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Group Title: Economic information report - University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences ; 176
Title: Economic impact and participant characteristics of offshore sportfishing tournaments
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026477/00001
 Material Information
Title: Economic impact and participant characteristics of offshore sportfishing tournaments two Florida case studies
Series Title: Economic information report
Physical Description: iii, 24 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Ellerbrock, Michael J
Milon, J. Walter
Sparks, Amy L
Publisher: Food & Resource Economics Dept., Agricultural Experiment Stations, College of Agriculture, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla.
Publication Date: 1983
 Subjects
Subject: Tournament fishing -- Economic aspects -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Fishing surveys -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Fishing -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Michael J. Ellerbrock.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: "February 1983."
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Bibliographic ID: UF00026477
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001546852
oclc - 22614450
notis - AHG0387

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Abstract
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Appendix
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
Full Text

Ellerbrock


J. Walter Milon


Amy L.


Sparks


Economic


Impact and Participant


Characteristics


of Offshore


Sportfishing Tournaments:


Two


Florida


Case


Studies


Food and Resource Economics Department
Agricultural Experiment Stations
College of Agriculture
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida, Gainesville, 32611


February 1983


Michael J.


Economic Information
Report 176









ABSTRACT


This report presents the methodology and findings of surveys of
participants in the Second Annual Fort Pierce Open Offshore Fishing
Tournament and the Second Annual Greater Jacksonville Natural Light
Kingfish Tournament. The main purpose of the studies was to estimate
the economic impact of the tournaments. Expenditure data on various
goods and services and sociological information about the participants
are also presented. The two tournaments are briefly compared with each
other in the summary.


Key Words: Economic impact, socio-economic characteristics, sport-
fishing tournaments, expenditure data, multiplier effects,
survey methodology, tournament evaluation, tournament
comparisons.




ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


Grateful appreciation is expressed to the survey respondents and
the Tournaments' Officials for their assistance, especially Mr. Chuck
Rhoads and Mr. Don Brewer, Tournament Chairmen. Thanks are expressed
to Dr. Jim Cato, Director of the Florida Sea Grant Program, for support-
ing the research, and to Mr. Frank Lawlor and Mr. Joe Halusky, Marine
Advisory Program Extension Agents, for serving as liaisons between the
research team and tournament officials. Thanks are also extended to Dr.
David Mulkey and Dr. John Gordon, of the Food and Resource Economics
Department at the University of Florida, for providing data on multi-
pliers.







TABLE OF CONTENTS


Page

ABSTRACT ....................................................... i

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ................................................ ii

LIST OF TABLES ............................... ................ iii

LIST OF FIGURES ............................................. iii

SUMMARY ......................................................... 1

INTRODUCTION ...................... ............................ 2

DESCRIPTION OF TOURNAMENTS

Second Annual Greater Jacksonville Natural Light
Kinqfish Tournament .................................... 2
Second Annual Fort Pierce Open Offshore Fishinq
Tournament ........................................ ... 3

SURVEY METHODOLOGIES .......................................... 4

Jacksonville Tournament ................................. 4
Fort Pierce Tournament .................................... 5
Economic Impact Calculations .............................. 5

FINDINGS ..................................................... 8

Socioeconomic Characteristics of Participants .............. 9
Level of Enjoyment ........................................ 11
Expenditures ....... ...................................... 11

LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDIES ...................................... 14

REFERENCES ................................................... 15

APPENDIX I:
Fort Pierce Sportfishing Club Open Economic Survey ......... 16

APPENDIX II:
Greater Jacksonville Natural Light Kingfish
Tournament Captain's Opinion Survey ..................... 19

APPENDIX III:
Greater Jacksonville Natural Light Kingfish
Tournament Follow-Up Letter ............................ 21

APPENDIX IV:
Selected Economic Output Multipliers ....................... 23



ii







LIST OF TABLES


Table Page

1 Estimated number and percent of participants
by age and sex. ...................... ................ 9

2 Highest educational degree earned, occupation
and household income of respondent boat
captains, 1981 ........................................ 10

3 Estimated total expenditures by category in
the Greater Jacksonville Area and other places
in Florida by tournament participants from within/
outside the Greater Jacksonville Area ................. 12

4 Estimated total expenditures by category in Fort
Pierce and other places in Florida by tournament
participants from within/outside Fort Pierce .......... 13

5 Estimated economic impact of tournaments .............. 14

6 Selected economic output multipliers ............... App. IV


LIST OF FIGURES


Figure

1 Participants and survey respondents for
Jacksonville tournament by resident
and non-resident ...................................... 6

2 Participants and survey respondents for
Fort Pierce tournament by resident
and non-resident ..................................... 7














ECONOMIC IMPACT AND PARTICIPANT CHARACTERISTICS OF OFFSHORE
SPORTFISHING TOURNAMENTS: TWO FLORIDA CASE STUDIES

Michael J. Ellerbrock
J. Walter Milon
Amy L. Sparks


SUMMARY


Based on expenditures reported by participants in the Second Annual
Greater Jacksonville Natural Light Kingfish Tournament, the estimated
local economic impact of the tournament was between $619,320 and
$673,587; the impact on other places in Florida was between $22,088 and
$23,114; and the total impact was therefore between $642,434 and
$695,675, according to two different methods of calculation. Based on
expenditures reported by participants in the Second Annual Fort Pierce
Open Offshore Fishina Tournament, the estimated local economic impact of
the tournament was between $258,263 and $285,557; the impact on-other
places in Florida was between $121,331 and $122,101; and the total
impact was therefore between $380,364 and $406,888, according to the
same methods of calculation used in analyzing the Jacksonville tourna-
ment. The following sections present more detailed information about
the tournaments and the economic analyses.








Michael J. ELLERBROCK and J.W. MILON are assistant professors and
Amy L. SPARKS is a graduate assistant, all of the Food and Resource
Economics Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
32611.








INTRODUCTION


It has recently been estimated that recreational saltwater fishing
in Florida is a $5 billion per year industry directly responsible for
44,108 jobs and indirectly responsible for 80,000 other jobs [1].
Recreational sportfishing tournaments are an 'increasingly popular means
of attracting visitors to particular communities and of drawing atten-
tion to the fishery stocks of coastal areas. Large scale tournaments
generate benefits and costs for the host communities. The amount of
benefits and costs are of growing concern to communities, industry
merchants, tournament planners, conservation groups and scientific
researchers interested in wise management of environmental resources and
tourism promotion.


Only a few reports have been published on the economic impact of
marine sportfishing tournaments [3,6]. No agreement has been reached on
the ideal methodology for estimating the economic impact on host commun-
ities [2]. This report presents the methodology and findings of studies
conducted to estimate the economic impact of sportfishing tournaments
recently held in Fort Pierce and Jacksonville, Florida. The Second
Annual Greater Jacksonville Natural Light Kingfish Tournament and the
Second Annual Fort Pierce Sportfishinq Club Open were large offshore
tournaments held in late July and early July, 1982, respectively. The
analysis follows the procedures used in the authors' study of the 1981
Greater Jacksonville Natural Light Kingfish Tournament [4]. The studies
do not examine the costs, e.g. traffic congestion, law enforcement,
environmental damage, possible fishery stock deletion, of the
tournaments.


DESCRIPTION OF TOURNAMENTS
Second Annual Greater Jacksonville Natural Light
Kinqfish Tournament


Jacksonville, Florida-has a population of 550,000 and is located in
Duval County on the northeast Florida coast. The Jacksonville








Tournament was regional in nature, with the average miles traveled one-
way by participants being 62.1. The maximum was 1,500 and the minimum
was one mile. The Jacksonville Offshore Sportfishing Club and Anheuser-
Busch, Inc. were the sponsors and there was a total purse of $176,000 in
cash and prizes. The purposes of the tournament were to promote the
sportfishing industry and to raise funds for the construction and main-
tenance of artificial reefs. All fish caught in the tournament were
donated to charitable organizations or eaten at the tournament fish
fry. Fishing was devoted exclusively to King Mackerel, more commonly
called "Kingfish." On July 27 and 28 there was a celebrity tournament,
with registration and a captains' meeting for the regular tournament
also held on July 28; general fishing was on July 29 and 30 with an
awards ceremony on July 31. Seven hundred and forty-four boats
participated. Of these, an average of 0.59 tournaments per boat had
been entered in the previous 12 months with a minimum of zero and
maximum of eight. The total winnings in the other tournaments were
$73,650, with $4,608 per winner.


Second Annual Fort Pierce Offshore Fishing Tournament


Fort Pierce, Florida has a population of 34,000 and is located in
St. Lucie County on the southeast Florida coast. The Fort Pierce tour-
nament was local in nature, with the average miles traveled by oartici-
pants being 17.9. The maximum was 1,100 and the minimum was one mile.
The Fort Pierce Sportfishinq Club was the sponsor and there was a total
purse of $75,000 in cash and prizes. The purposes of the tournament
were to promote the sportfishing industry and to raise funds for an
offshore artificial reef. Participants in the tournament were allowed
to keep their catch. Seven species of fish were included and there were
two days of fishing, July 3 and 4, with a banquet the evening of July
4. The species were Marlin, Sailfish, Wahoo, Dolphin, Kingfish, Grouper
and Snapper. One hundred eighty-six boats participated in the
tournament. Of these, an average of 2.97 tournaments per boat were
entered in the preceding 12 months with a minimum of zero and'a maximum
of 20. Fort Pierce residents who won money in other tournaments won an








average of $1,181 while non-Fort Pierce residents who won money received
an average of $1,076.

SURVEY METHODOLOGIES


Jacksonville Tournament


A questionnaire was distributed to all registered boat captains at
the initial orientation meeting (Appendix II). The survey instrument
gave specific instructions that the captain of each boat should answer
the questions for himself and his party. A sampling procedure was not
used due to the difficulty of contacting participants who embarked from
many different points around Jacksonville.


The researchers were present at the post-tournament awards ceremony
to collect the completed surveys. Captains were encouraged to complete
the survey since this would qualify them for a special prize drawing.1
Following the tournament a list of non-respondents to the survey was
developed from the tournament registration list. A letter was sent
(Appendix III) encouraging the captains to return completed survey
forms. The total response rate was 38 percent.


All the information contained in this report is based on responses
to the survey. Although some additional economic activity was attribut-
able to the promotion and concession sales to the general public that
visited the tournament, no reliable estimates of the dollar value of
these activities were available. The analysis focuses directly on the
tournament participants and the economic impact created by their
activity.





1A Penn fishing reel was awarded to the winner of the drawing. The
tournament steering committee provided the prize to encourage completion
of the survey.








Figure 1 presents the number and percent of boats participating in
the tournament, by resident and non-resident, and the number and percent
of boat captains who responded to the survey, by resident and non-
resident. The Questionnaire solicited sociological information on age,
sex, education level, occupation and household income in 1981. It
solicited economic information on expenditures per boat on 17 categories
of goods and services in the local area, and other parts of Florida in
conjunction with their participation in the fishing tournament.


Fort Pierce Tournament


A somewhat simplified procedure was used to survey participants in
the Fort Pierce Tournament. A questionnaire (Appendix I), slightly
abbreviated from the Jacksonville Tournament questionnaire, was distri-
buted by tournament officials without the researchers being present for
the tournament. After the tournament, officials sent a follow-up letter
and questionnaire to non-respondents. The total response rate was 42
percent. Figure 2 presents the number and percent of boats partici-
pating in the tournament, by resident and non-resident, and the number
and percent of boat captains who responded to the survey, by resident
and non-resident. .


Economic Impact Calculations


The average expenditures per boat reported by survey respondents
were extrapolated to all participants in the tournaments to estimate
total direct expenditures locally and in other places in Florida by
tournament participants. However, the direct expenditures do not fully
reflect the total volume of economic activity sparked by the tourna-
ments. The economic impact on a community of $1 spent on retail goods
is greater than $1 because the expenditure generates a chain reaction in
which the dollar may be respent several times on production inputs and
other retail goods.. Termed the "multiplier" effect, the magnitude of
the chain reaction varies over different types of goods and in different
geographic areas [2]. The multiplier effect is most important when












ALL JACKSONVILLE


TOURNAMENT PARTICIPANTS
TOURNAMENT PARTICIPANTS


(744 total boats)


Greater Jacksonville
Residents
(463 boats, 62%
of total boats)


Non-Greater Jacksonville
Residents
(281 boats, 38%
of total boats)


SURVEY RESPONDENTS


(284 boats, 38% of
I


Greater Jacksonville
Residents
(176 boats, 24%
of total boats)


total boats)


Non-Greater Jacksonville
Residents
(108 boats, 14%
of total boats)


Figure l.--Participants and survey respondents for Jacksonville tournament,
by resident and non-resident













ALL FORT PIERCE
(186


Fort Pierce Residents
(82 boats, 44%
of total boats)


TOURNAMENT PARTICIPANTS
total boats)


Non-Fort Pierce Residents
(104 boats, 56%
of total boats)


SURVEY RESPONDENTS
(78 boats, 42% of total boats)


Fort Pierce Residents
(34 boats, 18%
of total boats)


Non-Fort Pierce Residents
(44 boats, 24%
of total boats)


Figure 2.--Participants and survey respondents for Fort Pierce tournament,
by resident and non-resident








visitors bring in new dollars to a community. Some of the money spent
by residents at a special attraction in their community would have been
spent locally anyway on regularly purchased items.


Mulkey and Gordon (M&G) of the University of Florida have estimated
output multiplers for the Jacksonville Region, Miami Region, and the
State of Florida [5]. The United States Water Resources Council (WRC)
has estimated output multipliers for the Jacksonville Region, Miami
Region and the Orlando Region [7]. The multipliers were applied to the
total direct expenditures by non-residents in the tournament area and
other places in Florida and to the total direct expenditures by local
residents in other places in Florida. Orlando was selected as a proxy
for the entire state for use with the WRC multipliers because it is
centrally located and has several well-known tourist attractions.
Appendix IV presents the economic output multipliers. .The two sets of
multipliers were used to provide a range of the total estimated economic
impact of the tournaments.

FINDINGS


A total of 744 boats. registered and participated in the Jackson-
ville tournament, 463 of which were from the Greater Jacksonville area
and 281 from other areas. One hundred seventy-six surveys were com-
pleted by boat captains from the Greater Jacksonville area and 108 by
captains from outside the area. The 284 respondent captains represented
38 percent of all Jacksonville tournament participants.


A total of 186 boats registered and participated in the Fort Pierce
tournament, 104 of which were from Fort Pierce and 82 from outside the
town. Thirty-four' surveys were completed by boat captains from Fort
Pierce and 44 by captains from outside the town. The 78 respondent
captains represented 42 percent of all Fort Pierce tournament
participants.







Socioeconomic Characteristics of Participants


The estimated number and percent of participants in each tourna-
ment, by age and sex, are shown in Table 1. The majority of the
participants in both tournaments were males between the ages of 19 and
65 with the next largest group being females of that age category.
Males 18 and under made up the third largest qroup. The highest
educational degree earned, occupation and 1981 household income of the
respondent boat captains are presented in Table 2. For the Jacksonville
tournament, the highest degree attained by 36 percent of the respondent
captains was a high school degree; however, a junior college degree and
a bachelor's degree were each attained by 24 percent. In the Fort
Pierce tournament 32 percent of the respondent captains had attained a
high school degree, 21 percent a junior college degree and 32 percent a
bachelor's degree. Of the Jacksonville tournament respondent captains,
22 percent were in management, 21 percent self-employed, 17 percent
professional and 16 percent skilled labor. Fifty-one percent of the
Fort Pierce tournament respondent captains were self-employed, 18
percent in management and 15 percent professional. Thirty-seven percent
of the Jacksonville respondent captains earned incomes of over $40,000.
in 1981, 25 percent had household incomes between $30,001 and $40,000
and 28 percent between $20,001 and $30,000. Sixty percent of the Fort.,
Pierce tournament respondent captains had household incomes of over
$40,000, 18 percent between $30,001 and $40,000 and 16 percent between
$20,001 and $30,000.


Table 1.--Estimated number and percent of participants by age and sex

Jacksonville Fort Pierce
Category
number percent number percent

AGE AND SEX
Females < 18 58 2 24 3
Females 19-65 337 11 229 29
Females > 65 3 a 14 2
Males 18 234 7 107 14
Males 19-65 2,489 79 405 52
Males > 65 45 1 5 a
TOTAL 3,166 100 784 100
less than 1 percent








Table 2.--Highest educational degree earned, occupation and household
income of respondent boat captains, 1981

Jacksonville Fort Pierce
Category
nunter percent number percent

EDUCATION
High school 103 36.3 25 33.8
Vocational school 13 4.6 2 2.7
Junior college 67 23.6 16 21.6
Bachelor's 68 23.9 25 33.8
Master's 16 5.6 2 2.7
Doctorate 3 1.1 1 1.4
Doctor of Medicine 5 1.8 2 2.7
Doctor of Jurisprudence 3 1.1 1 1.4
Other 6 1.8 0 0.0
Total respondents 284 100.0 7 100.0
---------------------------------------------------------------
OCCUPATION
Management 62 21.9 13 17.6
Sales 34 12.0 6 8.1
Professional 49 17.3 11 14.9
Skilled 44 15.5 3 4.0
Nonskilled 0 0.0 0 0.0
Self-employed 60 21.2 38 51.4
Military 9 3.2 0 0.0
Fishing industry 6 2.1 2 2.7
Retired 16 5.7 1 1.4
Non-employed 3 1.1 0 0.0
Total respondents 283 100.0 74 -100.0
---------------------------------------------------------------
INCOME
$0-$10,000 8 3.0 2 2.9
$10,001-$20,000 20 7.4 2 2.9
$20,001-$30,000 75 27.7 11 16.2
$30,001-$40,000 68 25.1 12 17.6
Over $40,000 100 37.0 41 10.00








The captain's fishing party averaged 4.2 persons per boat for both
the Jacksonville and the Fort Pierce tournaments. With 744 boats in the
Jacksonville tournament, the estimated number of participants was
3,166. Similarly for the Fort Pierce tournament, 186 boats with 4.2
people oer boat yielded an.estimated 784 participants.


Level of Enjoyment


Of the 3,166 participants in the Jacksonville tournament, an esti-
mated 2,172 said they "enjoyed it very much," 709 said they "enjoyed
it," 206 said it was "satisfactory," 57 said they "did not enjoy it" and
22 said they "did not enjoy it at all." Of the 784 participants in the
Fort Pierce tournament, approximately 513 said they "enjoyed it very
much," 241 said they "enjoyed it," 30 said it was "satisfactory" and no
one said they "did not enjoy it."


Expenditures


The survey asked for an estimate of expenditures for the captain's
group in the tournament area and in other places in Florida. The expen-
ditures per boat reported by the respondent captains were then extra-
polated to the total number of tournament boats. The results represent
approximate expenditures directly related to the tournament by all
participants. These are presented in Tables 3 and 4 for the Jackson-
ville and Fort Pierce tournaments, respectively.


The full economic impact of these expenditures is reported in Table
5. The results were obtained using the WRC and M&G multipliers. Expen-
ditures in .the Greater Jacksonville Area as a result of the tournament,
calculated using the WRC multipliers, were $673,587. In other places in
Florida expenditures due to the Jacksonville tournament were calculated
to be $22,088 for a total economic impact of $695,975 or $935 per
boat. Expenditures due to the Fort Pierce tournament, calculated using
WRC multiplers, were $288,577 locally and $121,331 in other places in
Florida, with a total economic impact of $406,888 or $2,188 per boat.











Table 3.--Total expenditures by category in the Greater Jacksonville area and other places in Florida
by tournament participants from within/outside the Greater Jacksonville Area

Greater Jacksonville


Residents


Non-residents


Subtotal


Other Places in Florida,
All participants


Oil and gas for boat
Oil and gas for car
Lodging
Bait
Tackle (replacement or new)
Restaurant/coffee shop meals
Entertainment
Groceries/beverages
Ice
Launching or marina fees
Boat repairs
Travel (public transport)
Rental car
Airfare
Boat charter
Crew costs (e.g., tips)
Other


Subtotal


...................................... $440,557


Activity


$ 65,172
17,029
13,289
15,487
35,538
19,479
13,814
21,787
5,460
10,599
32,280
546
512
3,612
812
4,786
7,007

$267,209


$ 39,944
10,438
8,145
9,492
21,781
11,939
8,467
13,354
3,347
6,498
19,784
334
313
2,214
498
2,934
4,294

$163,776


$105,116
27,467
21,434
24,979
57,319
31,418
22,281
8,807
8,807
17,097
52,064
880
875
5,826
1,310
7,720
11,301

$430,985


$1,943
2,085
1,510
240
323
1,212
573
920
125
180
457
0
0
0
0
0
0

$9,568


ESTIMATED TOTAL DIRECT EXPENDITURES








Table 4.--Total expenditures by category in Fort Pierce and other places in Florida by tournament
participants from within/outside Fort Pierce


Fort Pierce


Residents


Non-residents


Subtotal


Other Places in Florida,
All participants


Oil and gas for boat
Oil and gas for car
Lodging
Bait
Tackle (replacement or new)
Restaurant/coffee shop meals
Entertainment
Groceries/beverages
Ice
Launching or marina fees
Boat repairs
Travel (public transport)
Rental car
Airfare
Boat charter
Crew costs (e.g., tips)
Other


Subtotal


$136,257 $50,179


................................ $186,436


Activity


$24,771
3,909
226
2,709
3,812
2,359
1,644
4,574
1,065
1,215
3,847
0
0
0
3,574
1,405
1,727


$15,571
8,753
16,671
4,577
5,201
11,717
5,488
6,574
2,121
986
1,761
0
0
0
0
0
0


$79,420


$ 40,342
12,662
16,897
7,286
9,013
14,076
7,132
11,148
3,186
2,201
5,608
0
0
0
3,574
1,405
1,727


$8,561
8,167
6,939
3,171
3,970
8,847
3,219
3,517
534
1,550
1,192
238
0
0
0
36
238


$56,837


ESTIMATED TOTAL DIRECT EXPENDITURES








Table 5.--Estimated economic impact of tournaments


Multiplier Local Other Places Total Impact
Tournament Source Impact in Florida Impact per Boat


Jacksonville WRC $673,587 $22,088 $695,675 $935
Jacksonville M&G 619,320 23,114 642,434 864
---------------------------------------------------------------
Fort Pierce WRC 285,557 121,331 406,888 2,188
Fort Pierce M&G 258,263 122,101 380,364 2,045



The results obtained using the M&G multipliers were similar. For
the Jacksonville tournament, the local impact was $619,320 and the
impact on other places in Florida was $23,114, with a total impact of
$642,434 or $864 per boat. For the Fort Pierce tournament, the local
impact was $258,263 and other Florida locations $122,101, with a total
impact of $380,364 or $2,045 per boat.


LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY


This analysis falls short of estimating the entire economic impact
of the tournaments for several reasons. It was not possible to include
all pre-tournament expenditures related to planning, organizing and
advertising the events. Post-tournament expenditures related to this
year's tournaments should also have been available and identified by
sector. It was also not possible to quantify benefits to the areas
which may stem from good will, public relations improvement and tourist
promotion brought about by the tournament.


A second aspect of the tournaments' economic impact that is missing
from the analysis is expenditures by non-fishing visitors and observers
on concessions, tournament events and related activities. If data were
available on both aspects it would have been possible to identify the
total economic activity created by the tournaments. This information
could then be compared with estimates of the cost for added police
enforcement or other costs borne by the communities involved in the
tournaments. In this manner the net benefits to the areas from the
tournaments could be determined.








REFERENCES


[1] Bell, F.W., P.E. Sorensen, and R. Leeworthy. The Economic Impact
and Valuation of Saltwater Recreational Fisheries in
Florida. Univ. of Fla. Sea Grant Marine Advisory Program
No. 47. Gainesville: 1982, pp. 118.

[2] Davidson, R.S., and W.A. Schaffer. "A Discussion of Methods
Employed in Analyzing the Impact of Short-term Entertainment
Events," Journal of Travel Research 18 (Winter 1980), Dp.
12-16.

[3] Falk, J.M., A.R. Graefe,, and W.P. DuBose. 1981 Milford World
Championship Weakfish Tournament: A Socio-Economic
Analysis. Del. Sea Grant Program, Nov. 1981.

[4] Milon, J.W., M.J. Ellerbrock, G.L. Brinkman, and C.M. Logan.
Economic Impact and Participant Characteristics for the
First Annual Greater Jacksonville Natural Light Kingfish
Tournament. Fla. Sea Grant Tech. Paper No. 21. Gaines-
ville: Mar. 1982.

[5] Mulkey, W.D., and J.R. Gordon. "An Input/Output Model for the
State of Florida." Computer model developed in the Food and
Resource Economics Dept., Univ. of Fla. Gainesville: Oct.
1981.

[6] Smith, J.W., and C.J. Moore. A Socio-Economic Survey of the Third
Annual Arthur Smith King Mackerel Tournament. S.C. Marine
Resources Center Tech. Report No. 46. Charleston, SC: Nov.
1980.

[7] U.S. Water Resources Council. Guideline 5 Regional Multipliers.
Washington: Bureau of Economic Analysis, Jan. 1977, p. 44.


























APPENDIX I
FORT PIERCE
OPEN ECONOMIC SURVEY




17








FORT PIERCE SPORTFISHI NG CLUB


OPEN ECONOMIC SURVEY

Dear Captain,
We are delighted that you decided to participate in our Tournament. We
want to make this the best Tournament anywhere and in order to do that we need
your help. Please take a few minutes to answer the questions below. Your
responses will help us learn how to better serve you, the sport-fishing industry,
and the Fort Pierce community. All responses are strictly confidential.
Thank you.


Chuck Rhoads
Tournament Chairman


Mike Ellerbrock
Wally Milon
Florida Sea Grant College


1. Boat entry number___

2. What is the number of people in your GROUP
(fishing party, families and friends) who came
to the Fort Pierce Area because of this tournament?
Males Females
Youth (under 18 yrs.)
Adults (19-65 yrs.)
Seniors (Over 65 yrs.) _

THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS APPLY ONLY TO THE BOAT CAPTAIN:
Check circle where appropriate /
3. Hometown State
4. Approximate number of miles from your hometown to
Fort Pierce:
0 0 51-100 0
1-25 0 101-250 0
26-50 0 Over 250 0
5. Age'
6. Highest educational degree you have earned:
High School 0 Doctorate 0
Vocational School 0 M.D. 0
Junior College 0 J.D. 0
Bachelor's 0 Other
Master's 0
7. Occupation:
Management 0 Self-employed 0
Sales 0 Military 0
Professional 0 Fishing
Practice Industry 0
Skilled Laborer 0 Retired 0
Nonskilled Laborer 0 Non-employed 0
8. What was your household's approximate income last year?
SO- 4,999 0 $25,000-29,999 0
$ 5,000- 9,999 0 $30,000-34,999 0
$10,000-14,999 0 $35,000-39,999 0
$15,000-19,999 0 Over $40.000 0
$20,000-24,999 0 (OV'E)


OFFICE USE ONLY


1.
2.
3.


4.
5.
6.


S=FL
7. 0 = Other
8. 11.
9.- 12.
10. 13.

14-15

16. 21.
17.- 22.
18. 23.
19. 24.
20.

25. 30.
26. 31.
27. 32.
28. 33.
29. 34.

35. 40.
36. 41.
37. 42.
38. 43.
39.

















9. How many other fishing tournaments have YOU entered
in the past 12 months?
10. What is the dollar value of the prizes YOU won in
those tournaments? $
11. How many days does your GROUP plan to stay in the
Fort Pierce Area?
12. How many days does your GROUP plan to visit other
places in Florida?
13. Please estimate the expenditures by your GROUP for
the following items while visiting the Fort Pierce
Area and other places in Florida.
Fort Other Places
Pierce in Florida
Oil and gas for your boat......... $ $
Oil and gas for your car......... $__ $
Lodging......................... $_ $__
Bait........................... $-- $S
Tackle (replacement or new)...... $_ $_
Restaurant/coffee shop meals ...... $' $__
Entertainment.................... $___ $
Groceries/beverages.............. $_ $_
Ice.............................. $7- $
Launching or marina fees......... $-. $
Boat repairs.............. ....... $ $
Travel (public transport)......... $_
Rental car..................... $_ $_
Airfare.......................... $_ $
Boat charter.................... $__ $
Crew costs(e.g. tips,wages,food). $ $
Other( )........... $ $___
14. Did you enjoy fishing in this Tournament?


Yes, very much 0 No
Yes 0 No, not at a
Satisfactory 0
15. Would you like to participate again next
Yes 0 Probably not
Yes, with improvements No
listed below 0


0
11 0

year?
0
0


OFFICE USE ONLY

44-45.

46-50.


51-52.


53-54.







55-57 106-108
58-60 109-111
61-63-- 112-114-_
64-66 115-117
67-69 118-120
70-72 121-123
73-75 124-126
76-78-- 127-129
79-81 130-132
82-84 133-135
85-87 136-138
88-90 139-141
91-93 142-144
94-96 145-147
97-99 148-150
100-102 151-153
103-105 154-156

157 160
158- 161


159


162 164
163 165


16. Your comments, complaints, ideas, suggested improvements:


THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME!


PLEASE RETURN TO AWARDS BANQUET OR MAIL TO:
Fort Pierce Sportfishing Club
P.O. Box 3688
Fort Pierce, Florida 33454


---

























APPENDIX II
GREATER JACKSONVILLE NATURAL LIGHT
KINGFISH TOURNAMENT CAPTAIN'S
OPINION SURVEY











1. Boat entry number

2. What is the total number of people In your GROUP
(fishing party, families, and friends) who came to the
Greater Jacksonville area for this Tournament?-

3. What is the number of males and females In your
FISHING PARTY In each of the following age groups?

Males Females

Youths (under 18 years)
Adults (19-65) years)
Seniors (over 65 years)

THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS APPLY ONLY TO
TIE BOAT CAPTAIN:

4. Hometown State

6. Approximate number of miles from your hometown to
Jacksonville Beach:

0 0 161-200 0
1-60 0 201-250 0
51-100 0 251-300 0
101-150 0 over 300 0

6. Age

7. Highest educational degree you earned:

High School 1 Doctorate O
Vocational School 0 M.D. 0
Junior College 0 J.U. 0
Bachelor's 1 Other 0
Master's 0

8. Occupation:

Management 0 Own business 0
Sales 0 Military 0
Professional 0 Fishing Industry 0
Skilled laborer 0 Retired 0
Nonskilled laborer 0 Non-employed 0

9. What was your household's Income last year?

0 $10,000 0 $40,001 $50,000 0
$10,001.$20,000 $50001$60,000 $50, 0,00
$20,001 $30,000 0 $60,001-$70,000 0
$30,001-$40,000 0 over $70,000 0


10. How would you characterize your feelings about your
household's current Income level?

Satisfied 0 DIssatlsfied 0

11. Did you participate In the Kingfish Tournament last
year?

Yes 0 No 0

12. If Yes, what was the dollar value of the prizes YOU
won? $

13. How many other fishing tournament have YOUsantred

In the past 12 months?_____

Your fishing PARTNERS?_

14. What Is the dollar value of the prizes YOU won In those

tournaments?

Your fishing PARTNERS?'

16. Please Indicate with a check mark bow Important each
of the following factors were in YOUR decision to enter
this Tournamept?



Not Somewhat Very
Important Important Important

Pre-Tournament
publicity 0 0 0
Fun and fellowship D 0 0
Competition 0 0 0
Prestige of winning 0 0 0
Number of prizes 0 0 0
Value of prizes 0 0 0
Total purse 0 0 0


16. How many days does your GROUP plan to stay In the
Greater Jacksonville area? days

17. How many days does your GROUP plan to spend visit-
ing other places in Florida? days


18. Please estimate the expenditures by your GROUP for
the following Items while visiting the Greater Jackson-
vile area and other places In Florida:

Greater Other Places
Jacksonville in Florida

Oil and gas for
your boat............
Oil and gas or
your car............. $
Lodging............... $ $
Bait ................ $
Tackle (replacement
or new) .............
Restaurantlcoffee
shop meals............--
Entertainment .........
Groceries/beverages ...... $
Ice.............. ..1. 4
Launching or
marina fees..........
Boat repairs ...........
Travel (public
transport) ............
Rental car ........... .-
Alrfare ............. .
Boat charter ........... $
Crew costs (e.g. tips,
wages, food) ............
Other( )........

19. Did you enjoy fishing In the Tournament?

Yes, very much 0 No 0
Yea 0 No, not at all 0
patisfactory 0

20. Would you like to participate again next year?

Yes 0 Probably not 0
Yes, with improve. No 0
ment listed
below 0

21. Your comments, complaints, ideas, suggested improve.
ments:


r -7n C- .~--P----------3rr-SI-i~l~ .~T~mC-R
( lr I-I ( iI-lr II II ---

























APPENDIX III
GREATER JACKSONVILLE NATURAL LIGHT
KINGFISH TOURNAMENT FOLLOW-UP
LETTER






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
FAS INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES



GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 32611
OOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT
McCARTY HALL


August 5, 1982





Dear Captain:

We hope that you enjoyed participating in the Greater
Jacksonville Natural Light Kingfish Tournament. Because we
did not receive a completed Captain's Opinion Survey from you
at the Tournament, we have enclosed another copy which we hope
you will return to us as soon as possible. Your responses will
be included in our research project which will help the Tournament
Committee in serving you, the sport-fishing industry, and the
Greater Jacksonville community. All of your responses are strictly
confidential. Please drop your completed Survey in the mail,
no postage is needed. Thank you for your assistance.

Sincerely,



Wally Milon



Mike Ellerbrock
Florida Sea Grant

WM:ME:edl
Enclosure


EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER



























APPENDIX IV
SELECTED ECONOMIC OUTPUT MULTIPLIERS








Table 6.--Selected economic output multipliers

Source Se r Jacksonville Miami Orlando State of
region region region Florida


Water
Resources
Council


Mulkey and
Gordon


43--0il and gas
56--General services


43--0il and oas
45--General services


aNot available
b"State of Florida" multipliers preferred for expenditures in
"Other Places in Florida."


Source: [4,7].


1.692
2.832


2.6
1.95


2.148
3.203


1.984
2.78


1.586
2.834


2.3
2.5




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