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Group Title: Economic information report
Title: A microcomputer program to determine citrus tree value
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026515/00001
 Material Information
Title: A microcomputer program to determine citrus tree value
Series Title: Economic information report
Physical Description: 27 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Muraro, R. P
Ferguson, Francis, 1959-
Publisher: Food & Resource Economics Dept., Agricultural Experiment Stations, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Food & Resource Economics Dept., Agricultural Experiment Stations and Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Publication Date: 1982
Copyright Date: 1982
 Subjects
Subject: Fruit trees -- Computer simulation   ( lcsh )
Fruit trees -- Economic aspects   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: R. P. Muraro, Francis Ferguson, Jr.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: "September 1982."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026515
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AHH0068
alephbibnum - 001556439
oclc - 23111361

Table of Contents
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        Front Cover
    Abstract
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    Table of Contents
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    Main
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Full Text

"R. P. Muraro Economic Information

Francis Ferguson, Jr. Report 168






A Microcomputer Program
to Determine Citrus Tree Value



"HUME LIBRARY
MAY 10 1983
1.F.A.S. Univ. of Florida














Food Et Resource Economics Department
Agricultural Experiment Stations and
Cooperative Extension Service
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences September 1982
University of Florida, Gainesville 32611

















ABSTRACT


A microcomputer program to determine citrus tree value with examples
is presented. Growers, accountants and appraisers can use this micro-
computer program to estimate citrus tree values--both the value of the
lost citrus tree and of the replacement tree. Data on the specific trees
being valued are used in the analysis.

Key words: additional care, capitalized tree value, discounting,
discount rate, microcomputer, tree severance value, citrus.










































i

















TABLE OF CONTENTS


Page

ABSTRACT. . . . . . . . . ... . . . .... i

INTRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . ... ....... 1

METHODOLOGY TO DETERMINE NET TOTAL CITRUS TREE VALUE. . . .. 1

RUNNING THE PROGRAM . . . . . . . . .. . . 3

INTERPRETING THE OUTPUT . . . . . . . . . .. 5

PROGRAM EXAMPLES. . . . . . . . . ... . . 6

CONCLUSION. . . . . . . . . ... . . . . 7

SOURCES OF INFORMATION. . . . . . . . . ... .. 8

FIGURE 1. SAMPLE OUTPUT, PART 1. . . . . . . . . 9

FIGURE 2. SAMPLE OUTPUT, PART 2. . . . . . . . ... 10

APPENDIX A: PROGRAM LISTING. . . . . . . . . ... 11

APPENDIX B: ANNUAL RESET COSTS AND HISTORICAL CITRUS YIELD DATA. 18

























ii

















A MICROCOMPUTER PROGRAM TO DETERMINE CITRUS TREE VALUE


Ron Muraro and Francis Ferguson, Jr.


INTRODUCTION


The value of citrus trees lost due to condemnation, government taking
of property, or other causes is difficult to determine for two reasons.
The first is that the necessary calculations are long and tedious. The
second is that the methodology is conceptually complex. The problem is
for these reasons well suited for computer solution.
In this report, a microcomputer program is described which allows a
citrus grower to use whatever fruit prices, grove care costs, yields and
discount (capitalization) rates which are appropriate in determining the
value of a particular tree loss.
The program was written in Applesoft BASIC for use on a 48K Apple II
Plus microcomputer with an eighty column printer. The program can also be
run on other microcomputers of similar memory size, but some modifications
to the code will be necessary. Different printers may also require minor
program modifications.


METHODOLOGY TO DETERMINE NET TOTAL
CITRUS TREE VALUE


After visually inspecting a damaged tree and determining that it
should be removed, it must be assumed that the tree would be replaced by
the end of the first year after tree loss.



RON MURARO is a Farm Management Economist with Cooperative Extension
Service, AREC, Lake Alfred, FL. FRANCIS FERGUSON, JR. is a computer pro-
grammer with Cooperative Extension Service, Tavares, FL.




1






2



Three pieces of information are required to perform the necessary
calculations. First, the estimated care costs of a reset (young tree)
are needed. It must be assumed that additional care costs are incurred
for the first 4 years of a reset's life (see APPENDIX B).
Second, a yield profile for the lost and newly replanted tree is
required. Nearby trees with similar characteristics can help determine
future yields. Statewide average yields are used in the upcoming examples
(see APPENDIX B).
Third, an appropriate discount rate must be determined. To develop
the concept of discounting, consider its more familiar counterpart, com-
pounding. Suppose an investor possesses a sum of money, say X dollars,
which he can invest at an annual interest rate of r, compounded annually
for n years. At the end of n years, his investment has grown to a value
R where
R = X(l+r)....(l+r)
n-terms

R X(l+r)n.
Equivalently, a sum R received n years from today has a present value X
given by
X= R
(1+r)n.
This expression is known as the present value formula.
The appropriate value to use for r, the interest rate or discount
factor, is difficult to determine. Several methods to derive a discount
rate are available that yield different rates. The summation method is
one. An example of the summation method is:
Safe or non-risk rate (prime rate, passbook saving
rate, C. D.'s, bonds, etc.) 8.5%
Risk of ownership (uncertain weather, disease,
unstable prices) 2.5%
Lack of liquidity (slowness of converting land into
money) 2.0%
Management (cost of managing money) 1.0%
Discount rate 14.0%


Includes watering, fertilizing, banking and unbanking, sprouting,
and herbiciding.





3



For example, $1.00 (R) received on year (n) from today discounted
at 5% (r) has a $0.95 present value (X). In the following analysis, a
14.0% discount rate, as derived above, and corresponding present value
factors were used for illustrative purposes.
The annual expected gross income and grove care costs of the lost
tree are multiplied by the present value factors yielding discounted
income and costs. The difference between these two values gives the
annual discounted net return of the lost tree. The same procedure is
used to discount income and costs for the replanted tree. Then these
annual discounted returns are summed to derive the capitalized value of
the lost tree2 and the severance value3 of the replanted tree.
The number of years over which the summation is performed is the
number of years required for the replanted tree to reach maturity. Tree
age at maturity varies among citrus varieties. Yields normally level off
at approximately 25 years of age. For purposes of analysis, 20-year-old
trees were classified as mature. At maturity, the lost tree and replanted
yield equally, and thus no income is "lost."
The sum of the capitalized value of the lost tree and the severance
value of the replanted tree at maturity gives the total value of tree
lost.4


RUNNING THE PROGRAM


The program begins by prompting the user to input the information
necessary for the tree value analysis. In the following example run, the
underlined numbers are not provided by the program. Instead, they are
example answers which have been provided to demonstrate the program.
Individual users should, of course, enter whatever responses are appro-
priate for their individual situations.



Defined as expected income if the tree had lived minus expected
tree care cost if the tree had lived.

Defined as expected tree care cost of the maturing reset tree minus
expected income from the maturing reset.

This approach implicitly assumes citrus trees have infinite lives.
Citrus trees do, in fact, have life spans of 100 years or more, and, thus
this is a reasonable assumption.







4




The first information entered by the user is the type of fruit
involved. In this example, late oranges (#3) have been chosen.


CAPITALIZED TREE VALUE
FRUIT TYPE

1. EARLY ORANGES
2. MID ORANGES
3. LATE ORANGES
4. TEMPLE ORANGES
5. TANGERINES
6. SEEDY GRAPEFRUIT
7. SEEDLESS GRAPEFRUIT
--> 3


The user is next given a chance to type in yield values or to use
historical yields from Savage or the Department of Citrus for the lost
tree. Historical yields from Savage and the Department of Citrus are
listed in APPENDIX B and have been "built in" to the program. In this
example, values will be supplied by the user (option #1).


(1) ENTER TREE YIELD
(2) HISTORICAL YIELDS (SAVAGE)
(3) HISTORICAL YIELDS (DEPT. OF CITRUS)
--> 1


Since the user has elected to supply yield figures, the next infor-
mation required is the tree yield, in boxes, of the lost tree.


TREE YIELD PER BOX ? 5.5


The next questions asked concerning the lost tree are the following.


ENTER TREE AGE IN YEARS 20
ENTER GROVE CARE COST PER TREE 6.50
ENTER PRICE PER BOX 5.00
ENTER PRESENT VALUE RATE 14.0


The program now requires information concerning the trees which are
to be reset in place of those which are lost. The first information
requested is the grove care costs for the first four years. This includes






5



the normal grove care cost per tree plus the additional grove care cost of
planting and maintaining the reset tree.


TREE SEVERANCE VALUE
ENTER GROVE CARE COST OF RESET TREE
FOR THE FIRST FOUR YEARS.

COST YEAR #1 29.95
COST YEAR #2 11.15
COST YEAR #3 9.85
COST YEAR #4 10.00


Next, the expected price per box for fruit from the reset tree is
entered.


EXPECTED PRICE PER BOX 5.00


The user is then asked to select from historical yields of Savage or
the Department of Citrus for the reset tree. Low, average or high yield
values are allowed.


(1) HISTORICAL YIELDS (SAVAGE)
(2) HISTORICAL YIELDS (DEPT. OF CITRUS)
--> 1
EXPECTED YIELD OF RESET TREE
(1) LOW
(2) AVERAGE
(3) HIGH
---> 2


Finally, the user is asked to select a period of analysis from one
to 40 years long.


NUMBER OF YEARS OF ANALYSIS (1->40) 20


After checking to make sure the printer is on, the two tables shown
in Figure 1 and Figure 2 are produced on the printer.


INTERPRETING THE OUTPUT


The output is divided into two tables. The first is the capitalized
value of the lost tree (Figure 1). The second table is the severance value





6




(Figure 2).
The capitalized tree value is comparable with the capitalization or
income approach to valuing (appraising) property. The capitalized value
represents a value for land, trees and any irrigation improvements. There-
fore to determine only tree value, a prorated amount of land and irrigation
value must be subtracted out.
The severance value is the additional value loss due to complete loss
of a citrus tree and/or the value loss due to the time required to recover
an equivalent tree. The net discounted value of replacement grove care
costs of the tree less the expected future income from the tree repre-sP ts
the severance value of the tree. When determining total value lost trom
condemnation where trees, land and improvements are taken, a prorated
value for land and irrigation must be added back to the severance tree
value.
The combination of capitalized value and severance value would repre-
sent the total lost from the taking of a citrus tree.


PROGRAM EXAMPLES


As an example of how the program can be used, consider a case in which
the value of three trees lost due to fire must be estimated for an insurance
claim. If the program output indicates a capitalized value per tree of
$139.15 and a severance value per tree of $24.09, the total value lost per
tree is $163.24. However, since property is not being taken, the land and
irrigation value must be subtracted. If these values are $20.00 per tree
and $10.00 per tree, respectively, then the net value lost per tree is
$133.24. The insurance claim would be three times this amount, or $399.72.
As a second example, suppose that 20 trees are to be taken (property
included) due to government condemnation for a paved road. If the capi-
talized value and severance value are the same as in the first example,
the total loss in this case would be 20 trees at $163.24 per tree, or
$3,264.80. Since both trees and property are being taken, the land and
irrigation value would not be subtracted.
Finally, suppose that 10 non-productive reset trees are taken due to
government condemnation, and that the average age of the trees is two
years. If the two year accumulated severance value per tree is $34.84,







7



land value per tree is $20.00 and irrigation value per tree is $10.00,
then the total loss per tree is $64.84. The total loss is 10 times as
much for 10 trees, or $648.40. Since the severance value does not include
a value for land and improvements (irrigation), these values must be
added to the tree value lost in a condemnation.


CONCLUSION


The validity of the program output is highly dependent on the
validity of the numbers supplied by the user. Therefore, some research
on costs and yields may be necessary before the program is run. Nonethe-
less, the microcomputer can handle much of the necessary analysis quickly
and efficiently. In this way, it can be a valuable tool in determining
the value of lost citrus trees.






8



SOURCES OF INFORMATION

Abbitt, Ben, R. P. Muraro and T. H. Spreen. 1979. A Method for Estimating
Net Total Loss from Losing a Citrus Tree. Univ. of Fla. Econ. Info.
Rept. 105.

American Institute of Real Estate Appraisers. 1973. The Appraisal of
Real Estate.

Florida Crop and Livestock Reporting Service. Florida Agricultural Citrus
Summary, 1977.

Florida Department of Citrus. 1972. Estimated Florida Oranges, Temple
and Grapefruit Production, 1972-73 to 1979-80. Cir. 72-5.

Muraro, Ron. 1981. Estimated Cost of Planting and Maintaining a Citrus
Tree Through Four Years. Unpublished data.

Muraro, R. P. 1982. Budgeting Costs and Returns: Central Florida Citrus
Production, 1981-82. Univ. of Fla. Econ. Info. Rept. 160.

Savage, Zach. 1960. Citrus Yields Per Tree Age. Agr. Ext. Ser. 60-8.
University of Florida, Gainesville.

Smith, Donald G., et al. 1975. Professional Rural Appraisal Manual.
Fourth edition.





9




CAPITALIZED VALUE OF 20 YEAR OLD LATE ORANGES
USER YIELD VALUES

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)

P.Vo/ EXPo P.V. OF GCCb/ IF P.V. OF NET RETURN
FACTOR INCOME EXP. INCOME TREE HAD GCC OF TREE LOST
YEAR @ 14% Y=5.5 P=5 (1 X 2) LIVED (1 X 4) (3 5)


1 .877 27.50 24.12 6.50 5.70 18.42
2 .769 27.50 21,15 6,50 5.00 16.15
3 .675 27.50 18,56 6,50 4.39 14.17
4 .592 27.50 16.28 6.50 3.85 12.43
5 .519 27,50 14.27 6.50 3.37 10.90
6 .456 27.50 12,54 6,50 2.96 9.58
7 .400 27.50 11.00 6.50 2.60 8.40
8 .351 27.50 9.65 6.50 2.28 7.37
9 .308 27.50 8.47 6.50 2.00 6.47
10 .270 27.50 7.43 6.50 1.76 5.67
11 .237 27.50 6.52 6.50 1.54 4.98
12 .208 27.50 5.72 6.50 1.35 4.37
13 .182 27.50 5.00 6.50 1.18 3.82
14 .160 27.50 4.40 6.50 1.04 3.36
15 .140 27.50 3.85 6.50 .91 2.94
16 .123 27.50 3.38 6.50 .80 2.58
17 .108 27.50 2.97 6.50 .70 2.27
18 .095 27.50 2.61 6.50 .62 2.00
19 .083 27.50 2.28 6.50 .54 1.74
20 .073 27.50 2.01 6.50 .47 1.53
**TOTAL** $182.22 $43.07 $139.15



/ P.V.--Present Value

-/GCC--Grove Care Cost








Figure 1. Sample output, part 1.





10




SEVERANCE VALUE OF 20 YEAR OLD LATE ORANGES
SAVAGE YIELD VALUES


(7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)

EXP. GCC;/ P.V- OF EXP, INCOME PoV. OF SEVERANCE TOTAL VALUE
OF RESET GCC FROM RESET EXP. INC. VAL. RESET OF TREE LOST
YEAR TREE (1 X 7) TREE Y=A (1 X 9) (8 10) (6 + 11)


1 29.95 26.27 0.00 0.00 26.27 44.68
2 11.15 8.57 0.00 0.00 8.57 24.72
3 9.85 6.65 2.00 1,35 5.30 19.47
4 10.00 5.92 3.50 2.07 3.85 16.28
5 6.50 3.37 5.00 2.60 .78 11.68
6 6.50 2.96 7.00 3.19 -.23 9.35
7 6.50 2.60 8.50 3.40 -.80 7.60
8 6.50 2.28 9.50 3.33 -1.05 6.32
9 6.50 2.00 11.00 3.39 -1.39 5.08
10 6.50 1.76 12,50 3.37 -1.62 4.05
11 6.50 1.54 13,50 3.20 -1.66 3.32
12 6.50 1.35 15.00 3.12 -1,77 2.60
13 6.50 1.18 16.00 2,91 -1.73 2.09
14 6.50 1.04 17.00 2.72 -1.68 1.68
15 6.50 .91 18,50 2.59 -1,68 1.26
16 6.50 .80 19,50 2.40 -1.60 .98
17 6.50 .70 20.50 2.21 -1.51 .76
18 6,50 .62 21.50 2.04 -1.43 .57
19 6.50 .54 22.50 1.87 -1.33 .42
20 6.50 .47 23.00 1,68 -1.20 .33
**TOTAL** $71.54 $47.45 $24.09 $163.24



- GCC--Grove Care Cost

"P.V.--Present Value








Figure 2. Sample output, part 2.



























APPENDIX A


PROGRAM LISTING







12


10 REM ******** ************ ****************
15 REM ********** ** * ** ** ****
20 REM ** **
25 REM ** CITRUS TREE VALUE **
26 REM ** (C) COPYRIGHT, 1982 **
27 REM ** UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA **
30 REM ** **
35 REM ** THIS PROGRAM HAS BEEN DEVELOPED **
40 REM ** BY RON MURARO FOR IFAS. **
50 REM * REVISION DATE: 2/3/82 **
55 REM ** (LAKE ALFRED AREC 813/956-1151) **
60 REM ** FRANCIS FERGUSON JR. PROGRAMMER **
65 REM ** **
70 REM ** FOR FURTHER INFO. CALL **
75 REM ** AG. EXT. SERVICE TAVARES, FL. **
80 REM ** TEL.# (904) 343-4101 **
85 REM u* **
90 REM *************** IHt***** 1ti*ic'K*cfc*fxcH
95 REM ***i****************** **************
100 CLEAR
110 GOSUB 1190: REM WORKING
120 GOSUB 1090: REM INIT VALUES
130 HOME
140 VTAB (1): HTAD (9): INVERSE : PRINT "CAPITALIZED TREE VALUE
": NORMAL
150 VTAB (4)
160 INVERSE : HTAB (15): PRIIT "FRUIT TYPE": NORMAL
170 PRINT
180 FOR I = 1 TO 7
190 :: PRINT TAV( 10)I;". ";TT$(I)
200 NEXT I
210 PRINT TAB( 6)"--> "
220 GET YS: PRINT Y$
230 IF VAL (YS) < = 0 OR VAL (YS) > 7 THEN GOTO 130
240 LET TP% = VAL (YS)
250 VTA3 (15)
260 PRINT "(1) ENTER TREE YIELD"
270 PRINT "(2) HISTORICAL YIELDS (SAVAGE)"
280 PRINT "(3) HISTORICAL YIELDS (DEPT. OF CITRUS)"
290 PRINT "--> "; GET Y : PRINT VAL (Y$): IF VAL (Y$) = 0 OR
VAL (YS) > :I THEN GOTO 250
300 IF VAL (YS) > 1 THEN GOTO 350
310 VTAB (15l: CALL 958
3j0 INPUT "TREE YIELD PER BOX ? ";BT
330 LET TH% = 0
340 GOTO 420
350 VTAB (10): CALL 958
360 LET TH% = VAL (YS) 1
370 PRINT "(1) LOW YIELD"
380 PRINT "(2) AVERAGE YIELD"
390 PRINT "(3) HIGH YIELD"
400 PRINT "--> ";: GET Ys: PRINT VAL (Y$): IF VAL (Y$) 0 OR
VAL (YS) > -3 THEN GOTO 330
410 LET TY = VAL (YS)
420 VTAB (20)
430 INPUT "ENTER TREE AGE IN YEARS ";TA%
440 INPUT "ENTER GROVE CARE COST PER TREE ";G1
450 INPUT "ENTER PRICE PER BOX ";PP
460 INPUT "ENTER PRESENT VALUE RATE ";PV
470 HOME
480 VTAB (1): HTAB (10): INVERSE : PRINT "TREE SEVERANCE VALUE"
: NORMAL
490 VTAB (4)
500 PRINT "ENTER GROVE CARE COST OF RESET TREE"
510 PRINT "FOR THE FIRST FOUR YEARS."
520 'PRINT
530 FOR I = 1 TO 4
540 :: PRINT TAB( 5)"COST YEAR #";I;: INPUT ";EC(I)
550 NEXT I
560 PRINT
570 INPUT "EXPECTED PRICE PER BOX ";EP
580 VTAB (14)
570 I TH% > 0 THEN LET TZ% = 0: GOTO 650
o00 PRINT "(1) HISTORICAL YIELDS (SAVAGE)"
610 PRINT "(2) HISTORICAL YIELDS (DEPT. OF CITRUS)"
620 PRINT "--> ";: GET Y$: PRINT VAL (YS): IF VAL (Y$) < 1 OR
VAL (Y5) > 2 THEN GOTO 580
630 LET TZ% = VAL (YI)






13

640 VTAB (18)
650 PRINT "EXPECTED YIELD OF RESET TREE"
660 PRINT (1) LOW"
670 PRINT (Z) AVERAGE"
680 PRINT (3) HIGH"
690 PRINT "---> ";: GET YS: PRINT VAL (Y$): IF VAL (YS) = 0 OR
VAL (YS) > 3 THEN GOTO 640
700 LET EY% VAL (Y5)
710 PRINT
720 INPUT "NUMBER OF YEARS OF ANALYSIS (1->40) ";NY%
730 GOSUB 1190: REM WORKING
740 IF TH% = 0 THEN LET YZS = "USER YIELD VALUES"
750 IF TZ% = 1 THEN LET YWS = "SAVAGE YIELD VALUES"
760 IF TZ% = 2 THEN LET YWS = "DEPT. OF CITRUS YIELD VALUES"
770 IF TH% = 1 THEN LET YZS = "SAVAGE YIELD VALUES"
780 IF TH% = 2 THEN LET YZS = "DEPT. OF CITRUS YIELD VALUES"
790 IF TH% = 1 OR TH% = 2 THEN YW$ = YZS
800 REM POINTERS SAVAGE
810 PZ% = TP% 25:P1% = PZ% 24
820 REM POINTERS DEPT. OF CITRUS
830 IF TP% = 1 OR TP% = 2 THEN LET P3% = 1:P4% = 22
840 IF TP% 3 OR TP% = 4 THEN LET P4% = (TP% 1) 22:P3% =
P4% 21
850 IF TP% > = 6 THEN LET P4% = (TP% 2) 22'P3% P4% 21

860 GOSUB 1300: REM YIELD VALUES 40 YEARS (NORMAL)
870 GOSUB 1640: REM TABLE VALUE FIGURE
880 GOSUB 1980: REM DECIMAL ROUTINE
890 GOSUB 1250: REM PRINTER ON ?
900 GOSUB 122.0 REM TEMP STOP
910 GOSUB 1190: REM WORKING
920 PRINT D$;"PR#1": PRINT CHRS (9);"80N": PRINT CHRS (12)
930 GOSUB 2650: REM CREDIT LINE
940 GOSUB 2260: REM FIRST TABLE HEADINGS
950 GOSUD 1910: REM FIRST PRTNT ROUTINE
960 GOSUB 1290: REM DIVIDER LINE
970 GOSUB 2430: REM SECOND TABLE HEADINGS
980 GOSUB 2590: REM SECOND PRINT ROUTINE
990 GOSUB 1290: REM DIVIDER LINE
1000 PRINT : PRINT DS;"PR400"
1010 HOME
1020 VTAB (12): PRINT "WOULD YOU LIKE TO RERUN THE PROGRAM ?"
1030 VTAB (14): HTAB (17): PRINT "(Y/N) ";: GET Y$: PRINT Y$
1040 IF YS = "N" THEN GOTO 1070
1050 IF Y$ = "Y" THEN GOTO 100
1060 GOTO :010
1070 PRINT D0 ;"RUN HELLO"
1080 END
1090 REM INIT VALUES
1100 LET DS CHR$ (4)
1110 DIM TT (7)
1120 DIM TT( 40,1.) ,TS (40, 12) ,T1(40),T2 (40)
1130 DIM GV(175,3),GV 1140 FOR I = 1 TO 175: READ GV(I,1),GV(I,Z),GV(I,3): NEXT I
1150 FOR I = 1 TO 110: READ GW(I,1),GW(I,2),GW(I,3): NEXT I
1160 FOR I = 1 TO 7: READ TTC(I): NEXT I
1170 RETURN
1180 REH START SHORT ROUTINES
1190 TEXT : HOME
1200 VTAB (12): HTAB (14): INVERSE : PRINT "<--WORKING--)": NORMAL

1210 RETURN
1220 VTAB (23): PRINT "ENTER ANY CHARACTER TO CONTINUE.";
1230 GET YS
1240 RETURN
1250 HOME
1260 VTAB (12): HTAB (5): PRINT "IS THE PRINTER ON...?"
1270 RETURN
1280 PRINT "-------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------": RETURN
1290 PRINT : PRINT "*;* 9 * a* * * * * * * * *
* * * * * ** : PRINT : RETURN
1300 REM YIELD VALUES FORTY YEARS (NORMAL)
1310 ON TH% + 1 GOSUB 1350,1390,1440
1320 IF TH% > 0 AND TZ% 0 THEN ON TH% GOSUB 1520,1570
1330 IF TZ% ) 0 AND TH% a 0 THEN ON TZ% GOSUB 1520,1570
1340 RETURN
1350 FOR I = 1 TO NY%
1360 :: LET Tl 1370 NEXT I






14

1380 RETURN
1390 FOR I = 1 TO NY%
1400 :: IF TA% + I 1 > = 25 THEN LET Tl(I) = GV(P2%,TY): GOTO
1420
1410 :: LET T1(I) = GV(TA% + P1% + I Z,TY)
1420 NEXT I
1430 RETURN
1440 IF TP% = 5 THEN GOSUB 1390: GOTO 1510
1430 REN TANGERINES ARE NOT INCLUDED IN THE DEPT. OF CITRUS TA
BLE--USE SAVAGE
1460 FOR I = 1 TO NY%
1470 : IF TA% + I 1 < = 3 THEN LET T1(I) = GV(TA% + P1% + I
Z,TY : GOTO 1500
1480 :: IF TA% + I 1 > = 25 THEN LET TI(I) = GW(P4%,TY): GOTO
1500
1490 :: LET T1(I) = GW(TA% + P3% + I 2 3,TY)
1500 NEXT I
1510 RETURN
1520 FOR I = 1 TO NY%
1530 :: IF I > = 25 THEN LET TZ(I) = GV(PZ%,EY%): GOTO 1550
1540 : LET TZ(I) = GV(P1% + I 1,EY%)
1550 NEXT I
1560 RETURN
1570 IF TP% = 5 THEN GOSUB 1520: GOTO 1630
1580 FOR I = 1 TO NY%
1590 :: IF I < = 3 THEN LET T2(I) = GV(P1% + I 1,EY%): GOTO
1620
1600 : IF I > = 25 THEN LET TZ(I) = GW(P4%,EY%): GOTO 1620
1610 : LET T2(I) = GW(P3% + I 1 3,EY%)
1620 NEXT I
1630 RETURN
1640 REM TABLE VALUE FIGURE
1630 FOR I = I TO 7: LET S(1) = 0: NEXT I
1660 FOR I = 1 TO NY%
1670 : LET Pi = 1 / ((1 + (PV / 100)) A I)
1680 : LET Pt = ( INT ((P1 + .0005) 1000) / 1000)
1690 : LET TT(I,1) = Pi
1700 : LET TT(I,2) = Ti(I) PP
1710 : LET TT(1,3) a TT(I,1) TT(I,2)
1720 : LET 5(1) = S(1) + TT(I,3)
1730 : LET TT(I,4) = Gi
1740 : LET TT(I,5) = TT(I,4) TT(I,1)
1750 : LET S(2) = S(Z) + TT(I,5)
1760 : LET TT(I,6) = TT(I,3) TT(I,5)
1770 : LET S(3) = S(3) + TT(I,6)
1780 : IF I < = 4 THEN LET TT(I,7) = EC(I)
1790 : IF I > = 5 THEN LET TT(I,7) = G1
1800 : LET TT(I,8) = TT(I ,1) TT(I,7)
1810 : LET S(4) = 5(4) + TT(I,8)
1820 : LET TT(I,9) = TZ(I) EP
1830 : LET TT(I,10) = TT(I,1) TT(I,9)
1840 : LET S(5) = S(5) + TT(I,10)
1850 : LET TT(I,11) = TT(I,8) TT(I,10)
1860 : LET S(6) = S(6) + TT(I,11)
1870 : LET TT(I,12) = TT(I,6) + TT(I,11)
1880 : LET S(7) = S(7) + TT(I,12)
1890 NEXT I
1900 RETURN
1910 REM FIRST TABLE PRINT
1920 FOR J = 1 TO NY%
1930 :: PRINT J;: POKE 36,9: PRINT TS$(J,1);: POKE 36,21 + (5 -
LEN (TSS TSS;J,3))): PRINT TS$(J,3);
1940 :: POKE 36,49 + (5 LEN (TS$(J,4))) : PRINT TSS(J,4);: POKE
36,60 + (5 LEN (TSC(J,5))): PRINT TS$(J,5);: POKE 36,70 +
(6 LEN (TSS(J,6))): PRINT TS$(J,6)
1950 NEXT J
1960 PRINT "** TOTAL **";: POKE 36,32 + (7 LEN (SS(l))): PRINT
"*"$";SS(1);: POKE 36,37 + (7 LEN (S$(2))): PRINT "$";S$(2
) : POKE 36,68 + (7 LEN (SS(3))): PRINT "S";S$(3)
1970 RETURN
1980 REM DECIMAL ROUTINE
1990 FOR I = 1 TO 7
2000 :: LET SS(I) = STR$ (( INT ((S(I) + .005) 100)) / 100)
2010 : LET X = LEN (S 2020 :: FOR K = 1 TO X
2030 :::: IF MIDST (S$(I),K, ) a CHR6 (46) THEN LET XI = K: GOTO
2050
2040 : NEXT K
2050 :: IF XI = 0 THEN LET S&(I) a SS(I) + ".00": GOTO 2080





15

2060 : IF X XI = 2 THEN GOTO 2080
2070 :: IF X X1 = 1 THEN LET SS(I) = S$(I) + "0"
2080 NEXT I
2090 FOR I = 1 TO NIY%
2100 :: LET TS$(I,1) = STRS (TT(I,1))
2110 NEXT I
2120 FOR I = 1 TO NY%
2130 :: FOR J = 2 TO 12
2140 : : LET TS$(IJ) = STRS (( INT ((TT(I,J) + .005) 100) 1
100)
2150 :: LET X = LEN (TS (I,J)):X1 = 0
2160 ::: OR K = 1 TO X
2170 ::::: IF MIDS (TS6(I,J),K,1) = CHR$ (46) THEN LET X1 =
K: GOTO 2390
2180 : : NEXT K
2190 : : IF X1 = 0 THEN LET TS&(I,J) = TSS(I,J) + ".00": GOTO

2200 ::: IF X XI = Z THEN GOTO 2220
2210 : : IF X XI = 1 THEN LET TSS(I,J) = TSS(I,J) + "0"
2220 : NEXT J
2230 NEXT I
2240 RETURN
2250 REM FIRST TABLE HEADINGS
2260 PRINT
2270 PRINT TAB( 1i)"CAPITALIZED VALUE OF. ";TAl;" YEAR OLD ";TT
$ (TP%)
2280 PRINT TAB( 1;)YZS
2290 PRINT
2300 POKE 36,10: PRINT "(I)";: POKE 36,23: PRINT "(2)";: POKE 3
6,36: PRINT "(;)";: POKE 36,50: PRINT "(4)";: POKE 36,61: PRIN'
"(5)":: POKE 36,73: PRINT "(6)"
2310 CGSUB 1280
2320 IF TH% = 0 THEN LET YX- = STRS (BT)
2330 IF (TH% = 1 OF. TH% = 2) AND TY = 1 THEN LET YX$ = "L"
2340 IF (TH% = 1 OR TH% = 2) AND TY = 2 THEN LET YXS = "A"
2350 IF (TH% = 1 OF: TH% = 2) AND TY = 3 THEN LET YX$ = "H"
2360 PRINT "YEAR P.V.FACTOR EXP INCOME P.V.OF GCC I
F TREE P.V.OF NET RETURN"
237( PRINTV @ ";PV;"%"; : POKE 36,19: PRINT "Y=";YX$;" P=
";P; : POKE 36,33: PRINT "EXP.INCOME HAD LIVED GCC
OF TREE LOST"
238C POKE 36,34: PRINT "(1 X 2)";: POKE 36,59: PRINT "(1 X 4)
(3 5)"
2390 GOSUB 1280
2400 PRINT
2410 RETURN
2420 REM SECOND TABLE HEADINGS
2430 PRINT
2440 PRINT TAB( 15)"SEVERANCE VALUE OF ";TA%;" YEAR OLD ";TT$(
TP%)
2450 PRINT TAB( 11)YWS
2460 PRINT
2470 IF (TZ% > 0 OR TH% > 0) AND EY% = 1 THEN YX$ = "L"
2480 IF (TZ% > 0 OR TH% > 0) AND EY% = 2 THEN YXS = "A"
2490 IF (TZ% > 0 OR TH% > 0) AND EY% = 3 THEN YX$ = "H"
2500 POKE 36,10: PRINT "(7)";: POKE 36,23: PRINT "(8)";: POKE 3
6,36: PRINT "(9)";: POKE 36,49: PRINT "(10)";: POKE 36,61: PRI
"( )";: POKE 36,72: PRINT "(12)"
2510 GOSUB 1280
2520 PRINT "YEAR EXP.GCC OF P.V.OF EXP.INCOME FROM P.V
.OF SEVERANCE TOTAL VALUE"
2530 PRIN" RESET TREE GCC RESET TREE Y=";YXS;"
EXP.INC. VAL.RESET OF TREE LOST"
254(1 PRINT (1 X 7) (1 X
9; (8 10; (6 + 11)"
s550 GOSUD 1280
2560 PRINT
2570 RETURN
2580 REM SECOND TABLE PRINT
2590 FOR J = 1. TO NY%
2600 :: PRINT J.: POKE.36,8 + (5 LEN (TSS(J,7))): PRINT TS6(J
,7; POKE 36,21 + (5 LEN (TS$(J,8))): PRINT TS$(J,8);: POK
36,35 + (5 LEN (TS$(J,9))): PRINT TS$(J,9';
2610 :: POKE 36,49 + (5 LEN (TS$(J,10))): PRINT TS$(J,10);: POKE
36,60 + (b LEN (TSf(J,11))): PRINT TS$(J,11);: POKE 36,7
0 + (6 LEN (TS$(J,12))): PRINT TSO(J,12)
2620 NEXT J
2630 PRINT T* TOTAL **";: POKE 36,18 + (7 LEN (SS(4))): PRINT
"I";S$(4); : POKE 36,46 + (7 LEN (S$(3))) : PRINT "S";S$(5
) POKE 36,57 + (7 LEN (S6(6))): PRINT "$";S6(6);: POKE






16

36,68 + (7 LEN (SS(7)) : PRINT "$";S$(7)
2640 RETURN
2650 REM CREDIT LINE
2660 PRINT
2670 PRINT ::::::::::::::::::::

2680 PRINT ": CITRUS TREE VALUE
II
2690 PRINT ": THIS PROGRAM HAS BEEN DEVELOPED BY R.MURARO & F.F
ERGUSON FOR IFAS WITH THE :"
2700 PRINT ": COOPERATION OF THE GOVERNOR'S ENERGY OFFICE (LAKE
ALFRED AREC 813/956-1151) :"
2710 PRINT "::::::::: :::: : :::::::::::::: :: : :::::::::

2720 RETURN
2730 REM TABLE 3 THROUGH TABLE 9 ARE CREDITED TO ZACH SAVAGE,
1960.
2740 REM CITRUS YIELDS PER TREE AGE. AGR. EXT. SER. 60-8.
2750 REM UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE.
2760 REM BEGIN TABLE 3 EARLY ORANGE VARIETIES (NAVEL AND HAMLI
N)
2770 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0 4, .3, .7,1.1 5,1 2,1.8,.7,1.7,2.5
,I,Z 2,3.2,1.3,2.7,3.9,1 .5,3.1,4 6,1.7,3.5 ,5 3
2780 DATA 2,3 9,6,2.2,4.3,6.7, .3,4.6,7.4,2.5,4.9,8. 1,2.7,5.2,
8.8,2.8,5 5,9.3 2.9,5.7,9.8,3 0 5.8,10.2,3.1,5.9,10.5,3.2,6
,10 8
2790 DATA 3 3,6.1,11,3.4,6.2, 1 .2,3.5,6.3,11.3,3.5,6.4,11.5,3
.5,6.5,11 6
2800 REM END TABLE 3
2810 REM BEGIN TABLE 4 MIDSEASON ORANGE VARIETIES (PARSON BROW
N AND PINEAPPLE)
2820 DATA 0,0,0,0.0,0,0,.3,1.1, .7,1.9 .5,1.1,2.6,.8,1.6,3.2
,. 1,2,3 8, 1.4 ,2. 4 .3,1 .6 2 8,4.8 ,1 8 3. 1,5 3
2830 DATA 2. ,3...4 .7,2.3,3 7,6. ,2.5,4. ,6.5,2.7,4.4,6.9,2.8,4
.6,7 2,3, 8, 6 3 1,5 7 9 3 3,8 2,3 3, 4,8 4,3 .4,5.
6,8.7
2840 DATA 3.:,5.7,8.9,3.5,5.8,9.2,3.6,5.9,9.4,3.6,6,9.7,3.7,6
,9.9
2850 REM ZND TAIL, 4
2860 REM BEGIN 'TAI'LE 5 LATE SEASON ORANGES (VALENCIA)
2870 DATA 0,,0,0 ,0,0 ,0, .4,.6,.3, 7, .9,.5,1,1.3,.7,1.4,1.6, .9,
1 ',Z,1. 1,1.9,23. 3,1 2,Z.2.2.6,1 4,2. ,3
2880 DATA 1.5,2.7,3.3, .7,3,3.7,1.8,3.2,4,1.9,3.4,4.3,2.1,3.7,
4. 6.2 .2,3. 9,4.9,2.3,4. 1,5.2,2 .4,4. 3, .5,2.5,4.5,5.8,2.6,4.6

2890 DATA 2.7,4 .7,6.4,2.7,4.9, 6.7,2.8,5,6.9,2.9,5.1,7.1,2.9
,3.2,7.4
2900 REN END TABLE 5
2910 REM BEGIN TABLE 6 TEMPLE ORANGES
2920 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0, .5,1.2,.1,.7, .5,.2,1,1.8,.4,1.2,2, .5,
1.4,2.3,.7,1.6,2.6, .8,1.8,2.8, .9,2,3.1
2930 DATA 1 1, .3,3 3,1 .2,2. 5,3.6,1 .3,2. 7,3.8,1 5,2.8,4. 1 1 .6,3
,4.3,1.7,3.2,4 6,1.8,3.4,4.8,2,3.6, ,2.1,3.8,5.3,2.2,4,5.5
2940 DATA 2.4,4.2,5.7,2.5,4.4,5.9,2.6,4.5,6. 1,2.7,4.7,6.3,2.9
,4.9,6.Z
2950 REM END TABLE 6
2960 REM BEGIN TABLE 7 TANGERINES
2970 DATA 0 0,0, 0,0,0,0,0,1,0, ,1.3,0,.5,1.7,.1,.9,2, .,1.2,2
.3,.4,1.5,2.6,.6,1.8,2.9,.7,2.1.3.2
2980 DATA .9,2.3,3. 1,2.5,3.8, .1,2.8,4.2,1.3,3,4.5,1.4,3.2,4.
8,1.5,3.4, 5.1, 1.7,3.6,5.3, 1.8,3.7,5.6, 9,3 5.,5.9,2,4,6.2
2990 DATA 2.1,4.2,6.5,2.2,4.3,6.8,2.3,4.4,7.1,2.4,4.5,7.4,2 5
,4 6,7.6
3000 REM END TABLY ?
3010 REM BEGIN TABLE 8 SEEDY GRAPEFRUIT (DUNCAN)
3020 DATA 0,0,0, 0,0,0,0 .5,1,0,1.3,2, .3,1.9,2.9, 6,2 5,3.8, 8,
3 .1 ,4 , 3 .3, 1 .3 ,4,6, 1 .5 ,4 .4 ,6 .6
3030 DATA 1.7,4 8,7.1,1 .9,5. ,7.6,2.2,5.5,8.1,2.4,5.8,8.5 ,2 6,
6.1,6.?,, 3,6 3.?. 3,3.1,6.6,9.7,3.3,6.8,10,3.5,7,10.3,3.7,7
.2, 0.6
3040 DATA 3. ,7.',10. 9,4,7.6,11 .2,4. 2,7.8,11. 4,4.4,8, 1 .6,4.6
,8 2 11 .
3050 REM END TABLE 8
3060 REM BEGIN TABLE 9 SEEDLESS GRAPEFRUIT (MARSH AND PINK)
3070 DATA 0,0,0 ,0 ,0 ,0,0, .5,1,. 1.7 5,1.7,2.4, 7,2.2,3,1,
2.7 .3 ,l. 2,3 .2,4 .1,1.5,3 .6,4 .7,1.7,4,4 .2
3080 DATA 2, 3,5.7, 2,4.7,6 1,2.4,5,6.6,2.6,5.3,7,2.8,5.5,7.
4, 3,5.7,7. 8,3.2, 6 ,8. 2,3 .4, 6 2 8 6,3. 5,6.4 ,8.9 ,3.7,6.6,9.2
3090 DATA 3.9,6.8,9.5,4,6.9,9.8,4.2,7.1,10,4.3,7.3,10.3,4.4,7
.4.10.5






17

3100 REM END TABLE 9
3110 REM THE FOLLOWING TABLE IS CREDITED TO FLORIDA DEP. OF CI
TRUS. 1972
3120 REM ESTIMATED FLORIDA ORANGES, TEMPLE AND GRAPEFRUIT PROD
UCTION.
3130 REM 1972-73 TO 1979-80 CIR. 72 5.
3140 REM EARLY AND MID SEASON ORANGES
3150 REM (NAVEL, HAMLIN & FARSON BROWN, PINEAPPLE)
3160 DATA .55, 68, .92, .69, 85,1 15, .83 1.02,1.38,.94,1.26,1 62
,1 03,1 59,1 86, 1 2,1 92,2.1,1.21,2.25,2 34,1 3,2.58,2.66,
1 4, .9,3,1 .7,3.07,3.36,2.01,3.26,3.72,2.31,3.45,4 08
3170 DATA 2 56,3.64,4 44,2 8,3.83,4.8,3.04,4.02,5.16,3.28,4 21
,5 .52,3 45,4.37,3.82,3.56,4.52,6.05,3.67,4.67,6.29,3.78,4.8
2,6.52,3 89,4.97,6 76,4,5.1,7
3180 REM LATE SEASON ORANGES (VALENCIA)
3190 DATA .3, 68,.8,.38,.85,, .46,1 02,1.2,.6,1 18,1 36,.82,1
.34,1.64,1.04,1.5, 1 .93,1 26, 1 66,2.22, 1 48, 1.82,2.51,1.7,2,
2 8,1.89,2 17,2.99,2 02,2 36,3.18,2 1 ,2.55,3.36
3200 DATA 2 23,2.74,3.55,2.34,2.93,3.74,2.44,3.12,3.92,2.55,3
31,4 11,2 65,3 47,4.34,2.76,3.62,4.61,2 87,3 77,4.88,2.98,3
.92,5.16,3 09,4 07,5.43,3.2,4.2,5.7
3210 REM TEI4FLE ORANGES
3220 DATA .5, 7, 8,.6, 9,1,.7.1.1,1.2 ,.82, .22,1 42,.94,1.34,1
.64,1 .05,1 45,1.85,1.17,1.57,2.07,1 .29,1.69,2.29,1.4,1.8,2.
5,1 62,1 95,2 68,1.74,2 1,2.86,1.85,2 25,3.05
3230 DATA 1.97,2.4,3 23,2 24,2. 5,3.41,2.2,2.7,3.6,2.37,2.97,3
.96, .54,3 24,4 33,2 71,3.51,4.67,2.88,3 .78,5.03,3.05,4. 05,
5.39,3.22,4.32,5.74,3.4,4.6,6. 1
3240 REM SEEDY GRAPEFRUIT (DUNCAN)
3250 DATA 1.26,1.78, .25, .58,2.23,1.5,1.9,2.68,1. 7 ,2.21,3
07 ,1.97,2.52,3 41 ,2.09, 83,3.75,2.21, 3.14,4.09,2.33,3. 45,4
.43,2.47,3.75, 4 .81,2.55,3.91,5 09,2.64,4. 1 ,5.43, 2 .73, 4 29, 5
.77
3260 DATA 2.02.4.48,6.11,2 91,4.67,6.45,3,4.86,6 79,3.09,5.05,
7 3,3.41,5.3 ,7.48,3.95,5.77,7.68,4.49,6.18,7.84,5.03,6.59
,8.08,5.47,7,8.64,5.8,7.4,9.2
3270 REM SEEDLESS GRAPEFRUIT (MARSH & PINK)
3280 DATA 1 1 .44 1.72, 38, 8, 15, 1 66, 16, 58, .04,2 5
5,2.97,2.53,2.97,3.32,3.02,3.39,3.67,3.36,3.81,4.08,3.52,4.
23,4.61,3.7,4.64,5.2,3.93,4.9,5.49,4 14,5.14,5.8,4.35,5.38,
6.11
3290 DATA 4.56,5 62,6.42,4 77,5.86,6.73,4.98,6 1,7.04,5.19,6.3
4,7.35,5.37,6 .55,7 .59, 5 52,6.73,7.77, .67,6.91,7.95, .82,7.
09,8.13,5.97,7.27,8.31,6.1,7.44,8.5
3300 DATA EARLY ORANGES,MID ORANGES,LATE ORANGES,TEMPLE ORANGE
S,TANGERINES,SEEDY GRAPEFRUIT,SEEDLESS GRAPEFRUIT
3310 END

























APPENDIX B


ANNUAL RESET COSTS AND
HISTORICAL CITRUS YIELD DATA







19




ESTIMATED COST OF PLANTING AND MAINTAINING A RESET CITRUS TREE THROUGH FOUR YEARS*

Number of Resets Per Acre
1-2 3-5 6-10 11-25 26 and more

----------------Cost Per Tree---------------

Year 1l:
Tree Removal $13.80 $ 9.20 $ 6.80 $ 4.50 $ 3.50
Site Preparation (Stake, Mound,
Etc.) 1.50 1.20 .90 .60 .40
Tree Cost (Bare Root) 3.85 3.75 3.65 3.45 3.45
Planting Tree and First Watering 2.00 1.80 1.60 1.40 1.30
Total Planting Costs 21.15 15.95 12.95 9.95 8.65
Water Tree with Truck (Average 10
Times)2/ 4.50 4.00 3.50 3.00 2.50
Fertilize Tree (4 Times) 1.25 1.10 .95 .85 .75
Tree Wrap and Sprouting 1.50 1.35 1.20 1.05 .90
Herbicide .35 .35 .35 .35 .35
Ridomil .45 .45 .45 .45 .45
Miscellaneous .25 .25 .20 .20 .15
Total Tree Care Year #1 6.30 7.50 6.65 5.90 5.05
Total Cost Year #1 29.45 23.45 19.60 15.85 13.70

Year #2:
"Water Tree with Truck.(Average 5
Times)2/ 2.25 2.00 1.75 1.50 1.25
Fertilize Tree (4 Times) 1.80 1.60 1.40 1.20 .95
Ridomil .45 .45 .45 .45 .45
Herbicide Material & Application .35 .35 .35 .35 .35
Miscellaneous .25 .25 .20 .20 .15
Total Cost Year #2 5.10 4.65 4.30 3.70 3.15

Year 03:
Fertilize Tree (4 Times) 2.45 2.20 1.90 1.65 1.30
Ridomil .45 .45 .45 .45 .45
Herbicide Material & Application .35 .35 .35 .35 .35
Miscellaneous .35 .35 .25 .25 .15
Total Cost Year #3 3.60 3.35 2.95 2.70 2.25

Year 04:
Fertilize Tree (4 Times) 3.10 2.80 2.50 2.15 1.75
Herbicide Material & Application .35 .35 .35 .35 .35
Miscellaneous .35 .35 .25 .25 .15
Total Cost Year #4 3.80 3.50 3.10 2.75 2.25
Total Four Year Accumulated Costs $41.95 $34.95 $29.95 $25.00 $2165


-/The costs listed are the additional costs incurred above the costs of cultivation,
spray, fertilization, etc. of the normal grove care program.

2/
- The use of a truck for watering' reset trees will vary depending upon rainfall,
availability of irrigation, soil type, etc. Adjust according to own management
program.

Prepared by Ronald P. Muraro, Farm Management Economist, AREC, Lake Alfred, FL,
December, 1981.










a b
Table 1.--Estimated yield per tree for early orange varieties


Age of tree Low Average High Age of tree Low Average High

(boxes) (boxes)

1 0.0 0.0 0.0 29 3.5 6.6 11.9
2 0.0 0.0 0.0 30 3.5 6.7 12.0
3 0.0 0.2 0.4 31 3.5 6.7 12.0
4 0.3 0.7 1.1 32 3.5 6.7 12.0
5 0.5 1.2 1.8 33 3.5 6.7 12.0
6 0.7 1.7 2.5 34 3.5 6.8 12.0
7 1.0 2.2 3.2 35 3.5 6.8 12.0
8 1.3 2.7 3.9 36 3.5 6.8 12.0
9 1.5 3.1 4.6 37 3.5 6.8 12.0
10 1.7 3.5 5.3 38 3.5 6.8 12.0
11 2.0 3.9 6.0 39 3.5 6.8 12.0
12 2.2 4.3 6.7 40 3.5 6.8 12.0
13 2.3 4.6 7.4 41 3.5 6.9 12.0
14 2.5 4.9 8.1 42 3.5 6.9 12.0
15 2.7 5.2 8.8 43 3.5 6.9 12.0
16 2.8 5.5 9.3 44 3.5 6.9 12.0
17 2.9 5.7 9.8 45 3.5 6.9 12.0
18 3.0 5.8 10.2 46 0.0 7.0 0.0
19 3.1 5.9 10.5 47 0.0 7.0 0.0
20 3.2 6.0 10.8 48 0.0 7.0 0.0
.21 3.3 6.1 11.0 49 0.0 7.0 0.0
22 3.4 6.2 11.2 50 0.0 7.0 0.0
23 3.5 6.3 11.3 51 0.0 7.0 0.0
24 3.5 6.4 11.5 52 0.0 7.0 0.0
25 3.5 6.5 11.6 53 0.0 7.0 0.0
26 3.5 6.5 11.6 54 0.0 7.0 0.0
27 3.5 6.6 11.7 55 0.0 7.0 0.0
28 3.5 6.6 11.8
"a-3/5 bushel box equivalents bNavel and Hamlin Source: Savage







Table 2.--Estimated yield per tree for midseason orange varieties


Age of tree Low Average High Age of tree Low Average High

(boxes) (boxes)

1 0.0 0.0 0.0 29 3.8 6.0 10.7
2 0.0 0.0 0.0 30 3.9 6.0 10.8
3 0.0 0.3 1.1 31 3.9 6.0 11.0
4 0.2 0.7 1.9 32 3.9 6.0 11.0
5 0.5 1.1 2.6 33 3.9 6.0 11.0
6 0.8 1.6 3.2 34 3.9 6.0 11.0
7 1.1 2.0 3.8 35 4.0 6.0 11.0
8 1.4 2.4 4.3 36 4.0 6.0 11.0
9 1.6 2.8 4.8 37 4.0 6.0 11.0
10 1.8 3.1 5.3 38 4.0 6.0 11.0
11 2.1 3.4 5.7 39 4.0 6.0 11.0
12 2.3 3.7 6.1 40 4.0 6.0 11.0
13 2.5 4.1 6.5 41 4.0 6.0 11.0
14 2.7 4.4 6.9 42 4.0 6.0 11.0
15 2.8 4.6 7.2 43 4.0 6.0 11.0
16 3.0 4.8 7.6 44 4.0 6.0 11.0
17 3.1 5.1 7.9 45 4.0 6.0 11.0
18 3.2 5.3 8.2 46 4.0 6.0 0.0
19 3.3 5.4 8.4 47 4.0 6.0 0.0
20 3.4 5.6 8.7 48 4.0 6.0 0.0
21 3.5 5.7 8.9 49 4.0 6.0 0.0
22 3.5 5.8 9.2 50 4.0 6.0 0.0
23 3.6 5.9 9.4 51 4.0 6.0 0.0
24 3.6 6.0 9.7 52 4.0 6.0 0.0
25 3.7 6.0 9.9 53 4.0 6.0 0.0
26 3.7 6.0 10.1 54 4.0 6.0 0.0
27 3.8 6.0 10.3 55 4.0 6.0 0.0
28 3.8 6.0 10.5

al-3/5 bushel box equivalents Source: Savage
bparson Brown and Pineapple












Table 3.--Estimated yield per tree for late season oranges


Age of tree Low Average High Age of tree Low Average High

(boxes) (boxes)

1 0.0 0.0 0.0 29 3.1 5.4 8.2
2 0.0 0.0 0.0 30 3.1 5.5 8.3
3 0.0 0.4 0.6 31 3.2 5.5 8.5
4 0.3 0.7 0.9 32 3.2 5.5 8.6
5 0.5 1.0 1.3 33 3.3 5.5 8.7
6 0.7 1.4 1.6 34 3.3 5.5 8.8
7 0.9 1.7 2.0 35 3.3 5.5 8.9
8 1.1 1.9 2.3 36 3.3 5.5 8.9
9 1.2 2.2 2.6 37 3.3 5.5 9.0
10 1.4 2.5 3.0 38 3.4 5.5 9.0
11 1.5 2.7 3.3 39 3.4 5.5 9.0
12 1.7 3.0 3.7 40 3.4 5.5 9.0
13 1.8 3.2 4.0 41 3.4 5.5 9.0
14 1.9 3.4 4.3 42 3.5 5.5 9.0
15 2.1 3.7 4.6 43 3.5 5.5 9.0
16 2.2 3.9 4.9 44 3.5 5.5 9.0
17 2.3 4.1 5.2 45 3.5 5.5 9.0
18 2.4 4.3 5.5 46 3.5 5.5 0.0
19 2.5 4.5 5.8 47 3.5 5.5 0.0
20 2.6 4.6 6.1 48 3.5 5.5 0.0
21 2.7 4.7 6.4 49 3.5 5.5 0.0
22 2.7 4.9 6.7 50 3.5 5.5 0.0
23 2.8 5.0 6.9 51 0.0 5.5 0.0
24 2.9 5.1 7.1 52 0.0 5.5 0.0
25 2.9 5.2 7.4 53 0.0 5.5 0.0
26 3.0 5.2 7.6 54 0.0 5.5 0.0
27 3.0 5.3 7.8 55 0.0 5.5 0.0
28 3.1 5.4 8.0
al-3/5 bushel box equivalents bValencia Source: Savage











Table 4.--Estimated yield per tree for Temple oranges


Age of tree Low Average High Age of tree Low Average High

(boxes) (boxes)

1 0.0 0.0 0.0 24 2.7 4.7 6.3
2 0.0 0.0 0.0 25 2.9 4.9 6.5
3 0.0 0.5 1.2 26 3.0 5.0 6.7
4 0.1 0.7 1.5 27 3.1 5.2 6.8
5 0.2 1.0 1.8 28 3.2 5.3 7.0
6 0.4 1.2 2.0 29 3.3 5.5 7.2
7 0.5 1.4 2.3 30 3.4 5.6 7.3
8 0.7 1.6 2.6 31 3.5 5.8 7.5
9 0.8 1.8 2.8 32 3.6 5.9 7.6
10 0.9 2.0 3.1 33 3.7 6.0 7.7
11 1.1 2.3 3.3 34 3.8 6.2 7.8
12 1.2 2.5 3.6 35 3.9 6.3 8.0
13 1.3 2.7 3.8 36 4.0 6.4 8.1
14 1.5 2.8 4.1 37 4.1 6.5 8.2
15 1.6 3.0 4.3 38 4.2 6.6 8.3
16 1.7 3.2 4.6 39 4.3 6.7 8.3
17 1.8 3.4 4.8 40 4.3 6.8 8.4
18 2.0 3.6 5.0 41 4.4 6.9 8.5
19 2.1 3.8 5.3 42 4.4 7.0 8.6
20 2.2 4.0 5.5 43 4.4 7.0 8.6
21 2.4 4.2 5.7 44 4.5 7.0 8.6
22 2.5 4.4 5.9 45 4.5 7.0 8.7
23 2.6 4.5 6.1

a1-3/5 bushel box equivalents Source: Savage














Table 5.--Estimated yield per tree for tangerines


Age of tree Low Average High Age of tree Low Average High

(boxes) (boxes)

1 0.0 0.0 0.0 24 2.4 4.5 7.4
2 0.0 0.0 0.0 25 2.5 4.6 7.6
3 0.0 0.0 1.0 26 2.6 4.7 7.8
4 0.0 0.1 1.3 27 2.7 4.8 8.1
5 0.0 0.5 1.7 28 2.8 4.9 8.3
6 0.1 0.9 2.0 29 2.9 5.0 8.5
7 0.2 1.2 2.3 30 3.0 5.1 8.8
8 0.4 1.5 2.6 31 3.1 5.1 9.0
9 0.6 1.8 2.9 32 3.1 5.2 9.2
10 0.7 2.1 3.2 33 3.2 5.2 9.4
11 0.9 2.3 3.5 34 3.3 5.3 9.6
12 1.0 2.5 3.8 35 3.3 5.3 9.7
13 1.1 2.8 4.2 36 3.4 5.3 9.9
14 1.3 3.0 4.5 37 3.4 5.4 10.0
15 1.4 3.2 4.8 38 3.4 5.4 10.1
16 1.5 3.4 5.1 39 3.4 5.4 10.2
17 1.7 3.6 5.3 40 3.5 5.5 10.3
18 1.8 3.7 5.6 41 3.5 5.5 10.4
19 1.9 3.9 5.9 42 3.5 5.5 10.5
20 2.0 4.0 6.2 43 3.5 5.5 10.5
21 2.1 4.2 6.5 44 3.5 5.5 10.5
22 2.2 4.3 6.8 45 3.5 5.5 10.5
23 2.3 4.4 7.1

a1-3/5 bushel box equivalents Source: Savage





Table 6.--Estimated yield per tree for seedy grapefruit


Age of tree Low Average High Age of tree Low Average High

(boxes) (boxes)

1 0.0 0.0 0.0 29 5.2 8.6 12.4
2 0.0 0.0 0.0 30 5.3 8.7 12.6
3 0.0 0,5 1.0 31 5.5 8.8 12.7
4 0.0 1.3 2.0 32 5.6 9.0 12.8
5 0.3 1.9 2.9 33 5.7 9.1 12.9
6 0.6 2,5 3.8 34 5.8 9.2 13.0
7 0.8 3.1 4.6 35 5.9 9,3 13.1
8 1.0 3.5 5.3 36 6.0 9.3 13.1
9 1.3 4.0 6.0 37 6.1 9.4 13.2
10 1.5 4,4 6.6 38 6.2 9.5 13.3
11 1.7 4,8 7.1 39 6.3 9.6 13.4
12 1.9 5.2 7.6 40 6.3 9.6 13.4
13 2.2 5.5 8.1 41 6.4 9.7 13.4
14 2.4 5.8 8.5 42 6.4 9.7 13.4
15 2.6 6.1 8.9 43 6.5 9.7 13.4
16 2.8 6.3 9.3 44 6.5 9.8 13.5
17 3.1 6.6 9.7 45 6.5 9.8 13.5
18 3.3 6.8 10.0 46 6.5 9.9 13.5
19 3.5 7.0 10.3 47 6.5 9.9 13.5
20 3.7 7,2 10.6 48 6.5 9.9 13.5
21 3.9 7.4 10.9 49 6.5 10.0 13.5
22 4.0 7.6 11.2 50 6.5 10.0 13.5
23 4.2 7.8 11.4 51 6.5 10.0 13.5
S24 4.4 8.0 11.6 52 6.5 10.0 13.5
25 4.6 8.2 11.8 53 6.5 10.0 13.5
26 4.8 8.3 12.0 54 6.5 10.0 13.5
27 4.9 8.4 12.2 55 6.5 10.0 13.5
28 5.0 8.5 12.3

a1-3/5 bushel box equivalents bDuncan Source: Sagage












Table 7.--Estimated yield per tree for seedless grapefruit


Age of tree Low Average High Age of tree Low Average High

(boxes) (boxes)

1 0.0 0.0 0.0 24 4.3 7.3 10.3
2 0.0 0.0 0.0 25 4.4 7.4 10.5
3 0.0 0.5 1.0 26 4.5 7.5 10.7
4 0.2 1.1 1.7 27 4.6 7.6 10.9
5 0.5 1.7 2.4 28 4.7 7.7 11.1
6 0.7 2.2 3.0 29 4.8 7.7 11.2
7 1.0 2.7 3.5 30 4.8 7.8 11.4
8 1.2 3.2 4.1 31 4.9 7.8 11.5
9 1.5 3.6 4.7 32 4.9 7.9 11.6
10 1.7 4.0 5.2 33 4.9 7.9 11.7
11 2.0 4.3 5.7 34 5.0 7.9 11.8
12 2.2 4.7 6.1 35 5.0 8.0 11.9
13 2.4 5.0 6.6 36 5.0 8.0 11.9
14 2.6 5.3 7.0 37 5.0 8.0 11.9
15 2.8 5.5 7.4 38 5.0 8.0 12.0
16 3.0 5.7 7.8 39 5.0 8.0 12.0
17 3.2 6.0 8.2 40 5.0 8.0 12.0
18 3.4 6.2 8.6 41 5.0 8.0 12.0
19 3.5 6.4 8.9 42 5.0 8.0 12.0
20 3.7 6.6 9.2 43 5.0 8.0 12.0
21 3.9 6.8 9.5 44 5.0 8.0 12.0
22 4.0 6.9 9.8 45 5.0 8.0 12.0
23 4.2 7.1 10.0

"al-3/5 bushel box equivalents Source: Savage
bMarsh and Pink

















rtfl


oM c

S aTable 8. Estimated yield per tree for selected citrus varieties
n
o M b d Seedye Seedless
So n Age Early and mid- Late season TempleSeedy Seedless
o g of season orarangean esrE! grapefruit Grapefruit
r- Tree Low Avg. High Low Avg. Nigh Low Avg. High Low Avg. High Low Avg. High
" (boxes) (boxes) (boxes) (boxes) (boxes)

"- 0 4 0.55 0.68 0.92 0.30 0.68 0.80 0.50 0.70 0.80 1.00 1.26 1.78 1.10 1.44 1.72
o W 5 0.69 0.85 1.15 0.38 0.85 1.00 0.60 0.90 1.00 1.25 1.58 2.23 1.38 1.80 2.15
S o 6 0.83 1.02 1.38 0.46 1.02 1.20 0.70 1.10 1.20 1.50 1.90 2.68 1.66 2.16 2.58
g 7 0.94 1.26 1.62 0.60 1.18 1.36 0.82 1.22 1.42 1.75 2.21 3.07 2.04 2.55 2.97
S 0 B8 1.03 1.59 1.86 0.82 1.34 1.64 0.94 1.34 1.64 1.97 2.52 3.41 2.53 2.97 3.32
"o R 9 1.12 1.92 2.10 1.04 1.50 1.93 1.05 1.45 1.85 2.09 2.83 3.75 3.02 3.39 3.67
r o 10 1.21 2.25 2.34 1.26 1.66 2.22 1.17 1.57 2.07 2.21 3.14 4.09 3.36 3.81 4.08
S11 1.30 2.58 2.66 1.48 1.82 2.51 1.29 1.69 2.29 2.33 3.45 4.43 3.52 4.23 4.61
""n 12 1.40 2.90 3.00 1.70 2.00 2.80 1.40 1.80 2.50 2.47 3.75 4.81 3.70 4.64 5.20
S13 1.70 3.07 3.36 1.89 2.17 2.99 1.62 1.95 2.68 2.55 3.91 5.09 3.93 4.90 5.49
Sc 14 2.01 3.26 3.72 2.02 2.36 3.18 1.74 2.10 2.86 2.64 4.10 5.43 4.14 5.14 5.80
D M 15 2.31 3.45 4.08 2.12 2.55 3.36 1.85 2.25 3.05 2.73 4.29 5.77 4.35 5.38 6.11
M ? 16 2.56 3.64 4.44 2.23 2.74 3.55 1.97 2.40 3.23 2.82 4.48 6.11 4.56 5.62 6.42
0 n 17 2.80 3.83 4.80 2.34 2.93 3.74 2.24 2.55 3.41 2.91 4.67 6.45 4.77 5.86 6.73
tS 0 18 3.04 4.02 5.16 2.44 3.12 3.92 2.20 2.70 3.60 3.00 4.86 6.79 4.98 6.10 7.04
S" 0 19 3.28 4.21 5.52 2.55 3.31 4.11 2.37 2.97 3.96 3.09 5.05 7.13 5.19 6.34 7.35
s c o 20 3.45 4.37 5.82 2.65 3.47 4.34 2.54 3.24 4.32 3.41 5.36 7.48 5.37 6.55 7.59
3 21 3.56 4.52 6.05 2.76 3.62 4.61 2.71 3.51 4.67 3.95 5.77 7.68 5.52 6.73 7.77
M S S P 23 3.78 4.82 6.52 2.98 3.92 5.16 3.05 4.05 5.39 5.03 6.59 8.08 5.82 7.09 8.13
4 Wo 24 3.89 4.97 6.76 3.09 4.07 5.43 3.22 4.32 5.74 5.47 7.00 8.64 5.97 7.27 8.31
a M -J 25 & over 4.00 5.10 7.00 3.20 4.20 5.70 3.40 4.60 6.10 5.80 7.40 9.20 6.10 7.44 8.50

aa
M o a1-3/5 bushel box equivalents dValencia Source: Florida Department of Citrus
"-0 a bNavel and Hamlin eDuncan
a 'Parson Brown and Pineapple farsh and Pink
M *
O0

90





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Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs