A Book of emblems

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Material Information

Title:
A Book of emblems with interpretations thereof
Physical Description:
xii, 123 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Gatty, Alfred, 1809-1873
Bell and Daldy ( Publisher )
Chiswick Press ( Printer )
Whittingham & Wilkins ( Printer )
Publisher:
Bell and Daldy
Place of Publication:
London
Manufacturer:
Chiswick Press ; Whittingham and Wilkins
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Emblems -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Mottoes -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1872
Genre:
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Mrs. Alfred Gatty.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002230156
notis - ALH0503
oclc - 11235849
lccn - 81187462
System ID:
UF00026571:00001

Full Text
S N


4 mq m4III The Baldwin Librar4 siI m6I34Rm 4


A BOOK OF EMBLEMS


A BOOKOF EMBLEMSWITH INTERPRETATIONS THEREOFBY MRS ALFRED GATTYAUTHOR OF PARABLES FROM NATURE ETCLONDONBELL AND DALDY YORK STREETCOVENT GARDEN1872


CHISWICK PRESS PRINTED BY WHITTINGHAM AND WILKINSTOOKS COURT CHANCERY LANE


TO IMY DEAR DAUGHTERJULIANA HORATIA EWINGI DEDICATE THIS LITTLE VOLUMEKNOWING THAT A TASTE FOR ITS QUAINT DEVICESIS ONE OF THE MANY INTERESTSWE HAVE IN COMMONMARGARET GATTY


CONTENTSPageHE Dial of Life 2He must have plenty of broth who wouldstop everybody s mouth 8Imperial custom Second nature 12By yielding we conquer 16When God wills 20When the ass is too well off he goes dancing ontheice 24Not earthly things only 28Thus 0 my soul 32As you brew so you must bake 36Such is the life of man 40The hunchback sees his neighbour s hump not his own 44Now or never 48The ass may be invited to court but it is only to carryburdens 52Who feels the need seeks the remedy 56Together we suffer and rejoice 60There s many a slip twixt the cup and the lip 64b


vi CONTENTSPageShow me Thy ways 0 Lord 68I also am under authority 72They desire a better country 76Without losing its own light 80I rejoice in the present and have better things in store 84We covet not ambrosia or nectar 88If everyone swept before his own door all the streetwould be clean 92Roasted pigeons fly into nobody s mouth 96Securely rooted ooEver upwards 104What I carry in my bosom I bear on my face 8 8Made perfect through suffering 112Whithersoever thou leadest 116The softening influence of use 120Parabolic 124


PREFACEOME explanation is due to thereader who may observe that theEnglish and foreign mottoes ofthese emblems do not always correspondThe truth is the emblems are taken innearly all cases from old foreign books thisstyle of literature having been at one timemuch more popular on the Continent than ithas ever been in England Quarles himselfwas indebted to the same source for many ofthe emblems which he made his own by his


viii PREFA CEbeautiful verses but without acknowledgingthe fact In the present volume howeverwe have thought it better to refer to the booksfrom which the designs are taken whilstreserving to ourselves the right of puttingwhat interpretation we pleased upon themand even of modifying and altering the mottoif it seemed good to us This will sufficientlyaccount for the frequent discrepancies betwixtthe two mottoes These foreign books contain disquisitions upon the difference betweendevices and emblems but we have classedall under the latter name as having a moregeneral significationSimple devices are of very ancient originMoses is supposed to have borrowed the ideaof them from the Egyptians and they were


PREFA CE ixadopted by the twelve Tribes of Israel asindicated in Genesis chap xlix Their symbols however were of the simplest kind suchas are still in use in savage countries Ofthis there are examples in British Columbiaamongst the American Indians where thenative tribes are formed into divisions eachone of which assumes for itself a badge orcrest as they call it This is generallythe figure of some animal which is stuckupon a pole in front of their tents and represents a porpoise wolf eagle c remindingone of the lion of Judah the ass of Issacharthe hind of Naphtali c By and by ascivilization progressed devices took a morecomplicated character and were adopted notonly by families but by individuals The


x PREFACEFrench claim to have been the originatorsof these devices proper but they admitthat the Italians carried them to greater perfection They were required to have bothbody and soul that is to say there was tobe a bodily figure having two significations aliteral and an allegorical one There wasalso to be a motto elucidating the latterThe subjects were always to be refinedand noble in their character nothing monstrous or disgusting was to be introducednothing that could offend the sight or woundthe imagination They were moreover to bein harmony with the individual who adoptedthem and so one author finds fault with PopeGregory XIII for assuming the device of adragon as being inappropriate to the chief


PREFA CE xipastor of the Christian flock Neverthelessthey contained no direct moral teachingMoral or spiritual lessons were only introduced into them incidentally and in thisrespect they strikingly differed from emblemsproper which are perfectly unfettered in theirchoice of subject and pass from grave to gayfrom lively to severe making profitable use ofall humours And inasmuch as it is only themoral and spiritual teachings in these quaintdesigns which have any interest for us wehave included under the name of Emblemsonly such devices as contain themWe may add that we think a taste foremblems is natural to children at least wecan speak for ourselves We can hardlyremember the time when Quarles was not


xii PREFA CEdear to us and what is more our affection forhim remains with us still Nay our intimateacquaintance with and love for his workspaved the way for further interest in olderbooks of the same kind which fact may beaccepted as a cause of the present volumebeing offered to the readerMARGARET GATTYJune 1872These Emblems first appeared in AUNT JUDY SMAGAZINE from the pen of the Editor


EMBLEMSB


THE DIAL OF LIFEDESIGNED BY JAMES NASMYTH ESQHIS is a mysterious looking figure butit is easily explained The half circlerepresents a man s life from his firstbirthday down in the left corAer tothe eightieth one he may possibly live to in thecorner opposite Eighty years is the utmost allowance of time a man may reckon upon for doing anyactive work in the world and this is the reasonwhy it is given as the limit on this dial For whatdo you think the dial is for Not only to remindthe general looker on of the age and infirmity anddeath which must one day come upon us all butto call the attention of the young to the gloriousnumber of years God gives His creatures to be busy


40T E SF L I ESTIME FLIES


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THE DIAL OF LIFE 5in to the glorious opportunity they have thereforefor doing something in the world something goodat any rate possibly something greatTake the case of some young friend who is butten years old at the present time We will explainthe use of the dial to himAnd first as he can do nothing now with the yearshe has already lived we will shade them overThere it is done and now look what a little bitthe shaded ten years is to the large space of seventythat lies beyond Well the lad has not lost muchof his time yet however little he may have accomplished Besides a boy is such a little boy up toten years old that very little is expected of himObedience and love that is all If he has allowedhimself to be guided hitherto by others in his dutiesto God and man it is enough he has done all heought to have done and might sleep in peace if theend were to come nowBut as it has not only see what lies before himHow many years of that beautiful white space ofunused time from the figure of o1 to the figure of8o he cannot indeed tell but possibly numbers


6 THE DIAL OF LIFEand numbers of years which it would take ever solong to count even Yes think of this happy tenyear old child and ask yourself what you will dowith them Each man s life you know that iseach man s time on earth is a gift of God givenhim to do something with We are none of us nonot one drifted into the world to toss up and downand tumble about by chance like little bits of stickafloat on a river till the great tide carries us awayNo for some mysterious reason God sends everybody into the world to do some special work andyou have yours depend upon it and day by dayit will come under your hands to be doneBe sure then that what your hand findeth todo you do and to remind yourself of this as theyears pass over shade off each into the dead yearsin which you can do nothing further so that youmay not deceive yourself as to how much remainsTo every one living a white space does remain andit is never too late to be up and doingSee now the Dial of Life is the Dial of Life indeed a dial of hope a dial of promise From theearliest ages the circle has been an emblem of


THE DIAL OF LIFE 7eternity Here then is but a portion of it thetrial portion the working portion Work uprightlyand you need not fear what comes after As tothose clouds that you see coming up against the 80in the right hand corner like all other clouds theydo but hide the heaven beyond


HE MUST HAVE PLENTY OF BROTH WHOWOULD STOP EVERYBODY SMOUTHND then only for a time Oh youfoolish old fellow with the spoon helping the people all round you are surelyrelated to the Miller in AEsop s fablewho going to market with his son and his asslistened to all the tittle tattle by the waysidetook everybody s opinion rather than his owntried to please everybody rather than himselfand ended by pleasing nobody not even himselfSee now how the folks gape As fast as youfill one mouth another opens The empty onesopen to grumble at not being filled and I wishthe full ones may not open presently to find faultwith your cooking


HY MOET VEEL BRY HEBBEN DIE ELCK DEN MONTSAL STOPPEN CatZI


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NONE PLEASE ALL IBut come old greybeard you must turn wiseas Father Catz who drew your picture makes youdo and tell us your conclusions upon your pastexperienceI will go home and clean my hearthAnd heart and house and keep them sweetThen come who will from all the earthI ll set before him wholesome meatAnd offering this to friend or guestOr any man of honest mindI ll set all troubled thoughts at restAnd let those grumble who re inclinedSo be it for the proverbs thicken around usHe is indeed a knowing wightWho thinks to set the whole world rightHe who builds by the roadside has a goodmany advisersNever saw I all my daysOne who d everybody s praiseHe needs a clever counsel who is summonedbefore the world s tribunal


IMPERIAL CUSTOM SECOND NATUREManSNSLAVED yet not wishing to be freehaving wings yet not caring to flyborn to soar yet contented to sit aSdenizen of the skies yet grovellingrather in a cage see what custom has broughtthee to poor beautiful degraded birdBird Fine words poet fine words I canrepeat them myself to youMan Parrot like poor PollyBird Parrot like poor master That s justwhat I say Look at home master look at homeMan What mean you sirrah Am I enslavedthink you without caring to be free Have IwingsIdonot use Was I too born to soar Am I


GRAVISSIMUM IMPERIUM CONSUETUDINISDionysii Lebei Batillii Emblemata


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CUSTOM SECOND NATURE 15a denizen of the skies yet contented to grovelbelowBird Parrot like poor master yes Enslavedto the world without caring to be free Havingwings of thought never unfolded Able to soar inspirit but loth to the effort Born for heaven butclinging fondly to earth see what custom hasbrought thee to poor magnificent degraded man


BY YIELDING WE CONQUERND these are reeds shaken with the windAre we then to be carried about byevery blast of feeling or opinion toyield for yielding s sake to evil as wellas good Is this to be the victory that overcomethNay but see you it is the wind from heaven before which these reeds are bending not the feeblebreath of man Understand the lesson thereforeof submission to God s dealings with His creaturesYea and include among His dealings those whichHe permits as well as those which He ordainsIt is easier and safer and more pleasant saysa wise old bishop to live in obedience than to beat our own disposingOne fine autumn evening 1867 a lady on board


CEDENDO VICTOR ABIISCEDENDO VICTOR ABI13IS CatZ


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BY YIELDING WE CONQUER 19one of the stately steamers that ply on the Mississippi like castles on the deep was watching thewaves caused by the huge paddles of the vessel asthey broke from time to time on the bank Presently she noticed one larger than the rest gatheritself up as if bent on destruction On the bankstood a strong upright tree trunk looking as if benton resistance while by its side a graceful branchstretched droopingly over the water There wasa crash and the wave had burst alas bearingaway the broken tree trunk on its bosom But thebranch bending to the water had passed under itonly to come out beautified and refreshed Its tearbedewed leaves glistened in the late sunshine asit rose uninjured to its place By yielding it hadconquered and the lady brought the lesson hometo England


WHEN GOD WILLSUCH was the device of one William ofHenneberg Prince and Count of theS Holy Roman Empire of whom weknow nothing now but that it is longsince he went to his rest a grafted tree with themotto When God WillsYes when God wills Meantime all we seehere is a polled tree its branches disfigured bylumps of clay The skilled workman has gonehis way his own share in the matter is over andhe knows well that though he has proposed andlaboured accordingly God must dispose at lastThe tree stands there alone now waiting the working of the mysterious law within And that sotended and cultured it should one day bud andblossom and bring forth fruit might well be the


WAN GOTT WIL 7acobz Tyholzi Symbolart I


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WHEN GOD WILLS 23gardener s reasonable hope when he left it butwhich graft if any shall succeed and which if anyshall fail it is beyond his province to determineand out of all reason to fret aboutLet those who labour in the moral world takethe lesson to heart Churchmen statesmen parents teachers it speaks alike to all who labourfor the good of others i e for the ingrafting of ahigher law into a degenerated nature See thatyou use the means appointed see that you havenot your own indifference or negligence to blamefor failure But then be satisfied and go your wayit is not for you to know the times and the seasons When God wills the fruit will appearThe work its master glorifiesThe blessing cometh from the skies


WHEN THE ASS IS TOO WELL OFF HEGOES DANCING ON THE ICEGH One has to be very cautious ingiving advice to man with his godlike gift of reason lest he take offenceinstead of a hint So we put his follyupon a guiltless donkey or goose and strike themoral home to the higher animal by a side blowA well to do donkey really wanting to danceupon ice for instance who ever heard of such athing But a well to do man wanting to show offbeyond his means and take a place he is not fittedfor ah one has not to go far to look for himStill there lies the donkey in the picture and Imust whisper a word in his long ears Why didyou leave safe ground for slippery places whenyou did not know how to skate safely across them


WAN DEM EZEL ZU WOLL IST SOO GEHET ER AUFFTEISZ TANTZEN CatZE


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KNOW YOUR PLACE 27You had as much business there as any oneelse do you say You are as prosperous andwell fed as anybodyA true ass s answer indeed Will oats or beanseven give you the paw of the bear or the skatemaking brain of man Hush donkey dear Thegreatest secret of life is to know your own place inthe world and keep it till you are qualified for abetter


NOT EARTHLY THINGS ONLYOT earthly things only do even Thyearthly creatures need O Lord Whatevil spirit whispers of independence todependent manUpon a distant Star so distant that man maycalculate and speak of but cannot realize the spacewhich lies between it and him does life of everysort in this our world depend Extinguish thatand what becomes of this Thence light and warmthand dews and showers and purifying stormsNot earthly things only therefore do Thy servantsask But those who beg must not seek to chooseIt is easy to hold out hands into the pleasant sunshine or refreshing shower When the storm comesthen comes the trial Then must hands of faith


I I iN iiN I 1 1 iNON QUAE SUPRA TERRAM 7acobi Typotii Symbola


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NOT EARTHLY THINGS ONLY 31still be stretched out yea though winds may chilland hailstones bruise Still must the prayer go upNot cafthly things only 0 Lord and of heavenlywhat Thou seest fit


THUS 0 MY SOULs HUS does the word need commentwould some one have it explainedThus through the realms of whatseems boundless space stream rayscelestial life giving from the fountain of light themighty sun that rules our system upon the littleearthly flowerThus turns the little earthly flower day by dayto its distant lord not discerning him by sight butseeking after him by the surer instinct of its innerbeing0 heavenly light Light of light so disAinsi mon Ame The emblem figured above with thisFrench motto was the original sign on Child s BankingHouse and is still preserved within the building


AINSI MON AMEF


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THUS 0 MY SOUL 35tant yet so near present yonder as a mightypower which none can fully comprehend presentin our hearts by influences life giving divinewhich all may follow if they will touch the mountains pierce the valleys descend upon thy humanflowers draw us as Thou wouldst have us drawnthus after TheeAnd thou my soul follow where that Lightleads As the sun its maker as the flower itsmaster so thou thy GODThus 0 my soul


AS YOU BREW SO YOUMUST BAKES the good wife there knows well andseems to be explaining to the childFor is not her one anxiety on bakingday to obtain good yeast and is not itsure to be good if proper materials honest maltand hops have been properly put together in thebrewing otherwise there is no dependence to beplaced in it And thus are human actions andevents strangely interwoven so that oftentimes retribution for wrong doing comes from quarters themost unexpectedHear this all ye youngsters who would fain reapharvests of things ye have not sown or having sownthe wind are hoping to escape the whirlwind thatfollows As you brew so you must bakeIt is a coarse illustration of a great truth that


As You BREW SO YOU MUST BAKE


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AS YOU BREW YOU BAKE 39barrel though I am obliged to own In these daysone thinks of a brewer s vat as of the witches cauldronin Macbeth a receptacle of all abominations allill running in to make the charm grow madderWell let the witches and brewers look to it Asthey have brewed so shall they one day bake Notliterally perhaps oh no we emblem fanciers thinklittle of the letter it killeth but though not literally nevertheless not the less really


SUCH IS THE LIFE OF MANUMAN LIFE has been compared tomany things but not often to a game ofbackgammon Why not to chess muchratherNay chess is not half as good a simile for in thatroyal game a man s movements are in his own powerand his will rules his fortune throughout and suchis by no means the case in lifeFor the circumstances in which a man is placedand the accidents otherwise providences whichhappen to him from childhood to old age are not ofhis choosing These come to him like the throws ofdice to a backgammon player as chances beyondhis control What shall he do then Sit down withfolded arms and let Time and Chance carry himwhere they will


ITA EST VITA HOMINUM Dionysius Lebbe BatilliusG


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SUCH IS THE LIFE OF MAN 43Nay there is freedom of action as well as Time andChance both for the backgammon player and theman The throws of dice can be played more waysthan one Unskilful play will often make a goodthrow useless and skilful turn a bad one to goodaccountAnd if we do not say always that is because weare speaking of backgammon as well as life Of lifewe might say always As far as this world goeshowever the simile is a correct one and the Emblemwould bear two mottoes Such is the Life of Manand Unlucky accidents are to be borne and madethe best of for that is what may be called the verybeauty of the game


THE HUNCHBACK SEES HISNEIGHBOUR S HUMPNOT HIS OWNE that diligently watches himself will beSwilling enough to be silent concerningothers says good old Jeremy Taylorand a truer word was never spokenHunchbacks hear this and we are all hunchbacksmore or less if we could but see it But to see ourselves bodily as others see us would not be possibleunless we lived in a room lined with mirrors andeven then the mind would warp the eye Yet to seeourselves morally as others see us is more difficultstill That is the greatest of all secrets the realknow thyself which philosophers talk aboutThere is a clever joke in a modern tale Autocratof the Breakfast Table that when two people sit


EL CORCOBADO NO VEE SU CORCOBA Y VEE LA DE SUCOMOANNON Catz


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THE HUNCHBACKS 47down to talk together there are really six in conversation Call them John and Thomas and youwill see There is first John as he thinks he ishimself second John as Thomas thinks he isthird John as his Maker knows him to be and thesame with Thomas There is one comfort howeverit matters very little to us how our neighbours seeus provided we see ourselves as God sees usNeither John nor Thomas need mind therefore ifthey will only try to know themselves as their Makerknows them


NOW OR NEVERITTLE Bear stand still If you areever to be licked into shape it is nowWhen you are a great big grown upbear there will be no chance for youThere will be nobody to lick you to begin withand besides that your joints will be so stiff andthe hairs of your fur so bristly that if you hada dozen mammas ready and willing they wouldnot be able to smooth you down As it is roundrough ball as you are there is every chance if youwill but stand quiet you know of your turning outvery tidy and respectable even shapely indeedfor a bearYou had rather be the sort of bear you are ofyourself do you say No don t say it there s a


CURA ANIMI IMPRIMIS GERENDASchoonhovii EmblemataH


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NOW OR NEVER 5Igood little cub for you can t mean it really Iknow what you would like better than you dobecause I know how you will feel by and byAnd I will tell you what you would like youwould like to be a good looking lively healthyclever bear able to take care of yourself in theforests if that is your fate or fit to live in theZoological Gardens climb a pole gracefully andeat buns offered you by pretty little hands of otherpretty little cubs There there put down thatrestless paw and let your poor mother do her bestfor you


THE ASS MAY BE INVITED TO COURTBUT IT IS ONLY TO CARRYBURDENSHE ass in Father Catz s emblem speaksHe tells how gladly he left the grassto trot along the dusty road to Courthow his eyes were dazzled when he gotthere by the sight of mules and horses richlycaparisoned and with jewelled saddles c cBeholding which My day of honour is comethought he But even at that moment up comes arough fellow who flings a pack on his back andshouts to him with a kick to be off with it to themill At that one kick his castle in the air felldown Stupid beast that I was cried he What


MAN RUFFT DEM EZEL NIT GEN HOFF ER SALL DANNSACK TRAGENCatz


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THE ASS AT COURT 55could I expect to do here but what I have alwaysdoneThey don t ask asses to the CourtFor honour ornament or sportBut ass like asses work to doAnd fardels bear and insults tooObserve young reader that the moral does not hitthose whose noble ambition it is to rise by selfimprovement only the asses and such like of theworld who over estimate themselves and their vocation


WHO FEELS THE NEED SEEKSTHE REMEDYHIRSTY traveller you know this wellWhile the morning was young andyour spirit fresh before the droughthad parched your lips you may havethought little of the fountain of waters though itflowed for you even thenBut now we behold you as a hart desiring thewater brooks as a sick man running to the physician hearing as in a dream perhaps somethingbeyond all this even the Scripture invitation Hoevery one that thirsteth come ye to the watersPilgrim of the world if it be so listen Physicallife is but a shadow of the spiritual a dim shadowbut opening many a solemn truth by small similitudes Feel the need and you will seek the remedy


WHO FEELS THE NEED SEEKS THE REMEDYI


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THE NEED AND THE REMEDY 59or if you cannot apprehend it now dare to lookforward to the aching head and weary heart ofnoonday toil Heavy may be your burden roughyour road but for you too flow the living watersfresh from the throne of God


TOGETHER WE SUFFERAND REJOICER WORLDLY WISEMAN of thegood old book would call this verysilly Because the storm has beatenthe tree down he would say it hasnot therefore beaten you down oh vine Youare free to turn aside to some other firmer supportWould you have the tree so selfish as to wish otherwise And you oh tree now that you are down inthe dust and must decay whose leaves are alreadybeginning to droop and fade and who will ere longbe a derision to them that pass by how can youbear the mocking kindness of that vine creepingover you and putting you to shame see its brightleaves and tendrils making their boast as they


SEQUOR AMPLECTORQUE CADENTEMPere le Moyne De l Art des Devises


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WE SUFFER AND REYOICE 63twine round your drying up bark and point thecontrast See the rich purple fruit hanging insmiling scorn from your barren branchesOh the endless mischief that can be made bya few words and oh the misery that sometimesfollowsHappily indeed Mr Worldly Wiseman speaksin vain to the faithful vine and the poor old treeTogether they suffer and rejoice The one faithfulthrough all changes the other making the lovedone s prosperityits own It is a beautiful pictureLet friends and relations and families all look atit It teaches a lesson human beings will do wellto follow


THERE S MANY A SLIP TWIXT THECUP AND THE LIPT last madam cries good dog Carloas he overtakes Mrs Diving Duck atbreakfast tail upwards head downwards picking her food out of themud with her bill Now he comes nearer andhearer now he is close upon her now he openshis mouth to seize her but iYour servant sir says she and disappearsunder the waterSurely she was here just now whines Carloas he paddles round and round on the spot whereshe sank Surely she was here just nowYust now poor Carlo yes but where nowYonder half way down the pond pops up atiny feathery form Its bill is broad its eye isbright it swims prettily awhile on the surface


INTER MANUM ET MENTUM CatsK


IF


THERE S MANY A SLIP ETC 67then the head goes down the tail goes up madamis at her breakfast again in the mudAnd here comes Carlo after her once moreOnce more it is for the twentieth time perhapsNow at any rate he is sure he sees her nowfor once the prize is within his grasp At lastmadamOh the numberless vain at lasts of sanguinemen Fortune is often painted as a goddess withher feet on the rolling globe I would paint her asa diving duck with the nobler animal in chase


SHOW ME THY WAYS 0 LORDOT in the spirit of curiosity or vainglory not because I would be wiserand greater than Thou hast ordaineddo I ask this nevertheless show meThy ways 0 LordShow me Thy ways that my helpless bark maybe guided over the waves of this troublesomeworld to the unseen haven beyond Open upthe skies Lord and shine down scatter thevapours and let there be light Be gracious tothe spiritual as to the visible world where thedarkest night has a certainty of dawn Lordshow me Thy waysRocks are around me however hidden fromsight tempests are before me however distant


DOMINE VIAS TUAS DEMONSTRA MIHIJacobi Typotii SymbolaI


i


SHOW ME THY WAYS 0 LORD 71they may loom earthly beacons may fail ordeceive I float upon an ocean I cannot fathomabove me lies a heaven I cannot pierce Fromwhence I come there is no one to tell me whitherI am drifting none can reveal Lord show meThy ways


I ALSO AM UNDER AUTHORITYHARLES LAMB called the sun dialthe primitive clock the horologe ofthe first world and adds Adamcould scarce have missed it in ParadiseMissed measuring the progress of the day byshadows that is to say for trees cast them andthat regularly only we do not note the times andplaces of their appearing And this is what thedial does only more conveniently for the gnomoncoming between the sun and dial plate interceptshis rays and whatever does that casts a shadowand he is a simpleton indeed who looking at a dialplate in full sunshine cannot tell at what hourthe shadow is standing Is standing do I saywhen there is no standing at all either for theshadow or for us For as the sun moves it movesand as it moves life moves too While thoulookest at me thou growest older says one dial


NON REGO NISL REGARDial mottoL


t


I ALSO AM UNDER AUTHORITY 75Your time passes away like a shadow whispersa second The night cometh warns a thirdAlas how fleeting mourns a fourth Nowor when asks a fifth I only number brighthours murmurs a sixth with a sigh perhapsfor cloudy England But almost grander arethose which acknowledge the Power above theRuler whose rule they follow the Leading Starby which they guide Not without the raycelestial acknowledges one I guide not exceptI am guided protests another Without TheeI am silent admits a third I also am underauthority says the one figured aboveIt was a great faith which spoke that onceIt acknowledged fealty while it claimed obedienceIt recognised the Overruler of all Let thatfaith be ours


THEY DESIRE A BETTERCOUNTRY Heb xi 16HE first shock of parting is over Motherlook up Have they not gone to seekafar off that happy prosperous homewhich the circumstances of social life inthe old land do not always allow its childrenWhen the first letters come which tell the o lynews worth hearing viz that all is well with yourdear ones how peaceful will be the smile on yourlips how glad and grateful the heart within yourbosom what a sweet sleep will steal over your eyesthat night as they close upon tears of joy All iswell Details may amuse or interest but the comfort lies in those three brief words All is wellAnd there is a land whence no letters come withthe message of All is well but there all is well


THEY DESIRE A BETTER COUNTRY Heb xi 16


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A BETTER COUNTRY 79with a certainty that knows no change to thosewho have reached it having desired that bettercountry while in lifeBereaved ones mourners why do you call yourselves so Your dear ones are not the less yoursbecause absent now and you desiring the same landwill rejoin them soon Tears indeed are not forbidden but when they rain heaviest accept thecomfort of what you believe and again and againsay to yourselves All is well indeed thoughIn dear words of human speechWe two communicate no more


WITHOUT LOSING ITS OWNLIGHTS thy light less or worse for lightingmine sings our English emblematistFrancis Quarles though upon a differentemblem viz a light shut up in a darklantern That shows what we ought not to dothis what we ought But observe the lesson taughthere is not only or exactly that we are to let ourlight shine before men but that we are to share itwith them What does this light symbolize thenwhich we can share with others without diminutionto ourselves Not worldly goods since what wegive of them to others we are losers by ourselvesbut spiritual advantages light intellectual in all itsbranches human and divine with which whoeverpossesses it can enrich his neighbours without im


SIN PERDIDA DE SU LUZ Empresas de SaavedraM


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WITHOUT LOSING ITS OWN LIGHT 83poverishing himself This for good or for evil isthe power of the word Is it enough thought aboutor made use of in the intercourse of society in theexchanges of conversation and by those who aremost able to influence their neighbours9


I REJOICE IN THE PRESENT ANDHAVE BETTER THINGSIN STOREHE little wild strawberry plant leadsmelodious days indeed Happyinthe present still richer in the futureThere are moments in life when onewould like to be it or anything whose fate isoverruled for good by irresistible power the flowerof whose youth is the sure forerunner of worthyfruit in ripe age which can yield to the stormwithout suffering and cling safely without effortto earth s protecting bosomWe too indeed must lie still and let the windsof Heaven do their will upon us but the necessityis our cross and not our comfort no ease but afierce wrestling of which that of Jacob with theangel is but a type not bodily or this wouldbe the age of virtuous men but spiritual a wrest


DEL PRESENTE MI GODO E MEGLIO ASPETTO Vocabolariodegli accademici della crusca


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THE DIAL OF LIFE. DESIGNED BY JAMES NASMYTH, ESQ. HIS is a mysterious-looking figure, but it is easily explained. The half-circle represents a man's life, from his first birthday, down in the left corAer, to the eightieth one he may possibly live to, in the corner opposite. Eighty years is the utmost allowance of time a man may reckon upon for doing any active work in the world; and this is the reason why it is given as the limit on this dial. For, what do you think the dial is for? Not only to remind the general looker-on of the age and infirmity and death which must one day come upon us all; but to call the attention of the young to the glorious number of years God gives His creatures to be busy





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40 T E S -----------F---------------------L-----------I ES--.---------------TIME FLIES.



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'



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WHITHERSOEVER THOU LEADEST. TRANGE, that the acknowledged emblem of all inconstancy should also symbolize the patient endurance of the Christian saint-" Thy will be done" the outward expression thereof. Yet so it is; and we do well to learn from the weathercock both the higher and lower lessons. "Breath of the Lord, whithersover Thou leadest, I am contented to be led. I ask not for soft breezes and gentle guidance only. Based on that Rock, which no earthly power has force to overthrow-the Church of Christ-I hold fast amidst the shocks of tempests and the war of winds;



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xii PREFA CE. dear to us, and what is more, our affection for him remains with us still. Nay, our intimate acquaintance with and love for his works paved the way for further interest in older books of the same kind, which fact may be accepted as a cause of the present volume being offered to the reader. MARGARET GATTY. June, 1872. These Emblems first appeared in AUNT JUDY'S MAGAZINE," from the pen of the Editor.



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THE DIAL OF LIFE. 5 in-to the glorious opportunity they have therefore for doing something in the world: something good at any rate-possibly something great. Take the case of some young friend who is but ten years old at the present time. We will explain the use of the dial to him. And first, as he can do nothing now with the years he has already lived, we will shade them over. There! it is done; and now look what a little bit the shaded ten years is to the large space of seventy that lies beyond! Well; the lad has not lost much of his time yet, however little he may have accomplished. Besides, a boy is such a little boy up to ten years old, that very little is expected of him. Obedience and love, that is all. If he has allowed himself to be guided hitherto by others in his duties to God and man, it is enough; he has done all he ought to have done, and might sleep in peace if the end were to come now. But as it has not, only see what lies before him How many years of that beautiful white space of unused time, from the figure of o1 to the figure of 8o, he cannot indeed tell; but possibly numbers





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CONTENTS. Page HE Dial of Life. .....2 He must have plenty of broth who would stop everybody's mouth ..8 Imperial custom-Second nature ..12 By yielding we conquer .. 16 When God wills ........20 When the ass is too well off, he goes dancing on theice ......24 Not earthly things only .......28 Thus, 0 my soul! . .. 32 As you brew so you must bake .....36 Such is the life of man .....40 The hunchback sees his neighbour's hump, not his own. 44 Now or never .........48 The ass may be invited to court, but it is only to carry burdens. .52 Who feels the need seeks the remedy .56 Together we suffer and rejoice ..60 There's many a slip 'twixt the cup and the lip ..64 b



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A BOOK OF EMBLEMS, WITH INTERPRETATIONS THEREOF. BY MRS. ALFRED GATTY, AUTHOR OF PARABLES FROM NATURE, ETC. LONDON: BELL AND DALDY, YORK STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 1872.



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WHAT I CARRY, ETC. In True, this is a similitude which will not bear pushing to extremity. Few will, perhaps. But in a state of society where small treacheries are so common that men and women deceive each other daily, where a want of openness is even occasionally advised and made a merit of, we are tempted to think we may quite safely advise a nearer approach to the truth-telling of our timepieces Clocks and watches teach us many lessons, and this among them, that we ought never, even for a supposed good end, much less a bad one, to show a false face to each other. But the emblem-artist has figured children as well as a clock, and not without reason. With rare exceptions they teach us the same lesson by an example, which often and often puts to shame our worldly-wise insincerity. Oh, children, you will never know the value of childhood till you have left it behind you! But among its many privileges, none is more precious than that it is still untempted by the mean sins of worldly-mindedness! Fix your eyes on the timepiece then, and be children to the last in that one respect, at any rate.



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PREFA CE. xi pastor of the Christian flock. Nevertheless they contained no direct moral teaching. Moral or spiritual lessons were only introduced into them incidentally; and in this respect they strikingly differed from emblems proper, which are perfectly unfettered in their choice of subject, and pass from grave to gay, from lively to severe, making profitable use of all humours. And inasmuch as it is only the moral and spiritual teachings in these quaint designs which have any interest for us, we have included under the name of Emblems only such devices as contain them. We may add that we think a taste for emblems is natural to children, at least we can speak for ourselves. We can hardly remember the time when Quarles was not





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MAN RUFFT DEM EZEL NIT GEN HOFF, ER SALL DANN SACK TRAGEN. Catz.



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6 THE DIAL OF LIFE. and numbers of years, which it would take ever so long to count, even. Yes, think of this, happy tenyear-old child, and ask yourself what you will do with them. Each man's life, you know-that is each man's time on earth-is a gift of God, given him to do something with. We are none of us-no, not one-drifted into the world to toss up and down and tumble about by chance, like little bits of stick afloat on a river, till the great tide carries us away. No, for some mysterious reason God sends everybody into the world to do some special work; and you have yours, depend upon it; and day by day it will come under your hands to be done. Be sure, then, that what your hand findeth to do" you do; and to remind yourself of this, as the years pass over, shade off each into the dead years, in which you can do nothing further, so that you may not deceive yourself as to how much remains. To every one living a white space does remain, and it is never too late to be up and doing. See, now, the Dial of Life is the Dial of Life indeed-a dial of hope, a dial of promise. From the earliest ages the circle has been an emblem of



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,, I I -i N iiN I 1 1 i NON QUAE SUPRA TERRAM.--7acobi Typotii Symbola.



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WHO FEELS THE NEED SEEKS THE REMEDY. I



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PREFACE. OME explanation is due to the reader, who may observe that the English and foreign mottoes of these emblems do not always correspond. The truth is, the emblems are taken in nearly all cases from old foreign books : this style of literature having been at one time much more popular on the Continent than it has ever been in England. Quarles himself was indebted to the same source for many of the emblems which he made his .own by his



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"ROASTED PIGEONS FLY INTO NOBODY'S MOUTH." XCEPT in that delicious "Fool's Paradise" of Herr Bechstein's fairy talewhere little pigs run to you with knives and forks in their backs ready for carving, and ribbons and laces grow in hedgerows and offer themselves to your hand as you pass by. But then that is a place nobody can get to, without eating through the gingerbread wall which lies between us and it; and exactly where that is to be found, who knows? I do not; nor yet how thick the wall is, nor what the gingerbread tastes like; and yet these are very important considerations. It is not the great wall of China-that I do know; but I fear the negative information won't help us much in the search. So, on the whole, it



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CEDENDO VICTOR ABIIS.-CEDENDO VICTOR ABI13IS.--CatZ.



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CHISWICK PRESS:--PRINTED BY WHITTINGHAM AND WILKINS, TOOKS COURT, CHANCERY LANE.



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TO IMY DEAR DAUGHTER, JULIANA HORATIA EWING, I DEDICATE THIS LITTLE VOLUME, KNOWING THAT A TASTE FOR ITS QUAINT DEVICES IS ONE OF THE MANY INTERESTS WE HAVE IN COMMON. MARGARET GATTY.





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CURA ANIMI IMPRIMIS GERENDA. Schoonhovii Emblemata. H





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DEL PRESENTE MI GODO E MEGLIO ASPETTO. Vocabolario degli accademici della crusca. , .___________________



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TOGETHER WE SUFFER AND REJOICE. R. WORLDLY WISEMAN, of the good old book, would call this very silly. "Because the storm has beaten the tree down," he would say, "it has not therefore beaten you down, oh vine! You are free to turn aside to some other firmer support. Would you have the tree so selfish as to wish otherwise ? And you, oh tree, now that you are down in the dust and must decay; whose leaves are already beginning to droop and fade, and who will ere long be a derision to them that pass by; how can you bear the mocking kindness of that vine, creeping over you and putting you to shame ? see its bright leaves and tendrils making their boast, as they





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I ALSO AM UNDER AUTHORITY. 75 "Your time passes away like a shadow," whispers a second. "The night cometh," warns a third. "Alas, how fleeting!" mourns a fourth. "Now or when?" asks a fifth. "I only number bright hours," murmurs a sixth, with a sigh, perhaps, for cloudy England. But almost grander are those which acknowledge the Power above-the Ruler whose rule they follow-the Leading Star by which they guide. "Not without the ray celestial," acknowledges one. I guide not except I am guided," protests another. "Without Thee I am silent," admits a third. "I also am under authority," says the one figured above. It was a great faith which spoke that once. It acknowledged fealty while it claimed obedience. It recognised the Overruler of all. Let that faith be ours!



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"IF EVERY ONE SWEPT BEFORE HIS OWN DOOR, ALL THE STREET WOULD BE CLEAN;" R, as the proverb says more bluntly, "If every one would mend one, all would be mended." Still, it is not always the bluntest speaking which makes the strongest impression, and an emblem has a great advantage over a proverb in being a two-edged sword, striking two ways, though so delicately that people are not offended by the blow. Anybody can see that the dirtiest village would be made clean if not only the parson and doctor, but shopkeepers, and farmers, and labouring men would all sweep before their own doors, see that their own drains were not stopped up, &c., &c. And, admitting this, he must be worthy a fool's cap and bells



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"THEY DESIRE A BETTER COUNTRY." Heb. xi. 16. HE first shock of parting is over. Mother, look up Have they not gone to seek afar off that happy, prosperous home, which the circumstances of social life in the old land do not always allow its children ? When the first letters come, which tell the o'ly news worth hearing, viz.: that all is well with your dear ones, how peaceful will be the smile on your lips, how glad and grateful the heart within your bosom! what a sweet sleep will steal over your eyes that night as they close upon tears of joy! All is well! Details may amuse or interest, but the comfort lies in those three brief words-All is well. And there is a land whence no letters come with the message of All is well ;" but there all is well,





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SHOW ME THY WAYS, 0 LORD. OT in the spirit of curiosity or vainglory: not because I would be wiser and greater than Thou hast ordained, do I ask this; nevertheless, show me Thy ways, 0 Lord! Show me Thy ways, that my helpless bark may be guided over the waves of this troublesome world to the unseen haven beyond. Open up the skies, Lord, and shine down: scatter the vapours, and let there be light. Be gracious to the spiritual as to the visible world, where the darkest night has a certainty of dawn. Lord! show me Thy ways. Rocks are around me, however hidden from sight: tempests are before me, however distant



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"WHAT I CARRY IN MY BOSOM I BEAR ON MY FACE." F the clock were not to do this, how could we ever trust it for telling us the time of day ? If the face deceives us, it is vain for us that the works go well within. If ever this does happen, (as when the hour or minute hand are bent or otherwise injured and stick fast,) then our watch or clock is useless, and we take it to a clock-doctor to be put right. The application is obvious, to the value of moral sincerity-the truth-telling of speech and look, the honesty which never allows either face or tongue to express what does not correspond with the inner workings of heart and mind.



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"NOT EARTHLY THINGS ONLY." OT earthly things only do even Thy earthly creatures need, O Lord! What evil spirit whispers of independence to dependent man ? Upon a distant Star (so distant that man may calculate and speak of, but cannot realize the space which lies between it and him,) does life of every sort in this our world depend. Extinguish that, and what becomes of this ? Thence light and warmth, and dews and showers, and purifying storms. Not earthly things only, therefore, do Thy servants ask. But those who beg must not seek to choose. It is easy to hold out hands into the pleasant sunshine or refreshing shower. When the storm comes, then comes the trial. Then must hands of faith



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THE DIAL OF LIFE. 7 eternity. Here, then, is but a portion of it; the trial portion-the working portion. Work uprightly, and you need not fear what comes after. As to those clouds that you see coming up against the 80 in the right-hand corner; like all other clouds, they do but hide the heaven beyond.



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AS YOU BREW YOU BAKE. 39 barrel, though, I am obliged to own. In these days one thinks of a brewer's vat as of the witches' cauldron in Macbeth-a receptacle of all abominations-" all ill running in" to make the "charm grow madder." Well, let the witches and brewers look to it! As they have brewed so shall they one day bake. Not literally, perhaps-oh no we emblem-fanciers think little of the letter-it killeth-but though not literally, nevertheless not the less really.



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QUEL CHE CELA NEL SEN, SCOPRA NEL VOLTO. Mondo simbolico dell' Abbate D. Filibo Picineli.



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THE SOFTENING INFLUENCE OF USE. HE heavy weight of custom," says Wordsworth; and this enunciates one of the lessons, but one only, which our Semblem can teach. The heavy weight of custom. Yes by it the slave becomes so used to his degrading slavery, that his mind ceases to revolt from its unworthy chainsnay, lowers itself so as to have no wish beyond. Just as the bird, although gifted with wings to soar, becomes contented enough with confinement to lift up its voice in song. Let those who are falling under the tyranny of the world, the flesh, or the devil, take the warning. But now look at the picture from another point



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WITHOUT LOSING ITS OWN LIGHT. 83 poverishing himself. This, for good or for evil, is the power of the word. Is it enough thought about or made use of in the intercourse of society, in the exchanges of conversation, and by those who are most able to influence their neighbours? 9



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"SUCH IS THE LIFE OF MAN." 43 Nay, there is freedom of action as well as Time and Chance both for the backgammon player and the man. The throws of dice can be played more ways than one. Unskilful play will often make a good throw useless, and skilful turn a bad one to good account. And if we do not say always, that is because we are speaking of backgammon as well as life. Of life we might say always. As far as this world goes, however, the simile is a correct one, and the Emblem would bear two mottoes-" Such is the Life of Man," and Unlucky accidents are to be borne and made the best of:" for that is what may be called the very beauty of the game.



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"WHEN THE ASS IS TOO WELL OFF, HE GOES DANCING ON THE ICE." GH One has to be very cautious in giving advice to man, with his "godlike gift of reason," lest he take offence instead of a hint! So we put his folly upon a guiltless donkey or goose, and strike the moral home to the higher animal by a side blow. A well-to-do donkey really wanting to dance upon ice, for instance-who ever heard of such a thing ? But a well-to-do man, wanting to show off beyond his means, and take a place he is not fitted for !-ah one has not to go far to look for him Still, there lies the donkey in the picture, and I must whisper a word in his long ears. "Why did you leave safe ground for slippery places, when you did not know how to skate safely across them?"



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AINSI MON AME. F





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"SECURELY ROOTED." LOW wind, and crack your cheeks !"but it is in vain. You may bend the outer branches, it is true, for it is their nature to be gentle and yielding, and they do not much care to resist you; but each has a counterpart root in the soil below, and by these the tree holds fast in spite of you. This is no house built on the sand-no pretty branch stuck in the ground for mere show's sake, for the first blast to overthrow. The tree makes a beautiful show, no doubt; she stretches out her branches to the sea, and her boughs to the river," and her foliage is a pleasant sight to look upon; but she would perish from off the face of the earth in the first storm, were this all-were it not that for every outward grace she displays, there is a deeper corresponding



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"WE COVET NOT AMBROSIA OR NECTAR." F course not, being dirty pigs; but what is the moral of that?" Softly! These are not, to begin with, dirty pigs. Not the miserable sty-pigs men shut up, and make filthy and greedy, against the laws of their own nature. These are the neat, bright little black pigs of forest life. You will see plenty such, if you go to the New Forest and look around you,-shiny fellows with curly tails, lively as grigs,-running in and out among the red and gold foliage of oaks and beeches, and crunching acorns to their hearts' content. I do not mean to say they are never dirty, of course. Forests have swamps and marshy ground, here and there; and they plunge in and get wet, and scramble out muddy, perhaps. But they soon





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NONE PLEASE ALL. I But come, old greybeard, you must turn wise as Father Catz, who drew your picture, makes you do; and tell us your conclusions upon your past experience. I will go home and clean my hearth, And heart and house, and keep them sweet; Then, come who will from all the earth, I'll set before him wholesome meat; And offering this to friend or guest, Or any man of honest mind, I'll set all troubled thoughts at rest, And let those grumble who're inclined." So be it: for the proverbs thicken around us. He is indeed a knowing wight, Who thinks to set the whole world right." "He who builds by the roadside has a good many advisers." "Never saw I, all my days, One who'd everybody's praise." He needs a clever counsel who is summoned before the world's tribunal."



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WAN GOTT WIL. 7acobz Tyholzi Symbola. rt"I





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"WHEN GOD WILLS." [ UCH was the device of one William, of Henneberg, Prince, and Count of the S Holy Roman Empire; of whom we know nothing now, but that it is long since he went to his rest :-a grafted tree with the motto, When God Wills." Yes! "when God wills." Meantime all we see here is a polled tree, its branches disfigured by lumps of clay. The skilled workman has gone his way, his own share in the matter is over, and he knows well that, though he has "proposed and laboured accordingly-God must "dispose" at last. The tree stands there alone now, waiting the working of the mysterious law within. And that, so tended and cultured, it should one day bud and blossom, and bring forth fruit, might well be the



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EMBLEMS. B



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WHO FEELS THE NEED SEEKS THE REMEDY. HIRSTY traveller, you know this well! While the morning was young, and your spirit fresh, before the drought had parched your lips, you may have thought little of the fountain of waters, though it flowed for you even then. But now we behold you as a hart desiring the water-brooks"-as a sick man running to the physician,-hearing, as in a dream, perhaps, something beyond all this, even the Scripture invitation: Ho! every one that thirsteth come ye to the waters." Pilgrim of the world, if it be so, listen. Physical life is but a shadow of the spiritual-a dim shadow, but opening many a solemn truth by small similitudes. Feel the need, and you will seek the remedy;





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a.



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THE ASS AT COURT. 55 could I expect to do here but what I have always done ?" "They don't ask asses to the Court, For honour, ornament, or sport, But ass-like asses' work to do, And fardels bear, and insults too !" Observe, young reader, that the moral does not hit those, whose noble ambition it is to rise by selfimprovement; only the asses, and such-like of the world, who over-estimate themselves and their vocation.



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WERWAERTS GODT WIL. Catz.



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I



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"THUS, 0 MY SOUL!"* [ s HUS:" does the word need comment? would some one have it explained? Thus through the realms of what seems boundless space, stream rays celestial, life-giving, from the fountain of light-the mighty sun that rules our system-upon the little earthly flower. Thus turns the little earthly flower, day by day, to its distant lord; not discerning him by sight, but seeking after him by the surer instinct of its inner being. ..0 heavenly light,-Light of light-so dis"* Ainsi mon Ame. The emblem figured above with this French motto was the original "sign" on Child's Banking House, and is still preserved within the building.





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SECURA SUIS RADICIBUS. Philothei symbola Christiana. 9E *%





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"GRAVISSIMUM IMPERIUM CONSUETUDINIS." Dionysii Lebei-Batillii Emblemata.



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A BOOK OF EMBLEMS.



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" As You BREW SO YOU MUST BAKE."



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"THE HUNCHBACK SEES HIS NEIGHBOUR'S HUMP, NOT HIS OWN." E that diligently watches himself will be Swilling enough to be silent concerning others," says good old Jeremy Taylor; and a truer word was never spoken. Hunchbacks, hear this! and we are all hunchbacks, more or less, if we could but see it. But to see ourselves bodily as others see us would not be possible, unless we lived in a room lined with mirrors; and even then the mind would warp the eye. Yet to see ourselves morally as others see us is more difficult still. That is the greatest of all secrets; the real know thyself," which philosophers talk about. There is a clever joke in a modern tale (" Autocrat of the Breakfast Table"), that when two people sit



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SEQUOR AMPLECTORQUE CADENTEM. Pere le Moyne, "De l'Art des Devises."





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IMPERIAL CUSTOM-SECOND NATURE. Man. SNSLAVED, yet not wishing to be free; having wings, yet not caring to fly; born to soar, yet contented to sit; a Sdenizen of the skies, yet grovelling rather in a cage; see what custom has brought thee to, poor beautiful, degraded bird Bird.-Fine words, poet, fine words. I can repeat them myself to you. Man.-Parrot-like, poor Polly! Bird.-Parrot-like, poor master! That's just what I say. Look at home, master, look at home! Man.-What mean you, sirrah ? Am I enslaved, think you, without caring to be free ? Have Iwings Idonot use? Was I,too, born to soar? Am I



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"THERE'S MANY A SLIP 'TWIXT THE CUP AND THE LIP." T last, madam !" cries good dog Carlo, as he overtakes Mrs. Diving-Duck at breakfast; tail upwards, head downwards, picking her food out of the mud with her bill. Now he comes nearer and hearer; now he is close upon her; now he opens his mouth to seize her; but-i"Your servant, sir says she, and disappears under the water. "Surely she was here just now," whines Carlo, as he paddles round and round on the spot where she sank. Surely she was here just now !" Yust now, poor Carlo, yes but where now ? Yonder, half-way down the pond, pops up a tiny feathery form. Its bill is broad, its eye is bright-it swims prettily awhile on the surface;



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viii PREFA CE. beautiful verses, but without acknowledging the fact. In the present volume, however, we have thought it better to refer to the books from which the designs are taken, whilst reserving to ourselves the right of putting what interpretation we pleased upon them, and even of modifying and altering the motto if it seemed good to us. This will sufficiently account for the frequent discrepancies betwixt the two mottoes. These foreign books contain disquisitions upon the difference between devices and emblems; but we have classed all under the latter name as having a more general signification. Simple devices are of very ancient origin; Moses is supposed to have borrowed the idea of them from the Egyptians, and they were



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"WITHOUT LOSING ITS OWN LIGHT." S thy light less or worse for lighting mine ?" sings our English emblematist, Francis Quarles, though upon a different emblem, viz., a light shut up in a dark lantern. That shows what we ought not to do; this what we ought. But observe, the lesson taught here is not only or exactly that we are to let our light shine before men, but that we are to share it with them. What does this light symbolize then, which we can share with others without diminution to ourselves? Not worldly goods, since what we give of them to others we are losers by ourselves ; but spiritual advantages-light intellectual in all its branches, human and divine, with which whoever possesses it can enrich his neighbours without im-



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U



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EVER UPWARDS. AN is born to trouble as the sparks fly upwards." There may be doubt as to the correctness of this text, but there can be none as to the truth of the statement. Man is born to trouble, whoever and whereeer he may be; and sparks do fly upwards. So, flame. Reverse your torch, unbelieving inquirer! Throw it down-trample on it, if you choose. You struggle in vain. While life-i. e. its fire-exists, the flame will continue to go upwards. It owns no obedience to you-the law of its nature is stronger -while it has life it will soar upwards. Upwards, in spite of all your efforts to thwart it: upwards, through any clouds which may gather round it.



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"AS YOU BREW SO YOU MUST BAKE." S the good wife there knows well, and seems to be explaining to the child. For is not her one anxiety on baking .day to obtain good yeast, and is not it sure to be good if proper materials-honest malt and hops-have been properly put together in the brewing; otherwise there is no dependence to be placed in it? And thus are human actions and events strangely interwoven, so that oftentimes retribution for wrong-doing comes from quarters the most unexpected. Hear this, all ye youngsters who would fain reap harvests of things ye have not sown; or, having sown the wind, are hoping to escape the whirlwind that follows: As you brew so you must bake." It is a coarse illustration of a great truth, that



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SEMPER SURSUM. lMondo simbolico dell' Abbate Picinelli. P



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BY YIELDING WE CONQUER. 19 one of the stately steamers that ply on the Mississippi, like castles on the deep," was watching the waves caused by the huge paddles of the vessel as they broke from time to time on the bank. Presently she noticed one larger than the rest gather itself up as if bent on destruction. On the bank stood a strong upright tree-trunk looking as if bent on resistance, while by its side a graceful branch stretched droopingly over the water. There was a crash! and the wave had burst,-alas! bearing away the broken tree-trunk on its bosom. But the branch, bending to the water, had passed under it, only to come out beautified and refreshed. Its tearbedewed leaves glistened in the late sunshine as it rose uninjured to its place. By yielding it had conquered; and the lady brought the lesson home to England.



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PREFA CE. ix adopted by the twelve Tribes of Israel as indicated in Genesis, chap. xlix. Their symbols however were of the simplest kind, such as are still in use in savage countries. Of this there are examples in British Columbia amongst the American Indians, where the native tribes are formed into divisions, each one of which assumes for itself a badge, or "crest," as they call it. This is generally the figure of some animal, which is stuck upon a pole in front of their tents, and represents a porpoise, wolf, eagle, &c., reminding one of the lion of Judah, the ass of Issachar, the hind of Naphtali, &c. By-and-by, as civilization progressed, devices took a more complicated character, and were adopted not only by families, but by individuals. The



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BY YIELDING WE CONQUER. ND these are reeds shaken with the wind. Are we, then, to be carried about by every blast of feeling or opinion ?-to yield, for yielding's sake, to evil as well as good ? Is this to be the victory that overcometh ? Nay but see you, it is the wind from heaven before which these reeds are bending, not the feeble breath of man. Understand the lesson, therefore, of submission to God's dealings with His creatures. Yea, and include among His dealings those which He permits as well as those which He ordains. It is easier and safer and more pleasant," says a wise old bishop, "to live in obedience than to be at our own disposing." One fine autumn evening (1867) a lady on board



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A BETTER COUNTRY. 79 with a certainty that knows no change to those who have reached it-" having desired that better country" while in life. Bereaved ones-mourners-why do you call yourselves so ? Your dear ones are not the less yours because absent now, and you, desiring the same land, will rejoin them soon. Tears, indeed, are not forbidden, but when they rain heaviest, accept the comfort of what you believe; and again and again say to yourselves, All is well, indeed, though In dear words of human speech, We two communicate no more.'"



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NON REGO NISL REGAR. Dial motto: L



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S N.



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IF EVERY ONE SWEPT, ETC. 95 who cannot make the higher application for himself! This is offensive teaching, however, to certain classes of mind. The impetuous enthusiast likes to accomplish grand purposes by grand means,would with pleasure hire an engine and swill down a dirty street at a blow, with or without neighbours' consent: would like to initiate some extensive measures of social reform, which should, at any rate for a time, sweep sin from off the face of the earth. To such, the dull, unimposing, unambitious daily task of sweeping before his own door is repugnant. Nevertheless, whatever else a man can do, let him beware how he neglects that!





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"WHEN GOD WILLS." 23 gardener's reasonable hope when he left it: but which graft, if any, shall succeed, and which, if any, shall fail, it is beyond his province to determine, and out of all reason to fret about. Let those who labour in the moral world take the lesson to heart. Churchmen, statesmen, parents, teachers-it speaks alike to all who labour for the good of others, i.e., for the ingrafting of a higher law into a degenerated nature. See that you use the means appointed; see that you have not your own indifference or negligence to blame for failure. But then be satisfied and go your way -it is not for you to know the times, and the seasons. "When God wills" the fruit will appear. The work its master glorifies The blessing cometh from the skies."



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AMBROSIA E NETTAR NON INVIDIO A GIOVE. Vocabolario degli accademici della crusca. N



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ITA EST VITA HOMINUM. Dionysius Lebbe-Batillius. G



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WAN DEM EZEL ZU WOLL IST, SOO GEHET ER AUFFT EISZ TANTZEN.-CatZ. E



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INTER MANUM ET MENTUM. Cats. K



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4



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"THEY DESIRE A BETTER COUNTRY." Heb. xi. 16



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IF



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SHOW ME THY WAYS, 0 LORD. 71 they may loom: earthly beacons may fail or deceive. I float upon an ocean I cannot fathom; above me lies a heaven I cannot pierce. From whence I come there is no one to tell me; whither I am drifting none can reveal. Lord! show me Thy ways.



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SIN PERDIDA DE SU LUZ. Empresas de Saavedra. M



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"I REJOICE IN THE PRESENT, AND HAVE BETTER THINGS IN STORE." HE little wild strawberry-plant leads "melodious days" indeed. Happyin the present, still richer in the future. There are moments in life when one would like to be it, or anything, whose fate is overruled for good.by irresistible power; the flower of whose youth is the sure forerunner of worthy fruit in ripe age; which can yield to the storm without suffering, and cling safely without effort to earth's protecting bosom. We too, indeed, must lie still, and let the winds of Heaven do their will upon us; but the necessity is our cross and not our comfort-no ease, but a fierce wrestling, of which that of Jacob with the angel is but a type-not bodily, or this would be the age of virtuous men, but spiritual-a wrest-



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THE NEED AND THE REMEDY. 59 or, if you cannot apprehend it now, dare to look forward to the aching head and weary heart of noonday toil. Heavy may be your burden, rough your road; but for you, too, flow the living waters fresh from the throne of God.



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"NOW OR NEVER." 5I good little cub, for you can't mean it really. I know what you would like, better than you do, because I know how you will feel by-and-by. And I will tell you what you would like: you would like to be a good-looking, lively, healthy, clever bear, able to take care of yourself in the forests, if that is your fate; or fit to live in the Zoological Gardens, climb a pole gracefully, and eat buns offered you by pretty little hands of other pretty little cubs. There, there! put down that restless paw, and let your poor mother do her best for you.



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4~i e- :8'r A r i; r4 i ei~;~~A 4~1 Cg .:i I, N~~~~~~~d j I ~ -k iN 41





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WHITHERSOEVER THOULEADEST. 119 turning evermore whithersoever Thou leadest. 'Troubled on every side, yet not distressed; perplexed, but not in despair; persecuted, but not forsaken.'"



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KNOW YOUR PLACE. 27 "You had as much business there as any one else," do you say? "You are as prosperous and well fed as anybody." A true ass's answer, indeed Will oats or beans even give you the paw of the bear, or the skatemaking brain of man ? Hush! donkey dear! The greatest secret of life is to know your own place in the world, and keep it till you are qualified for a better.



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I REYOICE IN THE PRESENT. 87 ling with the Apollyon of human pride. And to cling fast to our protector-the God of our lifewhen the storms of sorrow and sin have hidden Him from our sight; yea, to hold on, blinded, miserable, and almost despairing, through the night, as Jacob did, till the dawn broke and the blessing came-this is no pleasant yielding to a natural impulse; but a battle, a deadly battle, with the evil spirits of distrust and unbelief. Nevertheless, for the sake of the glory that shall be revealed: On! Christian souls, all base temptations spurning, Drown coward thoughts in Faith's triumphant hymn, Since Jesus suffered, our salvation earning, Shall we not toil that we may rest with Him ? Soldiers of Jesus Blest who endure, Stand in the battle, the victory is sure."



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"NOW OR NEVER." ITTLE Bear, stand still! If you are ever to be licked into shape, it is now. When you are a great, big, grown-up bear, there will be no chance for you. There will be nobody to lick you, to begin with; and, besides that, your joints will be so stiff, and the hairs of your fur so bristly, that if you had a dozen mammas, ready and willing, they would not be able to smooth you down. As it is-round, rough ball as you are-there is every chance (if you will but stand quiet, you know) of your turning out very tidy and respectable-even shapely, indeedfor a bear. You had rather be the sort of bear you are of yourself, do you say? No! don't say it, there's a





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THERE'S MANY A SLIP, ETC. 67 then the head goes down, the tail goes up-madam is at her breakfast again in the mud. And here comes Carlo after her once more. Once more ? it is for the twentieth time perhaps. Now at any rate he is sure he sees her-now for once the prize is within his grasp. "At last, madam!" .... Oh, the numberless vain "at lasts" of sanguine men Fortune is often painted as a goddess with her feet on the rolling globe. I would paint her as a diving-duck with the nobler animal in chase.



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ROASTED PIGEONS, ETC. 99 is perhaps best for people to stay at home and do their own work-the trouble of hunting for the place where it would be done for them being so great, and the results so uncertain. But here I sit preaching away, and the man doesn't listen. Ho! you under the tree, there; do you see those pigeons flying away over your head? How are you to cook and eat them, if you don't catch them first? Well! only don't complain of your "fate," when you wake, that's all. Don't blame "destiny," if you get nothing for dinner. And do not try to carry it off by declaring you had the most miserable luck in the world, "not a single shot the whole day"-the whole sleep, you ought to say, The luck has flown over your head.



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EL CORCOBADO NO VEE SU CORCOBA, Y VEE LA DE SU COMOANNON. Catz



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y



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"MADE PERFECT THROUGH SUFFERING." E mute, O marble, under the master's hand, if thou would'st not be mute for ever. Let the chisel and mallet work his will now: so shalt thou one day become a breathing shape, and take thy place in halls of light, telling of Justice, Victory, or, it may be, Peace and Plenty, to admiring crowds. It is rough treatment, but thine is a rough nature: the blows fall hard and sharp, but soft ones would not shape thee. It is weary work to bear, but if thy master weary not, do not thou. Thou art but one of many, and hast but one burden to bear. He would have all made perfect, and must mould and temper all. Rejoice in the strokes



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PARABOLIC. N old man, bowed down with infirmity, became at last bedridden. His friends condoled with him: one sat by his bed-side and wept. "Rejoice rather," said the sick man; "while I was up, my eyes were bent to the earth: now I am down, they are turned upwards-to Heaven." CHISWICK PRESS:-PRINTED BY WHITTINGHAM AND WILKINS, TOOKS COURT, CHANCERY LANE.



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"THE ASS MAY BE INVITED TO COURT, BUT IT IS ONLY TO CARRY BURDENS." HE ass in Father Catz's emblem speaks. He tells how gladly he left the grass to trot along the dusty road to Court; how his eyes were dazzled, when he got there, by the sight of mules and horses richly caparisoned, and with jewelled saddles, &c., &c. Beholding which, My day of honour is come," thought he. But even at that moment up comes a rough fellow, who flings a pack on his back, and shouts to him with a kick to be off with it to the mill. At that one kick his castle in the air fell down. "Stupid beast that I was!" cried he. "What





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i



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x PREFACE.French claim to have been the originators of these devices proper, but they admit that the Italians carried them to greater perfection. They were required to have both body and soul; that is to say, there was to be a bodily figure having two significations, a literal and an allegorical one. There was also to be a motto elucidating the latter. The subjects were always to be refined and noble in their character: nothing monstrous or disgusting was to be introduced: nothing that could offend the sight or wound the imagination. They were, moreover, to be in harmony with the individual who adopted them; and so one author finds fault with Pope Gregory XIII. for assuming the device of a dragon, as being inappropriate to the chief



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I ALSO AM UNDER AUTHORITY. HARLES LAMB called the sun-dial "the primitive clock, the horologe of the first world ;" and adds, "Adam could scarce have missed it in Paradise." Missed measuring the progress of the day by shadows, that is to say; for trees cast them, and that regularly, only we do not note the times and places of their appearing. And this is what the dial does, only more conveniently, for the gnomon coming between the sun and dial-plate intercepts his rays, and whatever does that, casts a shadow; and he is a simpleton indeed who, looking at a dialplate in full sunshine, cannot tell at what hour the shadow is standing. Is standing, do I say? when there is no standing at all, either for the shadow or for us. For as the sun moves it moves, and as it moves life moves too. "While thou lookest at me thou growest older," says one dial.



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THE HUNCHBACKS. 47 down to talk together there are really six in conversation. Call them "John and Thomas," and you will see. There is, first, John as he thinks he is himself; second, John as Thomas thinks he is; third, John as his Maker knows him to be : and the same with Thomas. There is one comfort, however: it matters very little to us how our neighbours see us, provided we see ourselves as God sees us. Neither John nor Thomas need mind, therefore, if they will only try to know themselves as their Maker knows them.





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PERFECT THROUGH SUFFERING. 115 that awaken thee to life, transforming the soulless crag into the just proportions of angelic beauty; softening the harsh outlines; polishing the rough surfaces; bringing all things in subjection to the harmony of his will. As clay in the hands of the potter, so art thou in the hands of thy master. Exult in the brief adversity, if he be a Phidias fashioning thee to be a god.





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HY MOET VEEL BRY HEBBEN, DIE ELCK DEN MONT SAL STOPPEN.-CatZ. I '__



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SECURELY ROOTED. 103 life below the surface. So are these outside developments, not outside developments only; but witnesses of something more enduring beyond. Young readers, who rejoice to deck yourselves in the outward graces of virtue, and live in the smiles and approbation of the world, beware of cultivating outward graces only-be sure there is the deeper corresponding life within the heart. Only when securely rooted can the tree stand fast in the storm.



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WE SUFFER AND REYOICE. 63 twine round your drying-up bark, and point the contrast! See the rich purple fruit hanging in smiling scorn from your barren branches .." Oh, the endless mischief that can be made by a few words! and oh, the misery that sometimes follows! Happily, indeed, Mr. Worldly Wiseman speaks in vain to the faithful vine and the poor old tree. Together they suffer and rejoice. The one faithful through all changes: the other making the loved one's prosperityits own. It is a beautiful picture. Let friends, and relations, and families, all look at it. It teaches a lesson human beings will do well to follow.



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/i :I



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AMISSA LIBERTATE, LIETIOR. Calz. R



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"WE COVET NOT AMBROSIA." 91 shake and rub themselves clean among the bracken fronds and in the fine pasture grass under the trees; and there stands the happy company, taking their wholesome meal off the clean green herb, instead of gobbling it, scaly-backed and hurried, out of a trough. But let that pass. You want the moral, and it is not far off. The simple pleasures'which God gives you to enjoy, enjoy and be satisfied with. Covet no man's silver or gold, or food or drink, or clothing. There may be luxury in kings' palaces, no doubt, and for those who are born to it, it has its purpose; but acorns in the fresh air taste better than the finest meal-mash out of a trough.





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PERCUTIOR UT PERFICIAR. Pere le Moyne, "De l'Art des Devises." Q



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t



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vi CONTENTS. Page Show me Thy ways, 0 Lord ......68 I also am under authority ......72 They desire a better country ......76 Without losing its own light. .....80 I rejoice in the present, and have better things in store .84 We covet not ambrosia or nectar ...88 If everyone swept before his own door, all the street would be clean .......92 Roasted pigeons fly into nobody's mouth 96 Securely rooted .....oo Ever upwards ........104 What I carry in my bosom I bear on my face 8. 8 Made perfect through suffering. 112 Whithersoever thou leadest ......116 The softening influence of use ..120 Parabolic .....124



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" SUCH IS THE LIFE OF MAN." UMAN LIFE has been compared to many things, but not often to a game of backgammon Why not to chess much rather? Nay, chess is not half as good a simile, for in that royal game a man's movements are in his own power, and his will rules his fortune throughout; and such is by no means the case in life. For the circumstances in which a man is placed, and the accidents (otherwise providences) which happen to him from childhood to old age, are not of his choosing. These come to him like the throws of dice to a backgammon player, as chances beyond his control. What shall he do then ? Sit down with folded arms and let Time and Chance carry him where they will ?



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NOT EARTHLY THINGS ONLY. 31 still be stretched out: yea, though winds may chill, and hailstones bruise. Still must the prayer go up, Not cafthly things only, 0 Lord and of heavenly what Thou seest fit."



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ES FLIEGEN KEINE GEBRATENE TAUBE IN'S MAUL. i



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INFLUENCE OF USE. 123 of view. Change the motto to the softening influence of use," and you will recognise the merciful law of nature, which (provided he does not stubbornly resist) enables a man to bear up, even with cheerfulness, under trials the most distasteful to his nature. What evil equals that of a bird, with its large lungs, broad wings, and capacity for flight over land and sea, pent up in a narrow cage, where all use of its powers is impossible ? Not many. And yet in time the poor little thing sings even there. Afflicted ones, the application is for you! Be sure that nature works herein with grace-that there is no ill the flesh is heir to which will not be modified by the softening influence of use.



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HE MUST HAVE PLENTY OF BROTH WHO WOULD STOP EVERYBODY'S MOUTH. ND then only for a time! Oh, you foolish old fellow with the spoon, helping the people all round, you are surely related to the Miller in AEsop's fable, who, going to market with his son and his ass, listened to all the tittle-tattle by the wayside;' took everybody's opinion rather than his own; tried to please everybody rather than himself; and ended by pleasing nobody, not even himself! See, now, how the folks gape As fast as you fill one mouth another opens. The empty ones open to grumble at not being filled, and I wish the full ones may not open presently to find fault with your cooking



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CUSTOM SECOND NATURE. 15 a denizen of the skies, yet contented to grovel below ? Bird.-Parrot-like, poor master, yes. Enslaved to the world, without caring to be free. Having wings of thought, never unfolded. Able to soar in spirit, but loth to the effort. Born for heaven, but clinging fondly to earth; see what custom has brought thee to, poor, magnificent, degraded man!



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THUS, 0 MY SOUL! 35 tant, yet so near; present yonder, as a mighty power which none can fully comprehend; present in our hearts by influences-life-giving, divinewhich all may follow if they will: touch the mountains, pierce the valleys, descend upon thy human flowers; draw us as Thou wouldst have us drawn -thus after Thee. And thou, my soul, follow where that Light leads. As the sun its maker, as the flower its master, so thou thy GOD. Thus, 0 my soul!



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EVER UPWARDS. 107 Upwards, an emblem not of the earthly trouble which now darkens the horizon, now passes away like a vapour; but of the heavenly faith which rises through all obstructions and soars above all misgivings-upwards-ever upwards to the footstool of the Lord God Omnipotent, who ruleth over all.





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DOMINE, VIAS TUAS DEMONSTRA MIHI. Jacobi Typotii Symbola. -I