat heart knocks with echoing soundBids the giant come to battleSmites him wounded to the groundWhile they break the dungeon openAnd set free the pilgrims bound


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So they travelled ever steadfastOver plain and hill alongAnd the children grew in wisdomGrew in daily toil more strongTill the City gleamed before themAnd they heard the heavenly songSweetest music gently swellingFloated through the fragrant airAnd the sunshine streamed in splendourAnd no night was ever thereFlowers and fruits and corn fields wavingAll were rich beyond compareShining Ones in whitest raimentOften walk that radiant landBut a river cold and rapidStops at last the pilgrim bandAll who reach the Golden CityCross it at the King s commandSoon there came a gracious messageWords of friendship from the KingShining chariots for the motherFrom the river bank to bringAnd the children waiting watchingHeard the welcome angels singLittle pilgrims will you followStill the gates stand open wideJesus is the King of gloryAnd He calls you to His sideCalls you to the Golden CityJesus who for children died


THE LORD S PRAYER


OUR FATHER WHICH ART IN HEAVENHALLOWED BE THY NAMEGOD of glory throned on highRuling all the starry skyWilt thou hear an infant cryOur FatherHallowed be Thy name O LordBy the hosts of heaven adoredSoft we breathe the sacred wordOur FatherSmile upon us while we prayGrant Thy love from day to dayTeach us that we may obeyOur FatherStill surround us with Thy careGive us of Thy gifts a shareKeep our feet from every snareOur FatherPardon us when we do wrongHelp us life s rough path alongWe are weak but Thou art strongOur FatherLive we Thine this little spaceThen made holy by Thy graceGlad go home to see Thy faceOur Father


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THY KINGDOM COME THY WILL BE DONE INEARTH AS IT IS IN HEAVENHOLY is the kingdomWhere God reigns aboveSin can enter neverHis bright realms of loveSwift winged angels readyWaiting round His throneFly to do His biddingWhen His will is knownMay the little childrenAt his footstool waitMay they offer serviceTo a King so greatHow shall hearts so simpleKnow His holy willHow shall wills so waywardHis commands fulfilIf they ask for wisdomGod will make them wiseLittle children s prayersHe will not despiseFor His loving purposeHe delights to showAnd His grace bestowingGives the power to doDaily may we renderLittle loving deedsSpeak the word of kindnessWait on others needsAsk the gentle JesusThat we may be taughtHow to do God s pleasureAs His children ought


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GIVE US THIS DAY OUR DAILY BREADTHE Sower plants the tiny seedsThe dark ploughed earth belowAnd God pours down the spring s soft showersThat they may live and growAnd by and bye the tender greenPeeps up the earthy clods betweenThen God gives balmy summer airAnd beaming sunshine clearTo make the blade grow strong and tallAnd ripen into earAnd soon the ear is filled with cornAnd yellow fields the land adornThe reaper cuts the golden grainIn autumn s mellow daysAnd panting binds the nodding sheavesBeneath the fiery raysAnd all the earth by God is fedWho gives us thus our daily breadFather the bread of life we craveBy which our spirits liveThou knowest all our daily needAnd Thou dost daily giveProvide in Thine unfailing loveThis bread that cometh from above


AND FORGIVE US OUR TRESPASSES AS WEFORGIVE THEM THAT TRESPASS AGAINST USWHEN little friends impatientlyEach other chideSad tears of sorrow quick we seeThe fruit of prideFor angry words too frequentlyYoung hearts divideOh happy they who smitten turnThe other cheekWho hearing voices loud and sternCan softly speakWho of the gentle Saviour learnLowly and meekAnd happy they who quick bestowLove s kiss againWho wipe the bitter tears that flowAnd ease the painJoy in their hearts like flowers shall growSweet after rainAs we forgive we humbly prayForgiven to beOh Heavenly Father day by dayWe come to TheeAnd ask through Christ who is the wayThy pardon free


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LEAD US NOT INTO TEMPTATION BUT DELIVER US FROM EVILFAIR was Eden s garden As to Eve in EdenFruitful every tree Satan spake with guileGreen its bowers and sweet its flowers To the young with ready tongueBirds of song its groves among Whispering low speaks he nowMade glad melody Luring by his smileAnd the shining river Is there aught forbiddenThrough the midst which rolled Soft he asks them WhyLike a way for angels lay Bids them see nor hindered beFlowing bright in sunny light Fruit so sweet then bids them eatTowards the land of gold Says they shall not dieHappy they who dwell there Eve unsafe in EdenIn God s image pure All unsafe are weSinless they His word obey Father save Thy help we craveGlad rejoice to hear His voice By Thy side we would abideOf his favour sure From the tempter freeDark was Eden s garden From his power deliveredIn an evil day From the evil ledBringing shame the tempter came Cleansed from sin renewed withinHiding death with lying breath By Thy Spirit through His meritWhile he sought to slay Who to save us bled


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FOR THINE IS THE KINGDOM THE POWER ANDTHE GLORY FOR EVER AND EVER AMENTHE kingdom is Thine our FatherThe earth and the heavens aboveThou rulest o er all in Thy greatnessThou carest for all in Thy loveAnd thine is the power our FatherThe sun hath its brightness from TheeThe stars in their course Thou dost orderThe work of Thy framing are weThe glory is thine our FatherWe children Thy goodness would singThe angels adore Thee in heavenAnd we our glad praises would bringFor ever and ever Thy kingdomIn beauty and strength shall endureFor ever and ever Thy purposeRemaineth unshaken and sureJoin all in the chorus of gladnessAmen let our voices loud ringAll praise to our Father in heavenThe mighty most merciful King


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Full Text

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ANN ori / ~ . `~ T :~ "E~



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THE LITTLE MOUSE, AND OTHER FABLES.



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The wise little woman of THREE Set off to the toy-shop with me, And back she came bringing with glee A Dolly !-her first-all her own; A Dolly to nurse all alone; To sing to in soft and sweet tone: A Dolly to make-believe" feed, To carry in arms or to lead, To teach how to spell and to read. We dressed the Doll gay, and we called her "Miss May." A cradle was bought where at night "Miss May" could lie snugly and tight; But her mistress awoke with the light, And Doll she must fetch to her bed, For Doll must quite early be fed! When we bought her "Miss May's" cheeks were red, But petting so much made her pale, And her nose wore away-oh, sad tale! Lily wondered what Dolly could ail, So carried "Miss May" to the doctor one day, "Dear doctor," she said, I suppose You can tell me what ails Dolly's nose; And why so much paler she grows ?" Brother Harry, the doctor, looked wise" Well, Madam," said he, "I advise That she eat no more puddings or pies. Give her rest and fresh air; and be sure Her pale cheeks I cannot well cure Till your kisses be drier and fewer! Her poor nose to restore, give bread-pills-three or four.'



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As older our dear Lily grew, She could read easy words not a few, And this her kind grandfather knew. And on her SIXTH birthday he brought A Bible for Lily, who thought A more beautiful could not be bought. She peeped the gilt edges between, Where the clear and large letters were seen; And great must her pleasure have been, When her grandfather next bade her read him a text. Of a verse of a psalm it was partThy word have I hid in mine heart! "My darling," he said, "you must start On your journey through life with this guide; God's word in your heart you must hide, And there let its precepts abide. You will read of the Saviour herein: How he died to atone for our sin; How he loves little children to win, How all who believe he will surely receive. Search the Scriptures again and again; Seek the Spirit the truth to make plain; If you ask, it shall not be in vain. Read the wonderful message of love Which Jesus brought down from above; With his blessing your Bible shall prove A light to your path day by day, A lamp to your feet lest you stray; And as birthdays and years pass away, May its life-giving page be the joy of your age."



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LONG ago in olden story, When I was a child, I read Of some little pilgrim children, Who upon a journey sped, Ever onward-ever upwardBy a tender mother led. Childhood's home they left behind them, With its folly, mirth and din; There destruction frowned upon them, Sorrow there abode with sin; And they sought the Golden City, With its light and joy to win. Matthew, Samuel, James, and Joseph, Walking bravely side by side; With the gentle maiden, Mercy, Fearless all what should betide: For the King himself had called them, And for all he would provide. So they entered on their journey, Passing through the wicket gate; Reading there sweet words of welcome, While they knock and patient wait; Words of welcome to the children Who had chosen path so strait. From within the door was opened, And the keeper bade them come; Little children with the mother, And for Mercy there was room; And he rested them and blest them, Ere he sent them from his home.



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" Fine actions far more than fine feathers adorn: And I think," said their Uncle, "this story should warn All vain little people, when proud of their dress. -Are you ever vain ?-Now, Alice, confess !" The children all laughed. "Not that which we wear, But that which we do should be our chief care. THE DOG IN THE MANGER. ", Now hear of the Dog in a Manger who lay, Reposing his bones on a bed of sweet hay. By and by came a poor hungry Ox from the field; Oh! what a good dinner this nice hay should yield! He knew very well that Dogs never eat hay: He did not think Rover would bark a Nay-nay'Nor would he deprive the poor Dog of his bed, For that would be greedy, and very ill bred: Enough for them both, he believed to be there; So he stooped down to take his own rightful share. Then up jumped the Dog with an ungracious howl, And drove back the Ox with a bark and a growl: Quite true he himself could not eat if he wouldThe Ox he resolved should not eat if he could !" Oh! shame on the ill-natured Dog," Alice said; A shame indeed, Alice !" replied Uncle Fred; "But greater the shame if selfishly we Good manners forget, and ungenerous be.



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WHAT makes the dear children so gay ? What is it the little ones say ? "Many happy returns of the day !" The long weeks of waiting are past, The long-looked-for day come at last, And the little tongues run-and run fast. Ah! early to-day they must wake, For Lily their queen they will make; 'And dear Lily herself cuts the cake. Play away, play away, make the best of the day How swiftly the seasons have flown! The months and the years have rolled on, And our Baby to childhood has grown! She scarcely could lisp her own name, Nor stand when her FIRST birthday came. She could play just one merry wee game, When not in her cradle asleep, Brother Harry beside her would creep, And hiding his face cry "Bo-peep !" Oh! how Baby would crow, when Harry cried "Bo !" Ah! then she was helpless as fair; She needed our tenderest care, And our love met her wants everywhere. Dear mother, with sweet lullaby, Would sing her to sleep, and be nigh, Quick to hear if her Baby should cry. By mother the Baby was dressed, By mother so fondly caressed; And if Baby were hurt or distressed, In her dear mother's arms she was safe from alarms.



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Then again they journeyed onward, Reaching at the close of day Stately mansion built for pilgrims, By the Lord who owned the way; Where the simple gain instruction, Lest from out the path they stray. Pictures here and sights most wondrous Held the children's eager eyes; And from room to room they followed, Finding ever new surprise, As their host the truth unfolded, Clearing it from strange disguise. Here they saw a man who gathered Dust and straws with busy care; Bending over him, an angel Gave him golden crown to wear; But he would not leave the earthly For the heavenly treasure rare. So they learned, these youthful pilgrims, Many a lesson for their need; Here a little-there a littleTruth on which the heart might feed; Here was many a precept given, Line on line for all to heed. And the Master bade brave "Great-heart" Be the pilgrims' trusty guide, And the children's hearts grew stronger, For in him they could confide; Great-heart with his spear and helmet, And his sheath'd sword at his side.



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r Co., THe FrRST WALK.



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We loved her, and quickly she grew, The white pearly teeth all came through, And she gave us smiles many, tears few. She soon learned to throw the soft ball; To know us, and come at a call; To come running, and tripping to fall; To stand high on tip-toe to see What things on the table might be; To climb on her dear father's knee, Clasp and pull at his chain, to hear "tick-tick" again. Full well I remember the day When Lily first ran quite away; Father lured her from mother to stray", Come, Lily, sweet roses, come, take." And sure of her treasure to make, She trotted away by mistake: Then stopping in wonder and fear, Plump she fell! but her father was near; And for Lily we all gave a cheer! "Never mind, little maid! try-don't be afraid !" The flowers we gathered with care, Leaf by leaf from the stem she would tear; The roses no better would fare. Lily knew not that summer must go, She thought not of cold, frost, and snow, When the flowers sleep the dark earth below. But to summer the autumn succeeds, And autumn to winter quick leads; Then spring-oh, how fast the.year speeds! When next the spring smiled, Two years old was our child.



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THE LORD'S PRAYER.



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"And, children," he added, bear this too in mind, Be as humble and modest, as helpful and kind: Keep always your place, and of folly beware, Which would make you pretend to be more than you are. THE ASS IN LION'S SKIN. "6 An Ass once wandered through the forest wide, With long ears listening for what might betide. "When in the path he found a Lion's skin, And fastened it around his body thin. The beasts who saw him, trembled in alarm, And ran to hide themselves lest he should harm; The Ass was charmed that he so mean a thing, Should be mistaken for the Forest King. A Fox approached, when, thinking to affright, He vainly tried to roar with all his might. The hideous sound made Reynard draw more near: My eye played false,' he said, but not my ear; The while you held your tongue I was deceived; Your noisy braying has my fears relievedAn Ass indeed you are-as Ass by name; "Who but an Ass would play so mean a game ? Put off that skin, and know that vain pretence, Is wanting both in honesty and sense; What matters it how lowly be our state ? It matters more that we be true than great.'





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"AND FORGIVE US OUR TRESPASSES, AS WE FORGIVE THEM THAT TRESPASS AGAINST US." WHEN little friends impatiently Each other chide, Sad tears of sorrow quick we see, The fruit of pride; For angry words too frequently Young hearts divide. Oh happy they who smitten turn The other cheek; Who, hearing voices loud and stern, Can softly speak; Who of the gentle Saviour learn, Lowly and meek. And happy they who quick bestow Love's-kiss again; Who wipe the bitter tears that flow, And ease the pain! Joy in their hearts like flowers shall grow, Sweet after rain. As we forgive, we humbly pray Forgiven to be: Oh! Heavenly Father, day by day We come to Thee, And ask through Christ, who is the way, Thy pardon free!



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"THY KINGDOM COME, THY WILL BE DONE IN EARTH AS IT IS IN HEAVEN." HOLY is the kingdom Where God reigns above Sin can enter never His bright realms of love: Swift-winged angels ready, Waiting round His throne, Fly to do His bidding, When His will is known. May the little children At his footstool wait ? May they offer service To a King so great? How shall hearts so simple Know His holy will? How shall wills so wayward His commands fulfil? If they ask for wisdom, God will make them wise! Little children's prayers He will not despise. For His loving purpose He delights to show; And His grace bestowing, Gives the power to do. Daily may we render Little loving deeds; Speak the word of kindness, Wait on others' needs; Ask the gentle Jesus, That we may be taught How to do God's pleasure As His children ought.



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"' Well done, little Mouse !" cried the children with glee. Then listen again," said their Uncle, "to me; While you praise this wee Mouse, in its plain suit of grey, Take a lesson from one clad in brighter array. THE BIRDS IN COUNCIL. "Now only think of such a funny thing, The birds one day desired to have a King! The Magpie, Jackdaw, Peacock, Wren, and Owl, The Robin, Parrot, and the barn-door Fowl Together met upon the sunny plain, To choose a king who over them should reign. The Peacock spread his tail of feathers gay, The silly birds admired the vain display. The Peacock they proclaimed,-they clapped their wings: But then the Magpie spoke-just a few things He thought the Birds if wise ought first to know. He begged to ask the king what he could do ? How he would help them, if in warlike flight They saw descend the Eagle, Vulture, Kite ? Alas! he could not help; his splendid tail, His plumage gay would be of no avail. The birds began to think the Magpie wise; The Peacock looked quite foolish in their eyes: His feathers certainly they much admired, But more than beauty in their king desired.



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But the little ones are crying, As they to each other cling; Round about their anxious mother Trembling hands they wildly fling; Saying, Will the lions keep us From the City of the King ?" Chained the lions are; but blinded By their tears, no chains they see: And the giant Grim advances Fast, to set the lions free. Ah! the guide has slain the giant: Who so brave a guide as he? Soon they reach the lordly Palace, Enter at its lofty door; There they rest them, and its treasures Daily with delight explore; Then with hope and courage strengthened, Start upon their way once more. Now they speed adown the valley, Where the babbling streamlet springs; Hearken to the little shepherd! As he tends his flock, he sings, Happier there in his contentment Than the mightiest of kings. Once the Lord in pilgrim fashion Trod that valley all alone; Bearing there sin's bitter burden For His children to atone; Humbly walking through the darkness To the glory of His throne.



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" JWONDER now what can the little ones do ? SOf what use can the little folk be ?" Thus said Uncle Fred, as he drew little Ned, And Alice and Tom to his knee: Come, listen to me, while a story I tell Of one who was little and useful as well. THE MOUSE AND THE LION. "A wee little Mouse, with his sisters and brothers, His father and mother, his cousins and others, When out for a ramble one hot summer's day, Frisked over a Lion, as sleeping he lay. The Lion was heated with hunting, and tired, And roused thus untimely his anger was fired; Quick lifting his paw the intruder he seized, And poor captive Mouse he to death would have squeezed. Then hard the Mouse pleaded its pitiful fate, Oh spare me,' he cried; 'I am small, you are great! And the noble old beast, like a true forest king, Raised his foot and let go the poor wee little thing. Soon after, the Mouse met the Lion again, Caught fast in a net where he struggled in vain; Lion king,' said the Mouse, 'you were gracious to me, Now I in my turn may to you useful be!' Then with sharp tiny teeth, he nibbled and tore, Till the Lion broke through, and was free once more."



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"GIVE US THIS DAY OUR DAILY BREAD." THE Sower plants the tiny seeds The dark ploughed earth below; And God pours down the spring's soft showers That they may live and grow: And by and bye the tender green Peeps up the earthy clods between. Then God gives balmy summer air, And beaming sunshine clear, To make the blade grow strong and tall, And ripen into ear; And soon the ear is filled with corn, And yellow fields the land adorn. The reaper cuts the golden grain In autumn's mellow days, And panting binds the nodding sheaves Beneath the fiery rays: And all the earth by God is fed, Who gives us thus our daily bread. Father! the bread of life" we crave, By which our spirits live; Thou knowest all our daily need, And Thou dost daily giveProvide in Thine unfailing love This bread that cometh from above!



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Now the valley deepens downward, And the skies all gloomy grow; 'Tis the "Valley of the Shadow," And with trembling feet they go, For the air is thick with vapour, And strange shapes move to and fro. Great-heart bravely speaks and cheers them, And they kneel and pray for light; And the sunshine comes in answer And the end appears in sight; Glad they press upon their journey Till the fall of dewy night. Morning shows a thronging city, Full of Vanities they say; Crowds are buying, cheating, swearing At its Fair from day to day: And the idlers tempt the pilgrims, If within its walls they stay. Onward pass they where a river Broadens through the meadows fair; But a by-path leads where yonder Stands the Castle of Despair! And a giant fierce and cruel Waits to drag them to his lair. Boldly to the gate ascending, Great-heart knocks with echoing sound; Bids the giant come to battle, -Smites him wounded to the ground; While they break the dungeon open, And set free the pilgrims bound.



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PILGRIM CHILDREN. 1x



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MY BIRTHDAY.



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TOT BOOK TWENTY-FOUR COLOURED ENGRAVINGS. LONDON: THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY, 56, PATERNOSTER Row, 65, ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD, AND 164, PICCADTLLY. BRIGHTON: 31, WESTERN ROAD. MANCHESTER: 31, CORPORATION STREET. 1872.



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The children all listened with silent delight, Then declared in a breath the little Kid right. "6 Once more, learn how those who do selfishly wrong, Are sure to find out their mistake before long. THE BEAR AND THE BEES. A Bear too fond of honey sweet, Thought once to give himself a treat; He climbed a garden fence, where stood A row of hives in order good; With lifted paw the sweets to get, The Hives he in a trice upset; Then buzzed the Bees like angry foes, They stung his eyes-they pierced his nose; He tried to beat them down, but tore His own ears,-smarting all the more. And now, little people," said Uncle, t" one word My meaning is grave, though my stories absurd. Would you seek to be useful, and humble, and kind, And fill wisely the place by your Maker designed ?Would you learn true obedience and evil avoid, Lest the hope of your life by its sting be destroyed ?Believe me, the good and the true and the just, Are those God has taught in themselves not to trust; No heart is so happy as that He makes pure; No hope is like that which in Jesus is sure. May He pardon your sins, and his Spirit bestow, That as years pass away, you in wisdom may grow !"



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Dear mother, when Lily was FIVE, A party was asked to contrive; And as little bees buzz round a hive, Little voices in concert of sound Murmured sweetly our tea-table round; What pleasure in friendship is found! Thence gaily they troop to the hall, Where loudly for Lily they call, For Lily is loved by them all; And to give her the choice of the game they rejoice. "Blind Man's Buff !" So for Arthur they sought To be "Blind Man;" and Arthur soon caught Little Lily: and poor Lily thought The game so much better would be If only the Blind Man could see! For she could not catch one! Oh, what glee, As little girls round Lily danced! And little boys round Lily pranced! And Lily impatient once glanced The handkerchief under. Who saw her, I wonder ? Young Harry played "Blind Man" so well, He caught two together and fell; And the children rushed round him pell-mell. Then the bell rung: a knock at the door! Another! then two or three more! And the play for the evening was o'er. Good-bye" now to each little friend! The happiest day has its end; May Lily when cares shall descend, And life opens anew, find friendships as true.



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So he led them onward, onwardLed them where in years before, Christian walked, their pilgrim father; Told them of the load he bore, Showed the Cross where fell the burden,Cross uplifted evermore. And they followed upward, upward, Where the hill-side was so steep, They with toiling, panting, striving Foot-hold steady scarce could keep; Till the youngest child, faint-hearted, Sat him sadly down to weep. Courage, children! do not falter, Do not mind a little pain; Rest is sweeter after labour, They who fail, must strive again; Difficulty we must conquer, If we would the prize obtain. Fair the Palace Beautiful Glistens now within their sight: Comfort for the fainting children, Rest and shelter for the night: Why does Great-heart stand before them? Why unsheath his sword for fight? Quick his eye, the guide discovers Danger lurking in the way; 'Twixt the pilgrims and the Palace, Lions waiting for their prey! Fear not, children! faithful Great-heart Will their nearer coming stay.



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So they travelled ever steadfast, Over plain and hill along; And the children grew in wisdom, Grew in daily toil more strong; Till the City gleamed before them, And they heard the heavenly song. Sweetest music gently swelling Floated through the fragrant air! And the sunshine streamed in splendour, And no night was ever there! Flowers, and fruits, and corn-fields waving, All were rich beyond compare. Shining Ones, in whitest raiment, Often walk that radiant land; But a river, cold and rapid, Stops at last the pilgrim band; All who reach the Golden City, Cross it at the King's command. Soon there came a gracious message, Words of friendship from the King; Shining chariots for the mother, From the river bank to bring; And the children waiting, watching, Heard the welcome angels sing. Little pilgrims, will you follow? Still the gates stand open wide; Jesus is the King of glory, And He calls you to His side, Calls you to the Golden CityJesus, who for children died!



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"OUR FATHER WHICH ART IN HEAVEN, HALLOWED BE THY NAME." GOD of glory, throned on high, Ruling all the starry sky, Wilt thou hear an infant cry, Our Father. Hallowed be Thy name, O Lord, By the hosts of heaven adored! Soft we breathe the sacred word, Our Father. Smile upon us while we pray, Grant Thy love from day to day, Teach us that we may obey, Our Father. Still surround us with Thy care, Give us of Thy gifts a share, Keep our feet from every snare, Our Father. Pardon us when we do wrong, Help us life's rough path along; We are weak, but Thou art strong, Our Father. Live we Thine this little space; Then, made holy by Thy grace, Glad go home to see Thy face, Our Father.



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" And now in another short story we see, How obedience, a safeguard to children may be. THE WOLF AND THE KID. By-bye, my kid!' an old Goat said one day, Do just as you are bid whilst I'm away; The door see bolted; keep it so till I Come back to you again; by-bye, by-bye!' Then off the mother set upon her way; And soon a cunning Wolf who near by lay, Lifted the knocker with a rat-tat-tat. Says Kiddy from within, 'Pray who is that?' Child,' says the Wolf, in voice as like the Goat As he could bring from out his husky throat,'Child, open quick, your mother is outside !' 'I know my mother's voice,' the kid replied; 'The door is bolted, I am safe within, Loud you may knock, no entrance will you win!' The old Goat soon returned, 'Dear kid, I'm come!' And glad the Kid her mother welcomed home I saw, my child,' she said, 'a Wolf before; My heart misgave me, for he left our door. Oh! had you opened it, or disobeyed, You would, my pretty kid, have now been dead.' 'I peeped from out the window,' said the Kid; 'Thought of your words, and did as I was bid.'"



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CONTENTS. MY BIRTHDAY. THE LITTLE MOUSE, AND OTHER FABLES. PILGRIM CHILDREN. THE LORD'S PRAYER.



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Happy childhood! its joys pass away; Happy children! enjoy while you may Its innocent pleasures and play. Step by step life's long journey we take, Day by day we to wisdom awake, One by one childish pastimes forsake. Thus Lily the Babe" full of glee Grew apace, and the "Babe" ceased to be, For her birthdays passed-one, two, and three;J The Babe lost in the child, our fond hearts beguiled! She was FOUR! and was promised a ride; Arthur said he would walk by her side, And she mounted the Donkey with pride! The joy of the children was great, Harry eagerly opened the gate, And the little queen rode out in state. Now off down the lane, and away! What is it the singing birds say ? "Many happy returns of the day !" Lily heard their sweet song, as Ned trotted along. Up and down in the saddle she goes! .And Arthur his arm round her throws, For Lily is timid he knows. On the grass lay the glittering dew, On the bank the pale primroses grew, And violets in shade not a few. The sun sparkled glad through the trees, The leaves whispered low in the breeze, And all things united to please. Oh! how full of delight was that morning so bright.





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"LEAD US NOT INTO TEMPTATION, BUT DELIVER US FROM EVIL." FAIR was Eden's garden, As to Eve in Eden Fruitful every tree; Satan spake with guile, Green its bowers and sweet its flowers; To the young, with ready tongue Birds of song its groves among Whispering low, speaks he now, Made glad melody. Luring by his smile. And the shining river, Is there aught forbidden, Through the midst which rolled, Soft he asks them, Why ?. Like a way for angels lay, Bids them see, nor hindered be, Flowing bright in sunny light, Fruit so sweet; then bids them eat; Towards the land of gold. Says they shall not die. Happy they who dwell there, Eve unsafe in Eden, In God's image pure! All unsafe are we! Sinless they His word obeyFather, save-Thy help we crave;Glad rejoice to hear His voice, By Thy side we would abide, Of his favour sure. From the tempter free. Dark was Eden's garden! From his power delivered; In an evil day, From the evil led! Bringing shame, the tempter came, Cleansed from sin-renewed withinHiding death with lying breath, By Thy Spirit, through His merit, While he sought to slay. Who to save us bled!



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"FOR THINE IS THE KINGDOM, THE POWER, AND THE GLORY, FOR EVER AND EVER." AMEN. THE kingdom is Thine, our Father! The earth and the heavens above; Thou rulest o'er all in Thy greatness, Thou carest for all in Thy love. And thine is the power, our Father! The sun hath its brightness from Thee; The stars in their course Thou dost order, The work of Thy framing are we. The glory is thine, our Father! We children Thy goodness would sing; The angels adore Thee in heaven, And we our glad praises would bring. For ever and ever Thy kingdom In beauty and strength shall endure; For ever and ever Thy purpose Remaineth unshaken and sure! Join all in the chorus of gladness; Amen, let our voices loud ring; All praise to our Father in heaven, The mighty, most merciful King!