The old picture Bible, or, Stories from Old Testament history

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Material Information

Title:
The old picture Bible, or, Stories from Old Testament history
Portion of title:
Stories from Old Testament history
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 21 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Ward, Charlotte Bickersteth, 1822-1896
Gilman, Stella Scott, 1844- ( Author )
Cheshire, William ( Engraver )
John F. Shaw and Co ( Publisher )
Leighton Bros ( Printer of plates )
Publisher:
John F. Shaw and Co.
Place of Publication:
London
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Bible stories, English -- O.T -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1872
Genre:
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by the authors of "Doing and suffering" and of "Mothers in council" ; with plain and coloured illustrations.
General Note:
Illustrations engraved by W. Cheshire and 12 plates are printed in colors by Leighton, Bros.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002222206
notis - ALG2443
oclc - 58844063
System ID:
UF00026572:00001


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Full Text
u Mal vR 511 jo Ai INKilolM6igs arp 1 4ip2eAN


The Baldwin LibraryUli3 raityd


r4LE1 Hr0 1 R11THF OFFERIGS OF CAI AND ABEL


THE OLD PICTURE BIBLEORSTORIES FROM OLD TESTAMENT HISTORYBY THE AUTHORS OFDOING AND SUFFERING AND OF MOTHERS IN COUNCILteU pIatin an t Coevlaurt IluitrattanLONDONJOHN F SHAW AND CO 48 PATERNOSTER ROW


THE STORY OF ADAM AND EVECOME with me little readers into a small room at theback of a London house It looks like a study thereare shelves all round and they are filled not with thegay books you are fond of red blue and green coversand plenty of pictures inside but with grave old booksclosely printed in dusky leather bindings There is awriting table in the middle of th room and a well useddesk upon it and manuscripts under charge of somepaper weights but you are not looking at these I seebut at the kind pleasant face of a gentleman who hasdrawn up his study chair to the table and who is sittingwith his head in his hand as if he had something toconsiderSo he has and I will tell you about it for itconcernschildren like you but I must begin by explaining whohe is


THE CREATION AND DELUGEHis name is Mr Shepherd and he is the clergymanof the parish of St Mary s in which his house standsHe had a pretty church in a country village but he wasasked to come to London It was rather hard work toleave his friends and quiet parsonage and garden and tobring his wife and little children to this dingy house in adull London street but Mr Shepherd thought the happiest thing in all the world was to tell people how Jesusloved them and died for them and as he would have tentimes as many people to preach to in London as in thecountry he chose to comeIt was iq the bright month of May that he said goodbye to the green fields and hedgerows and now July isbeginning and London is very hot The window isopen but the day has been close and sultry and if MrShepherd had time to think about it he would know heis very tired for he has preached twice but as I toldyou he is busy thinking of something elseI think he has made up his mind now for I heardhim say That will do at least I will try And as hesaid so he opened his writing case and dipped his penin the ink to write some letters While he writes themI shall tell you my little readers what they are aboutMr Shepherd has been thinking about his school


The Garden of Eden


THE CREATION AND DELUGEchildren There are large parish schools at St Mary sSchool begins on Sunday at nine o clock and as theschools are very near the church it does not need toclose till a quarter to eleven Several kind teachers fromthe parish attend the school but it might be as well ifw teaching was a little more what children like morestories andnaot quite so much learning by heart However tiere is o fault to be found with their order Theb im Qf voies stops when a little bell tinkles and a longwessionx of boys in uniform and girls in snow whiteal land tippets falls into marching order and soon fillstie iarity schook benches in St Mary s Church Howleyrwish there was a good walk between the school andI SRepherd preaehes very good sermons I isqpihe a teat to hear him but you know a sermonwhir a i ry good for a grown person is not always whata littfl child can understand There were mastly littlebitaori purpose for them which they might have understoed and remembared but to tel the truth though allthe changes of standing and sitting and kneeling andrepeating and sitging helped to keep them awake duringthe service by tfle time the sermon began half the childienwere nodding and ling their sleepy heads on each


THE CREATION AND DELUGEother s shoulders The teachers frowned and the monitors pulled and shook the little sleepers They perhapsopened wide eyes for a moment but only to close themagain very soonMr Shepherd had seen this for several Sundays andhe began to feel that as far as the children were concerned he might as well not preach at allThen he remembered it was harder for them to listenthan for the grown people not only because they wereyounger but because they had already been listening andlearning at school nearly two hours before church timeWell said Mr Shepherd to himself what shallI do send the young children home from school andonly let the elder ones come to church No thatwouldn t do if the little ones were at home the mothersmust stay to keep them out of harm s way Shall Ipreach short easy sermons always on Sunday morningsfull of stories that the children may be able to listenNo I can t do that in the church because there aremany grown up people there who want a sermon as wellas the children but suppose I could get six kind friends toagree together to take turns Sunday by Sunday to keepall but the elder classes who can understand and keepawake at church behind in the school room at church


THE CREATION AND DELUGEtime and make a little service for my poor children suchas they can enjoy with pictures and stories and singingWould not that doYes Mr Shepherd thought it would and when heopened his writing case it was to write to Mr Jamesand Mr Brown and Mr Fawcett and Mr Elton andMr Carter and Mr Baxter six gentlemen most of whomhad children of their own and knew what sort of talkchildren could understand Mr Shepherd had a beautiful set of Bible prints for his own little Edith and hepromised to lend them every Sunday morning to thegentleman whose turn it was to take the church inthe schoolWhen Mr Shepherd had written his six letters helooked up and said Pray God make these kind friendswilling to feed my little lambs and God heard thatprayer and every one of the six agreed to do what heasked I think my little readers you will like to makeone of the listeners in this church in the school soyou shall hear how it all went onThe children knew nothing about it till the nextSunday morning when school was nearly done and Ican tell you they looked very much pleased when MrJames came in leading little Miss Edith Shepherd with


21The Expulsion from Eden


THE CREATION AND DELUGEone hand while under his other arm he carried her largecase of prints He let them talk to each other and resta little bit till the church bell had done and ten theymade a large circle round the stand which Mh4 u p theca e f pictures so that all could see The very littlebaos and girls sat in front of the others who could seeovert heir heads Mr James took out of the case first apicture of the garden of Eden and Edith who thoughtvery muh of her pictures was well pleased that it wasso muchi admired Tall trees and green slopes and running water are pleasant sights for little London childrenWell children what have I showa you said MrJames at lastA garden sirhe ysla know what gavdenAlittle modest girl wiith a palie ee and large eyessaid AiW that Adam and Eve sir on the river bankAin t it the garden of EdenVery well ittle maid now tell me who Adam andEve were and how they came into that gardenAILwere aeady with answers about Adam and Eveeim iWab s First Catechism but pale f ced AnnieMer d w6asw Twani e is say God put them thereto take care ofie t n


THE CREATION AND DELUGEDid He give them any rules about what they mightor might not doMr James waited a minute and then turned to Edithwho said The garden was full of fruit trees they mighteat of all except one they could tell which it was for itgrew by itself in the middle of the gardenWho can tell me what happened Suppose I tellyou Adam and Eve were very happy in that gardenHas anybody here been to the Zoological GardensA few hands were held upYou know there are lions and tigers and bearsand wolves and hissing snakes and hyenas there buteach is in his den and if the doors were opened therewould be sad work among the men and women anddear little children who have come to see them In thegarden of Eden there were all these beautiful creaturesthe striped tiger and the spotted leopard and the lionwith his bright eyes and bushy mane There were gentlecreatures too the little spotted fawn and the tenderlamb and the timid hare and the cooing dove All waspece and love in the garden of Eden tigers and leopardswere not fierce lambs and fawns were not fearful andall were obedient to Adam he was the master and Eve wasthe mistress and God s beautiful creatures served them


THE CREATION AND DELUGEThat was a happy time but it did not last longEdith we must change the picture and show what happened nextCan any one tell me what this new picture meansThat s a sword of fire sir up there said AnnieYes and who holds it Edith you can tell meThe Bible says God drove out the manWhy were Adam and Eve driven outSeveral answers were given at once They hadbeen naughty Eve took the apple God wasangry with themI see you know the story now I will tell you a littlemore about it There is a wicked spirit called Satanwho hates God and when God makes a good thingSatan directly wants to spoil it He hates everythingthat is happy because he is himself wicked and miserableAdam and Eve were happy The chief thing whichmade them happy was not living in a beautiful gardenand having delicious fruit to eat but loving God andknowing that He loved themSatan said to himself If I could only make themthink God is unkind So he entered into a serpentand waited for a chance to find Eve alone She wasGen iii 24


Abel was a keeper of sheep but Cain was a tiller of the groundi


THE CREATION AND DELUGEweaker than Aiaian and more easily persuaded Youwould run away from a serpent if it came near you butyou know none of God s creatures were hurtful thenso when Eve saw this serpent winding in graceful foldsround the forbidden tree she was not afraid Perhaps shestopped to admire the shining colours on its beautiful skinIt began to speak I wonder that did not put heron her guard for she had never heard speech before froman animal but perhaps she only thought it was somenew wonder God had madeThey were artful words that Satan spoke to Evethe meaning of them came to this God is not such avery kind friend to you after all He forbids you to eatof this tree though He knows you would be much wiserand happier for eating You had better try and seeYou know how it was children Eve believedSatan and plucked the fruit and ate it and gave some ofit toAdam who ate it tooThen God s words came true In the day that thoueatest thereof thou shalt surely die Not that theirbodies died that very day but the joy died out of theirhearts and sin came in instead with sin came sadnessand sorrow and pain and at last deathGod punished Adam by cursing the ground for his


THE CREATION AND DELUGEsake so that only thorns and thistles comeup of themselvesall good and useful plants have to be planted and takencare of God sent Adam and Eve out of the garden asa punishment but He had a kind purpose in it too Atree of life was growing in the garden it would not havebeen at all for Adam and Eve s happiness to eat of itand so make their earthly life which sin had spoiled laston for ever It was better for them now that their bodiesshould die so God said Lest man should put forth hishand and take also of the tree of life and eat and livefor ever I will drive him out The Bible tells us Godplaced at the east of the Garden of Eden cherubims anda flaming sword which turned every way to keep theway of the tree of lifeMr James looked at the school clock and found timewas getting on so he made haste to put up the nextpictureWho have we here childrenA shepherd and his sheep sirYes and who was the first shepherdThere was a pause till Edith answered Abel was akeeper of sheep but Cain was a tiller of the groundYou can all tell me who Cain and Abel wereAdam s children


THE CREATION AND DELUGEAnd why did they keep sheep and till the groundTo have something to eat sirYes you know God had said to Adam In thesweat of thy face thou shalt eat bread In the gardenof Eden everything had one voice it said to Adam andEve God loves you Now everything had two voicesOne voice said God pities you and cares for youanother voice said Sin has brought sorrow anddeath So while Abel was thankful God had given himsheep and lambs for food and clothing he had to watchand work for them and while Cain was glad to see hisseeds grow and his fruits ripen he had to plant andwater and dig and take a great deal of pains withthemYou might never have known what a difference therewas between these two sons of Adam if it had not beenfor one particular day of which I must tell youThey went together to worship God each broughtsomething to offer Cain brought some of his fruitsAbel brought a lamb of his flock Man s eye might seeno difference but God looks at the heart He waspleased with Abel and displeased with Cain Howshould Cain have felt He should have felt sorry andhumble He should have been quite sure God was in the


pTHE CREATION AND DELUGEright and he was in the wrong he should have tried tofind out what displeased God that he might not do it anymore How did he feel Angry and jealous He saidin his heart Abel is the favourite why is not my fruitas good as his lamb I am sure I am as good as Abelit is very hard to treat him better than me That wasthe first bad feeling Cain opened the door of his heart alittle way for Satan and when Satan finds the door of aheart open a little way he soon pushes at it So he saidto Cain I would not bear it you are the eldest youought to have the most honour Abel takes what belongs to you I would find some way to let him knowwho is masterCain liked what Satan said to him it fitted very wellwith his jealous angry feelings Bad thoughts when welet them lodge in our hearts soon turn to bad actionsand the next time Cain and Abel were alone togetherCain struck at him with savage blows till his brotherlaid in his blood all along upon the earth dead andhelplessCain added one more sin to passion and murderWhen God asked him Where is Abel thy brotherinstead of confessing and begging to be forgiven he saidI know not am I my brother s keeper Then Goda


THE CREATION AND D ELUGEspoke his sentence and Cain who had not been at allunhappy about his sins was unhappy about his punishment and said My punishment is greater than I canbear Here is a picture of him when he said soDear little children you think you could never beso wicked as Cain but remember angry jealous feelingsin the heart were at the beginning of Cain s murderinghis brother and so we read in the New TestamentWhoso hateth his brother is a murderer Oh ask theHoly Ghost to fill you with loving humble thoughts thatyou may be pleased to hear others praised and notalways want to be first and to have the best for yourselfVery little is told us in the Bible of what happenedfor many hundreds of years after Cain killed Abel exceptthe names of men who their sons were how long theylived and that they died Over and over again the 5thchapter of Genesis after telling us of men who lived 900or 800 and more yeais says he died and he diedOnce a man who did not fear God read this chapterand it struck him so much that it had to be said at lastof all these long lived men he died that this ungodlyman began to think I suppose I must die too andwhen I die where shall I go to God did not let that


THE CREATION AND DELUGEthought go to sleep in his heart and at last he was ableto answer the question Where shall I go for hecould say I desire to depart and be with Christ whichis far betterWell children as I said I can tell you very little ofwhat happened in many hundreds of years but this Imust tell you men became more and more wickedThe wickedness of man the Bible says was greatin the earth and God saw that every imagination ofthe thoughts of his heart was only evil continuallyGod could not let things go on so it would not havebeen for his honour If I always found this school in anuproar noise quarrelling disobedience I should say theschool had a poor sort of master for he could not keepit in order Besides God hates sin and though He isvery patient for a long time with sinners He will punishthem at lastSo God said I will destroy man whom I havecreated from the face of the earth I even I do bring aflood of waters upon the earth to destroy all fleshwherein is the breath of life from under heaven and everything that is in the earth shall dieNot quite all though God looks not only at all thisschool but at each child in it God looked not only at


THE CREATION AND DELUGEall that wicked world but at each man in it and He sawjust one who was different from the rest Ah chilSdren sometimes boys and girls make mock at a companion because he won t do naughty things with all therest Never mind brave little boy or girl who standalone in doing right there is One standing beside youwho is laughing not at you but at your poor foolish companions who think they can do wrong and yet go unpunished So it was then the one brave righteousman Noah who stood out against all the world foundgrace or favour in the eyes of the Lord And whenall the rest of the world was punished God made a wayfor him to escape Shall I show you how Help me tofind the picture Edith of building the ark There nowall look at it while I tell you what the Bible saysGod spoke to Noah we don t know whether a voicesounded from heaven or whether an angel was sent witha message any how Noah had no doubt they were God swords They told him God would destroy all the worldexcept him and his family he had a wife and three sonsand they had wives so there were eight in all Theywere to be saved by making an ark or a large boatcovered in at the top with a window and a door andpitched inside and outside with pitch to keep the water


And Cain said My punishment is greater than I can bear GEN iv 13


THE CREATION AND DELUGEout It was to have three stories in it and God toldhim the exact size how long how broad it was to beIt was to be so large because God wished to save alivesome of each kind of animal which He had made a wellas Noah and his familyNoah heard the words and believed than he wasquite sure God meant what He said quite sre the floodwas really coming and that the only way to be saa was tobuild the ark and take shelter ia it S imi this pictnre yousee good Noah very busy taiSoe the workena whatthey are to do the ark is beaginma to look you selike a Wg j anmd to rise lk aWJlB tnh groundWt QT 1 yu oie k the wkall people in to wVrldIsew seom on em makin game there behin Mirih tebr are Jemmny just as peop ma er imenow oftAwhe who are in ummet abcaa tUi weals andsay What must I do to be saved For the most psarthowever people paid very little attention toe what loahwas doing they were full of other things the Lovr Jesustells us They were eating and drinking marrying andgiving in marriage and knew not till the flood came andtook them all awayMatt xxiv 38 39


THE CREATION AND DELUGEIt was not for want of telling and warning that theydid not know Noah is called in the Bible a preacher ofrighteousness because he so often told them of God sanger against sin and the flood that was coming andthe one way of escape in the ark They saw too thatNoah believed what he preached else why did he buildthe ark They had even a more special warning forseven days beforehand God told Noah to come into theark which he had built himself and his family and all theanimals that were to be saved They went in two andtwo it must have taken a long time before all weresafely housed in the ark This was going on beforetheir eyes and you may be sure Noah preached moreearnestly than ever just before he went in knowing itwould be the last time he could warn these poor sinnersBut children as they did not see the water yet they didnot believe it was coming when they did see it it wastoo late to escape I wonder whether all this thathappened before the flood reminds you of something elsethat is happening nowNo one answered so Mr James said Edith will youfind in your Testament Matt xxiv 37 and read it to meEdith read But as the days of Noe were so shallalso the coming of the Son of man beL


THE CREATION AND DELUGEAnd the 44th verseTherefore be ye also ready for in such an hour asye think not the Son of man comethChildren does not Mr Shepherd sometimes tell youof a great and terrible day which is coming when theearth will be not drowned in a flood but burnt with fireDoes he not say it is coming soon perhaps before yougrow up to be men and women Does he not say thatthere is one way to be safe and only one that if youcome to Jesus He will keep you safe from the fire asthe ark kept Noah from the flood Do you believehim when he speaks so The people in the old worldkept out of the ark and went on as if nothing wasgoing to happen because they did not believe Noah Ifyou are keeping away from Jesus dear little childrenJesus who loves you and wants to save you it is becauseyou do not believe your minister and what is worse youdo not believe GodThe children were very quiet and serious and for aminute no one spoke then Mr James said I will showyou what these people who would not believe Noah didwhen the flood really came He changed the picture toone of the delugeThere they are you see The water has risen higher


Noah building the Ark


THE CREATION AND DELUGEand higher the rain is still pouring and it will rise higherstill The houses are all under water so are the tallesttrees except one which grows on a high rocky point Afew half drowned men and women and little children areclinging to this last remaining tree It is of no use thetopmost bough will soon be covered There in thedistance floats the ark where they might all have beensafe and happy but it is too late now God has shut tothe door of the ark and it will not be opened againOh it is a sad picture lIt us turn to the nextThe next is still the ark but not even a mountaintop is to be seen all is one wild waste of waters andthe ark is floating securely upon them So it was formany days and months At last the Bible tells usGod remembered Noah and made a wind to pass overthe earth and drove away the black clouds which hadbeen pouring down steady rain week after week andmonth after mouM A Think what it must have been toNoah and his family as they looked out of the window inthe ark to see the bright sunshine again dancing andsparkling u o the watersAt length one day between six and seven monthsafter the flood began a sound was heard under the arkit had touched a mountain top It no longer heaved and


THE CREATION AND DELUGEfell with the restless water it rested on Mount AraratThen they knew the water must be going down Tenweeks passed away and some one who looked out sawthe tops of mountains standing like little islands in a seaof water Forty days more and then Noah opened the arkwindow and let a raven fly There you see its dark wingsagainst the evening sky in the pictureHow glad it was to get its liberty Noah let a dove flynext but the gentle dove loves a warm soft nest and shesoon came back to her mate and to Noah in the ark Aweek later he let her fly again and this time she broughtback an olive leaf that she had gathered from the earthso Noah knew the waters were going down fastTwo months after the first mountain top had beenseen Noah was able to take off the covering of theark and as far as he could see the earth was dry buthe had come into the ark at God s word and he wouldnot leave it again till God gave him leave It was wellhe waited The earth only looked dry it was not fit forNoah to live upon for nearly eight weeks longer Godhad not forgotten Noah and when the earth was driedand ready the message he had waited for came It saidto him Go forth of the ark thou and thy wife and thysons and thy sons wives with thee


THE CREATION AND DELUGEAll the animals were to come too Can t you fancywhat a glad day it was after they had all been shut up morethan a year in the ark If any of you have been very illand shut up a long time in the little bedroom upstairsyou know how pleasant it is the first time father carriesyou down and mother puts a seat for you in the windowCountry children who can sit in the porch with the sweethoneysuckle round them and the bees buzzing aboutwould know still better what Noah and his family feltwhen they were let out of the ark and their feet walkedagain on the green beautiful earthThe very first thing Noah did was to build an altarand offer burnt offerings to God His wife and childrenjoined See here is a picture which shows you all sevenround the altar and Noah is raising his voice and hishand in praise to God first for having kept them safe fromthe flood in the ark and then for bringing them out of theark and giving them back the beautiful world to live inMr James thought that as the story of the flood hadbeen a long one his little hearers would be all thebetter for a change of occupation so they marchedround the school for a few minutes singing some oftheir favourite hymns The sweet story of old andHosanna and The happy land Perhaps you do


r BHAW Lco FATRBOStENi ROW E TON BRONOAH S SACRIFICE AFTER THE DELUGE


The Deluge


THE CRBEATION AND DELUGEnot knew ltfle reader whic hynm I call HosannaI wa write id out fWr uWhen ii salvationbaingingTo Mim asmeamiieichildren alli stode singiagHosanna tn funa nNor did eir ezea ofald iinmBun as He rode alongHe lbt them still atteudlHimAnd smiled to heai tfilr songHasanna to Jenisthey singAnd since tita Lord retainethHis love wo children stilThough now a King Ea reignethft Zion s liok hillWe ll flock amrond his bamnneWlio sits upon the throneAnd cry alond i ELaOMaTo David s roya S nHosanna t o asus we ll aingFor shoulwat e B roclaimingOur gpsA BtBeemer s praiseTh s am mre silence shamingWeuiitfltiarhosannaa raiaBi afiaMli we onLy renderThe tribute of our wordsNo while our hearts are tenderThey too shall be the Lord sHosanna to Jesus our King


THE CREATION AND DELUGEThey were ready enough however to gather round thepicture desk again when the little bell sounded andMr James saw that he should be able to tell Mr Shepherd there had been no sleepers that day at the churchin the schoolAll their eyes were attracted to a piece of clear glassMr James drew from his pocket shaped so as to havethree smooth sidesDo you know what this is childrenNo sir Even Edith was puzzledDo you see any colours in itNo sir tis clear glass leastways it looks so saidone of the eldest boysS Let us see if we can bring any colours out of itand by a fine string tied to each end Mr James hung itup at one of the school windows where a blaze of sunlight was pouring inThe delight of the children was unbounded as theprism threw its bright jewelled colours on the white wallopposite and when Mr James made the brilliant colourstravel over the little company now lighting on a curlyhead and now on a white pinafore they seemed to thinkan angel had somehow got among them and was givingthem glimpses of his beautiful wings


THE CREATION AND DELUGEWell children do you know what I have doneNo sirThis is a prism it catches sunbeams and showsyou what they are made of You see how thecolours melt into one another so that you can tsay where one begins and another ends yet thereare three very plain ones blue red and yellowNow screw up your little hands and look through themat the sun You see bright lines or rays of light don tyouYes sirWhat colour are theyWhite sirEach white ray is made up of three colours bluered and yellow My prism catches a ray and divides itso that you can see the three colours but how it does sois too difficult for you to understand You see that itdoes Now can you remember ever having seen anythinglike this in the skyYes sir a rainbow there was one last Tuesdayright over St Mary s when it rained so hard and thenthe sun shoneDid you see the rainbow before the sun came outNo sir


FINoah sent forth a raven which went forth to and fro until the waters were dried up


THE CREATION AND DELUGEDid you see it after the rain left offNo sirWhat was wanted then to make the rainbowSun and rain both sirGood the drops of rain were tiny prisms theycaught the white shining rays and divided them into thelovely rainbow colours Now the prism has taught uswhat a rainbow is and when it appears who can tell meof the first time we hear in the Bible of a rainbowAin t that it sir said Harry Frost a sharp littlefellow who had kept his eyes on the picture of Noah ssacrifice and who now pointed to a rainbow in the cornerof it See coloured plateWell found out Harry it was when Noah cameout of the ark that we first hear of a rainbow Youknow children there s a proverb which says A burntchilt dreads the fire when we have had a great sorrowand it has passed away we dread the first signs of itscoming bak God knew it would be so with those whohad seen the lood Whenever a good soaking rain cameto water the ground they would tremble lest it shouldbe the beginning of another flood God did not wantthm to be always in fear He likes to see us happy andtrusfkl in his love as a little child in happy and at rest


THE CREATION AND DELUGEin its father s arms So He said the rainbow should be asign between Him and them He would promise no moreto bring a flood on the earth to destroy it when Helooked on the rainbow He would remember his promiseand when they looked on the rainbow they would feelquite safe from another flood however hard it might beraining because God had promised and He could notbreak his word So the rainbow became a sign orpicture to remind them of God s promise God teachespeople very much by picturesThe children looked surprisedI will tell you what I mean What have I got hereon this deskNoah s sacrifice sirWhat the altar and the lamb and Noah sfamilyNo sir no a picture of emThen you see what a picture is not the thing itselfbut something that looks like it and reminds us of it orteaches us about it Now I will show you how theeluge is a picture story The wicked world before thed shows us wicked men now God s warning themut the water coming to destroy the earth is like hisarning now Flee from the wrath to come Noah


THE CREATION AND DELUGEthe preacher of righteousness is a picture of God s ministers now The ark is a picture of Jesus Christ Goinginto the ark and being safe there while all the world wasdrowned is a picture of coming to Christ and being safein Him while the earth and all the works in it are burnedup The new earth fresh and beautiful after the waterswere dried up is a picture of the beautiful new earthover which the Lord Jesus will reign when the storm ofGod s wrath has passed by and He is king over all theearth The rainbow will be there too for in the last bookin the Bible which tells us so much about the heavenlyglory we are told of God s throne and of Him who sat onit and it is said There was a rainbow round about thethrone in sight like unto an emeraldPlease sir is Cain and Abel a picture story toosaid little Annie MercerNot in the same way I think Annie at least Ido not see that it tells of future things but childrenthe Bible is like a mine full of rich treasure if you digyou will find People will take great pains in diggingfor goldMr James stopped for such a knowing look cameover little Ben Fraser s face as he spoke that he thoughthe must have something to say


Noah coming out of the ArkNoa coingoutof he rk


THE CREATION AND DELUGEWeb Ben what is it PBrother Tom he had luck out in Australy last yearhe found a iamp in his lotI worth ever such a dealHe was glad wasn t he BenI believe he was sir so was father for he senthim a note on itI once heard of a man children who was too gladHe had dug and dug and dug in his lot lengthways andacross and all ways till he almost lost heart for he foundnothing not a grain Once he got up before day andwent to work again He thought he d give it a lastchance In the morning his neighbours missed himWhen they reached the lots they found him at the bottomof his4 sitting in the hole he had dug and before himwas such a ig hmnp of gold as none of them had foundyet but the poor fellow was none the better for it forhe sat mowing at it with an idiot laugh the joy hadtaken away his sense It s a better kind of joy thanthat we get from God s Word David says I rejoice atthy word as one that findeth great spoil and he says Ilove thy commandments above gold yea above finegoldDoes any one remember another verse which tellshow David prized his Bible


STHE CREATION AND DELUGEEdith had an answer on her lips but she waited fort1e others till Mr James looked to her to give it then sheaid The law of thy mouth is better unto me thanousands of gold and silverl I wonder how many little boys and girls in this school2 ize God s Word and count it precious as David did IniBese days when Bibles can be had for a few pence andischools are full of them and most children have theirown Bible we are very apt to think of God s Word as ifK it was a common book and to forget that it is unlike allUther books because it is God s message to us telling uswhat He thinks and what He will do and how He feelstbwards usBy this time the tramp of feet outside the school doorIgave warning that the elder children were come backofn church Mr James asked the little ones how theyiadliked church in the school and whether they wishedr it again next Sunday If their tongues had been6ent he would have been quite content to take hisswer from their eyes


A 7 WiW CO PATERNCTER ROW LAIUION sIBABRAHAM AND LOT DIVIDING THE LAND


THE STORY OF ABRAHAMA VERY willing party gathered round the ext Sundaymorning for the Church in tle School Mr Brownwas to be the teacher to daj instead of Mr James andMr Brown s little boy Harold was to show the picturesinstead of Edith little Harold was an only child andthe nearer he could keep to his papa the better heliked itWhat did you hear about last Sunday childrenAdam and Eve sir Cain and Abel NoahThe ark The raven and the dove The rainbowSuch were some of the answers which came readilyfrom the elder children and the babies made a tolerablysuccessful attempt at lisping the words often only thelast word after them while their little fat hands werekept demurely clasped on their knees


ABRAHAM AND ISAACVery well then you left off with the 9th chapterof Genesis after that there are two chapters whichexcept the story of Babel are chiefly full of names sowe will pass on to the 12th and come to the story ofAbraham The chapters of names are very useful theyare like nuts wise men find a good kernel in them butthey have a hard shell not so easy for little children tocrack Harold find the picture of Abraham s journey tothe land of CanaanWhat do you seeS People riding on camels sirYes they used camels where we use horses therewere no roads then like our London streets paved andwatered with a drinking fountain here and there at acorner but rocks and hot sandy deserts horses wouldhave died but the patient camel with his broad feetplodded on bravelyLook a little at this travelling companyI see one woman among them What a pretty woman sheis a boy is leading her camel lest it should stumblethere are a good many cows and sheep with servants totake care of them I think that man in front is the masterof the company for he seems to be telling them which wayto go Now I will tell you about them There was a man4


Abraham going forth to the land ot Canaan


MMIAM AND ISAACand hi WW B g in Maran they had no ohildren oftiteir ofa btt they seem ti ere aken care of theirbr1o ie n whose fath ers The man and hiswi viww called Abram and Sara and their nephew sname was LotIt was about 427 years since the Flood for a greatpart of that time olmd Noe ad lived but now he had beendead seventy seven years All the people in the worldyou know since the flood were born of Noah s familyand he was the great father of them all While he livedand he lived a good long life altogether 950 years I amsure be woulitry tfalepthenm in the knowledge and fearof God but now that Noa had been dead many yearsGod chose another man t serr him faithfully likeNoahThis man wav called Abram it was he who wasliiang with his wife and nepher in the land of HaranTh e are two things Gods servants must do they musttrustiAim and they must obey Him God gave Abram apromise which he trusted and a command which heobeyed The promise was I will make of thee a greatnation and I M iltbe tte and make thy name greatand thou shalt be a blessing And I will bless them thatbless ee and tlrse him that cursetthhee and in thee


ABRAHAM AND ISAACshall all iamilies of the earth be blessed It was a greatrich full promise and it made Abram very happy Thecommand was Leave your country and your homeand your relations and go away into a land which I willshow you It was harder for Abram to obey that command than it would be for one of us because in thosedays families kept together much more than they do nowand as the family grew larger and the sons grew up andhad wives and children fresh tents were set up roundthe old father s tent and they all lived close togetherBut Abram did obey the Bible says So Abram departedas the Lord had spoken unto him Here in this pictureyou see them on their journey to the land of Canaan forthat was the land God showed him Abram was seventyfive years old when he left Haran That would seem apretty good age to us for taking a long journey but thoughthe time that people lived was growing much shorterthan it had been before the flood it was still longenough to make a man seem young and not old atseventy five Abraham lived a hundred years longerafter he took this journeyNow we will change the picture See what a prettyone I have next for you It is called Abram and Lotdividing the land See coloured plate


ABRAHAM AND ISAACAbram set a very good example in the way hetreated Lot to older children who have to take care oflittle brothers and sisters Abram and Lot were bothrich Abram was very rich in cattle in silver and ingold and Lot which went with him had flocks andherds and tents But because of their riches they hadto separate for so many cows and sheep could not all befed in one place and the servants fell to quarrelling forthe best places Abram s servants said Our mastershould have the best and that was true for God hadgiven all the land to Abram but Lot s servants did notlike to give in Abram could not bear to hear of thesedisputes He said to Lot that it would never do forthem to quarrel for they were brethren and as theycould not live together he said Lot should have the firstchoice and take any part of the land he likedDo you see them talking together There isAbram with his hands spread out giving Lot the choiceand Lot is looking at that green valley with a riverwinding through He is thinking That will be the placefor me I shall grow very rich there the green grass willfatten my sheep and my cows and there will be plentyof water near at hand It was the river Jordan whichflowed on through that valley and the Jordan ended in


God s Promise to Abraham Gen xv 5


A BkHA AtD ISAACa broad io er a eet of water Such a pleka placewas not l iy to be wi hout inhabitants Tera werecitie Ai e the I cities of the plain they were caledThe nameof some of those cities you know very wellthey were cald SBedia and Qmmrrah We shall seepresently whether Let ad a a he choseto live among tem h I tfiink not j T tif ble saysThe men of Sdom were wided ana sinmas before theLord exceedingly Now we wil ieave Lot a little whileand see what became of AbrahamWho is thait doo you think kneeling out on a rockin t 4aedak night0 it Apramnsiri i t is AlaiisA he is talking with God TheBi e Ahntec thefriend of God but Abram knewGod we very grea4 so when he talked wit Him hewaavery solae ad reverent He fell on hia knees totalk wviAtel gisea d remember that little e ildenwhen you kneel down to pray the great good manAbram di noi to trifle when he talked wi GodBut ilwht l liw e dide dare to do he tol Godall his troubleai Hadi Abiaaa any troubles Yes onethins madw im sad He did so wish to have a child ofhi twn a6i dia ae When he kneeled before


ABRAHAM AND ISAACGod on this dark night with the stars shining above himhe told God this trouble I go childless he said andwhen I die all my riches must go to my servant becauseI have no sonAh when we come with our troubles to God wetake the right way to get rid of them How often yourun crying to your mothers when you are sad or in painKind mothers pity and love their children but they can talways take away the pain and the trouble it is onlyGod who finds nothing impossible God found a wayfor Abram out of his trouble and promised him a son ofhis very own He told Abram to look up In thatcountry there are very few clouds in the sky the starslook brighter and clearer like little lamps hung in theblue heaven On this night the heavens were full ofstars God asked Abram if he could count them Nothey were too many to be counted Then God saidYour seed that means those who are born from yourchildren and grandchildren shall be like the stars toomany to be countedSomebody was once asked What is faith andthe answer that person made was Faith is to take Godat his word to think God means what He says and soto be glad when He promises us something we wishfor


ABRAHAM AND ISAACThat was what Abram did God kept him waiting fora time He does not promise to give us what we askdirectly but He never forgets and when the best time iscome He will give us whatever He has promisedSarai Abram s wife was not quite so ready to waitand to trust God as Abram was I shall tell you by andby of a plan of hers to find a child for him in anotherway You will see it did not answer very well butnow we are going to see what is happening to Lot inthe wicked cities where he chose to dwellWe don t hear in Genesis how Lot felt when he wasliving in Sodom but God tells us all about it nearly twothousand years after Lot was dead and buried for youknow children though we may forget what we have saidand what we have done and how we have felt it is alljust as fresh to the great God as when it first happenedHe forgets nothingGod tells us Lot had a very poor time of it in thosecities no comfort at all Lot really feared God and itmade him miserable to see every one round him sowicked he could hot help seeing and hearing thingswhich were always vexing him and his children seem tohave been very little better than the restLot was miserable because he feared God too much


The Destruction of Sodom


rAiAM AND UW Qoto be hJil kd place aalibe Sdid a f ear Himenough 4 It step here s aw longerGod f lemiay to ab a lave s lom n Does anyone kneoiw 6 it wasfHe mBfodom af ie firYes here is a picture of its deetin Look attheblamng houiise ad tAery rain sweeping down overthe city But there im a gi Rt deal to tell about SodomCZn you listen to along storyAbraham heard about it first for you remember hew God s friend and God said Shall I hide fromAachwm the thing that I doIt was i the middle of a very hot day that Abrahamwv iS4 g in his tent door where it was shaded from thes sm Aie could get any air that was stirring Helo edapand three men stood by him There were noirsme4ao tt apublic houses where strangers could turn ina dl gt aavna or a bed but rich men like Abrahamwear ah c ga lte be kid to traellers and to offerthem the bet d lteyhy hal I don t know wbAbraham kwm w it wha t rwaen visitors he hadfor the same vt f aness was often shown and isoften shown ow in oee counBies to any traveIersBut he soon did know for one of the hiee began to talk


ABRAHAM AND ISAACto him as only God could speak and to make himpromises which only God could makeThe two others were angels They all ate of thetender young calf Abraham had cooked for them and ofthe fresh hot cakes Sarah made for though angels don tneed to eat they can do so when they please After themeal the two angels went forward on their journeythey took the way that led to Sodom but the third was theLord of angels and He stayed behind to talk with AbrahamGod could make a friend of Abraham for He said Hewas sure Abraham would always fear God himself andbring up and command his children to do the same Yousee if children and servants don t like to do what is rightit is the duty of parents and those who are over them tocommand and make them do itOnce there was a good farmer who feared and lovedGod He had children who did not think like himThey were not bad sons to their father but they did notS think about pleasing and serving God In the placewhere that farmer lived a fair was to be held The sonswanted to go they wished to see the world and havea part of the fun The father did not like it they wouldsee a great deal of drinking and hear bad words andperhaps go wrong themselves He advised them not to


ARRAHAM AND ISAACgo but they said Oh let us go father we ll take careof ourselves we won t get into any mischief Well soit went on He did not say Yu shan t go and he didnot say You may go he kept hoping they would thinkbetter of it At last the day before the fair he foundthey all meant to go and he was troubledWhen that old farmer had a doubt or a trouble helooked into the Bible for advice and comfort Now it sohappened that this time he turned to the eighteenthchapter of Genesis and the verse that caught his eye was4I know Abraham that he will command his children andhousehold after himAh said he that s where I was wrong I advisedthem I should have come Abraham over them andcommanded them So the next morning he read thischapter at prayers and showed them how it was his dutyto command them to keep out of harm s way and theirduty to obey He forbade any one of them to go to thefair They all obeyed and he told a friend afterwardsI never had any trouble after I learned to comeAbraham over themI have told you this story to help you to obey cheerfully when you are told to do what you don t like Nowlet us hear what the Lord had to tell Abraham


ABRAHAM AND ISAACIt was about Sodom and Gomorrah and the othercities in that beautiful watered plain where Lot hadchosen to dwell God said he could not bear theirwickedness any longer He had come to destroy themAbraham felt very sorry when he heard it for heknew these were the cities and this was the wateredplain where his nephew Lot had gone to live He beganto beg for Sodom very hard that it might be spared Hethought surely Lot and all his children and grandchildrenand servants still feared God They would make a goodnumber perhaps fifty so he asked God to spare Sodomif there were fifty righteous people in it and God said Hewould Then Abraham s heart misgave him that theremight not be quite so many and he asked again for fortyfive and for forty and for thirty and for twenty and atlast Abraham grew very bold and he asked God to spareSodom if there were ten righteous people there Abrahamthought Lot was safe now and he stopped asking Butyou see little boys and girls what harm it does to live inbad company Lot s family and servants who seemed tobe God s servants while they lived near Abraham soonthrew off their religion when no one round them wasreligious Their religion had no root so it soon witheredup and now not even ten of the large company who


ABRAHAM AND ISAACcame in with Lot were God fearing men It is not singinghymns and learning texts and coming to school whichwill make good Christians of you Only one kind ofreligion will last the religion of trusting in Jesus eachfor ourselves and trying to please HimWhere did I tell you the two angels went to wholeft Abraham alone with GodTowards Sodom sirYes they reached Sodom by the evening verybeautiful the cities must have looked standing in therich green valley by the broad waters of the Dead Seaas the sun set upon them for the last time A travellerhas been there lately who tells us interesting thingsabout these cities he says the Dead Sea was once muchsmaller than it is now for it has spread southwards overthe plain where these cities once stood There were pitson this plain and they were full of bitumen bitumenburns like oil and the rocks and stones all round werefull of bitumen and such rocks and stones would burnand blaze as coals do when we throw them on a brightfire Now says Mr Porter most likely the housesand streets of Sodom were built of that stone and if sowhen the fire rained down from heaven it would light upthe bitumen pits and kindle the bitumen stone of which


ABRAHAM AND ISAACthe houses were made so that all would burn fiercelyStogether like a great furnaceChildren what became of Lot was he burned withthe restNo sirHow did that happenThe angels told him what was comingS Yes they saved him and would have saved all thatbelonged to him if they would have listened to thewarning but when Lot went out in the middle of thenight to the houses of the men who had married hisdaughters and told them to make all the haste theycould and get out of Sodom because God was going todestroy it his sons in law would not believe a word of itthey thought Lot was only mocking them The angelswould not let him linger to persuade them for fear thefire rain should begin before he was out of the cityhimself The angels hastened him and they took holdof Lot s hand and his wife s hand and the hands of histwo daughters who were with him in the house andmade them all run for their lives Escape for thy lifethey said look not behind thee lest thou be consumedPorter s Giant Cities of Bashan 112


ABRAHAM AND ISAACDid Lot look behindThe question puzzled the little company who had aP notion some one looked behind so Mr Brown turned tohis little Harold who answeredLot s wife did papa and she became a pillar ofsaltDo we hear about her in the New TestamentBut Harold was puzzled now till his papa told himto find Luke xvii 32 when he read Remember Lot swifeYes and those words are spoken to us What wehave to remember about Lot s wife is that though herfeet were hasting away from Sodom her heart was therestill and she turned for a last look and wished she couldhave stayed behind without being burned So it is withlittle children who wish to go to heaven but dob t wishto be holy and cling to their bad ways and wilfultempers and wish they could be safe without givingthem upIt was a sad sight for Abraham that morning Ithink he had hoped that the ten righteous would befound to save the city but he got up very early andwent to the place where he had talked with God the daybefore he looked eagerly towards the part where the


Hagar and Ishmael


ABRAHAM AND ISAACcities stood the sun was risen and he could distinguisha thick black cloud of smoke rolling up from the DeadSea That cloud covered four burning cities the citiesof the Plain only one little one was saved the city ofZoar which Lot was allowed to shelter inNow we have done with Lot he does not comeinto our story any more You remember don t youthe promise God made to Abraham and Sarah that theyshould have a child of their own So it happened justas God promised at the very time he had set for it ababy was born Sarah laughed for gladness she wasmore than ninety years old and Abraham was a hundredthey were so glad that they gave their baby boy thename Isaac which means laughter Presently thebaby was old enough to be weaned and Sarah thoughtso much of her little one that every thing whichhappened to him was a great occasion to her so whenIsaac was weaned she and Abraham marked the day bygiving a great feast to their householdWhile the feast was going on Sarah looked out andthere was a boy about fourteen years old who wasmaking very merry laughing and scoffing because everybody thought so much of little Isaac as to make a feastwhen he was weaned


ABRAHAM AND ISAACYou may think Sarah was not very well pleased tohear him but who was that boyI told you Sarah did not quite believe God wouldgive her a child and she made a plan to get a son forAbraham in another way My maid Hagar she saidto her husband shall be your wife perhaps she willhave a childHagar did have a child and till Isaac was born hewas Abraham s only son but this was not the son Godmeant or God promised when he said in thy seed shallall nations of the earth be blessedHagar s son was called Ishmael It was hard uponIshmael to see the little baby so much more thought ofthan he was and Sarah thought it would not do to bringthe two boys up together perhaps Ishmael would doher little Isaac some harmShe asked Abraham to send Hagar and Ishmaelboth away to live somewhere else Abraham felt verygrieved for he loved his bold boy Ishmael and did notlike to part with him but God told him Sarah was rightand that it was the best thing to do When onceAbraham heard God s voice telling him to do anythinghe never stopped to consider whether it was pleasant ornot so the very next morning he rose up early and sent


ABRAHAM AND ISAACHagar and Ishmael away giving them bread and waterfor their journey for as I told you there were no innsin those days where travellers could get a mealI don t know whether Hagar lost her way but weread She wandered in the wilderness of BeersheliaWho can tell what a wilderness isAll were silent till Mr Brown looked at HaroldI think papa it s a sandy place where there are nopeople or trees or waterYes that is a pretty good account of a wildernessIt is lonesome to have no people there and when the sunshines it is bad to have no shady trees to sit under butfar the worst trouble of a wilderness is having no waterThe thirst is so dreadful to bear that people go almostmad for water They don t care how bad it is if theycan only find water of any sort Camels are such usefulcreatures to travel in the wilderness not only becauseheavy water skins full of water can be carried by thembut because their own supply for several days is carriedinside them Their stomachs are divided into differentparts each of which is filled with water and used bydegrees as the camel wants it Travellers ready to diewith thirst have been known to kill their camels in orderto get at this hidden store


And Isaac said Where is the lamb tor a burnt iffering GEN xxii 17


ABRAHAM AND ISAACBut Hagar had no camel only a skin bottle Shemade it last as long as she could and hoped every houras she and Ishmael trod the fiery sandy plain that theyshould come to some little bubbling spring where theycould drink ahd she could fill her bottle again Butdays passed and no rain fell from heaven no water wasto be found in the wildernessIshmael was a brave young boy but he was not usedto hunger or thirst There was always plenty to eat anddrink in his father Abraham s house His legs trembledand he sank down fainting for thirstNow I have a picture for you about itLook at him poor young fellow just fourteen he wasnow There lies the bottle there s not a drop more in itHis poor mother is weak enough herself but she hasmanaged to lay him down where there was just a bit of ashrub to shelter him a little from the sun and then shegoes away sobbing as if her heart would break for shecan t sit by to see him die and she knows by the look ofhim he will die soon if no water can be foundHarold said there were no people in a wildernessHe was right but there is One who is everywhere forHe says Do not I fill heaven and earth Ishmael musthave called to God as he lay dying under the shrub for a


ABRAHAM AND ISAACvoice came down from the clear sky and it said Whataileth thee Hagar Fear not God hath heard the voiceof the lad where he isGod never mocks us If He tells us to be comforted it is because He is going to help us out of ourtrouble There was help nearer than Hagar thoughtGod showed her a well of water and you may think itwas not long before she filled her bottle with it and heldit to her child s parched dying lips His strength sooncame back and he grew up to be an archer He lived toa good old age 137 years and left twelve sons whobecame great and rich men and had towns of their ownand castles to live inNow which of you can tell me anything aboutAbraham s one special son Isaac for whose sake Ishmaelwas sent away I have told you about his being weaneddo you know what is the next thing we hear about himNo one knows Let us see whether a picture willhelp you at all What do you see here And whatdo you think it means Suppose we let Harold tellPapa there is an old man and a young one theyare going up a mountain the old man has got a staff inone hand to help him to climb and in the other there isa knife and a basket which looks as if it had fire in


ABRAHAM AND ISAACThe young man has a bundle of wood on his shoulderand he has turned round and is pointing to the fire Ithink he is asking a question about iWell Harold has given us a good description of thepicture I think you can guess now what itis aboutIt is Isaac papa saying My Father where is thelambYes most of you know something of that storyand it is the next thing we hear of Isaac after theweaning Many years had passed away Isaac hadgrown up he was probably older than this picturemakes him look One old historian Josephus says hewas twenty five Think how his parents must haveloved him his mother s only child in how many waysnow he was a comfort to them They were growingold but he was always with them to help and cheerthem True they had plenty of servants but no one soready or so willing as their only son No one can tellwhat love there was between Isaac and his parentsOne night Abraham heard the voice of God butwhat words that voice spoke Take now thy sonthine only son Isaac whom thou lovest and get theeinto the land of Moriah and offer him there for a burntoffering upon one of the mountains which I will tell thee1


J F SAW THE MEETCI A NG OF ISAAC AND REBECCATHE MEETING OF ISAAC ANK D REBECCA


IITRebekah at the Well


ABRAHAM AND ISAACof Was not this a bad dream No Abraham hadheard God s solemn voice too often before to have anydoubt God was really speaking to him What did hedo Did he begin to pray very hard that God wouldtake back the words Did he say Ask anything elseLord all my riches everything I have but Isaac istoo precious Did he say Lord if I do this all thypromises about Isaac will fail Children he left allthat to God to manage he had entire trust that Godwould find a way of fulfilling his own word He hadentire trust too that God knew all the sorrow such adifficult command as this would bring on him Godloves me he said to himself He loves Sarah He lovesIsaac what He bids me to do must be for our goodand to make us happier in the end though I can t seehow It will bevery hard and sad but He will helpme and I will show that I love God and can trust Himby obeying at onceSo Abraham got up early the next morning 1don t think he told Sarah what he was going for Hewas sure it would all end well and meanwhile he wouldsave her the pain if he could He took two of hisservants and Isaac I daresay Isaac always went aboutwith his father and it was no uncommon thing for


ABRAHAM AND ISAACAbraham to go and build altars to God and worship indifferent places Isaac who loved and feared God himself was pleased to join So the servants and Isaac setout cheerfully enough on that early morning and Abraham kept all his grief to himself it was between himand God Many a time I daresay when his nobleyoung son turned to him and the love in Abraham sheart rose and overflowed towards the darling of his oldage many a time then the secret prayer went up toGod 0 God help me to do thy willIt was a long journey they had been three dayson the road before Abraham saw the Mount Moriah Godhad told him of It is said to be the same MountMoriah on which the Temple at Jerusalem was afterwards built and a bit of the bare ancient rock standsup now in what was the temple courtAbraham did not take the servants nor the ass onwhich he had ridden up the mountain he left thembelow and said Abide ye here with the ass and I andthe lad will go yonder and worship and come again toyou Do you notice that children He thought heshould bring Isaac back God tells us in the letter ofSt Paul to the Hebrews that Abraham thought Isaacwould be raised up again from the dead


ABRAHAM AND ISAACBut oh it was a hard trial and as they climbedthe steep mountain side I think Abraham must havebeen thinking What can I say to Isaac How can Iexplain it to him How can I show him it is God s willand must be done And then he would look at his righthand and at the terrible knife and think Must thishand raise this knife and plunge it in the heart of myonly childPerhaps Isaac thought his father was very silentand there was a question he wanted to ask him Hewas carrying the wood Abraham had the knife and thefire but where was the lamb Some animal was alwaysslain on God s altar where was it My father saidIsaac where is the lambCould Abraham say My son you are to be thelamb Not quite yet There was a little more of themountain to climb They were not quite come to theplace where Isaac must be told so Abraham said Myson God will provide Himself a lambBut the time and the place were drawing very nearand at last Abraham had to tell his son that he must bebound on God s altar and die by his own father s handin his first days of bright young manhood The Bibleleaves us to picture those words We know how Abra


i i i dIcen a3iiIsaac lesdngJacob


ABRAHAM AND ISAACham would try to cheer Isaac by reminding him ofGod s promise and we know Isaac submitted patientlytrusting God and trusting his father So the altar wasbuilt and Isaac was bound and laid on it All was readyand Abraham took the knife to slay his sonDid he kill him childrenNo sirWhat stopped himGod called to him out of heavenCan any one tell me the words Find them andread them HaroldAnd the angel of the Lord called unto him out ofheaven and said Abraham Abraham and he saidHere I am And He said Lay not thine hand upon thelad neither do thou anything unto him for now I knowthat thou fearest God seeing thou hast not withheld thyson thine only sonI don t think I need tell you children what a joyfulmoment that was joyful for Isaac who was waiting forthe sharp plunge of the knife but most of all joyful forAbraham With what trembling eager hands he wouldundo the cords which had bound Isaac and throw hisarms round his son It would have been joy to havereceived him back from the dead but how much more to


ABRAHAM AND ISAACbe saved the dreadful sorrow of slaying his son Nowhe could take him back to Sarah and tell her all Butmost of all old Abraham s heart danced with joy forGod s approving words He loved Isaac as fathers lovetheir only sons as Mr Brown spoke his eyes filledwith tears for they rested on his little Harold hisonly child but if Abraham loved Isaac muchhe loved God more And now he had pleased Godand God had given him out of heaven a sweet word ofapprovalOur morning is slipping away fast and I musthasten over the rest of this story for there are two orthree more things in the lives of Abraham and Isaac Iwant to tell you before church is over Abraham hadsaid to Isaac God will provide Himself a lamb So ithappened for in a thorny bush close by a ram had gotentangled by its long horns and Abraham took it andlaid it on God s altar and offered it for a burnt offeringinstead of his sonWhen the sacrifice was over the angel s voice washeard again from heaven God sent Abraham a messageof comfort and blessing which made him and his childrenrich for everDoes this story of Abraham giving up his only


ABRAIIAM AND ISAACson remind you of any verse in the New TestamentGod so loved the world that He gave his onlybegotten SonYes my children we say Abraham loved God verymuch to be ready to give his only son when God askedhim But think how much more God loved you and mewhen He gave His Son for us No voice out of heavencried stop when Jesus was nailed to the cruel crossIf He did not die we must because we were sinners andsin must bring death So God laid our sin and punishment upon Him He was the Lamb in that great sacrifice the Lamb of God which taketh away the sin of theworld and it pleased the Father to bruise Him and itpleased the Lord Jesus to suffer because they loved youand me and wished to make a way by which we mightbe safe and happy for everWe have only a fe minutes left but I shall havetime to tell you two or three more things which happenedto Isaac He and his father went back from MountMoriah Soon after this Sarah died when she was onehundred and twenty seven years old Abraham and Isaacmissed her very much Abraham began to think of gettinga wife for Isaac The women all round them were


The Burial of Isaac


ABRAHAM AND ISAACheathen so Abraham sent his most trusty servant Eliezerto find a wife for his son among his own relations in thecity of Nahor Abraham s brotherLook at this picture a young woman is standing by a well she is giving a man some water out of apitcher I should think he is on a journey for there arehis camels and servants a little way behindThis man was Eliezer He has taken his journeyand has come to the city of Nahor which you see thereon the hill In those days the women of the city used tocome out at evening time with their pitchers to drawwater at the wellEliezer waited at the well He thought among thewomen who came he might see some of the daughters ofNahor s house Eliezer did more he thought withinhimself These women are strangers to me but Godknows which of them would make a good wife for Isaacand a good daughter to my master Abraham I will askGod to show meHe asked God to let him know it by a sign Hewould beg one of the women for a drink of water and ifshe was very kind and offered to draw water for hiscamels too then he would know that was the womanGod had chosen for Isaac His prayer was not quite


ABRAHAM AND ISAACdone when he heard footsteps A beautiful young girlwas coming up to the well She had such a sweetpleasant look that Eliezer thought how glad he should beif she answered to the sign He ran to meet her andsaid Let me I pray thee drink a little water of thypitcherYoung Rebekah did not know how happy she madeEliezer when she answered in her sweet pleasant voiceDrink my lord letting down the pitcher on her handas you see and as soon as he had done drinking went onto say I will draw water for thy camels also till theyhave done drinkingChildren God answers prayer Sometimes as inthis case with Eliezer He answers it very soon but Healways answers it sooner or later and gives us either thevery thing we have asked for or something else whichwill make us still happier A good man at the end of along life who had prayed to God ever since he was a boysaid on his dying bed No prayer is lost every prayerlivesAh there are the steps at the door I must passover a story I wished to tell you of Isaac s son JacobYou may take one last look at Isaac when his sons Esauand Jacob were carrying him to his funeral He lived to


1ABRAHAM AND ISAACa good old age one hundred and eighty years five yearsmore than Abraham You see bodies were not put incoffins then but wound round in cloths and laid to restin caves Abraham and Isaac were buried in the caveof Machpelah


J F SHAW CO PATERNOSTER ROWTHE MEETING OF JACOB AND ESAU


THE STORY OF JOSEPRIMP FAWCETT the third gentleman who had promised MrShepherd to feed his lambs during mornin service wasmuch younger than Mr James or Brown He had nochildren of his own but lived with his father and motherThere was not a child in the school however butloved Mr Fawcett Shall I tell you why Because heloved them He had a class on Sunday but that wasonly a small part of what he saw of them for on weekday evenings when other young men might be taking aride or smoking a cigar or reading a novel Mr Fawcettwas out and about in the houses where the childrenlived some he helped on with their lessons to others hetook a few seeds in a little flower pot and taught themhow to tend the plant Mr Fawcett s sisters saved upall theirold toys and games for any who were sickThis morning when he came to take his class there


JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE JOSEPH THE RULERwas a little basket in his hand covered with fresh greenleaves It was full of strawberries for little AnnieMercer the little girl with a pale face and large eyes shehad been struck down with fever since last SundayMr Fawcett thought to take his strawberries to Anniein the ten minutes while the children were resting betweentheir school lessons and school church but Annie wasvery ill and Mr Fawcett spent rather longer than hemeant in showing her mother what to do for her comfortWhen he came back he could hear angry noisy voices whenhe was some way off the children were quarrellingAll wanted the places nearest Mr Fawcett and thoseplaces were kept for the little ones because the otherscould see over their headsMr Fawcett s grave sad face when he opened thedoor was quite enough to stop the angry words andmake them drop the naughty hands which I am sorryto say some bigger boys had raised against their littlebrothers First of all he made the whole school stopjust where they were for five minutes without moving orspeaking By that time they were heartily ashamed andglad enough to be allowed to move quietly into their usualplaces At last Mr Fawcett broke the long silenceChildren I wanted to show you beautiful pictures


Jacob at Bethel GEN xxviii x8


JOSEPH THE OAPTVE JOSEPU THE BULERbut you have brought out an ugly thing we must look atfirst I am sorry ri it it will take up our time and wecan t have so may pictures but as it is here we hadbette look at it and see what it is made of When Icame to the door what did I find in the school PThe heads were hung low and the words not veryclear but the most part said something like a quarrelAudi what was it aboutWRawanted to sit anigh you sirSIAt tl you all sit near me1o sirBut you tBiJ ght it the best place so each wishedfor i for Msi a8s lAwvye shu3meB a Yes sir followed this inquiryIN5w chiBwimd w le ot at the secret of quarreXW Weo qwoepR wn ct they are selfish when theyare mlkeoaete tave the best for themselves Nevermilda gwt without if Ican getkwhl like Doesthakt sW we thinkuc o aWo iwit 4 10the reckoningthfZ ei Aplo He said Me woul bear thepaaht lte Wa wwjoy Well now all aref ft M ill lbegin with showing


JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE JOSEPH THE RULERyou a picture of two brothers becoming friends after aquarrel See coloured pictureI must say one of those brothers had some reasonto be displeased with the other I must tell you thestory in a few words Look at the picture two men areready to fall into each other s arms behind one thereis a little company of women and children behind theother there are armed men These are Isaac s twosons Jacob and Esau They had had a quarrel manyyears ago in which Jacob had behaved very badly toEsau Esau was a hunter he caught wild deer andother animals and when he had caught them hecould make capital dishes of them Isaac his fatherwas very fond of what he called Esau s savourymeat indeed because of this savoury meat he lovedEsau better than Jacob Parents should not make afavourite of one child above another least of all forsuch a poor reason as this but if Esau was his father sfavourite Jacob was his mother s Rebekah loved himbestAt last Isaac grew to be such an old man that hisstrength failed and his sight failed and he thought histime to die must be drawing near I must bless Esaufirst he said to himself a father s blessing waa thought


JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE JOSEPH THE RULERvery much of in those days He told Esau to take hisbow and arrows and shoot a wild deer and make himsome nice venison When I have eaten it he said Iwill bless you Esau went out to do itRebekah heard what Isaac said Everybody livedin tents then you know and voices could easily be heardoutside by any one listening I should like Jacob tohave that blessing instead of Esau she said to herselfI could soon make a nice dish for Jacob to take in to hisfather instead of Esau and Isaac is so blind he couldnever tell one from another by looking at them So shecalled Jacob and told him to fetch two tender youngkids from the flock to make savoury meat and told himwhy Jacob did not say Mother that would be actinga lie and would make God angry I don t thinkRebekah could have found any answer to that but hesaid Mother I should be found out perhaps my fatherwill want to feel as he cannot see me and if he doesmy skin is smooth and Esau s is rough and hairy Thedevil is always ready to help people to an idea when theyare doing his work so Rebekah thought directly whatto do The skin of the young kids was hairy too andout of the skins she made coverings for Jacob s handssome sort of gloves I suppose and a covering for the


15Tacob t thewell Gen x i 8


JOSEPH BH CAPTIVE J SBM T RULERsmooth paslf IWi neek besides tA U A had some ofEsau s eleow 1i 1e iisie and tes she put on Jacobfor unter s clothes son get to ahmeltuei wild beastshe4Bises and killsIt was a wicked tbiin to try and deceiw the pooroldcither and Jacob told lie after lie to maka his storygowa for Isaac had his doabts all along became thevoice was Jacob s That is just the way boys and girlsard drawn on they begin perhaps with half telling onelie and then they think they must stick to their taleand the second does not prick their conscience like thefirst at last unless by God s great goodness they arefouint out and punished they hardly know truth fromfals eod Oh children pray to God to give you the lipof tthJacob did not gp pquua d God loved him toowell fr t haLt I miWA i i kwhen Esani came inwia the meatIe e ba Aite Ea I aa W pains tocoai waWq lt fianA ab had robbedhint of his blessing Esa was no a g y an heneither prayed e r his trouble nor put it in God shands to set righ t IO Pant to revenge himself bykilling Ja4b as sooo as ieir oifither was deadThis got to Re i4 I a and now she had to


JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE JOSEPH THE RULERbear her share of the punishment for in fear and dreadlest her favourite son should be killed she made up hermind to send him right away to the place where shecame from where she had a brother living whose namewas LabanThis was how Jacob began a wandering life Forall his lying and deceit he was really God s child andthough God punished him He loved him still Jacobtoo loved God he thought of Him in the day as hewalked alone through deep valleys or climbed over highmountain tops he dreamed of Him at night My classcan tell me about one of Jacob s dreams for we talkedabout it only last Sunday James Abbot you can tell astory well tell us about Jacob s dreamWhen James heard a thing he wanted to rememberhe had a way of putting it by carefully in his memoryand now and then he looked to see that it was all safeso he was soon ready with his storyYou told us sir night came on when Jacob wason his way and he says I ll have to stop till morningand he was very tired for he d come a long way so helaid down glad enough to sleep anywhere with his headon a big stone for a pillowHe was soon right off to sleep and then he saw a


JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE JOSEPH THE RULERladder leastways it was steps to go up into heaven itwas put down on the earth and reached up to heavenThere were angels on the ladder some going up andsome down It was a fine sight but soon he could seeabove the ladder what was brighter than the angels forGod stood above it and began to talk to himThat is a very good account James Who canremember the three comforts God gave him He feltlonely you know away from his father and mother howdid God comfort him for thatHe said I am the Lord God of Abraham thyfather and the God of IsaacAnd he was wandering about in strange placeswhere he had never been before how did God comforthim for thatHe told him all the land should be hisAnd there were many dangers and some troublesin the way before him how did God comfort him forthatHe said Surely I am with thee and will keeptheeVery well This was a pleasant dream indeedWhen Jacob woke he said God is here this is thehouse of God this is the gate of heaven He took his


VAndJa vAnd Jacob served seven years for Rachel Gen xxix 20u


JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE JOSEPH THE BULERstone pillow and set it up to be a sign and he poured oilon it and called it Bethel the hona dtoi od I canshow you a picture of this See he sa iftiig up hishand and promising to God that he will always be hisservantJacob had still a long way to go but he coald gocheerfully for he took God s three comforts with himOur English Bible ss he went on his journey but inthe language in which the Old Testament was written inthe Hebrew the word is he lifted up his feet Youknow if you are very happy and glad you go with aspringing step At last he came to the old country hismother Rebekah had come from It was a land o feksand shepherds and presently he came to awellinal SLwith three flocks of sheep lying by it you may seethemlin this pictnre waiting for the drink df water which wasso preioms in that hot thirsty badle asked the shepherds if they kew Laban hismothe s brother Oh yes they said we know himhe is well look thae eanes his daugi r Rachel witlther sheepJacob looked and he was not soon tired of lookingfor the young s apherdess Rachel was a pleasant sightso pretty and so gentle in her ways Jacob did all her


JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE JOSEPH THE RULERwork for her of giving the sheep water and then toldher who he was She ran home in great joy to tell herfather and Laban came out to welcome his sister s sonand to ask him to stay with himJacob grew very fond of Rachel Here is anotherpicture of Jacob where he is standing talking with heras she sits among her sheep Rachel became Jacob swife so did Leah Laban s other daughter and Jacobstopped with Laban nearly three times seven years andbecame the father of many children and very rich incattle and sheepAfter a time Laban became jealous of Jacob andtried to defraud him It was a just punishment forJacob who had deceived his old father The Bible saysyou know Be sure your sin will find you out Godtakes care it should be so Once a cruel little boyfound his amusement in catching the dear little birds inspring cutting out their tongues and letting them goagain He did this to so many sweet singing birds thatie people of the place began to wonder why the birdssung so little that year That boy grew to be a mannd was married and had a home of his own God gaveto him and his wife a baby boy after a few months theyexpected to hear their baby begin to talk like otherA


JOSEPh THE CAPTIVE JOSEPH THE RULEBchildren but it never talked it was dumb Anotherbaby was born a third a fourth They were all dumbThen that man remembered his childish sin and sawthat God was punishing himJacob stole away from Laban in the night with hiswives and his flocks and though Laban followed andovertook him he would not return but those two madea covenant or agreement together in God s presenceHere is a picture of them the men round are bringingstones to build up an altar that Laban and Jacob maymake their promise as in God s sight After that Jacobwent on his journeyAll this time I have not been able to finish explaining the first picture about the brothers making up theirquarrel but now we have come to that part of thestory There was another of Jacob s sins he had to bereminded of he had not only deceived his father Isaacbut wronged his brother Esau When he drew near tohis old home he began to remember how angry Esau hadbeen with him twenty years before Had he forgottehis anger now Would he receive Jacob kindly Hethought he had better make sure and not bring his wiveand little children and flocks in the way of an angrybrother so he sent messengers before to Esau to tell


JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE JOSEPH THE RULERhim where he had been all this time and that now hewas coming home What answer do you think themessengers brought back Esau knows all about yourcoming back they said and he is coming to meet youwith four hundred menOh how frightened and distressed Jacob wasFour hundred men it was quite a little army He had noone to set against them only weak women and littletender children and a few shepherds and drivers to guidehis flocksThere was only one thing to do in such a trouble asS this and that one thing Jacob did do he brought histrouble to God Esau and his four hundred men werevery strong but God was stronger Jacob told histrouble to God in the simplest words Deliver me I prayThee from my brother for I fear him lest he will comeand smite me and the mother with the children PrayerSdoes not want fine words you know it is just talking toGod telling Him what we want what we are afraid oflat makes us glad what makes us sorryGod does not always hear us as soon as we begini t pray On this night when Jacob prayed about Esauhe had to pray hard and long it was called wrestlingor striving with God He won the answer at last howH


JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE JOSEPH THE RULEBever and the picture I showed you first shows what theanswer was the very best that could be Esau s angerwas all turned to love and instead of meeting Jacob withsharp weapons he met him with loving open arms andfell on his neck and kissed him and the two brotherswept together We know of no more quarrels betweenthem they lived in peace and before very long we hearof them as meeting again to bury their old father IsaacSome time after it happened to them as to Abraham andLot they were too rich and had too many flocks to livein the same country but they separated in peace andgoodwill and Esau was the one to go He went andlived in Mount Seir and left Jacob in possession of theland of Canaan which God had given to him God keptall his promises to Jacob though He punished his sinsThe next story I have to tell you is one of theprettiest in all the Bible for little children only I thinkmost of the boys and girls here know the story of JosephSuppose you tell me instead of my telling you Whowas JosephSon of Jacob sirRight had he any brothersYes sir there were twelve of themHad they all one mother P


JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE JOSEPH THE RULEESSome said No some Yes Mr Fawcett exS plained that there were four mothers Leah had six sonsand the other three two each but he told the childrenRachel the pretty young shepherdess that Jacob lovedfirst was always his favourite wife and after she diedher children Joseph and Benjamin were Jacob s favouritechildren specially Joseph Do you know anythingi about how Joseph was dressedJacob made him a coat of many coloursS What did his brothers say to thatl They couldn t bear him because he was the pet andtold talesIs it wrong to tell talesYes sir came from all as with one voiceSchool children mostly agree about that and the Biblesays Thou shalt not go up and down as a tale beareramong the people but I am not so sure that the BibleSand school children would agree as to what tale bearingreally is Now look here suppose I ve got a shilling in myO cket loose I take my handkerchief out and draw outthe shilling I don t hear it for it rolls on the mattingO i d no one sees it but we ll say Sam Carter and TomJones it rolls between them Tom puts out his foot onSthe sly and covers the shilling then he makes as if he


Full Text

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i J Moses at the Burning Bush. I'



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The Baldwin Library Uli3 raityd



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. all that wicked world, but at each man in it, and He saw just one who was different from the rest. Ah, chilSdren! sometimes boys and girls make mock at a companion because he won't do naughty things with all the rest. Never mind, brave little boy or girl, who stand alone in doing right, there is One standing beside you who is laughing, not at you, but at your poor foolish companions, who think they can do wrong, and yet go unpunished. So it was then; the one brave righteous man, Noah, who stood out against all the world, 'found grace,' or favour, 'in the eyes of the Lord.' And when all the rest of the world was punished, God made a way for him to escape. Shall I show you how? Help me to find the picture, Edith, of building the-ark. There, now all look-at it while I tell you what the Bible says. "God spoke to Noah, we don't know whether a voice sounded from heaven, or whether an angel was sent with a message, any how Noah had no doubt they were God's words. They told him God would destroy all the world except him and his family; he had a wife and three sons, and they had wives, so there were eight in all. They were to be saved by making an ark, or a large boat covered in at the top, with a window and a door, and pitched inside and outside with pitch, to keep the water



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. anointed king by the men of Judah, and there he reigned for seven years. Abner did not like to submit to him, and set up another king, a son of Saul's, called Ishbosheth, and there was a long war between the house of David and the house of Saul; but David became stronger and stronger, and Saul's house weaker and weaker. After a while Joab, David's captain, treacherously killed Abner without David's leave, and Ish-bosheth too was slain. Then all the tribes of Israel submitted to David and made him their king, and he came to Jerusalem and reigned there thirty-three years; and he went on and grew great because God was with him. Though he was so strong and prosperous, he would not do anything in his own strength; he asked God about everything. When the Philistines heard David was made king they came against him, and spread themselves in the valley of Rephaim. David would not fight them till he had asked God, but when God said, 'Go up, for I will doubtless deliver the Philistines into thine hand,' he went and beat them thoroughly. David did a great many wise things. He brought back the ark of God from Baal; he fought against Moab, and destroyed it; and defeated the Syrians; and the Lord preserved him wherever he went, and he reigned



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. 2. Each for ourselves. Having pious parents or teacher won't take you to heaven., 3. Go again and again, every day. It is not enough to pray and read on Sunday. Pray every day; read your Bible every day. "We soon hear of the Israelites murmuring again for water. It is true they had some excuse; you can hardly fancy the weariness that is felt in that great and terrible wilderness. Rock is heaped on rock, hollow after hollow, each looks more dreary than the last, overhung by steep bare mountains, without green trees, red, brown, and yellow, glaring in the hot sun. The people wearied for water, and instead of trusting God, they murmured, and wanted to stone Moses. Yet again God bore with them. And what do you see Moses doing in this picture ?" "-Striking the rock with his rod." (See coloured plate.) "Yes; and immediately water gushed out, and descended in a brook from the mountain (Deut. ix. 21), so that the -thirsty people could drink. Do you not see them crowding round? "Wise men who have travelled in those parts tell us that this marvellous source of water has never dried up. There is an exquisite valley called the Wady Feiran, which bursts upon you suddenly in the middle of all



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J. F. SAW THE MEETCI, A .NG OF ISAAC AND REBECCA. THE MEETING OF ISAAC ANK D REBECCA.



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"And Cain said, My punishment is greater than I can bear."-GEN. iv. 13.



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"And Isaac said, Where is the lamb tor a burnt iffering."-GEN. xxii. 17. *



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. over all Israel as a just and wise prince. He did not forget his early love to Jonathan and the promise he made him. When he heard that Jonathan had left a poor erippled son, called Mephibosheth, lame on both feet, he sent for himi a& made him live with him like his own child. "All this .time David was happy and prosperous, because he walked humbly and leaned upon God for help. Just so long as we keep near to God we shall prosper; but do you know, children, when ymo ha' been good a long while, you very often grow careless, and self-conceited; and when we are puffed up with self-conceit, a very little temptation will blow us away. Ever since he was a child David had fered God, but now he listened to the devil, and fell into a dreadful sin which brought trouble upon him all the rest of his life. I will tell you how it happened. One evening as he was walking on the roof of his house he saw a very beautiful woman washing herself, and David sent to take her for his wife. He was told she wasahe wife of Uriah the Hittite, who was away in the armywih Joab; but David was wicked enough to steal her bm her own husband and make her his wife. Then, wore still, he wrote to Joab sayings 'Set Uriah in the forefront of the hottest battle,



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. and cut off his head.' But the amne David who refused to let him lift the spear against Saul, forbids him to punish Shimei. Crushed under a sense f his own guilt, david felt he deserved all this, and more. 'Let him curse,' he answers, 'because the Lord hath said unto him, Let him curse David." Let him alone.' The king is in the wilderness, resting near Bahurim, but -Absalom is already in Jerusalem, he has seized the royal dwelling-house, and slept in his father's bed. Ahithophel thirsts for vengeance, 'Let me now choose twelve thousand men,' he cries, 'and I will arise and pursue after David this night; I will come upon him when he is weary and weak, and make him afraid; I will bring 4back all the people unto thee I will smbe the king only.' Capital advice, cleverly urged by a crafty man; but one little prayer breathed by the flying king when he first heard of Ahithophel's treachery, defeats all his wisdom. What was that little secret word? Read 2 Sam. xv. 31. Now see how God answers that prayer. Anather man in Absalom's camp, Hushai, is at heart a friend of David's, and when Absalom tells him Ahithophel'. advice, he cautions him not to attack his father, who has the



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. to be meddled with when they quarrel, and the fellow pushed Moses away, saying angrily, 'Who made thee a ruler, and a judge over us ? Wilt thou kill me as thou didst the Egyptian yesterday ?' "Then Moses was discouraged; he thought his brethren would have welcomed him as the deliverer promised by God, but they understood nothing about it; besides he was afraid, because he found his murder of the Egyptian was known. He had good cause to fear, for Pharaoh heard of it and sought to slay him. So Moses fled right away, all alone through a desert land; it must have been a dreary journey; pursued by fear of the king, not daring to linger, he hurried on. This was no pleasant travelling through green lanes and fruitful fields; the way he took was rough and rocky, and the burning sun beat on his weary head. Yet he endured it all. Why did he endure it ? What helped him to bear it ?" The children were silent, so Mr. Elton bade them read Heb. xi. 27: "By faith he forsook Egypt, not fearing the wrath of the king, for he endured as seeing Him who is invisible." "Moses could say like Hagar, 'Thou God seest me;' and this blessed comfort cheered him all through his



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THE CREATION AND D-ELUGE. spoke his sentence, and Cain, who had not been at all unhappy about his sins, was unhappy about his punishment, and said, 'My punishment is greater than I can bear.' Here is a picture of him when he said so "Dear little children, you think you could never be so wicked as Cain; but remember, angry, jealous feelings in the heart were at the beginning of Cain's murdering his brother, and so we read in the New Testament, 'Whoso hateth his brother is a murderer.' Oh, ask the Holy Ghost to fill you with loving, humble thoughts, that you may be pleased to hear others praised, and not always want to be first, and to have the best for yourself. "Very little is told us in the Bible of what happened for many hundreds of years after Cain killed Abel, except the names of men, who their sons were, how long they lived, and that they died. Over and over again, the 5th chapter of Genesis, after telling us of men who lived 900, or 800 and more yeais, says, 'he died,' and 'he died.' Once a man, who did not fear God, read this chapter, and it struck him so much that it had to be said at last of all these long-lived men, he died,' that this ungodly man began to think, I suppose I must die too, and -when I die, where shall I go to ?' God did not let that



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THE YOUTHFUL PrOPHET, AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. among.lions, whose teeth are spears;' but he added, My heart is fixed, I will sing and give praise.'* He had his feelings of fear and times of anguish, but God way his Friend, and again he wrote in the cave, 'I showed the Lord my trouble. When my spirit was overwhelmed within me, then Thou knewest my path. Thou art my refuge and my portion.'t "Amongst the many who came to David in the cave were his own father and mother and family. I suppose they were afraid of Saul's anger. It is very touching to see David's care for his parents; he did not mind roughing it for himself in the cave, but he craved for comfort and safety for his parents, so he went to Mizpeh, of Moab, and said to the king there, 'Let my father and my mother, I pray thee, come forth and be with you, till I know what God wilt do for me.' Can you guess why he took them to Moab ?" No, sir." "1 Most likely because they had relations there. Jesse's grandmother was Ruth, the Moabitess, and Orpah, her sister, lived there; she, or at least some of her relations, might still be alive. "While David was at Adullam, he heard the Philis"* Ps. Ivii. 4, 7. Ps. cxlii. 2-5.



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET, AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. "Look at him in this picture here. Do you not think you should be afraid of a lion, if one were to get loose when you were looking at it in the Zoological Gardens ? Should you not run screaming away ? "Now one day, when David was all alone in the woods, minding his father's sheep, there came a lion and took a lamb out of the flock, but instead of running away, David went out after him and smote him, and delivered the poor little lamb out of his mouth. The lion let go the lamb to spring upon David, but when he arose against him, David caught the lion by his beard and smote him and slew him. What made him so bold and strong? It was secret prayer. The Lord,' he said, delivered me out of the paw of the lion.' Another day he was attacked by a bear, but he slew the bear as he had slain the lion, for God was with him. "He was soon called to the king's court. From the time that Saul rejected God's commands, God's Spirit left him to himself; and who comes into our hearts unless they are kept by God ?" "The devil, sir." "Yes; evil spirits troubled Saul, and he felt very wretched. Don't you know how miserable you feel when you yield to the evil spirit of envy, or passion, or fret*~ ~ 4 j



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. It was not for want of telling and warning that they did not know, Noah is called in the Bible a preacher of righteousness," because he so often told them of God's anger against sin, and the flood that was coming, and the one way of escape in the ark. They saw, too, that Noah believed what he preached, else why did he build the ark ? They had even a more special warning, for seven days beforehand God told Noah to come into the ark which he had built, himself and his family and all the animals that were to be saved. They went in two and two; it must have taken a long time before all were safely housed in the ark. This was going on before their eyes, and you may be sure Noah preached more earnestly than ever just before he went in, knowing it would be the last time he could warn these poor sinners. But, children, as they did not see the water yet, they did not believe it was coming; when they did see it, it was too late to escape. I wonder whether all this that happened before the flood, reminds you of something else that is happening now ?" No one answered, so Mr. James said, Edith, will you find in your Testament Matt. xxiv. 37, and read it to me ?" Edith'read, "But as the days of Noe were, so shall also the coming of the Son of man be." L.



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The Destruction of Sodom.





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The Return of the Spies.



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. "Did He give them any rules about what they might or might not do ?" Mr. James waited a minute and then turned to Edith, who said, The garden was full of fruit-trees; they might eat of all except one, they could tell which it was, for it grew by itself in the middle of the garden." "Who can tell me what happened ? Suppose I tell you. Adam and Eve were very happy in that garden. Has anybody here been to the Zoological Gardens ?" A few hands were held up. "You know there are lions, and tigers, and bears, and wolves, and hissing snakes and hyenas there, but each is in his den; and if the doors were opened, there would be sad work among the men, and women, and dear little children who have come to see them. In the garden of Eden there were all these beautiful creatures, the striped tiger, and the spotted leopard, and the lion with his bright eyes and bushy mane. There were gentle creatures, too, the little spotted fawn, and the tender lamb, and the timid hare, and the cooing dove. All was pece and love in the garden of Eden, tigers and leopards were not fierce, lambs and fawns were not fearful, and all were obedient to Adam; he was the master and Eve was the mistress, and God's beautiful creatures served them.



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. other's shoulders. The teachers frowned, and the monitors pulled and shook the little sleepers. They perhaps opened wide eyes for a moment, but only to close them again very soon. Mr. Shepherd had seen this for several Sundays, and he began to feel that, as far as the children were concerned, he might as well not preach at all. Then he remembered it was harder for them to listen than for the grown people, not only because they were younger, but because they had already been listening and learning at school, nearly two hours before church-time. "Well," said Mr. Shepherd to himself, "what shall I do, send the young children home from school, and only let the elder ones come to church? No, that wouldn't do; if the little ones were at home, the mothers must stay to keep them out of harm's way. Shall I preach short easy sermons always on Sunday mornings full of stories, that the children may be able to listen ? No, I can't do that in the church, because there are many grown-up people there, who want a sermon as well as the children; but suppose I could get six kind friends to agree together to take turns Sunday by Sunday, to keep all but the elder classes (who can understand and keep awake at church) behind in the school-room at church.



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. "very beautiful boy, and they were not afraid of the wicked king, but were brave enough to. hide him three months. What happened then?" Jessie Dean, who had turned over the leaves of her Bible to Exodus ii., read"*Whea! she could no longer hide him, she took for hi ian. ark of bulrushes and daubed it with slime and with pitch, and put the child therein; and she laid it in the flags by the river's brink." And how coiid she trust her baby all alone in the river, where there were great hungry crocodiles who might eat: it, or where it would starve to death ?" "^She trusted od with hti." "06,s1 aind I cs fancy that whiili she was weaving the litse sarong bulrustes, she prayed many times thaet.tweawatch over heibaby. Aad -J yegEb ha she trenadf as she earied him down to the broad, iver; mQAU4 liA& i was in the eadr morning iherepeople wanir; agl: hid hiB, amaoug!t4 i tibte krewalong the ed ; aoh .sems to havet&B<iB fttajRler Miriam to stop adr wBC oIwat became ofr im "LMtsima mc weQr a te or tw.ele years old; but evef a. &tU giiNk a y be very useful to her mother if she is obedient and trustworthy. Are there any little



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET, AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. soon opening into a large chamber with high arches, from which many low passages lead in all idirections, joined by others cutting across them, Which ifarm a perfect labyrit th, which the guides at this! day stl.:you have never been explored, as people are afraid 4'fiiosing themselves. "Here a npmber of people joined David. .It was not a very choice set. All that were in distress; every one that was in debt; and every one that was discontented, joined him, in all about four hundred men, and David became their captain. Yet in the midst of this disagreeable company, and from this darksome acave, sweet songs of praise rose from David's 'heart to'God. Here some of his beautifl ,psalms were written. iEven on his way from Achish, fleeing for his life, he sung,' '," will bless the Lord at all times, his praise 'shall oEmtinually be in my mouth.' He was exposed to taheA1id beasts of the forest, he was hungry and thirsty, and'had no bed nor home, but he said confidently, 'The \young lions do lack and suffer hunger, but they that sekk ;t.he Lord shall not want any good thing.' When thepmanbtrs and debtors.gathered round him, he could 'teach them the ifear 6f the Lord, and show them how they might see good.' In the cave he wrote, 'lMy soul is



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Rahab and the Spies:



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p- THE CREATION AND DELUGE. right, and he was in the wrong; he should have tried to find out what displeased God, that he might not do it any more. How did he feel? Angry and jealous. He said in his heart, Abel is the favourite; why is not my fruit as good as his lamb ? I am sure I am as good as Abel; it is very hard to treat him better than me.' That was the first bad feeling, Cain opened the door of his heart a little way for Satan, and when Satan finds the door of a heart open a little way, he soon pushes at it. So he said to Cain, I would not bear it; you are the eldest; you ought to have the most honour; Abel takes what belongs to you. I would find some way to let him know who is master.' "Cain liked what Satan said to him; it fitted very well with his jealous, angry feelings. Bad thoughts, when we let them lodge in our hearts, soon turn to bad actions; and the next time Cain and Abel were alone together, Cain struck at him with savage blows, till his brother laid in his blood, all along upon the earth, dead and helpless. "Cain added one more sin to passion and murder. When God asked him, Where is Abel, thy brother ?' instead of confessing and begging to be forgiven, he said, 'I know not: am I my brother's keeper?' Then God '\ .a



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. They were ready enough, however, to gather round the picture-desk again when the little bell sounded, and Mr. James saw that he should be able to tell Mr. Shepherd there had been no sleepers that day at the church in the school." All their eyes were attracted to a piece of clear glass Mr. James drew from his pocket, shaped so as to have three smooth sides. Do you know what this is, children ?" "No, sir." Even Edith was puzzled. "Do you see any colours in it ?" "No, sir, 'tis clear glass, leastways it looks so," said one of the eldest boys. S"Let us see if we can bring any colours out of it," and by a fine string tied to each end, Mr. James hung it up at one of the school windows, where a blaze of sunlight was pouring in. The delight of the children was unbounded, as the prism threw its bright jewelled colours on the white wall opposite, and when Mr. James made the brilliant colours travel over the little company, now lighting on a curly head, and now on a white pinafore, they seemed to think an angel had somehow got among them; and was giving them glimpses of his beautiful wings.



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' ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. Abraham to go and build altars to God, and worship in different places. Isaac, who loved and feared God himself, was pleased to join. So the servants and Isaac set out cheerfully enough on that early morning, and Abraham kept all his grief to himself; it was between him and God. Many a time, I daresay, when his noble young son turned to him, and the love in Abraham's heart rose and overflowed towards the darling of his old age-many a time, then, the secret prayer went up to God, 0 God, help me to do thy will.' It was a long journey; they had been three days on the road before Abraham saw the Mount Moriah God had told him of. It is said to be the same Mount Moriah on which the Temple at Jerusalem was afterwards built, and a bit of the bare ancient rock stands up now in what was the temple court. "Abraham did not take the servants, nor the ass on which he had ridden, up the mountain; he left them below, and said, Abide ye here with the ass, and I and the lad will go yonder and worship, and come again to you.' Do you notice that, children? He thought he should bring Isaac back. God tells us, in the letter of St. Paul to the Hebrews, that Abraham thought Isaac would be raised up again from the dead.



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. And the 44th verse" Therefore be ye also ready: for in such an hour as ye think not the Son of man cometh." "Children, does not Mr. Shepherd sometimes tell you of a great and terrible day which is coming, when the earth will be not drowned in a flood, but burnt with fire ? Does he not say it is coming soon, perhaps before you grow up to be men and women ? Does he not say that there is one way to be safe, and only one, that if you come to Jesus He will keep you safe from the fire, as the ark kept Noah'from the flood? Do you believe him when he speaks so ? The people in the old world kept out of the ark, and went on as if nothing was going to happen, because they did not believe Noah. If you are keeping away from Jesus, dear little children, Jesus who loves you and wants to save you, it is because you do not believe your minister, and what is worse, you do not believe God." The children were very quiet and serious, and for a minute no one spoke; then Mr. James said, "I will show you what these people, who would not believe Noah, did when the flood really came." He changed the picture to one of the deluge. There they are, you see. The water has risen higher



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ABRAHAM .AND ISAAC. Abram set a very good example in the way he treated Lot, to older children who have to take care of little brothers and sisters. Abram and Lot were both rich: Abram was very rich in cattle, in silver, and in gold; and Lot, which went with him, had flocks, and herds, and tents.' But because of their riches they had to separate, for so many cows and sheep could not all be fed in one place, and the servants fell to quarrelling for the best places. Abram's servants said, 'Our master should have the best,' and that was true, for God had given all the land to Abram, but Lot's servants did not like to give in. Abram could not bear to hear of these disputes. He said to Lot that it would never do for them to quarrel, for they were brethren, and as they could not live together, he said Lot should have the first choice, and take any part of the land he liked. "Do you see them talking together'? There is Abram with his hands spread out, giving Lot the choice, and Lot is looking at that green valley, with a river winding through. He is thinking, That will be the place for me, I shall grow very rich there, the green grass will fatten my sheep and my cows, and there will be plenty of water near at hand. It was the river Jordan which flowed on through that valley, and the Jordan ended in



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. be saved the dreadful sorrow of slaying his son. Now he could take him back to Sarah, and tell her all. But most of all old Abraham's heart danced with joy for God's approving words. He loved Isaac as fathers love their only sons" (as Mr. Brown spoke his eyes filled with tears, for they rested on his little Harold, his only child); but if Abraham loved Isaac much, he loved God more. And now he had pleased God, and God had given him out of heaven a sweet word of approval. "Our morning is slipping away fast, and I must hasten over the rest of this story, for there are two or three more things in the lives of Abraham and Isaac I want to tell you before church is over. Abraham had said to Isaac, God will provide Himself a lamb.' So it happened; for in a thorny bush close by, a ram had got entangled by its long horns, and Abraham took it, and laid it on God's altar, and offered it for a burnt-offering instead of his son. When the sacrifice was over the angel's voice was heard again from heaven. God sent Abraham a message of comfort and blessing, which made him and his children rich for ever. "Does this story of Abraham giving up his only



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" Abel was a keeper of sheep, but Cain was a tiller of the ground." *i-~--~~~~-



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Death oft aul



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. children. There are large parish schools at St. Mary's. School begins on Sunday at nine o'clock, and as the schools are very near the church, it does not need to close till a quarter to eleven. Several kind teachers from the parish attend the school; but it might be as well if w' teaching was a. little more what children like-more stories, andnaot quite so much learning by heart. How-. ever, tiere-is-o fault to be found with their order. The b im, Qf voies stops when a little bell tinkles, and a long ,wessionx of boys in uniform and girls in snow-white al land tippets, falls into marching order, and soon fills tieiarity-schook benches in St. Mary's Church. How leyrwish there was a good walk between the school and I&. SRepherd preaehes very good sermons. I is qpihe a teat. to hear him; but, .you know, a sermon whir a i ry good for a grown person is not always what a littfl child' can understand. There were mastly little bitaori purpose for them, which they might have understoed, and remembared, but, to tel the truth, though all the changes of standing, and sitting,: and kneeling, and repeating, and: sitging, helped to keep. them awake during the service, by tfle time the sermon began, half the childienwere nodding and ling their sleepy heads on each



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. society; at least he thought he would go and tell Charley's mother what had happened, and give her a caution. He wmen to the house where his htle scholar lived; Charley's mother was down-stairs. "' Where is your little boy ? Is he come home ?' "' Yes, sir, and he has brougrt another boy with him; they are up-stairs.' "Mr. Bheard Charley's voice overhead, and on going up found Caarley.on his knees, and 'Big Bill' beside him. Charley was asking God to turn Bill's heart. Charley's suretyship brought him neither into disgrace nor trouble, and where do you think Bill is now? He is in foreign countries, a successful and honoured missionary, telling the heathen of the one "great Surety who took our sins, and suffered in our stead. This story will help you to remember that a surety is one who stad in another's place. When Judah said to his father, 'I will be surety for Benjamin,' he meant, I will stand between him and harm, and bear it instead of him. Do you remember that Judah had to be as good as his word? Can any one tell me about it ?"



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET, AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. Philistine, Abner took him to Saul, and he remained with Saul as his armour-bearer, and went no more home to his father's house. "There was some one else present as they were talking together, of whom we must speak a little. His name was Jonathan, which means God-given, and he was Saul's son. I think his character is one of the most beautiful in the Bible. He was exceedingly brave, and we read of his going alone with his armour-bearer to attack a stronghold of the Philistines, nothing doubting, for be said, It may be the Lord will work by us; for there is no restraint to the Lord to work by many or. by few.' Cheering on his armour-bearer, he climbed up the steep rock on his hands and feet, and surprised the garrison of the Philistines, so that they trembled and fell before his strong arm. "Jonathan stood by as Saul and David were speaking together, and his whole heart went out to David, and he loved him as his own soul. He might have been jealous of David, envious of his being such a favourite Samong the people, envious of his glory in slaying Goliath, afraid lest David should reign instead of him. But Jonathan was nota selfish, and he loved David like a brother-with a generous, true, devoted love. He



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THE CREATION -AND DELUGE. "Did you see it after the rain left off?" "No, sir." "What was wanted, then, to make the rainbow ?" Sun and rain both, sir." "Good; the drops of rain were tiny prisms, they caught the white shining rays and divided them into the lovely rainbow colours. Now the prism has taught us what a rainbow is, and when it appears; who can tell me of the first time we hear in the Bible of a rainbow ?" "Ain't that it, sir ?" said Harry Frost, a sharp little fellow, who had kept his eyes on the picture of Noah's sacrifice, and who now pointed to a rainbow in the corner of it. (See coloured plate.) "Well found out, Harry; it was when Noah came 'out of the* ark that we first hear of a rainbow. You know, children, there's a proverb which says, 'A burnt chilt dreads the fire;' when we have had a great sorrow and it has passed away, we dread the first signs of its coming bak. God knew it would be so with those who had seen the lood. Whenever a good soaking rain came to water 'the ground, they would tremble lest it should be the beginning of another flood. God did not want thm to be always in fear, He likes to see us happy and trusfkl in his love, as a little child in happy and at rest



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-I THE DESERT JOURNEY. Two men carrying fruit." Do you know the story of Caleb and the spies ?" Nobody liked to tell the story, so Mr. Elton went on. "When the Israelites drew near Canaan, God told Moses to send twelve men-one from each tribe of Israel-to spy out fhe land, and bring word what it was like, good or bad, and the people few or many, weak or strong. Oh, what a beautiful land they found it; look at the grapes they are bringing back from a place called Eschol, one bunch, and it takes two, strong men .to carry it between them on a pole. Even now, the bunches of grapes which grow in that country sometimes weigh forty-five pounds each. Then there was such delicious wild honey, and the cattle were so fat and plentiful; they said the land seemed to flow with milk and honey. But, they said, too, that the people who lived in that richiknd were strong and great, and lived in strong stone cities, with high walls, and there were giants there who would kill them. Two of the spies, indeed, Caleb and Joshua, encouraged them to trust God and go forward, but instead of trusting God, the people ibegan to cry, and sat fretting and crying all night. -Oh, how displeased God was! He sent them right back into the wilder-



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. time, and make a little service for my poor children such as they can enjoy, with pictures, and stories, and singing. "Would not that do ?" Yes, Mr. Shepherd thought it would, and when he opened his writing-case, it was to write to Mr. James, and Mr. Brown,. and Mr. Fawcett, and Mr. Elton, and Mr. Carter, and Mr. Baxter, six gentlemen most of whom had children of their own, and knew what sort of talk children could understand. Mr. Shepherd had a beautiful set of Bible prints for his own little Edith, and he promised to lend them every Sunday morning to the gentleman whose turn it was to take "the church in the school." When Mr. Shepherd had written his six letters, he looked up and said, "Pray God make these kind friends willing to feed my little lambs," and God heard that prayer, and every one of the six agreed to do what he asked. I think, my little readers, you will like to make one of the listeners in this "church in the school," so you shall hear how it all went on. The children knew nothing about it till the next Sunday morning, when school was nearly done, and I can tell you they looked very much pleased when Mr. James came in leading little Miss Edith Shepherd with



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. was sorry to sit quietly under the trees, and listen to thei splals of the cool fountain, as the wind blew it in feat2iems-of glistening spray half across the water, and they did not let Mr. Elton forget he had promised to tell them a story about Rahab. In this beautiful garden, children, you don't wonder at the Israelites longing to get out of the great and terrible desert into the good land. At the end of the forty years, Moses died, and God told Joshua to be strong and courageous, and lead the people in. Joshua sent two men to prepare his way, by spying out Jericho, the first large city to which they must come. It was a dangerous errand, for the Canaanites had heard all that God had done for the Israelites, and were very much afraid of them. I suppose the men stole in at dusk of evening, and they lodged at the house of the woman Rahab. ""The King of Jericho heard of it, and sent word, Bring forth the men which are come to thee, for they be come to search out all the country.' Instead of yielding to foolish fear, Rahab took the "men up to the flat top of her house, and hid them under the flax stalks which had been steeped in water, and were spread out there to dry. Then she told the King's



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21 The Expulsion from Eden.



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET, AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. "A happy, light-hearted boy that youngest was, full of bounding health and spirits, with glowing cheeks and beautiful eyes;* with a voice so musical, that he Sgloried in it even when a king;t with a wondrous skill in touching his simple harp, he led a happy life of it, % waking music from the woods and fields as he tended his father's sheep. Can you not fancy him summoned hastily from the Sfold, and bending reverently before the aged prophet ? 'This is he,' said the Lord, and Samuel arose, and .poured the fragrant anointing oil upon his head. From that day forward the Spirit of God came and dwelt in his young heart. We do not know that he or his brothers understood what the important meaning of the anointing was, yet I think strange dreams of a royal future must sometimes have flitted through his mind in his lonely hours. But David was truly humble, and he went back to his sheep, and was busy with his daily work, till God called him to one more important. And meanwhile every one could see God was with him, for his courage and bravery in danger, and his wisdom in S speech, were spoken of even in the king's court.$ "* 1 Sam. xvi. 12, "Fair of eyes," margin. t Ps. Ivii. 8. $ 1 Sam. xvi. 18.



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. in its father's arms. So He said the rainbow should be a sign between Him and them, He would promise no more to bring a flood on the earth to destroy it; when He looked on the rainbow He would remember his promise, and when they looked on the rainbow they would feel quite safe from another flood, however hard it might .be raining, because God had promised, and He could not break his word. So the rainbow became a sign or picture to remind them of God's promise. God teaches people very much by pictures." The children looked surprised. "I will tell you what I mean. What have I got here on this desk ?" "Noah's sacrifice, sir." "What! the altar, and the lamb, and Noah's family ?" "No, sir, no ; a picture of 'em." "Then you see what a picture is; not the thing itself, but something that looks like it, and reminds us of it, or teaches us about it. Now I will show you how the eluge is a picture-story. The wicked world before the d shows us wicked men now. God's warning them ut the water coming to destroy the earth is like his "arning now, 'Flee from the wrath to come.' Noah,



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. The young man has' a bundle of wood on his. shoulder, and he has turned round, and is pointing'to the fire. I think he is asking a question about i.''. "Well, Harold has given us a good description of the picture. I think you can guess now what itis about." "It is Isaac, papa, saying, 'My Father, where is the lamb ?' "Yes; most of you know something of that story; and it is the next thing we hear of Isaac, after the weaning. Many years had passed away; Isaac had grown up; he was probably older than this picture makes him look. One old historian, Josephus, says he was twenty-five. Think how his parents must have loved him-his mother's only child-in how many ways now he was a comfort to them. They were growing old; but he was always with them, to help and cheer them. True, they had plenty of servants, but no one so ready or so willing as their only son. No one can tell what love there was between Isaac and his parents. One night Abraham heard the voice of God; but what words that voice spoke! 'Take now thy son, thine only son Isaac, whom thou lovest, and get thee into the land of Moriah, and offer him there for a burntoffering upon one of the mountains which I will tell thee .'1 -." ^ **



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THE DESEET JOURNEY. listen, so Moses alone went near with his servant, a young man called Joshua, up the mountain. "Forty days and nights Moses stayed in that cloud, and when God had done speaking with him, He gave him two tables, or slabs of stone, on which the commandments were written with the finger of God. "While Moses was away, the people got tired of waiting for him, and made a calf of gold to worship, like the idolatrous Egyptians, and danced and played like fools around it. As Moses and Joshua were coming down they heard and saw the shouting and indecent singing and dancing, and the idol-calf. Then Moses was very angry, and threw down the tables of stone; and then he destroyed the calf, and punished the people. About three thdusand of them were slain. The holy God, too, was angry, but Moses begged and pleaded, and the people, too, repented and prayed. And tell me, children, what God does when we repent? If we confess our sins, He is just and faithful to forgive us.'" Yes, God forgave them this, and many, many other times; but I have not time to tell you much more today, and we have four more pictures to look at. "Who do you see here ?"



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r.-... David rescuing the lamb. 10*



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Abraham going forth to the land ot Canaan.



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. a strange country! So he was set to work. Slaves were hard worked, and beaten, and badly used; but this young Hebrew slave seemed to make everybody love him. All that they put him to do he did so cleverly and so cheerfully, that Potiphar began to think very well of his slave; he trusted him more and more, till he made him chief over all the other servants in his house. The Bible tells us a little secret about why it was that Joseph got on so well-' the Lord was with him.' Sometimes, you know, I come round in the evening to one or another of you, if you have rather a hard lesson to do, and help you. Is the lesson hard then ?" Many a pleasant look was directed to their friend in answer. Yet I am only a little wiser than you. There are many things I don't know, and want help in myself. The grand thing is to have Him for our friend who knows all and can do all. The Lord was with Joseph,' that is why he got on so well. He feared and loved God, God loved and helped him. Joseph's troubles were not quite over yet, but trouble can't really hurt the man whom God loves and helps. Potiphar had a wicked wife, who was not afraid to tell lies. She told lies about Joseph, and her husband



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. old, was asked, 'Do you ever pray ?' Oh, yes.' And when do you do it? You go out early in the morning, do you not ?' Yes, and we are only half awake when we leave the house. I think about God, but I cannot "say I pray then.' When then?' You see, our master orders us to mount the chimney quickly, but does not forbid us to rest a little when we are at the top. Then I sit upon the top of the chimney and pray.' .' And what do you say ?' Ah, very little. I know no grand words with which to speak to God. Most frequently I only repeat a verse which I learned at school.' And what is that ?' God be merciful to me a sinner.' "Whenever any one of us kneels down to pray we may hear God's voice saying to us, 'Aslc, what I shall give thee.' What did Solomon choose ?" A wise and undertanding heart." "Yes, you may read his answer to God in 1 Kings iii. 7: 0 Lord, my God, Thou hast made thy servant king instead of David my father, and I am but a little child: I know not how to go out or come in. And thy servant is in the midst of thy people which Thou hast chosen, a great people that cannot be numbered nor counted for



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. heathen, so Abraham sent his most trusty servant Eliezer to find a wife for his son among his own relations in the city of Nahor, Abraham's brother. "Look at this picture; a young woman is standing by a well-she is giving a man some water out of a pitcher. I should think he is on a journey, for there are his camels and servants a little way behind. This man was Eliezer. He has taken his journey, and has come to the city of Nahor, which you see there on the hill. In those days the women of the city used to come out at evening time with their pitchers to draw water at the well. "Eliezer waited at the well. He thought among the women who came he might see some of the daughters of Nahor's house. Eliezer did more; he thought within himself, These women are strangers to me, but God knows which of them would make a good wife for Isaac, and a good daughter to my master Abraham. I will ask God to show me.' He asked God to let him know it by a sign. He would beg one of the women for a drink of water, and if she was very kind and offered to draw water for his camels too, then he would know that was the woman God had chosen for Isaac. His prayer was not quite



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. command, Moses stretched his rod over the waters, and the tide rushed back. In vain the armed men struggled "with the waters, not one escaped. Then one song of victory, and joy, and thanksgiving, burst from that watching multitude:Sing, for the power of the tyrant is broken, His chariots and horsemen, all splendid and brave; How vain was their boasting; the Lord hath but spoken, And chariot and horsemen are sunk in the wave. "Who shall return to tell Egypt the story Of those she sent forth in the hour of her pride ? The Lord hath looked out from his pillar of glory, And all her brave thousands are dashed in the tide. Sound the loud timbrel o'er Egypt's dark sea, Jehovah hath triumphed, his people are free." Mr. Elton paused a moment to letithelittleies look more closely at the picture, and -then pointed out the pillar, of the cloud and fre, the drowning hosts, the distant pyramids, and Moses standing on the shore. "Would you not think, children, that after such a deliverance, those people would never doubt God again ? And yet the very next thing we hear of them, only three days after, is that they grumbled because the water they



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE BULER. stone pillow and set it up to be a sign, and he poured oil on it, and called it Bethel, 'the hona dtoi od.' I can show you a picture of this. See, he sa iftiig up his hand and promising to God that he will always be his servant. "Jacob had still a long way to go, but he coald go cheerfully, for he took God's three comforts with him. Our English Bible ss he went on his journey, 'but in the language in which the Old Testament was written, in the Hebrew, the word is, he lifted up his feet.' You know if you are very happy and glad, you go with a springing step. At last he came to the old country his mother Rebekah had come from. It was a land o:feks and shepherds, and presently he came to awellinal SL with three flocks of sheep lying by it-you may seetheml in this pictnre-waiting for the drink df water which was so preioms in that hot thirsty bad "le asked the shepherds if 'they kew Laban, his mothe's brother. Oh, yes, they said, 'we know him; he is well, look, thae eanes his daugi r Rachel witlt her sheep.' "Jacob looked, and he was not soon tired of looking, for the young sapherdess Rachel was a pleasant sight, so pretty and so gentle in her ways. Jacob did all her



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--y --^T JOSEPH THE CAPTIVZ--JOSEPH THE IULER. tell him all about their ime, and dteir ld fmater, and their yomm br ther Benjamin. Then b let them go with their saks full of corn; but he seai to t*em in parting, If you come again, mind you bring Benjamin with you' The corn they took lasted a good while, but at last it wa done, and none grew in the fields at home; so old Jacob said, 'Go again, and buy us a little food.' 'Then we must take Benjamin with us, father,' they said; 'we dare not show ourselves to the lord of Egypt without him.' Jacob was sadly troubled. Since he lost Joseph he had been moe choice than ever over Benjamin, the only child left of ws favourite wife Rachel. 'Let me take are of him, father,' Judah said; 'I will be surety for him.' Do you know what that meant ? If I tell you a tre story, you will understand it better. "In a London school there was a boy so rebellious and troiauome, that he did harm to all the rest; the more so, as he was one of the oldest boys in the school. They called him Big Bill.' Many times he was punished, but no punahment seemed to do him any good. Big Bill' led oe Aier boys wrong, and ill-used the little ones, aml sorely tried his kind and good master. At last the master, whom we will call Mr. B, said, 'I must turn Bill out of the shool, he does so much harm; the



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THE STORY OF SAMUEL. M .BAXTE was a few minutes late at the school, and .before he arrived a great many wondering eyes were ixed on the picture, and the children amused themselves i' with guessing who that sorrowful-looking woman was, rith downcast head and clasped hands, standing outside, and who that grave old man could be sitting inside, and lpoming so very cross." Mr. Baxter saw their heads were full of the picture, had said, "That woman's name is Hannah. Do you "know why she looks so sad?" "" "Oh, sir, she hadn't a child." " And the other was always worrying her." In those days men had often two wives. Hannah and Steinnah were both wives of Elkanah. He loved Hannah best, but she had one great trouble and disappointmenthe craved to be a mother, to have a little baby of her very



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. messengers two men had been there, but were gone, and they had better run after them. "Then she said to the spies, 'Pity me, and spare me, and my father's house, when you destroy the town.' And the men faithfully promised they would, if she kept their secret. But how could they get out? The city gates were shut, and every one was searching for them to kill them. Fortunately, Rahab's house was on the town wall, and she let them down by a rope out of the window. It was a scarlet rope, and she left it hanging there, that they might know her house, and spare it when they came to destroy Jericho. "That day was not very far distant. True, the river Jordan was broad and rapid, always twenty yards across, but now sixty yards-for it was the barley harvest, and Jordan overflows its banks in harvest. True, Jericho was surrounded by high stone walls, and defended by armed men, all on the watch to resist them. But what are rivers and walls and armies against the Almighty God ? God made a path for them through the river." "And how did they take the town ?" "They were told to march round it, once a day, for six days, and seven times the seventh day, and



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*r4 LE1 Hr0 1 R11 THF OFFERIGS OF CAIAND ABEL



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. Will you use this little prayer too ?" Then all the children repeated together, "Lord help me!" and many wrote it out afterwards. As soon as little Samuel was old enough to go away from his mother, Hannah took him up to God's house, and left him with old Eli that he might be a little servant of God. You read about it 1 Sam. iii., And the child Samuel ministered unto the Lord before Eli.' Dear children, you may be the little servants of Jesus; every thing that you try to do well to please Jesus, every naughty word you check, every little kind act, is a way of serving Jesus. You don't know how useful a child may be. "One night when Samuel was laid to sleep, he heard a voice calling his name. It was dark, only the lamp of sacred oil, which was not allowed to go out all night, still glimmered before the tabernacle where the ark of God was; but looking round by its dim light, he saw nothing, so he thought Eli called him, and said, 'Here am I!' and he ran to Eli and said, 'Here am I, for thou calledst me.' "But Eli answered, 'I called not, lie down again.' He went and lay down, but again that still small voice breathed his name, 'Samuel!' A second time he went to



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE--JOSEPH THE RULER. work for her of giving the sheep water, and then told her who he was. She ran home in great joy to tell her father, and Laban came out to welcome his sister's son, and to ask him to stay with him. Jacob grew very fond of Rachel. Here is another picture of Jacob, where he is standing talking with her as she sits among her sheep. Rachel became Jacob's wife, so did Leah, Laban's other daughter; and Jacob stopped with Laban nearly three times seven years, and became the father of many children, and very rich in cattle and sheep. "After a time Laban became jealous of Jacob and tried to defraud him. It was a just punishment for Jacob, who had deceived his old father. The Bible says, you know, Be sure your sin will find you out.' God takes care it should be so. Once a cruel little boy found his amusement in catching the dear little birds in spring, cutting out their tongues, and letting them go again. He did this to so many sweet-singing birds that ie people of the place began to wonder why the birds sung so little that year. That boy grew to be a man, %nd was married, and had a home of his own. God gave to him and his wife a baby boy; after a few months they expected to hear their baby begin to talk like other A<



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. him where he had been all this time, and that now he was coming home. What answer do you think the messengers brought back ? Esau knows all about your coming back,' they said, 'and he is coming to meet you with four hundred men.' Oh how frightened and distressed Jacob was! Four hundred men it was quite a little army. He had no one to set against them, only weak women and little tender children, and a few shepherds and drivers to guide his flocks. "There was only one thing to do in such a trouble as S this, and that one thing Jacob did do; he brought his trouble to God. Esau and his four hundred men were very strong, but God was stronger. Jacob told his trouble to God in the simplest words, 'Deliver me, I pray Thee, from my brother, for I fear him, lest he will come and smite me, and the mother with the children.' Prayer Sdoes not want fine words, you know; it is just talking to God, telling Him what we want, what we are afraid of, lat makes us glad, what makes us sorry. God does not always hear us as soon as we begin i t pray. On this night when Jacob prayed about Esau he had to pray hard and long, it was called wrestling or striving with God. He won the answer at last, howH ')



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X 4. 1. 500W & CO., PAlTERNOSTER ROWT. USIUTOll, BROS. JOSHUA COM MA ND ING ( TILE SUN TO STAND STILL.



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. you a picture of two brothers becoming friends after a quarrel. (See coloured picture.) "I must say one of those brothers had some reason to be displeased with the other. I must tell you the story in a few words. Look at the picture; two men are ready to fall into each other's arms; behind one there is a little company of women and children, behind the other there are armed men. These are Isaac's two sons, Jacob and Esau. They had had a quarrel many years ago, in which Jacob had behaved very badly to Esau. Esau was a hunter, he caught wild deer and other animals, and when he had caught them he could make capital dishes of them. Isaac, his father, was very fond of what he called Esau's 'savoury meat,' indeed, because of this savoury meat he loved Esau better than Jacob. Parents should not make a favourite of one child above another, least of all for such a poor reason as this; but if Esau was his father's favourite, Jacob was his mother's. Rebekah loved him best. At last Isaac grew to be such an old man, that his strength failed, and his sight failed, and he thought his time to die must be drawing near. 'I must bless Esau first,' he said, to :himself-a father's blessing waa thought



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. However that may be, the Israelites were very cruelly treated, and forced to work very hard. "I have myself seen some of their work. It was the proud fancy of some of these Egyptian kings to have S enormous buildings made, called pyramids, with square bottoms, each side sloping upward to a point. Some of these were built of stone, others of brick. One I saw was 197 feet high and 366 feet square. The bricks of which some of these immense pyramids are built are made of the mud of the great river Nile, which flows through Egypt. It is so hot there, that it is enough to bake the bricks in the sun without burning them, as we do in a kiln; and the mud is kneaded with the hands like dough, and mixed with chopped straw to make ib cling together. Bricks are made in the same way in Egypt at the present day. In Exodus v. we are told as a further hardship that the poor Israelites had to gather their own straw. You. can fancy what a toil it was when I tell you that 100,000 men took twenty years to biild one pyramid. Then these poor slaves are obliged to work all through the heat of the day, and are watched by taskmasters with whips in their hands. I do not think English boys would like to live in Egypt, the stick is so, S iuh used there; even respectable, grey-haired men are



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. shall all iamilies of the earth be blessed.' It was a great, rich, full promise, and it made Abram very happy. The command was, 'Leave your country, and your home, and your relations, and go away into a land which I will show you.' It was harder for Abram to obey that command than it would be for one of us, because in those days families kept together much more than they do now, and as the family grew larger, and the sons grew up and had wives and children, fresh tents were set up round the old father's tent, and they all lived close together. But Abram did obey: the Bible says, 'So Abram departed as the Lord had spoken unto him.' Here in this picture you see them on their journey to the land of Canaan, for that was the land God showed him; Abram was seventyfive years old when he left Haran. That would seem a pretty good age to us for taking a long journey, but though the time that people lived was growing much shorter than it had been before the flood, it was still long enough to make a man seem young and not old at seventy-five. Abraham lived a hundred years longer after he took this journey. "Now we will change the picture. See what a pretty one I have next for you. It is called Abram and Lot dividing the land.' (See coloured plate.)



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Noah building the Ark.



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Death of Eli.



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Hebron.



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. and retire ye from him that he may be smitten and die.' "The horrible scheme prospered. Joab was a proud, wicked man, quite ready to do anything to please the king, and he set Uriah in the battle where he was killed. Instead of being ashamed and grieved for his wickedness David sent at once and took Bathsheba, and made her his wife. Is it not a dreadful thought that the holy, loving David became a murderer? The thing which David had done displeased the Lord. How did He show his displeasure ? Did He strike him dead instantly ? "No. He left him alone for a whole year. But during that year we do not hear that David repented and turned to God. We cannot turn our own hearts. All this time David only grew harder and more careless in sin. He thought he had dode it so secretly, so artfully, that nobody except Joab knew, and Joab was away fighting. I wonder whether anybody here has tried to cover up sin. It only brings misery. It is far better when you have been tempted into what is wrong to tell it at once, the longer you put off the harder it will be. A child was one day playing alone in a room full of beautiful ornaments. He had often been told not to touch any of them, as they were made of rare china and cost a great



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. came in with Lot were God-fearing men. It is not singing hymns, and learning texts, and coming to school which will make good Christians of you. Only one kind of religion will last-the religion of trusting in Jesus each for ourselves, and trying to please Him. "Where did I tell you the two angels went to, who left Abraham alone with God ? " Towards Sodom, sir." "Yes, they reached Sodom by the evening; very beautiful the cities must have looked, standing in the rich green valley by the broad waters of the Dead Sea, as the sun set upon them for the last time. A traveller has been there lately, who tells us interesting things about these cities, he says the Dead Sea was once much smaller than it is now, for it has spread southwards over the plain where these cities once stood. There were pits on this plain, and they were full of bitumen; bitumen burns like oil, and the rocks and stones all round were full of bitumen, and such rocks and stones would burn and blaze as coals do when we throw them on a bright fire. 'Now,' says Mr. Porter, most likely the houses and streets of Sodom were built of that stone, and if so when the fire rained down from heaven it would light up the bitumen pits, and kindle the bitumen stone of which



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. For a little time Saul was ashamed of his own baseness in hunting David, and went home, but very soon he returned with his armed host. David would hardly believe it, but sent out spies to see. When he heard Saul was truely there, he came by night and spied the place where the king and his army had pitched their tents, in the valley by the hill of Hachilah. There they lay sleeping under the moonlight in the midst of their carriages, and the soldiers lay all around. Then David suddenly asked his men, who will go down with me into the camp ? Abishai, his nephew, a brave young man, full of daring, cried out, I will go down.' So they stealthily crept down under the shadow of the hill side, and stole their way through the sleeping soldiers till they reached the king's tent. There he lies in the royal tent fast asleep, a spear stuck in the ground at his bolster, and a little cup of water beside him. Abishai burned with revenge. 'God has delivered thine enemy into thy hand this day,' he said. Let me strike him to the earth with the spear; I will not need to strike twice.' But David said, 'Destroy him not, for who can stretch forth his hand against the Lord's anointed, and be guiltless ? God shall smite him, or he will die, or perish in battle. I will



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. 'God hath laid on Him the iniquity of us all.' Tht minute we tell our sins to Jesus, and ask his forgiveness, that minute we are free and pardoned. A poor New Zealander, who was very frightened because of the dreadful sins he had done, fell asleep, and dreamed he was trying to go to heaven, but just before him rose a high, steep mountain, so steep that he tried to climb it in vain; then he sat dowh and wept; but as he wept, a single drop of blood fell from heaven upon the mountain, and it all melted away. When he woke, he said, That mountain was my sins, but Christ's blood has blotted them all away.' "Do you think David cared no more about his sin when he heard God would forgive it ?" Some answered, No," some "Yes," but Mr. Carter thought David had never felt so sorry before. Some of his most beautiful psalms were written at this time,* which show how very very grieved and humbled he was. The fifty-first Psalm is a very good portion to read when our hearts tell us we have been in the wrong about anything. "God forgave David, but he had to suffer the consequences of his sin. Every act we do is like a little Ps. vi., xxii., xxxviii., xxxix., xl., xli., ii., ciii.



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THE DESEET JOURNEY. constantly beaten by those above them in rank, and beaten so cruelly as you would be ashamed to beat an ass. So we read"' The Egyptians made the'children of Israel to serve with rigour: And they made their lives bitter with hard bondage, in mortar and in brick and in all manner of service in the field: all their service wherein they made them serve was with rigour.' "But this was not the worst. The king was afraid of the Israelites, and made a wicked law that all the boy babies should be drowned in the river as soon as they were born. But stay, I have a picture about this; now come, tell me what you see." Many voices joined at once to say, "A little baby," and one of the little ones said, rather sadly, "And look, they are just going to drown it in the water." No," cried another, "that's Moses, and there stands Pharaoh's daughter." "Quite true, my boy, and you shall tell the story." "Please, sir, there was a good woman." "Yes, Joseph, and a good man, too; their names were Jochebed and Amram; and they had two children, Miriam and Aaron, before the cruel law was made to kill the baby-boys, but afterwards God gave them another



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. now, and work.' And he bade the taskmasters give them more work, and make them find their own straw; and the people were more beaten than ever, and groaned against Moses and Aaron, for they were worse off than ever. "Even Moses's heart was ready to fail when his people reproached him; but Moses knew where to go for help. He cried to God, and even with a heart full of fear, he did what God bade him, and went again to Pharaoh. Did the king let them go ?" "Not yet." "What happened ?" God sent the plagues on Egypt, sir." "Who can remember what the plagues were ?" "They had to drink blood instead of water." "And frogs came up out of the river into the houses, even in their beds, and ovens, and kneading-troughs." "And all the dust turned into live lice." "And flies swarmed all over the land." Over all the land ?" No, not where the people of Israel lived." "What next, children ?" "The beasts all fell sick, sir, with the cattle-plague," said Johnny Mole. Poor John he was likely to think of



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. likely to become that ugly character that everybody hates-a tale-bearer. Now, here are my two rules:" 1st. Te2 God, and ask Him to forgive the person that has done wrong, and to make him sorry. 2nd. Tell the person himself when you are alone wilt him. "Don't think of telling any one else before you have done these two things. "However, we must not stop too long about this. Whether Joseph was really a tell-tale, or whether he only tried to keep his brothers out of harm's way, I can't quite say, but they hated him; and one day, when he was comingot to them in the field, they did a cruel thing to him. Who knows what it was ?" They put him in a pit, sir." "Yes; he was but a young fellow-scarcely more than a boy-and these strong, full-grown brothers took hold of him, tore off the gay coat his old father had made him, and threw him down into an empty pit. He begged and prayed them to pity him, but they would not; they sat down to eat their bread. I wonder it did not choke them. By and by some strangers passed by -men with their camels, taking spices down from Gilead into the land of Egypt. It gave Joseph's cruel brothers a thought. 'Do you want to buy a slave ?' they said;



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. cities stood; the sun was-risen, and he could distinguish a thick black cloud of smoke rolling up from the Dead Sea. That cloud covered four burning cities, the cities of the Plain, only one little one was saved, the city of Zoar, which Lot was allowed to shelter in. "Now we have done with Lot, he does not come into our story any more. You remember, don't you, the promise God made to Abraham and Sarah, that they should have a child of their own ? So it happened just as God promised, at the very time he had set for it, a, baby was born. Sarah laughed for gladness, she, was more than ninety years old, and Abraham was a hundred; they were so glad that they gave their baby-boy the name 'Isaac,' which'means 'laughter.' Presently the baby was old enough to be weaned, and Sarah thought so much of her little one that every thing which happened to him was a great occasion to her,,so when Isaac was weaned she and Abraham marked the day by giving a great feast to their household. "While the feast was going on Sarah looked out and there was a boy about fourteen years 'old, who was making very merry, laughing and scoffing because every body thought so much of little Isaac, as to make a feast when he was weaned.



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. "If I tell you the quantity of food provided for the royal household each day you will see they did not starve. How much bread do you think they ate ?" A great many guesses were made, but nobody guessed half enough. Two thousand two 'hundred and twenty gallons of fine flour, and twice that quantity of meal. How much beef and mutton ? "Ah, I see I must tell you. Ten fatted oxen, twenty pasture oxen, and one hundred sheep; besides harts, and roebucks, and fallow deer, and fatted fowls. All these abundant provisions were served up in golden dishes, and all the drinking vessels were of gold. The beautiful pure gold was fetched from the far-off land of Ophir by a fleet of ships which Solomon had built and kept on the shore of the Red Sea "The first use he made of his riches was for the service of God. David his father had had a special wish to build a house for God. In those days there were no churches for the service of God such as we have, there was only a tent, or tabernacle, as it was called. Now David wanted to praise God by building a splendid church or temple where the ark might be kept, and prayer and sacrifices offered. But God told him he must





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BRS IIUIBUL, POBMHBZ ABND ISRAEL'S PIRST KING. fcartfl proi"a N .sy-. Gid did not forget, but gave her a lMtfki eoy; fr ay t er jay! She calld him Samal, whi means asked of God, and she preminF to give him to Gied all the days of his life. Children, have you ever asked anything of God ?" "Yes, sir." I say my prayers every night." "I say tihe prayers mamma taught us." These and many other answers were given. "Oh, I don't mean do you say your prayers; but when you want something, do, you ask God fAr it ?. I will give you an instance. A gentleman once asked a poor lad, 'Do you, pray to God ?' "' No, I don't know how.' "w If I teach you a prayer will you use it ?' "Y* es, but it must be short, for my head is tBlk.' The prayer was very short: Lord help me "' Please sir, will that do for everything? If I am hungry andi eold?' Then tell God, and say, Lord help me.' When they met again Mr. M-asked, 'Did you pray ?' Yes.' "'What did you say?' "' Lord help me, because Mr. Msays you will.'



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THE STORY OF ABRAHAM. A VERY willing party gathered round the, .ext Sunday morning for the "Church in tle. School." Mr. Brown was to be the teacher to-daj instead of Mr. James, and Mr. Brown's little boy Harold was to show the pictures instead of Edith; little Harold was an only child, and the nearer he could keep to his papa the better he liked it. What did you hear about last Sunday, children ?" "Adam and Eve, sir." "Cain and Abel." "Noah." "The ark.". "The raven and the dove." "The rainbow." Such were some of the answers which came readily from the elder children, and the babies made a tolerably successful attempt at lisping the words, often only the last word, after them; while their little fat hands were kept demurely clasped on their knees.



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. That was what Abram did. God kept him waiting for a time. He does not promise to give us what we ask directly, but He never forgets, and when the best time is come, He will give us whatever He has promised. Sarai, Abram's wife, was not quite so ready to wait and to trust God as Abram was. I shall tell you by and by of a plan of hers to find a child for him in another way. You will see it did not answer very well; but now we are going to see what is happening to Lot, in the wicked cities where he chose to dwell. We don't hear in Genesis how Lot felt when he was living in Sodom, but God tells us all about it nearly two thousand years after Lot was dead and buried, for, you know, children, though we may forget what we have said and what we have done, and how we have felt, it is all just as fresh to the great God as when it first happened. He forgets nothing. God tells us Lot had a very poor time of it in those cities; no comfort at all. Lot really feared God, and it made him miserable to see every one round him so, wicked; he could hot help seeing and hearing things which were always vexing him, and his children seem to have been very little better than the rest. "Lot was miserable because he feared God too much



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God's Promise to Abraham.-Gen. xv. 5.



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE--JOSEPH THE RULER. Now, therefore, be not grieved nor angry with yourselves that ye sold me hither, for God did send me before you to preserve life.' Was not that a kind way of putting it? Just acting out the rule, you know, 'Love as brethren; be pitiful; be courteous.' Dear children, if you would act like Joseph when a schoolfellow, or a brother or sister, has been unkind, and has done you harm-if you would forgive, and put the best face on it, what happy homes yours would be I "Joseph's kindness quite overcame them. He kissed them all, and wept upon them. After that they got courage, and talked with him. Now, little boys and girls, listen to me. You are only little children. You have very little strength, very little money, very little wisdom; but there is one thing you can have much of, and that one thing makes more happiness and is more worth than all the rest-you can have much love. Look at Joseph. He was almost a king for greatness; he lived in a palace; horses and servants waited to do his bidding; but I am sure Joseph had never had such a happy day since Pharaoh raised him to all this power and riches, as the day when he took his brothers to his heart, and wept over them, and said, 'I am Joseph, your brother.'



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. had a very special meaning, only he could not tell what it was; and though he called together all the wise men of Egypt, and the wisest men in the world were to be found in Egypt then, yet none of them could see the sense of this dream, or tell what it meant. "When Joseph came in, Pharaoh the great king of Egypt spoke to him, and said, I hear you can tell what dreams mean, and I have had one that I want to have explained.' Joseph was not proud or set up when the king spoke so to him; he said,' It is not in me, God shall give Pharaoh an answer of peace.' Then Pharaoh told the dream, and a very strange one it was. I am sure it would have puzzled you, but God made quite clear to Joseph what it meant, and he told the king. He said God was going for seven years to send very good harvests, there would be much more corn than people would want to eat; but after those seven years 'of plenty would come seven years of terrible famine. 'Now,' said Joseph, 'while the good years last, let Pharaoh set a man over all Egypt, who can lay by in store the corn which is not wanted, that when the famine comes, the people may not be starved.' Pharaoh thought this was very wise advice, and he could think of no one more fit to set over all Egypt than Joseph, I think I



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. out. It was to have three stories in it, and God told him the exact size, how long, how broad it was to be. It was to be so large, because God wished to save alive some of each kind of animal which He had made,, a well as Noah and his family. "Noah heard the words and believed than ; he was quite sure God meant what He said, quite sre the flood was really coming, and that the only-way to be saa was to build the ark and take shelter ia it. S.imi this pictnre you see good Noah very busy taiSoe the workena what they are to do; the ark is beaginma to) look, you se, like a Wg j,, anmd to rise lk aWJlB tnh ground. "WtQT 1 yu oiek the wkall people in to wVrld "Isew seom on 'em makin' game there behin Mir." "ih tebr are, Jemmny, just as peop ma &er ime now oftAwhe who are in ummet abcaa tUi weals, and say, What must I do to be saved ? For the most psart, however, people paid very little attention toe what loah was doing, they were full of other things; the Lovr Jesus tells us, 'They were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, and knew not till the flood came and took them all away.' * Matt. xxiv. 38, 39.



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET, AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. "Was not Amalek a son of Esau ?" "Didn't the Amalekites fight with the people in the wilderness ?" Yes. If you turn to Exod. xvii., you read, after the # story of the battle, verse 14, Write this for a memorial in a book, for I will utterly put out the remembrance of Amalek from under heaven.' That was four hundred years before, but God's words always come true in the end. Wicked people often fancy they will get off, if they are not punished immediately, but they make a great mistake. Sometimes people are not punished on earth, but there is a great reckoning book kept by God, and every sin is marked down there, and will be punished if it is not blotted out in the pardoning blood of Jesus. Saul went, as he was told, to destroy the Amalekites, but he spared Agag, their king, and the best of the cattle, and all that was good, and would not utterly destroy them, he only destroyed everything that was vile and refuse. This was only half obedience; God will have whole obedience, and He was angry, and sent Samuel down to reprove Saul. As Samuel drew near, he heard the bleating of the sheep and lowing of the cattle, which should all have been destroyed, but Saul



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.r. BHAW & Lco, FATRBOStENi ROW. E TON, BRO. NOAH'S SACRIFICE AFTER THE DELUGE.



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. Web, Ben, what is it P" Brother Tom, he had luck out in Australy last year, he found a iamp in his lotI worth ever such a deal." He was glad, wasn't he, Ben ?" "I believe he was, sir; so was father, for he sent him a note on it." "I once heard of a man, children, who was too glad. He had dug, and dug, and dug in his lot, lengthways and across and all ways, till he almost lost heart, for he found nothing, not a grain. Once he got up before day and went to work again. He thought he'd give it a last chance. In the morning his neighbours missed him. When they reached the lots they found him at the bottom of his4 sitting in the hole he had dug, and before him was such a ig hmnp of gold as none of them had found yet; but the poor fellow was none the better for it, for he sat mowing at it with an idiot laugh-the joy had taken away his sense. It's a better kind of joy than that we get from God's Word. David says, I rejoice at thy word as one that findeth great spoil,' and he says, I love thy commandments above gold, yea above fine gold.'" Does any one remember another verse which tells how David prized his Bible ?"



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.THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET, AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. fulness, or sille ess'? :-Baul couldn't bear himself. Then his servants begged him to send for the young shepherd withajoakeous power in playing his harp, that he might chai isaway -Saul's trouble; and so it was, that when Dai[kllayed Saul was refreshed and got well, and the eyW'pirit.went away. "UItthikyou can tell me the next thing we hear of David, even the little ones know the story of Goliath. Try to tell it me." Little Alice and'IFreddy, and some twenty otherlittle people, looked first .at each other, and then at Mr. iBaxter. A few looked very shy,iand one or two laughed, Ltit tittleAlice spoke up so clearly, the others soon joined i3,adawith t a little prompting told the whole beautiful Mr. 1Baxter ,rewarded (them by showing them the 3Mture of the young giant-killer, as h&estafted-with only :histiyg in hand togo forth against the terrible Philistine((see c6loured*pitwB e). ""Do yyou msee'those toio tiig together within the teft-? tit ils :Saal kaWi MAbner, his chief captain, "'Whose son is this youth?' But Abner didn't know. And the king said, 'Inquire whose son the stripling is.' So when David returned from the slaughter of the 'A



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. of the Lord, 'He hath made with me an everlasting covenant, ordered in all things and sure, for this is all my salvation and all my desire.' Resting on that sure promise David fell asleep in God. "Now let us see how Solomon fulfilled his father's dying charge. W6 read he loved the Lord and walked in the statutes of David, and one of his first public acts "was an act of solemn worship before God, for he went to Gibeon and offered up a thousand sacrifices there. That same night as he slept he saw a glorious dream; the Lord appeared unto him and said, Ask what I shall give thee.' "What a wonderful privilege You think it a treat, Isabel, to choose your birthday gift from grandpapa; what must it have been to hear God say, Ask what I shall give thee.'" Little Ellen Myer's heart was very full, and she could not help saying, "I wish I might ask what I like; but I have nowhere to go to pray." "You may, dear child. God loves you, and will listen to your prayer from the garret in St. Ann's Court as He listened to Solomon at the High Altar at Gibeon. I can tell you of a strange place from which prayer once rose to God. A poor little chimney-sweeper, only ten years



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET, AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. "Then Saul removed him out of the palace and made him a captain of war, and promised David should marry his daughter, if he would kill a hundred Philistines. Secretly Saul hoped David would be killed in fighting, but God kept him, and he returned after slaying two hundred Philistines, and claimed his wife, the young Michal, who had loved him, perhaps, ever since she first heard his music. I think he loved her too, for when' he went to fight Goliath, he had dwelt on the, promise that he should have the king's daughter as his 'Tewari. Fresh war with the Philistines,aad :fresh victories of David, roused -tauls anger agai, a'id again'he tried to strike David with ihis javeliin; wthsn ihe failed, he thought of a -surer vway ;rf satisfyi g iiis ,matiee. iHe sent messengers .to watch all round 'David-s imse at night andlidllhim in theearly morning, ere iythbrake. But Midal ;fonad .at tthe wicked 'scheme; -the lbegged David too flee, zaadl ikt 1him i iown ttfrouh z a wa ;ow; and :-hen--*e raessengers eame ,.to &eise Davld, Aere was ,an 'iage in the bed, wihich sheihai dresedw unp with a pillow of goat'a !hair, anidDavid r easifr away, taking-'rfuge with Samuel, the oldiprtqaet,.in Naioth. "-Should you like to peep into TDavid's heart as he fled away through the dark .night from his angry *11



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-1 ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. a good old age, one hundred and eighty years, five years more than Abraham. You see bodies were not put in coffins then, but wound round in cloths, and laid to rest in caves. Abraham and Isaac were buried in the cave of Machpelah."



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Noah coming out of the Ark Noa coingoutof he rk



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. seed. If you sowed a thistle seed, what plant would come ?" "A thistle." "And just as surely trouble will come from sin as thistles from thistle-down. The first trouble that came on David was the death of his and Bathsheba's little baby. God would not allow it to live; and though David wept and prayed, the little baby died. "The next trouble which befell David was a much sorer one. "One of his sons was very beautiful, can you tell me his name ?" "Absalom." "In all Israel there was no one so beautiful; from head to foot he had not one blemish, and his hair was so long and heavy, that he was obliged to have it cut every year, because he could not bear the weight, it weighed over two pounds. 4 Beauty like that is often a great snare. Sometimes pretty children are so conceited, and give themselves such airs, that they are quite unbearable. "Though Absalom's face was so handsome, his heart was full of hateful, ugly tempers; he was revengeful and artful, and nursed up malice in his heart. He had a 12



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. thought go to sleep in his heart, and at last he was able to answer the question, Where shall I go?' for he could say, 'I desire to depart and be with Christ, which is far better.' Well, children, as I said, I can tell you very little of what happened in many hundreds of years; but this I must tell you, men became more and more wicked. 'The wickedness of man,' the Bible says, was great in the earth,' and God saw that 'every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually.' God could not let things go on so; it would not have been for his honour. If I always found this school in an uproar, noise, quarrelling, disobedience, I should say the school had a poor sort of master, for he could not keep it in order. Besides, God hates sin, and though He is very patient for a long time with sinners, He will punish them at last. "So God said, 'I will destroy man, whom I have created, from the face of the earth; I even I do bring a flood of waters upon the earth, to destroy all flesh, wherein is the breath of life, from under heaven, and every thing that is in the earth shall die.' "Not quite all though. God looks not only at all this school, but at each child in it. God looked not only at



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. ham would try to cheer Isaac by reminding him of God's promise, and we know Isaac submitted patiently, trusting God and trusting his father. So the altar was built, and Isaac was bound and laid on it. All was ready, and Abraham took the knife to slay his son. "Did he kill him, children ?" "No, sir." "What stopped him ?" God called to him out of heaven." "Can any one tell me the words ? Find them and read them, Harold." "'And the angel of the Lord called unto him out of heaven, and said, Abraham, Abraham: and he said, Here I am. And He said, Lay not thine hand upon the lad, neither do thou anything unto him: for now I know that thou fearest God, seeing thou hast not withheld thy son, thine only son.' " I don't think I need tell you, children, what a joyful moment that was-joyful for Isaac, who was waiting for the sharp plunge of the knife, but most of all joyful for Abraham. With what trembling, eager hands, he would undo the cords which had bound Isaac, and throw his arms round his son. It would have been joy to have received him back from the dead, but how much more to



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ABRAHAM -AND ISAAC. But, oh, it was a hard trial; and as they climbed the steep mountain-side, I think Abraham must have been thinking, What can I say to Isaac ? How can I explain it to him ? 'How can I show him it is God's will, and must be done ? And then he would look at his right hand, and at the terrible knife, and think, 'Must this hand raise this knife, and plunge it in the heart of my only child ?' "Perhaps Isaac thought his father was very silent, and there was a question he wanted to ask him. He was carrying the wood, Abraham had the knife and the fire, but where was the lamb? Some animal was always slain on God's altar-where was it ? 'My father,' said Isaac, 'where is the lamb ?' Could Abraham say, 'My son, you are to be the lamb ?' Not quite yet. There was a little more of the mountain to climb. They were not quite come to the place where Isaac must be told, so Abraham said, 'My son, God will provide Himself a lamb.' But the time and the place were drawing very near, and at last Abraham had to tell his son that he must be bound on God's altar, and die by his own father's hand in his first days of bright young manhood. The Bible leaves us to picture, those words. We know how Abra-



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. sack, and the steward searched in them one by one, beginning with the eldest. "You know whose sack the cup was found in. Here is a picture of the search. The steward has just pulled the cup out of Benjamin's sack, and poor young Benjamin is wringing his hands, and saying he never touched the cup, nor thought of carrying it away in his sack. "Now came the time for Judah's suretyship. The steward brought them all, back to Joseph, and Joseph said Benjamin must stay behind, and be his servant for having taken his cup. Then Judah spoke out, and told all about old Jacob, their father; how Benjamin was the darling of his old age; how unwilling he had been to let him come; and how, if they went back without him, old Jacob would break his heart and die. Then he said, Let me stay; let me be the slave instead, and let Benjamin go back to his father.' "Joseph listened till he could bear it no longer. His heart was ready to burst. Leave me alone with these men. Let every one else go out.' Almost before the place was cleared, he broke out into loud iweeping. 'I am Joseph,' he said. Doth my father yet live ?' They could not answer him. 'I am Joseph, your brother,' he said again, 'whom ye sold into Egypt.



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3 THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. it to mother, for she had no shoes either; and I thought I could g6 barefoot better than she.' Don't you think that little boy understood what it meant to honour his mother ?" Mr. Carter stopped speaking a little, that the children might be refreshed by marching round, and singing one or two favourite hymns, and then he promised to tell them stories about another son of David, whom they would like better than Absalom. When they gathered again round the desk, there was a new picture. What do you see ?" An old man lying in bed, and a young man sitting by him, listening; they look very serious." That old man is David on his dying bed. He has had many troubles since Absalom's death, battles and sorrows of many kinds, and now he is going home to God, and he is giving his last charge to Solomon. I promised to tell you something about Solomon. After the death of Bathsheba's baby, God gave the mother another child, whom they called Solomon, and God loved that little babe, and blessed him, and David promised he should be king after him. David had reigned a long while, forty years, but now be was an old



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i: i ,, i d Icen a =3ii Isaac lesdngJacob



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. So Charley came quite close and spelled"H, e, b, r, o, n, Hebronm" Then the elder children looked rather blank; they could have told plenty of stories about Bethlehem, or Jerusalem, but they could think of nothing about Hebron. I see I must help you out, children. Long years ago, before these stone walls were built, a stranger from a far land came and dwelt 'in the plains of Mamre, which is Hebron.' I fancy I see him now, with his flocks of sheep, and herds, and camels, and his servants busy pitching tents around, while their master's first care was to build an altar to the Lord. What was his name ?" "Abraham." "It was in those plains, which you see at the foot of yon distant hills, that three angels appeared to Abraham and promised him a son, and foretold the destruction of Sodom. And it was there that Abraham came, some twenty-six years after, to mourn the death of Sarah his wife and to bury her in the field of Ephron, which was before Mamre. It was here, too, that the spies cut down the famous branch of grapes from beside the little brook Eschol. That was more than three thousand years ago, but the land is still as rich. When a friend of mine, Dr. Keith, visited it in 1839 he saw some Jews cut down a



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**1----------------" THE DESEBR JOURNEY. lonely journey. When you are afraid to be alone, try to remember the unseen God is close beside you. At last Moses reached the land of Midian, and sat down on a well to rest. This evening seven sisters all came together to draw water for their father's flock; but as soon as they filled the trough, other shepherds came and rudely drove them away. Then Moses stood up and helped them; and their father, grateful for his kindness, invited the stranger to partake of his hospitality. Moses was glad to live with them, and he married one of the sisters, and kept the flock of his father-in-law Jethro. Moses lived in this quiet, lonely place forty years. Do you think he forgot his people Israel toiling in Egypt? No; all these many years he felt himself a stranger in a strange land, and when God gave him a baby boy, he called him Gershom, which means a stranger here. Some one else had not forgotten too. The eye of the great God looked upon the children of Israel, and He remembered his promise. One day Moses led his flock to the back-side of one of the steep mountains of Horeb, where there is a little sheltered valley, with shrubs and grass; and suddenly the angel of the Lord appeared to him in a blaze of fire



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Le Ii Joseph's Coat brought to Jacob. 6



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. God on this dark night, with the stars shining above him, he told God this trouble, 'I go childless,' he said, 'and when I die all my riches must go to my servant, because I have no son.' "Ah, when we come with our troubles to God, we take the right way to get rid of them. How often you run crying to your mothers when you are sad or in pain. Kind mothers pity and love their children, but they can't always take away the pain and the trouble; it is only God who finds nothing impossible. God found a way for Abram out of his trouble, and promised him a son of his very own. He told Abram to look up. In that country there are very few clouds in the sky, the stars look brighter and clearer, like little lamps hung in the blue heaven. On this night the heavens were full of stars. God asked Abram if he could count them ? No, they were too many to be counted. Then God said, 'Your seed' (that means, those who are born from your children and grandchildren) 'shall be like the stars,' too many to be counted. "Somebody was once asked, 'What is faith?' and the answer that person made was, 'Faith is to take God at his word,' to think God means what He says, and so to be:glad when He promises us something we wishfor.



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STHE CREATION AND DELUGE. Edith had an answer on her lips, but she waited for -t1e others till Mr. James looked to her to give it, then she "aid, The law of thy mouth is better unto me than ousands of gold and silver." l' I. wonder how many little boys and girls in this school 2 ize God's Word and count it precious as David did. In iBese days when Bibles can be had for a few pence, and ischools are full of them, and most children have their .own Bible, we are very apt to think of God's Word. as if K it was a common book, and to forget that it is unlike all Uther books, because it is God's message to us, telling us what He thinks, and what He will do, and how He feels tbwards us. By this time the tramp of feet outside the school door Igave warning that the elder children were come back ofn church. Mr. James asked the little ones how they iadliked church in the school," and whether they wished r it again next Sunday? If their tongues had been 6ent, he would have been quite content to take his ,swer from their eyes. "/



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. "Was Joseph a good son as well as a good brother ? Had he forgotten his old father Jacob ?" "He sent for him, sir, to come and see him in Egypt." Yes, I can show you a picture about it. (See coloured plate.) Joseph and his father are standing in the middle, S and the old man is saying that he could be content to die 'now, because he has seen his dear son Joseph once more. 'Joseph's chariot and servants stand on one side, and on the other are all the fathers and mothers and little chili i dren who made up the families of Jacob's sons. Children, does Joseph remind you of any one ? "Many things about Joseph remind me of our Lord Jesus. He was 'his father's well beloved son; he was sold for money; he was unjustly accused; he went before Shis brethren to sit at God's right hand in heaven; he i knows them and loves them, and pities and forgives them; She sends for them to come'and live with him and share his | riches. We cannot help loving Joseph though he lived so Slongago, and never knew anything about you and me. How much more we should love the Lord Jesus, who cares : : for each one of us, and gave his own life that He might Ssave us. When Mr. Fawcett glanced round at the gefitle loving



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET, AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. "It was a sad meeting in that pleasant field; the sun shone on heavy hearts. At a signal agreed upon, David came out of his hiding place, and the two friends kissed each other and wept. You see them in the picture, they are making a solemn covenant of peace and love together. "From the time David parted with Jonathan in the field (probably in the little retired valley between Nob and Gibeah), he led a wandering, hunted life. Saul continually pursued him with armed men, trying to kill him. First he fled to Nob, a small city on a hill near by, where some of the priests lived, but a wicked man, Doeg, spied him out, and told Saul, and Saul, in his rage, because David had escaped, killed all the priests in cold blood; eighty-five priests, beside all the people who lived in the town, a'nd the very beasts of the field. Only one of the priests escaped and fled after David. Then for a little time he took refuge with Achish, king of Gath, but I do'not think he felt happy or safe with those Philistines, they were the enemies of God, they could not be his friends. So David fled away again, and this time he sheltered in the large cave of Adullam. It is a place where many men might shelter; an underground passage runs in by long, narrow, winding ways,



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The finding of Moses, I1



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET AND ISRAELS FIRST KING. dost thou pursue afterthrssevanttp? What harm have I done ?'. David neverrfd& owa moment f6rgot the respect due to Saul as his king, bnt he would not trusts himself to him. He answered the king's false promises, Iwill no more do thee harm,' byythe calm assurance of his trust in a higher power. 'TiUeLord render to every man his righteousness. Letritma daliver me out of all triiulation.' Amdi Saul himself was constrained to answer, 'Blessed; be thouy,my son iDavid". Thou shalt both do great things. and also shalt still prevail.' "Twileday of whih. David spoke to Abishai was near at hand.. God often delays to punish; He never forgets. "We hae .seen Saul's ddwnward course, all beginning from one acttofi disobedience; now we are going to see his dreadfii lend.. '"MAeady the hosts of the Philistines were gathering togethbr, ,and they came and pitched in Shunem, probably at thwfooit of the hill of Moreh. Saul, too, gathered all Israel togethe on the opposite heights of the rocky Gilboa., Looling down on his enemies below, conscience made a;coward of him, and 'he was afraid, and his heart greatly brembled.' Now in the hour of danger fear drove him to seek God, but God did not answer him.



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THE CRBEATION AND DELUGE. not knew, ltfle reader, whic hynm I call "Hosanna." I wa write id out fWr u. "When, ii salvationbainging, To. Mim asmeam,, 'iieichildren alli stode singiag Hosanna, tn&funan Nor did eir ezea ofald iinm, Bun as He rode along, He lbt them still atteudlHim, And smiled to heai-tfilr song. Hasanna to Jenisthey sing. And since tita Lord retaineth His love wo children stil Though nowa King Ea reigneth ft Zion's liok hill, We'll flock amrond his bamnne Wlio. sits upon the throne, And, cry alond' i ELaOMa, To David's roya Sn. Hosanna to asus we'll aing. For shoulwat e B roclaiming! Our gpsA BtBeemer's praise, Ths-am mre silence shaming, Weuiitfltiarhosannaa raia Bi afiaMli'we onLy render The tribute of our words No while our hearts are tender, They too shall be the Lord's. Hosanna to Jesus our King.



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The Garden of Eden.



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ARRAHAM AND ISAAC. go; but they said, Oh, let us go father, we'll take care of ourselves, we won't get into any mischief.' Well, so it went on. He did not say Yu shan't go,' and he did not say You may go,' he kept hoping they would think better of it. At last the day before the fair he found they all meant to go, and he was troubled. When that old farmer had a doubt or a trouble he looked into the Bible for advice and comfort. Now it so happened that this time he turned to the eighteenth chapter of Genesis, and the verse that caught his eye was4 I know Abraham that he will command his children and household after him.' "' Ah said he, 'that's where I was wrong. I advised them. I should have come Abraham" over them, and commanded them.' So the next morning he read this chapter at prayers, and showed them how it was his duty to command them to keep out of harm's way, and their duty to obey. He forbade any one of them to go to the fair. They all obeyed, and he told a friend afterwards, 'I never had any trouble after I learned to "come Abraham over them.' "I have told you this story to help you to obey cheerfully when you are told to do what you don't like. Now let us hear what the Lord had to tell Abraham.



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. and see his own sin, so he told it David as if it was of another man; and when the king was full of anger against this murderer, Nathan said, 'Thou art the man.' And then conscience spoke too, that inward voice which David had so long refused to hear, and in deep and bitter sorrow David-said, I have sinned,' not against Uriah, not against Bathsheba, but 'against the Lord.' what was the answer ? "The Lord also hath put away thy sin, thou shalt not die." Directly he confessed, God forgave freely and fully. Who can tell me texts which show how ready God is to pardon ?" "' Thou art a God ready to pardon."* "'The blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin.'t "' If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins.' + These and many, many other texts were given, and Mr. Carter asked the children tb write them out for him. Unforgiven sin is like a heavy load hung round the neck; it can sink us to hell, but thp Lord Jesus bids us cast that weight on Him, and get rid of it altogether. "* Neh. ix. 17. t 1 John i. 7. .1 John i. 9.



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. "You may think Sarah was not very well pleased to hear him, but who was that boy ? I told you Sarah did not quite believe God would give her a child, and she made a plan to get a son for Abraham in another way. 'My maid, Hagar,' she said to her husband, 'shall be your wife; perhaps she will have a child.' Hagar did have a child, and till Isaac was born he was Abraham's only son, but this was not the son God meant, or God promised, when he said 'in thy seed shall all nations of the earth be blessed.' Hagar's son was called Ishmael. It was hard upon Ishmael to see the little baby so much more thought of than he was; and Sarah thought it would not do to bring the two boys up together-perhaps Ishmael would do her little Isaac some harm. She asked Abraham to send Hagar and Ishmael both away to live somewhere else. Abraham felt very grieved, for he loved his bold boy Ishmael, and did not like to part with him; but God told him Sarah was right, and that it was the best thing to do. When once Abraham heard God's voice telling him to do anything, he never stopped to consider whether it was pleasant or not; so the very next morning he rose up early, and sent



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. not touch him.' As he spoke David himself grasped the spear, and took the cruse of water, and said, 'Now let us go.' How was it that not one of those thousands woke and caught the intruders ? Because a deep sleep from God was over them; an invisible shield was held by an Almighty hand between his faithful servant and the dangers which surrounded him. Well might David singFear Him, ye saints, and you shall then Have nothing else to fear. "As soon as they got safely out of the camp they climbed the opposite hill, and stood on the top, and shouted to Saul's captain as loud as they could shout, Abner !' Rousing out of sleep, he said, Whp art thou that criest ?' Then David laughed at him, Art thou not a valiant man, nobody like you in Israel ? Then why did you not defend the king, for there came some one in to destroy him? Look, where is his spear and crase of water?' Saul heard that voice and knew it, and the same tones whose music in days gone by had chased the evil spirit which tormented him, now awoke the bitterest shame and remorse. For a moment better feelings returned, as he asked, Is this thy voice, my son David ?' And David replied, It is my lord, O king. Wherefore



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. own, but year by year she was disappointed. I suppose Peninnah was jealous of her being the favourite, and instead of comforting her under her disappointment she gloried over her, because she had many children, and -she worried and provoked her, till between the disappointment and fretting, Hannah felt so sick at heart, she could not eat even the dainty portions with which her husband tried to tempt her. Hannah never told tales of Peninnah to their husband, so he did not know above half her trouble, and asked why she cried so, and could not eat. But there was One to whom she told it all. When the family went up to worship in God's house of prayer, Hannah eased her full bitter heart, by pouring out all her trouble before God. She stood and prayed so long to herself without speaking aloud that Eli, the old priest, who watched her lips move, and saw her eyes red and swelled with crying, thought she was drunken, and scolded her. "Poor Hannah! it was hard to be mistaken for a drunkard, but she explained her trouble very gently and humbly. Then Eli cheered her by telling her God would hear her, and give her what she wanted. She never questioned, but believed him at once, and was no more sad, but ate and drank, and went away full of joy to wait



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. done when he heard footsteps. A beautiful young girl was coming up to the well. She had such a sweet pleasant look that Eliezer thought how glad he should be if she answered to the sign. -He ran to meet her, and said,' Let me, I pray thee, drink a little water of thy pitcher.' "Young Rebekah did not know how happy she made Eliezer when she answered in her sweet pleasant voice, Drink, my lord,' letting down the pitcher on her hand, as you see; and as soon as he had done drinking went on to say,' I will draw water for thy camels also till they have done drinking.' Children, God answers prayer. Sometimes, as in this case with Eliezer, He answers it very soon; but He always answers it sooner or later, and gives us either the very thing we have asked for or something else which will make us still happier. A good man at the end of a long life, who had prayed to God ever since he was a boy, said on his dying bed, No prayer is lost, every prayer lives.' Ah! there are the steps at the door. I must pass over a story I wished to tell you of Isaac's son Jacob. You may take one last look at Isaac, when his sons Esau and Jacob were carrying him to his funeral. He lived to



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THE STORY OF ADAM AND EVE. COME with me, little readers, into a small room at the back of a London house. It looks like a study; there are shelves all round, and they are filled, not with the gay books you are fond of-red, blue, and green covers, and plenty of pictures inside-but with grave old books, closely printed, in dusky leather bindings. There is a writing-table in the middle of throom, and a well-used desk upon it, andmanuscripts under charge of some paper weights; but you are not looking at these, I see, but at the kind, pleasant face of a gentleman who has drawn up his study chair to the table, and who is sitting with his head in his hand, as if he had something to consider. So he has, and I will tell you about it, for itconcerns children like you; but I must begin by explaining who he is.



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F" I Mesa breaking the Tables. 8



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The Deluge.



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THE STORY OF JOSEPRI MP. FAWCETT, the third gentleman who had promised Mr. Shepherd to feed his lambs during mornin* service, was much younger than Mr. James or Brown. He had no children of his own, but lived with his father and mother. There was not a child in the school, however, but loved Mr. Fawcett. Shall I tell you why Because he loved them. He had a class on Sunday, but that was only a small part of what he saw of them, for on week. day evenings, when other young men might be taking a ride, or smoking a cigar, or reading a novel, Mr. Fawcett was out and about in the houses where the children lived; some he helped on with their lessons, to others he took a few seeds in a little flower-pot, and taught them how to tend the plant. Mr. Fawcett's sisters saved up all theirold toys and games for any who were sick. This morning when he came to take his class, there



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET, AND ISRAEL'S FIRST K1NG. tines had attacked Keilah, and were robbing tl4 corn; with true courage he and his little band of men set off to fight them, but he did not forget to ask first counsel of God. Oh, how successful we should always be in all we do if, like David, we asked God first about everything. "David saved Keilah, but Saul heard he was there, and came after him; then David fled to the wilderness, and Saul sought him every day, but God took care of him. Once when David was going round one side of the mountain, Saul and his men were going round the other, but just as he came close upon David, Saul was called off by a messenger, saying, Haste thee, and come, for the Philistines have invaded the land.' "As soon as he returned from the Philistines, Saul took three thousand picked men to go and destroy David. He .was now in the wilderness of Engedi, amongst the rocks where the wild goats lived, a rough, craggy part, full of holes and corners. Now it so happened one day that David and his men had hidden themselves in the sides of a large cave, when Saul came in to get a little rest. I suppose he must have gone to sleep, for David's men said to him, 'Now, now is your time, now you may kill Saul; don't you see God has put him into your hand ?'



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THE DE2ERT JOURNEY. these rocks; tufted palm trees and fragrant flowers grow there; the pomegranate, and fig, and acacia, form shady : groves, and tempt you with their delicious fruits; water.springs gush around you, and a stream flows six miles into the desert below. Very wonderful writing has been found graven on the rocks around, and one learned traveller thinks he has found out what it means. I will read you one or two sentences out of many:"'The people the hard stone satiates with water, thirsting.' The hard rock, water, a great miracle.' S" 'The people in the waterless desert, swill, drinking again and again. The people, a roarer, the water flowing in the desert drink like the camel in one long draught.' "It was in the rocky desert near by, that God gave His solemn laws. Moses gathered all the people below, and there were thunders and lightnings, and a thick cloud upon the mountain, and the voice of a trumpet so very loud, that all the people trembled, and Mount Sinai was altogether in a smoke, because the Lord descended upon it in fire; and the whole mount quaked greatly, and God Himself spoke with them from heaven, and gave the ten commandments in the hearing of all the people. Even Moses -trembled with fear, and the people dared not



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. weaker than Aiaian, and more easily persuaded. You would run awayfrom a serpent if it came near you; but you know none of God's creatures were hurtful then; so when Eve saw this serpent winding in graceful folds round the forbidden tree, she was not afraid. Perhaps she stopped to admire the shining colours on its beautiful skin. "It began to speak. I wonder that did not put her on her guard, for she had never heard speech before from an animal; but perhaps she only thought it was some new wonder God had made. "They were artful words that Satan spoke to Eve; the meaning of them came to this :-' God is not such a very kind friend to you after all. He forbids you to eat of this tree, though He knows you would be much wiser and happier for eating. You had better try and see.' "You know how it was, children. Eve believed Satan, and plucked the fruit and ate it, and gave some of it toAdam, who ate it too. Then God's words came true, In the day that thou eatest thereof, thou shalt surely die.' Not that their bodies died that very day, but the joy died out of their hearts, and sin came in instead; with sin came sadness, and sorrow, and pain, and at last death. "God punished Adam by cursing the ground for his



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. is a temple not made with hands eternal in the heavens; a greater than Solomon fills that house with his glory, and you may be amongst the white-robed host who praise Him with golden harps, if only now you are washed in the blood of the Lamb."



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.JOSEPH 'THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULEE. SSome said "No," some "Yes." Mr. Fawcett exS plained that there were four mothers, Leah had six sons, and the other three, two each; but he told the children, .Rachel, the pretty young shepherdess that Jacob loved first, was always his favourite wife, and after she died, her children, Joseph and Benjamin, were Jacob's favourite children, specially Joseph. "Do you know anything i about how Joseph was dressed ?" Jacob made him a coat of many colours." S"What did his brothers say to that ?" ""l They couldn't bear him, because he was the pet, and told tales." "Is it wrong to tell tales ?" "Yes, sir," came from all as with one voice. "School children mostly agree about that, and the Bible says, Thou shalt not go up and down as a tale-bearer "among the people;' but I am not so sure that the Bible Sand school children would agree as to what tale-bearing really is. Now, look here, suppose I've got a shilling in my O cket loose; I take my handkerchief out, and draw out "the shilling; I don't hear it, for it rolls on the matting, O'i d no one sees it but, we'll say, Sam Carter and Tom Jones, it rolls between them. Tom puts out his foot on Sthe sly and covers the shilling, then he makes as if he



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Jacob's covenant with Laban.-Gen. xxxi. 43-55-



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. he heard the cry and the tumult, and asked what it meant. Then the man came hastily and told Eli, I fled to-day out of the army.' "' What is there done, my son ?' "' Israel is fled before the Philistines, and there hath been a great slaughter among the people; thy two sons also are dead, and the ark of God is taken.' When he made mention of the ark of God Eli fell off the seat backward by the side of the gate, and his neck brake and be died. "After Eli's death Samuel judged the people of Israel, and he made them put away their strange gods, and repent and turn to God, and then God forgave them and subdued their enemies, and they set up a great stone which they called Eben-ezer, the stone of help, in remembrance of that day (1 Sam. vii). Many long years Samuel ruled over Israel, but when he grew old his sons did not walk in his ways. Very often the Bible teaches us that the children of holy parents are not always good. The Israelites did not ask God to appoint them another judge after Samuel, but asked for a king that they might be'like the other nations. How many wrong things even little boys and girls do because they want to be like others / f



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1 THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. ""Sanamel wael te pewle ieir 1king would biag trmW6 e t^ iaw b at ihd wonld laa e fih row way; so oike Lord said to sAi wal n 'hain t ticr Vwin and mauke them a linig. There was za dvigwy o1f a tbe frbe of Beojaain safled Kis, and he lhad a sjma, scmine yonlg man, whose name was Saul. One day Ki lost his asses, and he told Saul to go with a servant .ad i k after tihm. You know how troublesome they are to catclh and a royal hunt 1Saul had all up and down the (com# oy for three days witbout finding them. At last he saitbo his aervant, Come, let us return; lest my father leave raiBg for the asses and take thought for us.' The -erxaAt diA not want to go back without them, and he mnemenmbers that in the city where they are there is a anm of God. Let us go there; perhaps he can show us or way.' So they set off to find the prophet. They met some y4aug maidens who could chatter as fast as some of our little girls" (Mr. Baxter gave a sly look at Emima Jadson), "and from them they learned there was to be a public sacrifice, and Samuel would come to it; and they just met him on the way. Perlbaps you would have called this a happy chance, but there is no such thing as chance. God had ordered it, and told Samuel that just at this time he would send



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The death of Absalom. 0



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David sparing Saul.



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THE STORY OF MOSES. iv waM noe>a plaat wa-y by which Jamip Carter and V1s siesrBtw to: sclhool; *te inarrw streets which led ot -Couit to St. Mary's School passed some of the busiest and dirtiest thoroughfares in London, and yet, s Jamie said to his sister, "there seemed a Sunday *ling about the air." The noisy crowd of Sabbathbeakers had been drafted away to other places; a heavy h uner-storm the night before had cleared the sultry :iir ah the fresh breeze which drove along some white Sleas over their heads found its way even into the Ssawest streets and dirtiest corners. i UJttle Annie looked up quite merrily as sne answered *:ther, "Yes, Jamie, and the ugly smoke cannot Sa., ose bright clouds to spoil them." Sseewas something else to make the children glad. This very week they had been promised theiryearly treat,



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. courage of a lion, till he gathers all Israel together to help. Then secretly Hushai sends a message to David to escape quickly beyond Jordan. Do you see him, children ? (See coloured picture.) How tired and sad he looks, leaning wearily on his staff. As he sits down by the river side to rest awhile, a wounded deer comes by to drink; gasping with heat and haste it' plunges into the cool waters, quenches its thirst, and escapes its pursuers. Then David breaks out in the words of that beautiful Psalm you have often heard, As the hart panteth after the water-brooks, so panteth my soul after Thee, 0 God. My soul thirsteth for God.' David felt the bitterness of sin; he had been wounded .of the devil, he would fly back to God his Father for pardon and peace. "The sun is setting over the distant hills, the silver moon glitters already in the little waves of the rapid Jordan, but they must not tarry, and before morning light every one of the company crossed the river, and passed on to Mahanaim. God was not unmindful of their wants, for various friends brought beds and basins, and honey and butter, with cheese and bread, for David and his hungry people. "Absalom, too, in hot haste, passed over the Jordan



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. to him as only God could speak, and to make him promises which only God could make. "The two others were angels. They all ate of the tender young calf Abraham had cooked for them, and of "the fresh hot cakes Sarah made; for though angels don't need to eat, they can do so when they please. After the meal the two angels went forward on their journey, they took the way that led to Sodom; but the third was the Lord of angels, and He stayed behind to talk with Abraham. "God could make a friend of Abraham, for He said He was sure Abraham would always fear God himself, and bring up and command his children to do the same. You see, if children and servants don't like to do what is right, it is the duty of parents and those who are over them to command and make them do it. Once there was a good farmer who feared and loved God. He had children who did not think like him. They were not bad sons to their father, but they did not S think about pleasing and serving God. In the place where that farmer lived a fair was to be held. The sons wanted to go; they wished to see the world and have a part of the fun. The father did not like it; they would see a great deal of drinking and hear bad words, and perhaps go wrong themselves. He advised them not to



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. and this year it was something that pale London children liked better than a visit to the Polytechnic or Museum; it was to be a whole day at Kew Gardens. A long country drive in holiday vans, dinner on the village green outside the large iron gates, and hours of delight amongst the gay flower-beds, green lawns, and hot-houses with their wonderful eastern plants. The gentleman, who provided this treat at his own expense, was to give the address at school this afternoon. No wonder there were no truants, and little feet tripped more lightly and tongues ran faster than usual on the road. A few minutes' bustle was soon hushed in .eager attention, and every eye was fixed on Mr. Elton when he began. "I suppose, children, you all dream sometimes. I know somebody" (and Mr. Elton looked very knowingly at his own little girl), who likes to tell her dreams. Generally dreams are only like a picture over again of our waking thoughts; but sometimes the great God has spoken to the minds of men in sleep. We read of many such dreams in the Bible, and I am going to tell you ofone which was a prophecy, and came to pass after many hundred years. Turn to the fifteenth chapter of Genesis."



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET, AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. him a man to anoint as king; and when Samuel saw Saul the Lord said unto him, This same shall rule over my people.' Then Saul came up to Samuel, and asked where the seer, or prophet, lived. Samuel answered, I am the seer. I will tell thee all that is in thine heart. As for thine asses that were lost, set not thy mind upon them, they are found. And on whom is all the desire of Israel, is it not on thee?' These must have seemed strange words to Saul, but he followed the directions of the prophet, spent that night at his house, and early the next morning was anointed asthe king of Israel. Then Samuel called all the people together at Mizpeh, and Saul was chosen by lot as their king. In this picture you see Samuel presenting him to the people; and if you were there, you would hear them all shout, ,God save the king !' For some time all promised very fair; Saul fought many battles against all his enemies on every side, and whithersoever he turned he vexed them. When he had been king some sixteen years, God commanded him to go and fight against Amalelc, and utterly to destroy them, and all they had. Which of you remembers anything about Amalek ?"



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. Oh, it is a dreadful thing to wait to knock till the door is shut, to wait to call till God refuses to answer. Never, never delay praying to God till death and fear drive you to it. A Christian friend pleaded with a careless youth to turn and seek God, but he answered him very lightly, Oh, I mean to be a Christian some day. I intend to change. But three words will always be sufficient. When I mean to turn I shall say, Jesus save me !" that will do at any time.' His friend reminded him he had no power to change his own heart, and begged him not to trifle with his soul and provoke God's Holy Spirit, but he only laughed. A few days later that lad wa!a crossing a bridge on a spirited horse; the horse took fright, pranced, reared, and before help could be given he was thrown over the bridge and dashed to pieces. As he fell he was heard to say, with terrible distinctness, not 'Jesus save me !' but 'Devil take all!' Don't be like that lad-don't be like Saulbut think of the text you so often repeat, They that seek M6 early shall find Me.' "Finding God had forsaken him, Saul asked counsel of the devil. Hidden by the darkness of the night he crossed the valley, passed along, the east side of the Philistine army over the hill Moreh, to Endor, where lived a witch



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. the preacher of righteousness, is a picture of God's ministers now. The ark is a picture of Jesus Christ. Going into the ark and being safe there while all the world was drowned is a picture of coming to Christ and being safe in Him, while the earth and all the works in it are burned up. The new earth, fresh and beautiful after the waters were dried up, is a picture of the beautiful new earth over which the Lord Jesus will reign, when the storm of God's wrath has passed by, and He is king over all the earth. The rainbow will be there too, for in the last book in the Bible, which tells us so much about the heavenly glory, we,are told of God's throne and of Him who sat on it, and it is said, There was a rainbow round about the throne in sight like unto an emerald.' " Please, sir, is Cain and Abel a picture story too ?" said little Annie Mercer. Not in the same way, I think, Annie; at least, I do not see that it tells of future things; but, children, the Bible is like a mine full of rich treasure, if you dig you will find. People will take great pains in digging for gold." Mr. James stopped, for such a knowing look came over little Ben Fraser's face as he spoke, that he thought he must have something to say.



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. sake,'so that only thorns and thistles comeup of themselves, all good and useful plants have to be planted and taken care of. God sent Adam and Eve out of the garden as a punishment; but He had a kind purpose in it, too. A tree of life was growing in the garden; it would not have been at all for Adam and Eve's happiness to eat of it, and so make their earthly life, which sin had spoiled, last on for ever. It was better for them now that their bodies should die, so God said, Lest man should put forth his hand, and take also of the tree of life, and eat and live for ever, I will drive him out.' The Bible tells us God 'placed at the east of the Garden of Eden cherubims and a flaming sword, which turned every way, to keep the way of the tree of life.' Mr. James looked at the school clock, and found time was getting on, so he made haste to put up the next picture. "Who have we here, children ?" A shepherd and his sheep, sir." "Yes; and who was the first shepherd ?" There was a pause, till Edith answered, "Abel was a keeper of sheep, but Cain was a tiller of the ground." You can all tell me who Cain and Abel were ?" "Adam's children."



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David and Jonathan.



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F I Noah sent forth a raven, which went forth to and fro until the waters were dried up."



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-ITHE YOUTHFUL PROPHET AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. Eli, but the old mam lb iia ItH m dbw again-he had not calledL "*baC1d amnuel be dreaming? Nt IS this time at. leat lo i r t slept, and yet he haeam a tird time the solfnn i aall,,'imuel !' See him rising andliateningon his littlf bed. Who could it be ? It must be Eli. Once more he; went, and persisted in assuring the old priest, 'Thoum didst call me.' Then Eli understood that the Lord had. called the child, and he bid him reply, if the voice came again, Speak, Lord, for thy servant heareth.' "Did the voice come again ? Yes, twice the solemn call, Samnal! Samuel!' and with eager haste and breathless awe the child replied, Speak, thy servant heareth.' Very awful (od's message was, it was a judgment against the sinful sons. of Eli. They had been spoiled' children; their father let them have their own way, and now they had grown up to be wicked men, and God himself would punish them. I don't think Samuel went to sleep that night, but he lay very still till morning, when it was time for hint to open the doors of the house of God, and he was a~aii too tell Eli about what he had heard. But. when Eli asked him, he would have been still more afraid not to tell the whole truth, so he told him every wit, and hid nothing; and Eli answered humbly, 'It is the Lord,



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULEB. ,ever, and the picture I showed you first, shows what the answer was, the very best that could be. Esau's anger was all turned to love, and instead of meeting Jacob with sharp weapons, he met him with loving open arms, and fell on his neck and kissed him, and the two brothers wept together. We know of no more quarrels between them, they lived in peace, and before very long we hear of them as meeting again to bury their old father Isaac. Some time after, it happened to them as to Abraham and. Lot, they were too rich and had too many flocks to live in the same country, but they separated in peace and goodwill, and Esau was the one to go. He went and lived in Mount Seir, and left Jacob in possession of the land of Canaan, which God had given to him. God kept all his promises to Jacob, though He punished his sins. "The next story I have to tell you is one of the prettiest in all the Bible for little children, only I think most of the boys and girls here know the story of Joseph. Suppose you tell me, instead of my telling you. Who was Joseph ?" "Son of Jacob, sir." "Right; had he any brothers ?" "Yes, sir, there were twelve of them." "Had they all one mother P"



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-_ ---------B-ui----l-d-i-n-gtm--Building the Temple.



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. ladder-leastways it was steps to go up into heaven; it was put down on the earth, and reached up to heaven. There were angels on the ladder, some going up and some down. It was a fine sight; but soon he could see above the ladder what was brighter than the angels, for God stood above it, and began to talk to him." "That is a very good account, James. -Who can remember the three comforts God gave him ? He felt lonely, you know, away from his father and mother; how did God comfort him for that? "He said, 'I am the Lord God of Abraham thy father, and the God of Isaac.' "And he was wandering about in strange places, where he had never been before; how did God comfort him for that ? "He told him all the land should be his." And there were many dangers and some troubles in_ the way before him; how did God comfort him for that? "He said, 'Surely I am with thee, and will keep thee.'" "Very well. This was a pleasant dream indeed. When Jacob woke. he said, God is here; this is the house of God; this is the gate of heaven.' He took his



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!:u M, al. v ,R 511 jo Ai INK ilol M6 igs arp.1 .............;4 .......... ip 2e, AN



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The Cup found in Benjamin's Sack.



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CO., PATERNOsR Row. LEIGHTON, sROS. SAUL ASKING ABNER WHO DAVID IS.



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Hagar and Ishmael.



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A. 7. WiW & CO., PATERNCTER ROW. LAIUION, sIB. ABRAHAM AND LOT DIVIDING THE LAND.



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. can find you a picture of Joseph when Pharaoh brought him out to all the people, and told them he was to be -their ruler. He was but a young man still-only thirty years old. This was a change indeed from the prison, and it was much better than being Potiphar's chief servant. "Joseph's words came quite true about the plenty and the famine; and before the years of plenty were over there were such stores of corn laid up, that it was' enough, not only for the Egyptians, but for other countries too; and on all the highways might be seen tribes of men with camels, who were comiing from other nations to buy corn of Joseph. "Joseph sold the corn himself. One day he looked hard at a company of travellers who came to buy corn: there were ten of them. Who do you think they were ? Joseph's ten brothers. Not young Benjamin; he stayed behind with his father; but all the rest. Times were changed since Joseph saw them last. Then he was begging and praying them to have pity on him, and not sell him for a slave; now he was next to the king of the great land of Egypt in power and glory. No wonder his brothers did not know the great lord they were bowing to was Joseph. He knew them, however, and made them



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. "Did Lot look behind ?" The question puzzled the little company, who had a P notion some one looked behind, so Mr. Brown turned to his little Harold, who answered, "Lot's wife did, papa, and she became a pillar of salt." "Do we hear about her in the New Testament ? But Harold was puzzled now, till his papa told him to find Luke xvii. 32, when he read, Remember Lot's wife.". Yes, and those words are spoken to us. What we have to remember about Lot's wife is, that though her feet were hasting away from Sodom, her heart was there still, and she turned for a last look, and wished she could have stayed behind without being burned. So it is with little children who wish to go to heaven, butdob't wish to be holy, and cling to their bad ways and wilful tempers, and wish they could be safe without giving them up. "It was a sad sight for Abraham, that morning. I think he had hoped that the ten righteous would .be found to save the city, but he got up very early and went to the place where he had talked with God the day before; he looked eagerly towards the part where the



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. "Very well, then, you left off with the 9th chapter of Genesis; after that there are two chapters which, except the story of Babel, are chiefly full of names, so we will pass on to the 12th, and come to the story of Abraham. The chapters of names are very useful; they are like nuts, wise men find a good kernel in them, but they have a hard shell, not so easy for little children to crack. Harold, find the picture of Abraham's journey to the land of Canaan. "What do you see ?" S" People riding on camels, sir." "Yes, they used camels where we use horses; there were no roads then like our London streets, paved and watered, with a drinking fountain here and there at a corner, but rocks and hot sandy deserts; horses would have died; but the patient camel, with his broad feet, plodded on bravely. "Look a little at this travelling company. I see one woman among them. What a pretty, woman she is! a boy is leading her camel lest it should stumble; there are a good many cows and sheep with servants to take care of them. I think that man in front is the master of the company, for he seems to be telling them which way to go. Now I will tell you about them. There was a man 4



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. was a little basket in his hand covered with fresh green leaves. It was full of' strawberries for little Annie Mercer, the little girl with a pale face and large eyes; she had been struck down with fever since last Sunday. Mr. Fawcett thought to take his strawberries to Annie in the ten minutes while the children were resting between their school lessons and school church, but Annie was very ill, and Mr. Fawcett spent rather longer than he meant in showing her mother what to do for her comfort. When he came back he could hear angry noisy voices when he was some way off; the children were quarrelling. All wanted the places nearest Mr. Fawcett, and those places were kept for the little ones, because the others could see over their heads. .Mr. Fawcett's grave sad face when he opened the door was quite enough to stop the angry words, and make them drop the naughty hands which I amsorry to say some bigger boys had raised against their little brothers. First of all, he made the whole school stop just where they were for five minutes without moving or speaking. By that time they were heartily ashamed, and glad enough to be allowed to move quietly into their usual places. At last Mr. Fawcett broke the long silence. "Children, I wanted to show you beautiful pictures,



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. down the school still, but no one spoke, no one would stand in Bill's shoes, they all knew his bad ways too well. Well, then,' said Mr. Bto the parents, 'I can think of nothing else, you must take him away again.' "'No, sir,' called out a little voice from the far end of the schoolroom, no, sir, don't send him away, I'll be surety for Bill.' "It was a little weak-looking fair-haired boy who spoke, one of the youngest in the school. Bill had often bullied and beaten him. "'You! my little man, you don't know what you are saying.' "' Oh yes, sir, I know, I'll be surety for Bill.' "'Well then, Bill,' said the master, 'you may take your place.' Bill went to his place, but he went with a choking feeling in his throat to which he was very little accustomed-' this little, ill-used boy to stand up for him; what could it mean ?' "When school was over, and the master had time to think over it, he remembered it might not be the best thing for little Charley to be thrown so much into Bill's



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JOSEPh THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULEB. children; but it never talked, it was dumb. Another baby was born, a third, a fourth. They were all dumb. Then that man remembered his childish sin, and saw that God was punishing him. "Jacob stole away from Laban in the night with his wives and his flocks, and though Laban followed and overtook him, he would not return, but those two made a covenant, or agreement together in God's presence. Here is a picture of them, the men round are bringing stones to build up an altar, that Laban and Jacob may make their promise as in God's sight. After that Jacob went on his journey. "All this time I have not been able to finish explaining the first picture about the brothers making up their quarrel, but now we have come to that part of the story. There was another of Jacob's sins he had to be reminded of; he had not only deceived his father Isaac, but wronged his brother Esau. When he drew near to his old home he began to remember how angry Esau had been with him twenty years before. Had he forgotte his anger now ? Would he receive Jacob kindly ? He thought he had better make sure, and not bring his wive and little children, and flocks, in the way of an angry brother, so he sent messengers before to Esau to tell



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. Why did you mention my name ?' "' I thought the Lord knew you, and would be more Slikely to mind me if you were my friend.' Next time the boy told his kind friend how bitterly he felt the cold, and inquired if he might ask God for a great-coat. "'Yes, we may tell God everything.' But in a few days the boy came looking very sad,' I : have asked, but God has not given me a great-coat.' Mr. Mpitied the boy, and longed to give him one, but he only said, Go on praying.' The day following his poor lad marched up, clad in a warm coat, and, his face shining with joy, exclaimed, Look, sir. Did not God hear me quickly ?' "' Where did you get that ?' "' When I left you I prayed again, and said, "Lord, don't you remember how I asked for a great-coat, because I was so cold, and the weather keeps so bad, and I have none; please send one: soon. Lord help me P" When I went out all shivering, a gentleman said to me,. "How cold you look lad," and he called me with him into a shop and bought me this. Isn't it a beauty ?' he added, his eyes glittering with pleasure. Mr. M-was not less. pleased, and they knelt down and thanked God together. L'-



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-~-< -•2 I I --_ )I I I Daid rebuke bNaI David rebuked by Nathan.



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. wooaed gve a delicious fragrance. Very few of those nobleM trees are left now, only here and there a little clump remings. It looks very still and lonely, does it not ? Buain Solomon's days, if you had been there, you would!lave seen eighty thousand men swarming amongst the loefy trees, hewing away at their huge trunks and felling them by hundreds; and toiling up the mountain and down the mountain, seventy thousand more, who were appointed toe be bearers of burdens. Hiram, the King of Tyre, towhom the land belonged, sold the services of his famous woodmen to Solomon, and the beams of cedar were ffoated down by sea to Joppa and carried up fromn there to JerusalemSolomon thought nothing too gooel fi Goa s service, and no trouble too great to take for his temple. When the cedar work was all finished it was waaii with pure gold, even the floor' and the walls wws aerned with exquisite carving in lily work ande, Miate chains of wrought gold, and with precious marblts and glistening stones. S:.en; yearsit took to build that gorgeous temple, and then Saeman.assembled all the elders of the people, and the fath&ei and the priests in all the land, and the priests brought upm the ark of Go.d, in which the tables of the law were kept, and on which the golden cherubims rested,



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Jacob at Bethel.-GEN. xxviii. x8.



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JOSEPH 'BH CAPTIVE-J@SBM T RULER. smooth paslf IWi neek, besides tA U A had some of Esau!'s eleow1i 1e iisie and tes she put on Jacob, for &unter's clothes son get to ahmeltuei wild beasts he4Bisesand kills. "It was a wicked, tbiin to try and deceiw the poor oldcither, and Jacob told lie after lie to maka his story gowa; for Isaac had his doabts all along, became -the voice was Jacob's. 'That is just the way boys and girls ard drawn on; they begin, perhaps, with half telling one lie, and then they think they must stick to their tale; and the second does not prick their conscience like the first; at last, unless by God's great goodness they are fouint out and punished, they hardly know truth from fals*eod. Oh, children, pray to God to give you the lip of tth. "* Jacob did not gp pquua d. God loved him too well %fr t haLt I miWA&i& i.kwhen Esani came in wia&the meatIe*e ba Aite Ea


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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. Swanted to tighten his boot-lace, and picks it up and pockets it. That troubles Sam very much, for he's an honest boy, and he takes every chance to whisper to Tom, Give it back, Tom, 'tis Mr. Fawcett's.' Tom gives no answer, only scowls at Sam, and moves farther from him. "Presently I miss my shilling. I know it was there when I came into school. 'Children,' I say, 'I've dropped a shilling; has any one picked it up?' Sam turns very red. 'Surely,' I say to myself, it can't be Sam, he's such an honest boy; but I'll ask each one all round.' So I put the same question to each -' Do you know anything of my shilling?' 'No,' says one; 'No,' says another; 'No,' says Tom. Then I come to Sam. Yes,' says he. What do you know of it ?' 'I'd rather not say, sir.' Oh, you must say.' Well, sir, Tom picked it up, and it's in his pocket.' Now, children, I don't know what you think, but I don't call that tale-bearing-I call it telling the truth; and if Sam had looked me in the face, and said he kncr nothing about the shilling, to save Tom from blame and punishment, I should have said he was pretty near bad as Tom. If you will keep in mind two rules I will give you about other people's faults, you won't be very



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. *we can sell you a young man, if you do.' Poor Joseph was pulled up out of the pit, and bought and sold as if he had been a sheep or a cow. Twenty silver pieces the cruel brothers took as his price; and then they killed a young kid, and dabbled Joseph's bright coat with the blood, and brought it to poor old Jacob. 'Look what we have found,' they said; 'Is not this like Joseph's coat that you made him ? Do you think it is Joseph's coat ? Do you think perhaps a lion or a bear has met "him and eaten him ?' I am going to show you a picture of their coming with this wicked story to their poor old Sfather Jacob; and see how miserable he looks; he says he can never be happy again. Surely those cruel sons must be ashamed and sorry when they see him." "But Joseph, children-what became of Joseph ?" "He was taken to Egypt, sir." "Yes, and sold again there. A soldier bought him, an officer of the army. The King of Egypt was called Pharaoh; he had a guard of soldiers round him to protoot him, for people had not such good laws then as we have now, to keep them in order. The captain of that "guard was named Potiphar, and he was the man who bought Joseph. What a change from being Jacob's favourite son in his own house, to be Potiphar's slave in



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The Burial of Isaac,



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FI ____ _I Jericho surrounded.



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. ness for forty years. He would not let one of those unbelievers enter the promised land, they all died in the desert, except their children, and the two brave men, Joshua and Caleb. Joshua became their leader in Canaan. You see him in this picture (see coloured picture) fighting the people whom their fathers dreaded, and trampling them under foot, while God commanded the very sun to stand still, till his victory was finished. "Try to remember from our story, that it grieves God when we won't believe He loves us, and will help us. Even little children know something of the fight for the good land. Don't you often find it very hard to do what you know you ought to do ? Perhaps it is a difficult lesson to learn, or to fetch something for your mother when you want to play, or to speak gently and civilly when you feel very cross. I wonder what you feel and say then. Is it, can't .' or is it,' Pray God help me?' 'I can't' often means 'I won't.' 'Pray God help me, means, too, I will try and do my best.' There were two more pictures to see; but the school clock never waited for anybody, and it was just going to strike, so Mr. Elton told the children to give a good look at the pictures, and he would tell them the story under the tall elm-trees in Kew Gardens.



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IIT Rebekah at the Well. ________________ -----------



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. found they were really gone, his heart grew hard again, and he made ready six hundred chosen chariots, and all his horsemen and armies, and dashed after them, and caught them up just as they were pent in between the rocks and the sea. Then they cried aloud to God in their trouble, but Moses was not afraid, he stood firm and quiet, and answered their cries with the calm words, Fear not, stand still, and see the salvation of the Lord, which He will show you to-day; for the Egyptians whom ye have seen to-day, ye shall see them again no more for ever. The Lord shall fight for you.' Then he cried Forward!' and stretching out his rod over the sea, the obedient waves parted hither and thither, and the people walked on dry ground, between a wall of water on either side. "It was evening time, and the angel of God who rode in that marvellous cloud went behind the Israelites, and cast a broad light on their pathway, while it threw a darkness and cloud over the Egyptians. All night long they went on after the Israelites, but in the early morning God troubled the Egyptians, and the wheels came off their chariots, so that they could only drag heavily along. Now at last the Israelites reached the other side, just as day broke over the shore; and once again, at God's



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. looks which the children's faces wore as they listened to the story of Joseph, he could not help asking God to write in their memories this lesson of his holy word, that such quarrels as the one he had quieted when he came in, might never disgrace the school again. p



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. word after they entered the country churchyard, that he might have time to think where he was. "Moses trembled, and hid his face ; but, oh, what kind gentle words he heard! God had seen the burdens of his people. He had heard their cry, and He said, I know their sorrows." He now told Moses to return to Egypt, and bid Pharaoh let the people go. "Before, when Moses had been self-confident, he had been disappointed; now he had learned to be very humble, and to mistrust himself. But God put courage into him, and gave him a wonderful rod with which he might work great signs. It became a serpent when he threw it on the ground, and turned back into a rod when he caught it by the tail. This was to show the people that God had sent him. Moses went, and Aaron his brother came out to meet him, just as God foretold; and they went together, first to their own people, then to Pharaoh. When the people saw the wonders Moses did, and heard God's message of comfort, they believed and thanked God. But Pharaoh would not believe, and was very angry. He pretended they only wanted to hinder the people from their work. Ye are idle, ye are idle,' he said; 'therefore ye say, Let us go and do sacrifice to the Lord. Go therefore



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THE SHEPHEBD KING AND HIS WISE SON. "David had iime&i;n eadful in, but God loved and pitied his sinfl t4d aeEo welli.t e:o alone for ever. He sent ?t l Aedd yph dNat lhau mfeatM im. n titis pihtre you see Mathm myking to David, and you may read me the stamy about itr i(2 Sam. xii.). The whole school read tegd r till verse fifteen, when Mr. Carter aske|"C an any of you guess why Nathan did met at once tell David how wicked he had been ? Why did he tell him a round.-aat ostory P? "I suppose he was afraid to scold the i*ng, Vgandpapa," said little Rose, timidly. "I don't think that was the reason, Rose. I don't think God's servants need ever be :afraid to do od's bidding; but I think -t was because he wanted to anake David see his own fault. Now, we are Venae ry very sharp to see other people's faults and voa'tii to see our own. We are like a famous captainfind 4of one eye, who was asked to'look at an order he did not wish to see, se e oieted through his glass wi -his blind eye, and said, I .don't see.' We do not wish to see our own faults, so we are ll of excuses. I often hear of children's faults from each other, but very seldom from themselves. Nathan knew how hard it is for .a man to take reproof



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MMIAM AND ISAAC. and hi& WW B g in Maran : they had no ohildren of titeir ofa btt they seem tiere aken care of their br1oie n, whose fath:ers &. The man and his wi"viww called Abram and Sara and their nephew's name was Lot. It was about 427 years since the Flood; for a great part of that time olmd Noe-ad lived, but now he had been dead seventy-seven years. All the people in the world you. know, since the flood, were born of Noah's family, and he was the great father of them all. While he lived (and he lived a good long life, altogether 950 years), I am sure be woulitry tfalepthenm in the knowledge and fear of God; but now that Noa had been dead many years, God chose another man t serr him faithfully like Noah. This man wav called Abram, it was he who was liiang with his wife and' nepher in the land of Haran. Th' e are two things Gods servants must do-they must trustiAim, and they must obey Him. God gave Abram a promise which he trusted, and a command which he obeyed&. The promise was,' I will make of thee a great nation, and I M iltbe tte, and make thy name great; and thou shalt be a blessing. And I will bless them that bless ee, and tlrse him that*cursetthhee: and in thee



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. believed her, and put his faithful servant in prison; but in the prison it was the same story over again, everybody loved and trusted Joseph, and soon the prison-master gave the charge of all the other prisaoers into Joseph's hands; the Bible tells us the Lord made all he di -to prosper.' Which of you can tell me,how Joseph got out of prison ?" He told what the king's dream meant, sir." "But how came the king to know about him ?" No answer. "When he told the meaning of the king's dream, was it the first time he ever tried to do such a tlkng ?" Nao, sir,, he did it in the prison for the king's serasnte." "Yes, and he asked one of them to speak a good word for him to the king, but the servant forgot all about his prison-friend till one day the king was tribled wi a bad dream, which no one could explai. Then the king's servant remembered Joseph, and toUd the kidg about, him, and Joseph was quickly fetched eat 0e the prison to hear the king's dream. We don't take so much notice od dreams now; but in those days, when the Bible was not written, God often spoke to people by dreams, and Pharaoh, king of Egypt, felt sure this dream



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. voice came down from the clear sky, and it said, 'What aileth thee, Hagar ? Fear not, God hath heard the voice of the lad where he is.' "God never mocks us. If He tells us to be comforted, it is because He is going to help us out of our trouble. There was help nearer than Hagar thought. God showed her a well of water; and you may think it was not long before she filled her bottle with it, and held it to her child's parched, dying lips. His strength soon came back, and he grew up to be an archer. He lived to a good old age (137 years), and left twelve sons, who became great and rich men, and had towns of their own, and castles to live in. "Now, which of you can tell me anything about Abraham's one special son Isaac, for whose sake Ishmael was sent away ? I have told you about his being weaned; do you know what is the next thing we hear about him ? "No one knows ? Let us see whether a picture will help you at all. What do you see here? And what do you think it means ? Suppose we let Harold tell." "Papa, there is an old man and a young one; they are going up a mountain; the old man has got a staff in one hand to help him to climb, and in the other there is a knife, and a basket, which looks as if it had fire in.



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J. F. SHAW & CO., PATERNEOSTR ROW. LIGHTON, BEOS. SOLOMON AT THE DEDICATION OF THE TEMPLE.



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C dais of Lebanon.



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J. H. W & CO. PATERNOSTER ROW. LEIGHTO JOSE P l MEETING IIS AT E R.



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JOSEPH THE OAPTVE;-JOSEPU THE BULER. but you have brought out an ugly thing we must look at first. I am sorry ri it, it will take up our time, and we can't have so may pictures, but as it is here, we had bette look at it, and see what it is made of. When I came to the door what did I find in the school P" The heads were hung low, and the words not very clear, but the most part said something like "a quarrel." "Audi what was it about ?" 'WRawanted to sit anigh you, sir." SIAt tl you all sit near me ?" *1o, sir.'" "*But you tBiJ ght it the best place, so each wished for i for Msi a8s l Awvye shu3meB a "Yes,, sir," followed this inquiry. *IN5w, chiBwimd w*le ot at the secret of quarreXW Weo qwoepR wn.ct they are selfish, when they aremlkeoaete tave the best for themselves. Never milda gwt without if Ican getkwhl like.' Does thaktsW we & .think ?" *uc$o, a *Wo, iwit -.4 10the reckoning thfZ.ei Aplo* He said Me woul& bear the paaht lte Wa:wwjoy. Well, now all are f~ft ^ M** 'ill lbegin with showing



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J. F. SHAW & CO., PATERNOSTR ROW. LEIHTON, E0. AGAG BROUGHT BEFORE SAMUEL.



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Jacob presented to Pharaoh.



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S THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET, AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. was full of his own goodness, and said at once, 'I have performed the commandment of the Lord.' ". "Then Samuel said, 'The Lord sent thee on ajourney, Sand said, Go, utterly destroy the sinners the Amalekites until they be consumed. Why, then, did you not obey Sthe voice of the Lord ?' "Was Saul sorry and humbled when he heard this ?" "No, he excused himself, and said the people saved the beasts for sacrifice." "You see, children, when you begin to do wrong it Sis like running down hill, you go faster and faster till Syou cannot stop. Saul's first wrong step was disobedience, the next step was ?" "To justify himself and make excuses." "To put the blame on others." S( To pretend he had a good reason." "The way of obedience is the only safe, happy way; S all disobedience is sin against God, and remember half : obedience is disobedience. "Samuel said to Saul, To obey is better than sacrifice. Because thou hast rejected the word of the Lord, He hath also rejected thee from being king. The Lord hath rent the kingdom from thee, and given it to a neighbour of thine.' Then Samuel called for Agag. (See coloured 10



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. Hagar and Ishmael away, giving them bread and water for their journey; for, as I told you, there were no inns in those days where travellers could get a meal. "I don't know whether Hagar lost her way; but we read, She wandered in the wilderness of Beershelia.' Who can tell what a wilderness is ?" All were silent, till Mr. Brown looked at Harold. I think, papa, it's a sandy place, where there are no people; or trees, or water." "Yes, that is a pretty good account of a wilderness. It is lonesome to have no people there; and when the sun shines it is bad to have no shady trees to sit under; but far the worst trouble of a wilderness is having no water. The thirst is so dreadful to bear, that people go almost mad for water. They don't care how bad it is, if they can only find water of any sort. Camels are such useful creatures to travel in the wilderness, not only because heavy water-skins full of water can be carried by them, but because their own supply for several days is carried inside them. Their stomachs are divided into different parts, each of which is filled with water, and used by degrees as the camel wants it. Travellers ready to die with thirst have been known to kill their camels, in order to get at this hidden store.



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lTh d(estruction of the Egyptian host in tile Red &el.



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. girls here whose mothers can trust them with the baby ?" Many glistening eyes answered yes. S"Who is that in the picture beside the cradle ?" "Is it Miriam ?" "No, you cannot see her, for she stood 'afar off'; it is Pharaoh's daughter standing under the sun-shade; the very daughter of the cruel king was the first to see the floating basket, and the girl stooping over it is one of her maidens whom she sent to fetch it. You see she has just opened the basket; the poor baby was frightened by the strange faces and began to cry. Then God touched the royal lady's heart with pity, for she knew her father's cruel law, and she said, 'This is one of the Hebrew children.' Poor little Miriam had watched in silence and unseen till then, her heart fluttering with fear, but now she ventured to come up, and offered to find a nurse, and S the lady said, Go.' Whom did she fetch ?" "His mother." Yes. Can't you fancy how she flew to tell Jochebed, and how the mother's heart sung with joy and praise as S she hurried down to the river side, and how the baby would stretch out his eager arms to his own mother?



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. who had dealings with wicked spirits. But the wretched man got no comfort; the ghost of Samuel told him,' The Lord is departed from thee, and is become thine enemy.' Faint and weary-hearted he reached his own army e'er break of day, and drew them up in battle array by the fountain which is in Jezreel. It was a bad position, for the ground slopes down from Shunem, and while the Israelites were exposed to attack on all sides, they would find it hard indeed to flee up the steep mountain behind. They fled at the first onset of the Philistines, and the slaughter was dreadful as they tried to fly up Mount Gilboa. The Philistines followed hard upon Saul and upon his sons. They killed Jonathan and his brothers, and Saul was soon wounded. In his misery he cried to his armour-bearer to kill him, but he would not, so Saul fell upon his own sword and died. "There you see him lying a helpless corpse; and look, the armies of the Philistines are pressing up the hill, and they will cut off his head and strip his body; but far worse than all will be the wrath of God poured out upon the naked soul of that sinful, disobedient king. May God preserve each of you, my children, from the first act of wilful disobedience to his commandments."



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. "I go go -way of all the earlh; be thou strong, therefawe, a show Aiysiff a man, ad keep ; he charge of e d on lIp s i-Go to waki in his ways, o keep his statmieal Eis smmmapass s, and his judgments and lis erimfutiEes, asi i is witten in the law of Moses, that dbi maayegt prosper ii all that thou doest, and whitherseever thou turnest thysa : -that the Lord may continue his wondt wridh He spake Eoneerning me, saying, If thy ehiAdren tade heed to their way, to walk before Me in tluth with all their heart and with all their soul, there shall not fail thee, said He, a man itm'he Throne of Israel." Then David gave a few directions about those to waam he wished kindness to be shown, and cautioned Solomom against Joab and Shemei. "A!n now -his eyes grow dim, perhaps he can no longr feel the loving grasp which strives to warm his chill Iaami, nor hear the smswers of his son, nor see him a'iaatady bending .over him. But s he treads the valley. of the ihadow 4 death, and heart and flesh fail, God stands aease him, he sees another form, already a light dawas wpon him as of a morning when the sun ariseth widlamt clouds; he -hears .another vaine; it is the God, the SBak ifIsrael, who speaks to ima, =a is last words are to repeat the promise breatheld io h:im by the Spirit



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David's dying charge to Solomon..



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. man, he felt the weakness of 'death creeping over him, and he called Solomon, that he might give him his last directions. Oh, it is a blessed thing for a child so to live as to be his father's comfort and support on a dying bed. Treasure up every word a dying parent speaks. I am an old man myself now, but to this day I remember being called, a little boy of nine years old, into my dying father's room; the lattice window was open, and the cool evening wind blew fresh across roses and honeysuckles, but it could breathe no life into his pale cheeks. He laid his hand on my head, and said, 'Before that sun rises again, I shall be beyond those bright clouds, but God will be your Father, my boy. Promise me you will read his word every day of your life, and I shall meet you in heaven.' He put this very Bible into my hands, children." Mr. Carter held up a very old Bible. This book has saved me from many sins and many troubles. I was a thoughtless lad for many years, but I never dared shut my eyes in sleep without first opening my Bible on my knees before God. But now would you like to creep beside that pillar, and listen to what the old king says ? Isabel, you may read the words in 1 Kings ii. 2--4:-



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. anguish roused the sleepers at midnight, for 'there was not a house where there was not one dead.' "Then all the Egyptians rose up in the night, and bade the Israelites begone in haste, or else, they said, 'we be all dead men.' What a strange packing up and journey that was, children, in the hurry and darkness. There were six hundred thousand men, beside all the women and children, and they left nothing behind them; they took all they had, beside a great many presents the Egyptians. gave them, even the unbaked dough they packed up in their kneading-troughs, and they drove all the cattle in front of them. "But where must they go ? God guided them by a wonderful pillar of fire and cloud. At night it shone like flames of fire and lighted their pathway, in the day it cast its broad shadow over them like a cool, refreshing cloud. Which way did it take? Not the straight road to Canaan, the promised land, for there were enemies there, but round by the wilderness of the Red Sea. When they came to Pi-hahiroth, they were told to rest. That long word means' the opening of a valley between rocks,' on each side there were steep rocks, and straight before them the Red Sea. ""What did Pharaoh do all this time? When he



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. quarrel with his brother Amnon, and he kept his anger for two whole'years, and never once spoke to his brother all that time. At last he invited him to a feast, with all the rest of the king's sons, and in the middle of the feast he told his servants suddenly to strike and kill Amnon. How, David's heart ached when he heard the dreadful news that one son had killed another. Absalom fled away in fear to Geshur, to his grandfather Talmai. But every day David mourned for him, and his heart yearned over his son. At last, after three years, he allowed Absalom to return to Jerusalem, but it was two years more before he quite forgave him, and kissed him, and received him into his heart and home again. Now it was that this ungrateful son plotted a far worse thing than the death even of his brother. Absalom was very vain of his beauty. Everybody praised and admired him, and the thought came into-his heart, "How I wish I was king, and first in the land.' Every body likes to be first, that's why we see such pushing and scrambling for the best place. Only those who are truly 'taught of God to love one another,' learn to be kindly affectioned one to another with brotherly love, in honour preferring one another.'



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. trembling not for himself but for his erring child; and when he heard the tidings he we tt *aome into a little room "ad wept, sal cried aloud, 0 my son Absalom, my 'son, my son Absalom. Would God flad died for thee.' Oh, what bitterness disobedience brings! God's anger rests, on disobedient children, aad they always get into trouble." "I disobeypel ay another, and lost my eye," said. little Sammy, a boy wfo once had two bright blue eyes, but playing with a candle which his mother tLd him not to do, it fell on his eye, and put it out fer iife. "The Bible speaks most plainly to children about obedience; tell me a verse." Children, obey your parents.' "' Honour thy father and thy mother.' "* LBowwr means more than obey. Shall I tell you how a little boy once explained it ? He had repeated the fifth 'emnandm nt, and was asked what it meant. The little fellow, with his face covered with blushes, said, almost in a whisper, 'Yesterday, sir, I showed some strange gentlemen over the mountains. The sharp stones cut my feet, and the gentlemen saw them bleeding, and they gave me some money to buy me shoes. I gave



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I ~* I' Hannah's Prayer.



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. of.' Was not this a bad dream? No. Abraham had heard God's solemn voice too often before, to have any doubt God was really speaking to him. What did he do ? Did he begin to pray very hard that God would take back the words ? Did he say, Ask anything else, Lord-all my riches, everything I have-but Isaac is too precious?' Did he say, 'Lord, if I do this, all thy promises about Isaac will fail ?' Children, he left all that to God to manage; he had entire trust that God would find a way of fulfilling his own word. He had entire trust, too, that God knew all the sorrow such a difficult command as this would bring on him. 'God loves me,' he said to himself; 'He loves Sarah, He loves Isaac; what He bids me to do must be for our good, and to make us happier in the end, though I can't see how. It will bevery hard and sad, but He will help me, and I will show that I love God, and can trust Him by obeying at once.' "So Abraham got up early the next morning. 1 don't think he told Sarah what he was going for. He was sure it would all end well, and meanwhile he would save her the pain if he could. He took two of his servants and Isaac. I daresay Isaac always went about with his father, and it was no uncommon thing for



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M-M-w -_ I-11,,~-;;~:;_;:, --;;,;~, Solomon's Fleet,



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TIE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. not do it because he had shed so much blood in his many wars, but Solomon his son, whose very name meant peaceable, might build the house. "David had given Solomon a pattern and plan of the house and all the parts of it, and even of the vessels to be used in it, and much gold and silver which he had saved up for it. "Solomon began to build the temple soon after he became king, and a magnificent house he built. The materials were brought from very far. Huge, massive stones were all cut and squared far away in the stone quarries and fitted together so neatly that no ringing of hammers was heard in the building. See how busily they are at work together. Yet if you stood there you would hear neither hammer nor chisel-it was God's house, and was built in silence and order. Beside the costly stones there was a wainscoting of planks of cedar, a precious fragrant wood. Where did that come from ? You have often heard of the mountains of Lebanon. They are so lofty that their cold summits are always covered with a glittering crown of snow, but the lower heights were in those days covered with magnificent cedar-trees, ninety feet high and thirty feet round; the red



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SO.. and where God showed his glory. Hundreds and thousands of sacrifices were offered by the priests, and hundreds of Levites, whom you see dressed in pure white linen (see coloured picture), having instruments of music, and trumpets and harps, and bands of trained singers, all joined in one song of exquisite praise, 'For the Lord is good, his mercy endureth for ever.' Then the whole house was filled with a cloud of glory so bright that the priests could not stand in it, for it was the presence of God himself. Now the king, whom you see standing there (see picture), turns towards the people and offers up a long and fervent prayer to God to bless his house and meet his people there. After his prayer he blessed the people, and' for seven days they had such feasting and rejoicing as never was known. "You would like to have been there, to have trodden the golden pavement and seen the noble young king with his glittering crown and royal robes; to have stood amongst the white-robed multitude and heard the burst of praise and music echoed from the sacred courts; and when the fire came down and the cloud of glory filled the house, to have seen that vast host bow their heads to the ground. Ah, you cannot go there, a few heaps of rubbish are all that remain of that glittering temple. But there



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. "3. None must be kept till the morning, or it would turn bad, except on Saturday, when they would find twice as much, to last over Sunday. None would fall on Sunday morning. Sunday must be kept a holy day of rest. I wonder, children, whether any of you can tell'me of what the manna was a picture, a type ? No answer; but Ellen Jackson was very busy turning over the leaves of her Bible. At last she read John vi. 31. "Our fathers did eat manna in the desert, as it is written, He gave them bread from heaven to eat. Then Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you Moses gave you not that bread from heaven; but my Father giveth you the true bread from heaven. For the bread of God is He which cometh down from heaven, and giveth life unto the world. ...Jesus said unto them, I am the Bread of life: he that cometh to me shall never hunger." "How is Jesus bread for us ?" "We must die if we had no bread, and our souls would die without Jesus." "Yes, and we must seek Jesus as they gathered the manna"1. Early. They that seek me early shall find me.'



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. "All the animals were to come too. Can't you fancy what a glad day it was, after they had all been shut up more than a year in the ark. If any of you have been very ill, and shut up a long time in the little bedroom upstairs, you know how pleasant it is the first time father carries you down, and mother puts a seat for you in the window. Country children who can sit in the porch, with the sweet honeysuckle round them, and the bees buzzing about, would know still better what Noah and his family felt, when they were let out of the ark, and their feet walked again on the green beautiful earth. "The very first thing Noah did was to build an altar, and offer burnt-offerings to God. His wife and children joined. See, here is a picture which shows you all seven round the altar, and Noah is raising his voice and his hand in praise to God, first for having kept them safe from the flood in the ark, and then for bringing them out of the ark, and giving them back the beautiful world to live in." Mr. James thought that as the story of the flood had been a long one, his little hearers would be all the better for a change of occupation; so they marched round the school for a few minutes, singing some of their favourite hymns-" The sweet story of old," and "Hosanna," and "The happy land." Perhaps you do



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. one hand, while under his other arm he carried her large case of prints. He let them talk to each other and rest a little bit, till the church bell had done, and ten they made a large circle round the stand which Mh4 up the ca e f pictures, so that all could see. The very little baos and girls sat in front of the others, who could see overtheir heads. Mr. James took out of the case first a picture of the garden of Eden, and Edith, who thought very muh of her pictures, was well pleased that it was so muchi admired. Tall trees, and green slopes, and running water are pleasant sights for little London children. "*Well,'children, what have I showayou ?" said MrJames at last. "A garden, sir." he ysla know what gavden ?" Alittle modest girl wiith a palie ee and large eyes, said, AiW, that Adam and Eve, sir, on.the river bank ? Ain't it the garden of Eden?" "Very well, ittle maid, now tell me who Adam and Eve were, and how they came into that garden ?" AILwere; aeady with answers about Adam. and Eve eim, iWab'.s First Catechism," but pale-f&ced Annie Merd w6asw Twani e is say, God put them there, to take care ofie t &n.".



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. after David, and with him the thousands of Israel. A battle must.be fought, and it took place in the wood of Ephraim. David divided his little army into three, and as he stood in the gates of Mahanaim to watch them out, he commanded each captain and company as they passed on, deal gently, for my sake, with the young man, even with Absalom.' "God fought for that little army, and twenty thousand Israelites were slain that day before the servants of David. How fared it with Absalom ? I will show you his end. "What do you see ?" "He is hanging by his hair from a tree." "Can you tell me how it happened ?" "He rode on a mule, and it went under the thick ,boughs of a great oak, a branch caught hold of his hair, and off went the mule, and left him hanging in the air." A soldier passed; he had heard David's charge that morning, and seen the king's anxious face, so he would not hurt the lad, but went and told Joab, his captaii. Joab had no such scruples. He took three darts, and running forward thrust them through the heart of Absalom while he was yet alive in the oak, and they buried his body, and heaped stones upon it in the wood. "All this while David was watching in the city gates,



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.15Tacob t thewell Gen.x i 8



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. deal of money. He was usually an obedient boy, but this particular day he was seized with a great desire to lift up the lid of a beautiful jar, which he knew was filled with sweet-scented leaves. He left his toys and went to the stand where the jar was placed. As he was too short to reach the lid he climbed on a stool for the purpose; but just as his hajid was on the lid of the jar he heard a sound, and, starting, he let it fall from his hand. It was not broken, but cracked, and he thought most likely n6 one would notice it; so replacing it on the vase he left the room. Day after day passed, but although no notice was taken of the injury he lived in constant fear of discovery. Every time his aunt called him he started, and when he was in bed at night, if he heard but the rustle of her dress in the passage or on the stairs, he was frightened. Yet it was not his loving aunt but his sin which made him tremble. She was always kind and gentle, and had never spoken a harsh word to her little nephew all the time of his long visit. At last the misery of concealment became so great that one day he told-his aunt all, and the words she spoke to him then will never be forgotten. He learned more of. the misery of sin during that one week of a concealed fault than he had ever known before.



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. Yes, he did; and I think I can tell you why. I think Ahithophel's conduct was one of the bitter fruits of David's sin against Uriah. Ahithophel's son, Eliam, and "Uriah were both soldiers in David's guard, probably friends. Uriah's wife, Bathsheba, was Ahithophel's granddaughter. No doubt, ever since David's shameful sin, very bitter feelings must have rankled in Ahithophel's heart against David, and he was quite ready to do him an ill turn. When Ahithophel joined, the plot grew very strong, and the people crowded round Absalom more and more. "Now a messenger comes, and tells David, 'The hearts of all men are with Absalom.' Then the brokenhearted father flies with his servants and a few friends, and the faithful Ittai follows him with six hundred Gittites. They cross the little brook Kidron, and go up by Mount Olivet, weeping every one, with bare feet and covered heads. As they wind their slow way round a distant hill side, weary and foot sore, a wicked man of the house of Saul, Shimei, flies out upon David, and flings stones at him, and words sharper than stones, cursing and insulting him. Abishai, David's hot-tempered nephew, cannot stand this, and cries out angrily, 'Why should this dead dog curse the king ? Let me go



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. "And why did they keep sheep and till the ground ?" "To have something to eat, sir." "Yes; you know God had said to Adam, In the sweat of thy face thou shalt eat bread.' In the garden of Eden everything had one voice; it said to Adam and Eve, God loves you.' Now everything had two voices. One voice said, 'God pities you, and cares for you;' another voice said, 'Sin has brought sorrow and death.' So, while Abel was thankful God had given him sheep and lambs for food and clothing, he had to watch and work for them; and while Cain was glad to see his seeds grow and his fruits ripen, he had to plant, and water, and dig, and take a great deal of pains with them. You might never have known what a difference there was between these two sons of Adam, if it had not been for one particular day, of which I must tell you. "They went together to worship God; each brought something to offer. Cain brought some of his fruits; Abel brought a lamb of his flock. Man's eye might see no difference, but God looks at the heart. He was pleased with Abel, and displeased with Cain. How should Cain have felt? He should have felt sorry and humble. He should have been quite sure God was in the



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. bear her share of the punishment; for in fear and dread lest her favourite son should be killed, she made up her mind to send him right away to the place where she came from, where she had a brother living, whose name was Laban. This was how Jacob began a wandering life. For all his lying and deceit, he was really God's child; and though God punished him, He loved him still. Jacob, too, loved God; he thought of Him in the day, as' he walked alone through.deep valleys, or climbed over high mountain-tops; he dreamed of Him at night. My class can tell me about one of Jacob's dreams, for we talked about it only last Sunday. James Abbot, you can tell a story well-tell us about Jacob's dream." When James heard a thing he wanted to remember, he had a way of putting it by carefully in his memory, and now and then he looked to see that it was all safe; so he was soon ready with his story. You told us, sir, night came on when Jacob was on his way, and he says, I'll have to stop till morning;' and he was very tired, for he'd come a long way; so he laid down, glad enough to sleep anywhere, with his head on a big stone for a pillow. "He -was soon right off to sleep, and, then he saw a



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. "But Hagar had no camel, only a skin bottle. She made it last as long as she could, and hoped every hour, as she and Ishmael trod the fiery, sandy plain, that they should come to some little bubbling spring, where they could drink, ahd she could fill her bottle again. But days passed and no rain fell from heaven, no water was to be found in the wilderness. Ishmael was a brave young boy, but he was not used to hunger or thirst. There was always plenty to eat and drink in his father Abraham's house. His legs trembled, and he sank down fainting for thirst. Now I have a picture for you about it. Look at him, poor young fellow !-just fourteen he was now. There lies the bottle; there's not a drop more in it. His poor mother is weak enough herself, but she has managed to lay him down where there was just a bit of a shrub to shelter him a little from the sun, and then she goes away sobbing, as if her heart would break; for she can't sit by to see him die, and she knows by the look of him he will die soon if no water can be found. Harold said there were no people in a wilderness. He was right; but there is One who is everywhere, for He says,' Do not I fill heaven and earth ?' Ishmael must have called to God as he lay dying under the shrub, for a



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. in the very middle of a bush. It was the glory of the Lord Jesus which shone around him. And God called to him. Tell me, children, what God told him ?" S"Put thy shoes from off thy feet, for the place whereon thou standest is holy ground." "In England we take off our hats, boys, to show respect and reverence, but in Judea they slip off their shoes. They wear loose slippers, easily put off, and it would be thought very rude to go into the presence of a ruler with slippers or shoes on. The shoes are always put off in going into a place of worship. So we are told (Eccles. v. 1), Keep thy foot when thou goest into the house of God.' It means?" "That we must be very serious and quiet in God's house, sir," said little Joseph Smith, a fair-haired little fellow, who always sat with clasped hands during the Church service, and lisped the Lord's Prayer, though he could not read a single word. Mr. Elton looked hard at some other little boys, for he had often noticed them playing with flowers in church, and he told them that when he was a little boy, his mamma never allowed him to hold anything in his hand in church till he could read, nor to speak one single



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. 'How wast thou not afraid to stretch forth thy hand against the Lord's anointed?' Then David commanded him to be killed, and instead of exulting over his fallen enemy, he wept and mourned till evening over his fatherin-law, but most of all over his brother Jonathan. Now all his enemies were killed, David had nothing to prevent his going up straight into Judah, but he would not take a step without God's guidance. He asked of God first,' Shall I go up into any of the cities of Judah ?' And God said,,' Go up.' And David said, To which city ?'. And God answered, To Hebron.' "We do not know how God answered David; perhaps He spoke to him as He did to Samuel, when He called him in the night. But there are many ways in "which God guides us and shows us what to do without speaking aloud. Can you think of any ?" By the Bible." Yes; God's Word is a light to our feet and a lantern to our path. Any other ?" Good people." Good people often show us which way we ought to go; but mostly, I think, God's Holy Spirit whispers into our hearts the answer to our prayers. "David went up to Hebron, and there he was publicly



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. extremely learned and wise. But amidst all his knowledge he did not forget his aioher's lessons, he grieved over the hard labours of his own countrymen, and thought upon the wonderful promise of deliverance God made to Abraham, till his heart burned within him. I suppose he might have become a mighty prince in Egypt, but whenl he became a grownwman, he refused to be ,alcted the son of Pharaoh's daughter, and chose rather to -snar affliction with the people of God, than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season; he would rather have God's riches in heaven for ever, than the treasures of Egypt for a little while. So when he was forty years old he left the splendid court of the king, and came to visit his brothers, the poor despised Israelites. "' He saw them toiling under their heavy burdens, and as he watched them, he spied an Egyptian beat an Israelite wrongfully. Then Moses looked this way and that, and seeing nobody he struck down the Egyptian and killed him, and hid his body in the sand. The next day Moses came out again, but this time he saw two Israelites fighting together, so he said to the one who was in the wrong, 'Why do you strike your companion, your own countryman ?' People don't like



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ABRAIIAM AND ISAAC. son remind you of any verse in the New Testament ?" "God so loved the world that He gave his only begotten Son." "Yes, my children, we say Abraham loved God very much to be ready to give his only son when God asked him. But think how much more God loved you and me, when He gave His Son for us. No voice out of heaven cried 'stop' when Jesus was nailed to the cruel cross. If He did not die we must, because we were sinners, and sin must bring death. So God laid our sin and punishment upon Him. He was the Lamb in that great sacrifice, the Lamb of God which taketh away the sin of the world,' and it pleased the Father to bruise Him, and it pleased the Lord Jesus to suffer, because they loved you and me, and wished to make a way by which we might be safe and happy for ever. We have only a fe* minutes left, but I shall have time to tell you two or three more things which happened to Isaac. He and his father went back from Mount Moriah. Soon after this Sarah died, when she was one hundred and twenty-seven years old. Abraham and Isaac missed her very much. Abraham began to think of getting a wife for Isaac. The women all round them were



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET, AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. was ready to give all he had to David; he stripped off his princely robe and gave it him, and his sword, and bow, and girdle; and again and again we read, he loved him as his own soul.' Very differently Saul eyed David; he opened the door of his heart to envy, and where that mean, hateful passion dwells, all other sin can creep in. David's bravery and courtesy made him a sort of darling amongst the people, and Saul hated to hear his praises sung by them, and he was very wroth, saying, 'They have ascribed to David ten thousands, and to me they have ascribed only thousands, and what can he have more but the kingdom i' "You know, children, what happens when we indulge sinful tempers, they get more and more mastery over us. When Saul gave way to envy he invited the evil spirit back into his heart, and again he was troubled by those dreadful feelings; again David fetched his harp, and once more that exquisite music had power to drive away the evil spirit. But music, however heavenly, "cannot change our bad hearts, and even while David was playing, Saul struck at him with a dagger to kill him. An invisible shield protected David, the hand of God kept him, and twice he escaped from Saul.



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. fell with the restless water; it rested on Mount Ararat. Then they knew the water must be going down. Ten weeks passed away, and some one who looked out saw the tops of mountains standing like little islands in a sea of water. Forty days more, and then Noah opened the ark window, and let a raven fly. There, you see its dark wings against the evening sky in the picture. How glad it was to get its liberty. Noah let a dove fly next; but the gentle dove loves a warm, soft nest, and she soon came back to her mate, and to Noah in the ark. A week later he let her fly again, and this time she brought back an olive-leaf that she had gathered from the earth; so Noah knew the waters were going down fast. "Two months after the first mountain-top had been seen, Noah was able to take off the covering of the ark, and, as far as he could see, the earth was dry; but he had come into the ark at God's word, and he would not leave it again till God gave him leave. It was well he waited. The earth only looked dry; it was not fit for Noah to live upon for nearly eight weeks longer. God had not forgotten Noah; and when the earth was dried and ready, the message he had waited for came. It said to him, 'Go forth of the ark, thou and thy wife and thy sons, and thy sons' wives with thee.'



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(ill .A. SH & CO., PATERNOSTa RO'. lQuu., o MOSES STRIKING THE ROCK.



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. then to give a great shout and blow with trumpets." And then the walls fell flat down, so that the people went up straight into the city, and took it. Did they remember Rahab ?" "Oh, yes; she and her father, and family, and all she had; but everything else was burnt." "You see, children, what a blessed thing it is to fear God, and believe in Him. His children are always safe. It is not always summer time; you will have hard work to do, and want and sin to struggle against; so you must begin early. You will certainly conquer, if God fights with you and for you. And when all the fighting is over, you will go to live with Jesus in His paradise above, where no sin comes, nor death-a garden far more beautiful than this, where the river of water of life flows clear as crystal from the throne of God; where grow all manner of fruits; where the flowers never fade, and where you need not go out,' as now we must." So the day's pleasure was ended; but the children often talked about it; and there were some who began that night in good earnest to fight the good fight, and pray for a portion in the good land."



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J. F. SHAW & CO., PATERNOSTER ROW. THE MEETING OF JACOB AND ESAU.



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. next scrape he gets into, I will expel him.' Mr. Bhad not long to wait for Bill's next scrape, and in presence ot the whole school he was expelled. "The afternoon of the same day Bill's parents brought him back. 'If you turn him out,' they said, 'he is a ruined boy; we can do nothing with him.' And they pointed to him as he stood, sullen and sheepish, on the other side. "'But,' said Mr. B, 'if I keep him in, all the school suffers; I can't let all suffer for one. I have tried all I can to reform him, and now there is no help for it but turning him out.' "Very downcast looked the parents, and very sad was Mr. Bto have to refuse them. "'Stay,' he said, I think I might try one thing more. Boys, will any of you stand surety for Bill ?' "All the boys were silent; they did not quite know what the question meant. "'This is what I mean,' said the master, 'is there any one boy here who will stand in Bill's shoes, do his best to keep him right, but if he goes wrong, take his place and bear his punishment ?' "Not a boy spoke; the master turned his head slowly round the first class, second class, and farther



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.1L *'" So lom na dte ue tS eb ____



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Saul Presented to the People. Sa~ul lamsented to the People.



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_---------------------THE DESERT JOURNEY. that, for his father was a dairyman, and had lately lost a fine cow. "And the people fell sick, too, with boils. And there was an awful thunder-storm; great hailstones; fire running all along the ground, and the crops were spoiled, and all the trees broken." "That was the more wonderful in Egypt, because rain never falls there; no wonder the people were frightened. Was that all ?" God sent locusts, which ate all the green things the storm had left." Locusts are insects something like large grasshoppers, only with wings like dragon-flies. They are dreaded because they eat up everything that is within their reach; the ground they have passed over looks as if it had been burned with fire. Mr. Barrow, a traveller in Africa, once saw a district 2000 miles broad and 2000 miles long actually covered by them. The water of a wide river was hardly visible from the numberless dead locusts floating on-it. On another occasion, a cloud of locusts was seen 500 miles long, and so thick that as they flew they darkened the sun, and the buzzing of their wings was like the rumbling of carriages. Sometimes they are quite suddenly destroyed. Once a



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Joseph's Exaltation.



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alf Samuel's Call.



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-7~ Gathering the Manna.



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THE SIEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. branch with one cluster of grapes about a yard long, though unripe and scarcely fully grown. Forty years after the sgieshad picked these first-fruits of the promised land; Calbl claimed the wooded heights of Hebron for his portion. ".'Give me,' he said, 'this mountain whereof the Lord spake in .that day, for thou heardest in that day how the Anakims were there, and that the cities were great and fenced, if so be the Lord will be with me, then I shall be able to drive them out.'* "But it is not about Abraham or Caleb that I want to talk now, but of David, and how it was he came to live in Hebron. "When David saw Saul the last time, he left Judea and took refuge in the land of the Philistines with Achish. While he was there an Amalekite came running out of the camp of Israel, only too proud and happy to tell David of thel death of Saul. I suppose he thought he was bringing good news, for he said, 'I stood upon him and slew. him, because I was sure that he could not live, and I took his crown and helmet and have brought them to my lord.' If the Amalekite was telling a lie, see what he got by it.. David, took him at his word, but said severely, Josh. xv. 14.





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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. multitude. Give, thaefore, thy servant an understanding heart to judge thy Vple, that I may discern between good and hadf" "God was ,pleased with what he asked, and because he had asked neither long life, nor riches, nor victory, God gave him what he asked and all these beside. "When Solomon woke it seemed a dream, but it all came true. Though he was quite a young man, only about twenty years old, God blessed him so wonderfully that for riches and wisdom no one could compare with him. Never had there been such a merry time of it in all Israel. Solomon reigned over the whole land from one end to the other; he had peace with all the kings round about, and they all brought him presents and served him. People came from long distances to hear his wisdom. The'4ueen of Sheba came from far to prove him with haratquestions, and when she heard his answers and saw aH his riches, she declared the half had not been told .er. In this picture you can see her speaking with the kisg. His own people were as many as the sand on the seBhore, eating and drinking, and merry-making, for eC eanae -lwdt safely in his own little garden, under his NiBesadd *Ig-free.



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. Perhaps Pharaoh's daughter guessed who she was, but she only said, Take the child and nurse it for me, and I will give thee thy wages.' So his mother took him home awhile, and while he was but a baby-child, she taught him all about the God of Israel. We shall see presently how he remembered and acted on his mother's early lessons; but before we go on, can you tell me what little children may learn from this story ?" "It teaches us faith in God, sir," said all the elder boys at once. One little pale-faced girl added, "We learn who to go to in trouble, sir." Mr. Elton changed the picture once more, and asked the children what they saw ? "A man hiding his face in his hands." A blazing fire in a bush." A lonely desert place." And who is that man ?" "Is it Moses by the burning bush ?" "Yes; but let us hear all about it. When Moses grew up, his mother had to take him back to Pharaoh's daughter, and she was as good as her word, and treated him as her own son, and had him taught all kinds of useful things. I think he must have been a very engaging boy; his disposition was very meek and gentle, and he was very beautiful, and very clever too, for he became



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. His name is Mr. Shepherd, and he is the clergyman of the parish of St. Mary's, in which his house stands. He had a pretty church in a country village, but he was asked to come to London. It was rather hard work to leave his friends and quiet parsonage and garden, and to bring his wife and little children to this dingy house in a dull London street; but Mr. Shepherd thought the happiest thing in all the world was to tell people how Jesus loved them and died for them, and as he would have ten times as many people to preach to in London as in the country, he chose to come. It was iq the bright month of May that he said goodbye to the green fields and hedgerows, and now July is beginning, and London is very hot. The window is open, but the day has been close and sultry, and if Mr. Shepherd had time to think about it, he would know he is very tired, for he has preached twice; but as I told you, he is busy thinking of something else. I think he has made up his mind now, for I heard him say, "That will do; at least, I will try." And as he said so, he opened his writing-case and dipped his pen in the ink to write some letters. While he writes them, I shall tell you, my little readers, what they are about. Mr. Shepherd has been thinking about his school



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., V ~ AndJa v And Jacob served seven years for Rachel."--Gen. xxix. 20.


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THECREATION AND DELUGE. "That was a happy time, but it did not last long. Edith, we must change the picture, and show what happened next. Can any one tell me what this new picture means ?" "That's a sword of fire, sir, up there," said Annie. "Yes; and who holds it ? Edith, you' can tell me." "The Bible says, God drove out the man."* "Why were Adam and Eve driven out ?" Several answers were given at once. "They had been naughty." "Eve took the apple." God was angry with them." "I see you know the story; now I will tell you a little more about it. There is a wicked spirit called Satan, who hates God, and when God makes a good thing,. Satan directly wants to spoil it. He hates everything that is happy, because he is himself wicked and miserable. Adam and Eve were happy. The chief thing which made them happy was, not living in a beautiful garden, and having delicious fruit to eat, but loving God, and knowing that He loved them. Satan said to himself, If I could only make them think God is unkind!' So he entered into a serpent, and waited for a chance to find Eve alone. She was Gen. iii. 24.



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. the houses were made, so that all would burn fiercely Stogether, like a great furnace.' "* S"Children, what became of Lot ? was he burned with the rest ?" No, sir." "How did that happen ?" The angels told him what was coming." S"Yes, they saved him, and would have saved all that belonged to him if they would have listened to the warning, but when Lot went out in the middle of the night to the houses of the men who had married his daughters, and told them to make all the haste they could and get out of Sodom, because God was going to : destroy it, his sons-in-law would not believe a word of it; they thought Lot was only mocking them. The angels would not let him linger to persuade them, for fear the fire-rain should begin before he was out of the city himself. The angels hastened him, and they took hold of Lot's hand and his wife's hand, and the hands of his two daughters who were with him in the house, and made them all run for their lives. Escape for thy life,' they said, 'look not behind thee, lest thou be consumed.' Porter's Giant Cities of Bashan," 112.



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. let Him do what seemeth Him good.' Does God ever speak to children now ?" Several answered "No," but little Charley Mills lisped out a verse of the last hymn he had learned:And does He never speak, Oh yes, for in his Word He bids me come and seek The God that Samuel heard. In almost every page I see The God of Samuel speaks to me. "Yes, Charley, and like little Samuel we must answer, 'Speak, Lord, for thy servant heareth.' The judgment which God threatened, all came true. There was a great battle between the Israelites and their old enemies the Philistines, and when the Israelites got worsted they sent for the ark of God, but they had sinned against God, and God would not fight for them. ", Poor old Eli, he was so terribly anxious that he sat on a seat by the wayside fearfully watching, for his heart trembled for the ark of God. Dearly as he loved his sons, he loved God better, and his first care was for the ark. As he sat there a man came running past him. Eli was very old, ninety-eight, and could not see, but when the man had passed to tell the sad news in the city,



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A 'BkHA AtD .ISAAC. a broad io er a eet of water. Such a pleka place was not. l:iy to be wihout inhabitants. Tera were citie Ai e the I cities of the plain,' they were caled. The nameof some of those cities you know very well, they were cald SBedia andQmmrrah. We shall see presently whether Let -ad a a,. he chose to live among tem. h I tfiink not;j T tif, ble says,% 'The men of Sdom were wided,. ana sinmas before the Lord exceedingly.' Now we wil ieave Lot a little while, and, see what became of Abraham. Who is thait doo you think, kneeling out on a rock in t 4aedak night "0 it Apramnsir i it is AlaiisA he is talking with God: The Bi ;e Ahntec thefriend of God,' but Abram knew God we: very grea4 so when he talked wit. Him, he waavery solae ad. reverent. He fell on hia knees to talk wviAtel gisea d; remember that, little e ilden, when you kneel down to pray, the great good man Abram dinoi to trifle when he talked wi& God. But ilwhtl:liw e dide dare to do-he tol God all his troubleai Hadi Abiaaa any troubles ? Yes one thins madw im sad He did so wish to have a child of hi,-.twn; a6i&dia*ae. When he kneeled before



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r THE STORY OF DAVID. THE children of St. Mary's School were always glad to see Mr. Carter. He was a grandpapa, and he knew how to win the hearts of litle people. He always had a kind look and smile for everybody, his head was full of stories, and his pockets were full of various delights for his little friends. And they had pleasant looks for him too, for love makes love just as music makes an echo and light a reflection. Each little face grew brighter as Mr. Carter passed up to the high desk, and so many had brought him nosegays that he had to share them with his little grand-daughters, Rose and Isabel, who came with him. "If I tell you the name of this place, children" holding up a picture of Hebron, "you must tell me what happened there. But stay, little Charley Mills shall spell the name."



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THE OLD PICTURE BIBLE; OR, STORIES FROM OLD TESTAMENT HISTORY. BY THE AUTHORS OF "DOING AND SUFFERING" AND OF "MOTHERS IN COUNCIL." teU pIatin an) t Coevlaurt Iluitrattan. LONDON: JOHN F. SHAW AND CO., 48, PATERNOSTER ROW.



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. found in the desert was bitter. Very soon again they complained they were hungry, and they were so ungrateful as to wish themselves back in Egypt, where they had bread and flesh; forgetting all their toil, and hard blows and words there, and how they had groaned under them. Yet, oh, how patient God was with them. He forgave their murmuring, and sent them flesh and bread. In the evening a flight of birds flew all round the camp, so that they could kill and eat, as many as they wanted. In the morning a still more wonderful thing happened. When the sun rose and dried up the dew, the whole ground was sprinkled with small, white, round things, it looked just like hoar-frost, and when the people tasted it, they found it as sweet as honey. They were so puzzled and surprised, they called it manna, which means, What is it? You see them gathering it up in this picture. "God promised them that all the time they were in the wilderness, He would rain this manna for them from heaven, and He bade them remember some rules about it. 1. It must be gathered early, before the sun was hot, or it would melt. 2. Each must gather for himself, and there would be enough for all.



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. Most of the children knew something about the cup in Benjamin's sack, but no one was very ready to tell, so Mr. Fawcett went on:"Old Jacob was persuaded to let Benjamin go down with his brothers to Egypt, and he trusted him to Judah's care. They took a present for Joseph to make him more pleased with them. They little thought this governor of Egypt, who seemed so hard and proud, was their own brother Joseph. When he saw Benjamin among them his heart was too full, he could not help crying; but he did not let them see, he went alone by himself to cry; he did not wish yet to let them know who he was. "Then he made them all come to his grand palace, Sand dine with him. He told the steward, the servant who managed everything in his house, to give them as much corn as their asses could carry, and to take no money for it; but he said, 'Put my silver cup in Benjamin's sack.' When they had gone a little way, Joseph said to his steward, Go after those men, and search for the cup.' "Jacob's sons were in great trouble. They were sure they had not taken the cup. Look and see,' they said; 'search in our sacks.' Every man lifted down his



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. tempestuous wind drove all the full-grown locusts into the sea, and their bodies were cast up on the beach, where they made a ibank tihsee or four feet high, and fifty miles long !" There were two more plagues. What were they ?" The darkness, sir-thick darkness, when they could not see each other for three days." "The death of the first-born." "And then Pharaoh let them go. Before he said he would, over and over again, but directly God took away the judgment, his heart grew hard again, and each time he became more and more obstinate, until God took away his own son, and then at last he yielded." "In the darkness of the night, when all was still, the angel of the Lord passed through the land. The people knew He was coming, and the Israelites were all ready and prepared. God had told them that for every family a little lamb must be killed, and its blood sprinkled on the door. Wherever the destroying angel saw the blood, he passed over that door, and did not go in, but he spared no other house, from the palace of Pharaoh to the dungeon of the captive; wherever he entered he slew every first-born son, and a great and terrible cry of



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. and higher, the rain is still pouring, and it will rise higher still The, houses are. all under water; so are the tallest trees, except one which grows on a high rocky point. A few half-drowned men and women and little children are clinging to this last remaining tree. It is of no use, the topmost bough will soon be& covered. There in the distance floats the ark, where they might all have been safe and happy; but it is too late now; God has shut to the door of the ark, and it will not be opened again. Oh. it is a sad picture;: lIt us turn to the next. The next is still the ark, but not even a mountaintop is to be seen; all is one wild waste of waters, and the ark is floating securely upon them. So it was for many days and months. At last, the Bible tells us, God remembered Noah,' and made a wind to pass over the earth, and drove away the black clouds which had been pouring down steady rain, week after week, and month after mouMA Think what it must have been to Noah and his family, as they looked out of the window in the ark, to see the bright sunshine again, dancing and sparkling u o the waters. At length one day, between six and seven months after the flood began, a sound was heard under the ark; it had touched a mountain-top. It no longer heaved and



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET, AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. "'tDid'David kill him-?" ""No." "He neither killed ihim himself, nor allowed hisiten to touh' im, butihe cut off a piece ofSaiil's .robe,uamd *when Saul left the cave he showed it him from faer,aand called after him, saying, 'My lord, the king. :Some bade me kill thee, but my eye spared thee. My father, see, yea, see the skirt of thy robe in my hand. I have not sinned vagainst thee, yet thou huntest my soul to take' it. IThe Lord avenge me of thee, but my hand shall not be on thee.' 'ilMy children, -you have not4ihe same temptations to revenge as David had. No owe iis hunting .you up and down alay and night tto 14ll y1ou, ibut i.there are Ltimes when ie atan whispers augry, lreveng ful feelings into your ilearts; one Rpitifiil w"ord provokes another, a hasty blow is quicklyrpaidback, and you tihink it quite excase tenough for going into a passion and 'hurting others .if they provdked 2iyou, car thuft uyou first. "Who can tellrme Jesus Ohris's rule about this ?" 'Many voices ,answered, for the children had lately been learning the fifth chapter of Matthew. "L'Love your enemies; bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you."



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THE SHEPHERD KING AND HIS WISE SON. "When Absalom had once admitted his wicked scheme into his heart, he began slily to prepare for it. He first tried to steal the hearts of the people, flattering them. Then came deceit and backbiting. If anybody came to the king for justice, Absalom would meet them, and say, "Oh, your cause is right and good, but the king won't hear you. I wish I might judge for you, I would do every one justice.' At last, when his plot was quite ripe, he told a wicked lie to the king. He pretended he wanted to go and worship God in Hebron, saying, 'He had vowed to serve God, if David ever allowed him to return.' David was quite taken in, and said, Go in peace.' Then that wicked, ungrateful son sent spies all through the land, telling the people everywhere, as soon as they heard the trumpet blown in Hebron, to say, Absalom is king.' There was one man on whom David specially relied, and called him his counsellor, his name was Ahithophel, and he was so remarkably wise, that men followed his advice as if it had been God's. Absalom thought, If only Ahithophel will join me, I shall be sure to succeed.' But would Ahithophel listen to him and betray the king ?" Oh, no," answered many voices.



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET, AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. father-in-law ? What was he feeling and thinking? The fifty-ninth Psalm tells us. Instead of breathing -vengeance against his cruel enemies, he was praying to God. 'Deliver me from mine enemies, O my God,' he cried;.'they lie in wait for me; awake to help me, and behold.' His heart did not quail. God is my defence,' he exclaimed triumphantly; 'let them wander up and down, and grudge, if they are not satisfied, but I will sing aloud of thy power and mercy, for thou hast been my defence and refuge in the day of my trouble.' "From Naioth David came secretly to Jonathan, and said there was 'but a step between him and death,' and asked why Saul hated him,. and wished to kill him. Jonathan would not believe that Saul hated him, but promised to find out, and let him know in three days, if he would hide in a field near by, and meet him there at that time. "It was not difficult to find out. In his rage and "passion against David, Saul was ready to kill even his own son Jonathan, for being David's friend. 'Do I not know,' he said, 'thou hast chosen the son of Jesse to thine own confusion ? As long as he lives thou shalt aot be established, nor thy kingdom. Fetch him unto me, for he shall surely die.'



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THE CREATION AND DELUGE. Well, children, do you know what I have done ?" No, sir." "This is a prism, it catches sunbeams, and shows you what they are made of. You see" how the colours melt into one another, so that you can't say where one begins and another ends, yet there are three very plain ones, blue, red, and yellow. Now screw up your little hands, and look through them at the sun. You see bright lines or rays of light, don't you ?" "Yes, sir." "What colour are they ?" "White, sir." "Each white ray is made up of three colours, blue, red, and yellow. My prism catches a ray and divides it, so that you can see the three colours, but how it does so is too difficult for you to understand. You see that it does. Now can you remember ever having seen anything like this in the sky?" Yes, sir, a rainbow; there was one last Tuesday, right over St. Mary's, when it rained so hard, and then the sun shone." Did you see the rainbow before the sun came out ?" "No, sir."



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:*rAiAM AND UW Qo' to be hJil kd place, aalibe Sdid af ear Him enough 4 It step. here s aw longer/. God f.lemiay to ab a lave s lom.n Does any one kneoiw 6 it wasf' "He mBfodom af-ie, fir" "Yes, here is a picture of its deetin. Look at theblamng houiise ad tAery rain sweeping down over the city. But there im a giRt deal to tell about Sodom. CZn you listen to along story '" Abraham heard about it first, for you remember he w God's friend, and God said, Shall I hide from Aachwm the thing that I do ? "* It was i the middle of a very hot day that Abraham wv iS4 g in his tent door where it was shaded from the s sm Aie could get any air that was stirring. He loedapand three men stood by him. There were no irsme4ao, tt apublic-houses where strangers could turn in adl gt aavna or a bed; but rich men like Abraham wear ah c ga lte be .kid to traellers, and to offer them the bet d-lteyhy hal. I don't know wb Abraham kwm -w&!it what rwaen visitors he had, for the same vt f aness was often shown, and is often shown ow 'in &oee counBies, to any traveIers. But he soon did know, for one of the hiee began to talk



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. The first class read from verse twelve to fourteen"When the sun was going dao s, aLidep sleep fell upon Abraham; and, lo, an horrorso grea darkness fell upon him. And God said unto Abraham, Know of a surety that thy children shall be a stranger in a land that is not theirs, and shall serve them; and they shall affict them four hundred years; and also that nation, whom they shall serve, will I judge: and afterward shall they come out with great substance." "It was more than one hundred and eighty years before this dream came true, but at last every word of it was fulfilled. I need not remind you of the story of Joseph being sold as a strager im*)H jypt-aEo his& fathe Jacob (Abraham's grandson) and al ]Bi sos cameiogdown to live in the land tha wariwt rd ir' 'liswa the first part of the dream, bat they didnet yt; samW Se Elgyptians, and were at first homkmpe4. not S aii$ b y bthem; and for long the Istiaata weisg ry pwriae i auimuidtiplied. exceedi "OBe some time afW Josel*p' an ag.wB t1B,, "KBimsd arose ip.an am ing over uIiAw & ner aw: e JMIVa' HiMstory tafl kustbas.k *te adiPAM in 1i6jl"y a raE of flere raw owax i fiei Aral wo n iB pepalerd Kings tandthat it was they. wkho mappriw Aw: people.



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ABRAHAM AND ISAAC. It was about Sodom and Gomorrah and the other cities in that beautiful watered plain, where Lot had chosen to dwell. God said he could not bear their wickedness any longer. He had come to destroy them. "Abraham felt very sorry when he heard it, for he knew these were the cities, and this was the watered plain, where his nephew Lot had gone to live. He began to beg for Sodom very hard that it might be spared. He thought surely Lot and all his children and grandchildren and servants still feared God. They would make a good number, perhaps fifty, so he asked God to spare Sodom if there were fifty righteous people in it, and God said He would. Then Abraham's heart misgave him that there might not be quite so many, and he asked again for fortyfive, and for forty, and for thirty, and for twenty, and at last Abraham grew very bold, and he asked God to spare Sodom if there were ten righteous people there. Abraham thought Lot was safe now, and he stopped asking. But you see, little boys and girls, what harm it does to live in bad company. Lot's family and servants, who seemed to be God's servants while they lived near Abraham, soon threw off their religion when no one round them was religious. Their religion had no root, so it soon withered up, and now not even ten of the large company who



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JOSEPH THE CAPTIVE-JOSEPH THE RULER. very much of in those days. He told Esau to take his bow and arrows, and shoot a wild deer, and make him some nice venison. When I have eaten it,' he said, I will bless you.' Esau went out to do it. "Rebekah heard what Isaac said. Everybody lived in tents then, you know, and voices could easily be heard outside by any one listening. 'I should like Jacob to have that blessing instead of Esau,' she said to herself; I could soon make a nice dish for Jacob to take in to his father instead of Esau, and Isaac is so blind, he could never tell one from another by looking at them.' So she called Jacob, and told him to fetch two tender young kids from the flock to make savoury meat, and told him why. Jacob did not say, Mother, that would be acting a lie, and would make God angry'I don't think Rebekah could have found any answer to that-but he said, Mother, I should be found out; perhaps my father will want to feel, as he cannot see me; and if he does, my skin is smooth, and Esau's is rough and hairy.' The devil is always ready to help people to an idea when they are doing his work; so Rebekah thought directly what to do. The skin of the young kids was hairy too, and out of the skins she made coverings for Jacob's handssome sort of gloves, I suppose-and a covering for the



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THE DESERT JOURNEY. Thursday did come at last! Many anxious little faces peeped out at daybreak, to question the sky whether it meant to be fine. No doubt about it-not a cloud anywhere; and never was a merrier party than that which met in holiday dress and holiday temper at St. Mary's School. Eight large vans, all decked with flowers and flags, stood at the door, and, after a hymn, and a few words from good Mr. Shepherd, the clergyman, they were packed in their respective conveyances. The drive was delicious, and the hungry children did full justice to a capital dinner spread out on the Kew Green. Meat pies and cakes, ginger-beer and cherries, were hardly finished at one o'clock, when the iron gates swung open, and the happy party were dispersed in little bands over the garden. All the wonders of the place were duly admired; they were shown the papyrus of the Nile, the plant of which Moses's floating cradle was woven, the tall palms, of which we read in the Bible, and a hundred other marvels and beauties. But, as our legs grow tired before our eyes, when five o'clock came, not one of them



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D. AD AND ITIS FRENDS RUETRATING FROM A EIHTSALON. DAVID AND IllS FRIENDS RETREATING FROM ABSALON.



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THE YOUTHFUL PROPHET, AND ISRAEL'S FIRST KING. picture.) You see him in the picture, he thought he was spared, but Samuel said sternly, As thy sword has made women childless, so thy mother shall be childless,' and he hewed him in pieces. How awful and how sure God's judgments are "Now we must leave Saul a little while, and pay a visit, with Samuel, to a lowly home near the small town of Bethlehem. Samuel had a message from God to one of the eight sons of Jesse, who lived there, to anoint him as king instead of Saul. He called them all together for a sacrifice. When he saw the eldest, a tall, noblelooking man, Samuel said to himself, 'Surely that's the one,' but God said, I have refused him.' God does not look, as we do, on the outside, He looks at the heart. Ah, children, some of you think a great deal of dress on Sunday, but remember, God does not look at the outward appearance, so if you go to church to meet God, you will care less about fine dress than to have your hearts washed in the blood of Jesus, and clothed with the beautiful graces of his Spirit. Jesse made all his sons pass before Samuel, but it was not these. He was puzzled, and asked if these were all. 'No, there was one more, the youngest, keeping the sheep.'