Group Title: Bulletin University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station
Title: Soils and fertilizers for Florida vegetable and field crops
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026439/00001
 Material Information
Title: Soils and fertilizers for Florida vegetable and field crops
Series Title: Bulletin University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station
Physical Description: 23 p. : col. map ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Edson, S. N ( Seton N )
Smith, F. B ( Frederick Burean )
Publisher: University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1953
Copyright Date: 1953
 Subjects
Subject: Crops and soils -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Vegetables -- Soils -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Vegetables -- Fertilizers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 4).
Statement of Responsibility: compiled by S.N. Edson and F.B. Smith.
General Note: Cover title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026439
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEN6687
oclc - 18269744
alephbibnum - 000926028

Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE



The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida







Bulletin 514 February 1953
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS
WILLAR M. FIFIELD, Director
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


Soils and Fertilizers for Florida
Vegetable and Field Crops


CROP" PRO Maet


MINOR ELEMENTS

POTASH SULFUR
NITROGEN PHOSPHATE
00OD SEED TILLAGE
LEGUME
COVER INOCULATInoN
CROPS ORGANIC MATTER

CROP ROTATION

LIME ON ACID SOIL

DRAINAGE
RRig EROSION CONTROL
Factors in a Good System of Soil Maname
Factors in a Good System of Soil Management.











BOARD OF CONTROL EDITORIAL
J. Francis Cooper, M.S.A., Editor
Frank M. Harris, Chairman, St. Petersburg Clyde Beale, A.B.J., Associa:e Editor
Hollis Rinehart, Miami L. Odell Griffith, B.A.J., Asst. Editor 8
Eli H. Fink, Jacksonville J. N. Joiner, B.S.A., Assistant Editor 8
George J. White, Sr., Mount Dora William G. Mitchell, A.B.J., Assistant Editor
Mrs. Alfred I. duPont, Jacksonville
George W. English, Jr., Ft. Lauderdale ENTOMOLOGY
W. Glenn Miller, Monticello
W. F. Powers, Secretary, Tallahassee A. N. Tissot, Ph.D., Entomologist 1
L. C. Kuitert, Ph.D., Associate
EXECUTIVE STAFF H. E. Bratley, M.S.A., Assistant
F. A. Robinson, M.S., Asst. Apiculturist
J. Hillis Miller, Ph.D., President3 R. E. Waites, Ph.D., Asst. Entomologist
J. Wayne Reitz, Ph.D., Provost for Agr.3
Willard M. Fifield, M.S., Director HOME ECONOMICS
J. R. Beckenbach, Ph.D., Asso. Director
L. O. Gratz, Ph.D., Assistant Director Ouida D. Abbott, Ph.D., Home Econ.'
Rogers L. Bartley, B.S., Admin. Mgr.s R. B. French, Ph.D., Biochemist
Geo. R. Freeman, B.S., Farm Superintendent
HORTICULTURE
MAIN STATION, GAINESVILLE G H. Blackmon, M.S.A.. Horticulturist'
F. S. Jamison, Ph.D., Horticulturist 4
Albert P. Lorz, Ph.D., Horticulturist
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS R.K. Showalter, M.S., Asso. Hort.
H. G. Hamilton, Ph.D., Agr. Economist 1 R. A. Dennison, Ph.D., Asso. Hort.
R. E. L. Greene, Ph.D., Agr. Economist s R. H. Sharpe, M.S., Asso. Horticulturist
M. A. Brooker, Ph.D., Agr. Economists V. F. Nettles, Ph.D., Asso. Horticulturist
Zach Savage, M.S.A., Associate F. S. Lagasse, Ph.D., Horticulturist
A. H. Spurlock, M.S.A., Associate R. D. Dickey, M.S.A., Asso. Hort.
D. E. Alleger, M.S., Associate L. H. Halsey, M.S.A., Asst. Hort.
D. L. Brooke, M.S.A., Associate C. B. Hall, Ph.D., Asst. Horticulturist
M. R. Godwin, Ph.D., Associate Austin Griffiths, Jr., B.S., Asst. Hort.
W. K. McPherson, M.S., Economist S. E. McFadden, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Hort.
Eric Thor, M.S., Asso. Agr. Economist C. H. VanMiddelem, Ph.D., Asst. Biochemist
J. L. Tennant, Ph.D., Agr. Economist Buford D. Thompson, M.S.A., Asst. Hort.
Cecil N. Smith, M.A., Asso. Agr. Economist James Montelaro, Ph.D., Asst. Horticulturist
Levi A. Powell, Sr., M.S.A., Assistant M. W. Hoover, M.S.A., Asst. Hort.
Orlando, Florida (Cooperative USDA) LIBRARY
G. Norman Rose, B.S., Asso. Agri. Economist Ida Keeling Cresap, Librarian
J. C. Townsend, Jr., B.S.A., Agricultural
SStatistician 2 PLANT PATHOLOGY
J. B. Owens, B.S.A., Agr. Statistician2 PL PATH
J. K. Lankford, B.S., Agr. Statistician W. B. Tisdale, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist's
Phares Decker, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING Erdman West, M.S., Mycologist and
Botanist 3
Frazier Rogers, M.S.A., Agr. Engineer' s Robert W. Earhart, Ph.D., Plant Path.2
J. M. Myers, B.S., Asso. Agr. Engineer Howard N. Miller, Ph.D., Asso. Plant Path.
J. S. Norton, M.S., Asst. Agr. Eng. Lillian E. Arnold, M.S., Asst. Botanist
C. W. Anderson, Ph.D., Asst. Plant Path.
AGRONOMY
POULTRY HUSBANDRY
Fred H. Hull, Ph.D., Agronomist'2 POULTRY HUSBANDRY
G. B. Killinger, Ph.D.. Agronomist N. R. Mehrhof, M.Agr., Poultry Husb.'8
H. C. Harris, Ph.D., Agronomist J. C. Driggers, Ph.D., Asso. Poultry Husb.
R. W. Bledsoe, Ph.D., Agronomist
W. A. Carver, Ph.D., Associate SOILS
Darrel D. Morey, Ph.D., Associate 2 F. B. Smith, Ph.D., Microbiologist'
Fred A. Clark, M.S., Assistant Gaylor.l M. Volk, Ph.D., Soils Chemist
Myron G. Grennell, B.S.A.E., Assistant J. R. Neller, Ph.D., Soils Chemist
E. S. Horner, Ph.D., Assistant nathan Gammon, Jr., Ph:D., Soils Chemist
A. T. Wallace, Ph.D., Assistant I Ralph G. Leighty, B.S., Asst. Soil Surveyor 2
D. E. McCloud, Ph.D., Assistant G. D. Thornton, Ph.D., Asso. Microbiologist
G. C. Nutter, Ph.D., Asst. Agronomist Charles F. Eno, Ph.D., Asst. Soils Micro-
biologist
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND NUTRITION I. W. Winsor, B.S.A., Assistant Chemist
R. E. Caldwell, M.S.A., Asst. Chemist 4
T. J. Cunha, Ph.D., An. Husb.' s V. W. Carlisle, B.S., Asst. Soil Surveyor
G. K. Davis, Ph.D., Animal Nutritionist s J. H. Walker, M.S.A., Asst. Soil Surveyor
S. John Folks, Jr., M.S.A., Asst. An. IIusb. N. Edson, M. S., Asst. Soil Surveyor S
A. M. Pearson, Ph.D.. Asso. An. Hush.3 William K. Robertson, Ph.D., Asst. Chemist
"John P. Feaster, Ph.D., Asst. An. Nutri. 0. E. Cruz, B.S.A., Asst. Soil Surveyor
H. D. Wallace, Ph.D., Asst. An. Husb. W. G. Blue. Ph.D., Asst. Biochemist
M. Koper, Ph.D., An. Husbandman s J. G. A. Fiskel, Ph.D., Asst. Biochemist 3
E. F. Johnston, M.S., Asst. An. Hush. L. C. Hammond, Ph.D., Asst. Soil Physicist
J. F. Hentges, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. An. Husb. H. L. Dreland, Ph.D., Asst. Soils Chem.
L. R. Arrington, Ph.D., Asst. Biochemist
DAIRY SCIENCE VETERINARY SCIENCE
D. A. Sanders, D.V.M., Veterinarian 1
E. L. Fouts, Ph.D., Dairy Tech.'3 M. W. Emmel, D.V.M.,. Veterinarian
R. B. Becker, Ph.D., Dairy Husb.S C. F. Simpson, D.V.M., Asso. Veterinarian
S. P. Marshall, Ph.D., Asso. Dairy Husb." L. E. Swanson, D.V.M., Parasitologist
W. A. Krienke, M.S., Asso. Dairy Tech.8 Glenn Van Ness, D.V.M., Asso. Poultry
P. T. Dix Arnold, M.S.A., Asst. Dairy Hush. 3 Pathologist 8
Leon Mull, Ph.D., Asso. Dairy Tech. W. R. Dennis, D.V.M., Asst. Parasitologist
H. H. Wilkowske, Ph.D., Asst. Dairy Tech. E. W. Swarthout, D.V.M., Asso. Poultry
James M. Wing, Ph.D., Asst. Dairy Husb. Pathologist (Dade City)









REFERENCES

1. BEATTIE, W. R., Culture and uses of okra-USDA Farmers' Bul. 232.
1940.
2. BLASER, R. E., W. E. STOKES, J. D. WARNER, G. E. RITCHEY, and G. B.
KILLINGER. Pastures for Florida. Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 409.
1945.
3. DENNISON, R. A. and B. E. JAMES. Quality of vegetables as related to
fertilizer materials with emphasis on potash salts. Fla. Agr. Exp.
Sta. Ann. Rpt. 1949, pp. 97-99; Dennison, R. A., Ibid. 1950, p. 79.
4. FIFIELD, W. M. and H. S. WOLFE. Fertilizer experiments with potatoes
on the marl soils of Dade County. Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Bul. 352.
1940.
5. Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Fertilizer Recommendations,
1943. Mimeographed Rpt.
6. Florida Agricultural Extension Service. Cucumber production guide.
Agr. Ext. Service Cir. 101. 1951.
7. Pepper production guide. Agr. Ext.
Service Cir. 102. 1951.
8. --. Squash production guide. Agr. Ext.
Service Cir. 103. 1951.
9. Snap bean production guide. Agr. Ext.
Service Cir. 100. 1951.
10. Sweet potato production guide. Agr. Ext.
Service Cir. 97. 1951.
11. Sweet corn production guide. Agr. Ext.
Service Cir. 99. 1951.
12. -. Tomato production guide. Agr. Ext.
Service Cir. 98. 1951.
13. Watermelon production guide. Agr. Ext.
Service Cir. 96. 1951.
14. Vegetarian. No. 2. Agr. Ext. Service,
Univ. of Fla. 1950.
15. Florida State Department of Agriculture. Some Florida truck crops.
State of Fla. Dept. of Agr. Bul. 23. 1939.
16. HODGES, E. M., D. W. JONES and W. G. KIRK. Winter clovers for south
Florida flatwoods. Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Press Bul. 654. 1948.
17. HENDERSON, J. R. Recommended practices for the production of field
crops and pastures. Rpt. for the calendar year 1950. Agr. Ext.
Service, Univ. of Fla. Mimeographed Rpt. 1950.
18. JAMISON, F. S. The Florida home garden. Fla. Agr. Ext. Service
Bul. 131. 1946.
19. LOMBARD, P. M., B. E. BROWN and T. P. DYKSTRA. Potato production
in Northeastern and North Central States. USDA Farmers' Bul.
1958. 1948.
20. SMITH, J. LEE. Growing "Manure" with blue lupines in Florida. Fla.
Agr. Ext. Service Cir. 79. 1944.
21. SPENCER, A. P. Florida vegetables. Fla. Agr. Ext. Service Bul. 90.
1937.










BRANCH STATIONS SUB-TROPICAL STATION, HOMESTEAD
NORTH FLORIDA STATION, QUINCY Geo. D. Ruehle, Ph.D., Vice-Dir. in Charge
NORTH FLORIDA STATION, QUINCY D.. Wolfenbarger, Ph.D., Entomologist
Francis B. Lincoln, Ph.D., Horticulturist
W. C. Rhoades, Jr., M.S., Entomologist in Robert A. Conover, Ph.D., Plant Path.
Charge John L. Malcolm, Ph.D., Asso. Soils Chemist
R. R. Kincaid, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist R. W. Harkness, Ph.D., Asst. Chemist
L. G. Thompson, Jr., Ph.D., Soils Chemist R. Bruce Ledin, Ph.D., Asst. Hort.
W. H. Chapman, M.S., Asso. Agronomist J. C. Noonan, M.S., Asst. Hort.
Frank S. Baker, Jr., B.S., Asst. An. Husb. M. H. Gallatin, B.S., Soil Conservationist 2
T. E. Webb. B.S.A., Asst. Agronomist
Frank E. Guthrie, Ph.D., Asst. Entomologist
Mobile Unit Monticello WEST CENTRAL FLORIDA STATION,
Mobile Unit, Monticello ROOKVI
R. W. Wallace, B.S., Associate Agronomist BROOKSVILLE
Marian W. Hazen, M.S., Animal Husband-
Mobile Unit, Marianna man in Charge
R. W. Lipscomb, M.S., Associate Agronomist
Mobile Unit, Pensacola RANGE CATTLE STATION, ONA
R. L. Smith, M.S., Associate Agronomist W. G. Kirk, Ph.D., Vice-Director in Charge
Mobile Unit, Chipley E. M. Hodges, Ph.D., Agronomist
J. B. White, B.S.A., Associate Agronomist D. W. Jones, M.S., Asst. Soil Technologist

CITRUS STATION, LAKE ALFRED CENTRAL FLORIDA STATION, SANFORD
A. F. Camp, Ph.D., Vice-Director in Charge R. W. Ruprecht, Ph.D., Vice-Dir. in Charge
W. L. Thompson, B.S., Entomologist J. W. Wilson, Sc.D., Entomologist
R. F. Suit, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist P. J. Westgate, Ph.D., Asso. Hort.
E. P. Ducharme. Ph.D., Asso. Plant Path. Ben. F. Whitner, Jr., B.S.A., Asst. Hort.
C. R. Stearns, Jr., B.S.A., Asso. Chemist Geo. Swank, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Plant Path.
J. W. Sites, Ph.D., Horticulturist
H. O. Sterling, B.S., Asst. Horticulturist
H. J. Reitz, Ph.D., Horticulturist WEST FLORIDA STATION, JAY
Francine fisher, M.S., Asst. Plant Path. C. E. Hutton, Ph.D., Vice-Director in Charge
I. Wander, Ph.D., Soils Chemist H. W. Lundy, B.S.A., Associate Agronomist
J. W. Kesterson, M.S., Asso. Chemist W. R. Langford, Ph.D., Asst. Agronomist
R. Hendrickson, B.S., Asst. Chemist
Ivan Stewart, Ph.D., Asst. Biochemist
D. S. Prosser, Jr., B.S., Asst. Horticulturist SUWANNEE VALLEY STATION,
R. W. Olsen, B.S., Biochemist LIVE OAK
F. W. Wenzel, Jr., Ph.D., Chemist
Alvin H. Rouse, M.S., Asso. Chemist G. E. Ritchey, M.S., Agronomist in Charge
H. W. Ford, Ph.D., Asst. Horticulturist
L. C. Knorr, Ph.D., Asso. Histologist4
R. M. Pratt, Ph.D., Asso. Ent.-Pathologist GULF COAST STATION, BRADENTON
J. W. Davis, B.S.A., Asst. in Ent.-Path.
W. A. Simanton, Ph.D., Entomologist E. L. Spencer, Ph.D., Soils Chemist in Charge
E. J. Deszyck, Ph.D., Asso. Horticulturist E. G. Kelsheimer, Ph.D., Entomologist
C. D. Leonard, Ph.D., Asso. Horticulturist David G. A. Kelbert, Asso. Horticulturist
W. T. Long, M.S., Asst. Horticulturist Robert O. Magie, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist
M. H. Muma, Ph.D., Asso. Entomologist J. M. Walter, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist
F. J. Reynolds, Ph.D., Asso. Hort. Donald S. Burgis, M.S.A., Asst. Hort.
W. F. Spencer, Ph.D., Asst. Chem. C. M. Geraldson, Ph.D., Asst. Horticulturist
I. H. Holtsberg, B.S.A., Asst. Ento.-Path. Amegda Jack, M.S., Asst. Soils Chemist
K. G. Townsend, B.S.A., Asst. Ento.-Path.
J. B. Weeks, B.S., Asst. Ento.-Path.
R. B. Johnson, Ph.D., Asst. Entomologist FIELD LABORATORIES
W. F. Newhall, Ph.D., Asst. Biochem.
W. F. Grierson-Jackson, Ph.D., Asst. Chem. Watermelon, Grape, Pasture-Leesburg
Roger Patrick, Ph.D., Bacteriologist
Marion F. Oberbacher, Ph.D., Asst. Plant J. M. Crall, Ph.D., Associate Plant Path-
Physiologist ologist Acting in Charge
Evert J. Elvin, B.S., Asst. Horticulturist C. C. Helms, Jr., B.S., Asst. Agronomist
L. H. Stover, Assistant in Horticulture
EVERGLADES STATION, BELLE GLADE Strawberry-Plant City
W. T. Forsee, Jr., Ph.D., Chemist in Charge A. N. Brooks, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist
R. V. Allison, Ph.D., Fiber Technologist
Thomas Bregger, Ph.D., Physiologist Vegetables-Hastings
J. W. Randolph, M.S., Agricultural Engr. A. H. Eddins, Ph.D., Plant Path. in Charge
R. W. Kidder, M.S., Asso. Animal Husb. E. N. McCubbin, Ph.D., Horticulturist
C. C. Scale. Associate Agronomist T. M. Dobrovsky, Ph.D., Asst. Entomologist
N. C. Hayslip, B.S.A., Asso. Entomologist
E. A. Wolf, M.S., Asst. Horticulturist Pecans-Monticello
\V. H. Thames, M.S., Asst. Entomologist
W. N. Stoner, Ph.D., Asst. Plant Path. A. M. Phillips, B.S., Asso. Entomologist
W. G. Genung, B.S.A., Asst. Entomologist John R. Large, M.S., Asso. Plant Path.
Frank V. Stevenson, M.S., Asso. Plant Path. Frost
Robert J. Allen, Ph.D., Asst. Agronomist Frost Forecasting-Lakeland
V. E. Green, Ph.D., Asst. Agronomist Warren O. Johnson, B.S., Meterologist in
J. F. Darby, Ph.D., Asst. Plant Path. Chg. 2
H. L. Chapman, Jr., M.S.A., Asst. An. Husb. -
V. L. Guzman, Ph.D., Asst. Hort. Head of Department
M. R. Bedsole, M.S.A., Asst. Chem. s In cooperation with U. S.
J. C. Stephens, 'B.S., Drainage Engineer 2
A. E. Kretschmer, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Soils Cooperative, other divisions, U. of F.
Chem. 4 On leave










Soils and Fertilizers for Florida

Vegetable and Field Crops
Compiled by
S. N. EDSON AND F. B. SMITH

CONTENTS
Page
References ................... .......... .... ...... ... ..... ........ 4
Foreword ....-......-- .---....---- ..... ---... ..--- .- ..... 5
Flat Pine Land Soils .............-.....--............-.... ...... .........-.. 7
Suggested Applications for Vegetable Crops ..-..........--. 8
Suggested Applications for Field Crops ......................--...---. 14
Generalized Map of Florida Soil Areas ...................... 12-13
Rolling Upland Soils ..... ........ .. ............... .............. ..-- ........ 15
Suggested Applications for Vegetable Crops ................ 16
Suggested Applications for Field Crops ..............--- .......... 18
Definitions .... ....- ............................ ................ 21


FOREWORD

Florida's varied agriculture, soil types, crop adaptations and
climatic conditions make general fertilizer recommendations
difficult, if not impossible. Some crops are restricted to limited
areas because of one or more of these conditions. For example,
citrus is grown extensively on the Lakeland and associated soils
in the lower peninsula where climatic conditions are favorable;
but is not adapted to the somewhat poorly drained Leon and as-
sociated soils. Some soils in the state are well supplied with
certain of the plant food elements. Nearly all soils in the state,
however, are inherently poor in one or more of these plant food
elements.
These soil deficiencies, as well as crop adaptations and require-
ments, had to be discovered by research. Extensive field studies
and laboratory tests over a relatively long period have accumu-
lated a vast amount of valuable information. This information,
however, is scattered through a large number of bulletins, circu-
lars and leaflets; and there is an ever-increasing need to have this
information assembled in one publication. The purpose of this
bulletin is to bring together all the pertinent information avail-
able on vegetable and field crops fertilizer recommendations for
different soil types and conditions.








6 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

Unfortunately, recommendations cannot yet be made in all
cases for specific soil types. This is true because the investiga-
tions were not conducted on a soil-type basis in all instances.
However, a generalized soil map of the state is shown in the
center spread of this bulletin, divided into eight major areas. A
list of the predominant soil series in each area is also shown,
together with the dominant soil characteristics which influence
their use-such as texture, parent materials, occurrence and
drainage conditions. It is not possible to show individual soil
types or even series on such a small scale as the one presented
here. Some types occur in more than one area but the series
listed are the main ones for that area, with minor inclusions of
other types.
For practical purposes in the use of these recommendations
the somewhat poorly-drained sands correspond roughly to the
"dark" sands and the well-drained sands to the "light" sands.
Similarly, the well-drained loamy sands to sandy loams may, in
general, correspond to the "dark" sands in their fertilizer re-
quirements; also the deep sands of the rolling uplands may corre-
spond roughly to the "light" sands in their fertilizer require-
ments. These are, of course, only approximations based upon
the best available information. They may be modified as more
information becomes available on specific soil types.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Credit is due many Florida Agricultural Experiment Station workers
who have determined crop response in field fertilizer trials over a period of
years to make these recommendations. Special mention is made of the use
of the mimeographed report on Recommended Practices for the Production
of Field Crops and Pastures for the Calendar Year 1950, by J. R. Hender-
son, Extension Agronomist; the Vegetable Production Guide Circulars by
Dr. F. S. Jamison, Vegetable Crops Extension Specialist; and Florida Agri-
cultural Experiment Station Fertilizer Recommendations, 1943, compiled
by the staffs of several Departments and Branch Stations.








Soils and Fertilizers for Florida Crops 7

FLAT PINE LAND SOILS, PEAT, MUCK AND MARL.

AREA 1. Imperfectly to poorly drained, sands and loamy sands over
dominantly noncalcareous materials.
Soils I Principal Location
Sands IL.S. to S.L.* I
Leon I Approximately half the total area.
St. Johns I Widely scattered.
Scranton I Plant City, LaCrosse, Starke areas.
Plummer I Very extensive.
Portsmouth I Extensive.
Immokalee I Associated with Leon.
Rutledge I Widely scattered.
Bayboro I Alachua, Dade and Clay.
SBladen East Coast to St. Lucie.
Coxville IEast Coast and Alachua.
I Portsmouth IWidely scattered.
I Scranton I Bradford, Union and St. Johns
I Plummer Very extensive.
I Rutledge Widely scattered.






AREA 2. Imperfectly to poorly drained, sands and loamy sands over
calcareous materials; poorly drained marls.
Sands, L.S. and S.L.* Principal Location

Parkwood ...--...-- .. ...................----- I Levy County and East and West
I Coasts.
Matmon ....-----......-------.. ...-----........ Associated with Parkwood.
Ruskin ..-----............--...---..- ------.-----.... Ruskin area.
Adamsville --- ......................--.. .......... Ruskin area.
Sunniland .-.....-................- ........---- I Collier, Hillsborough, East Coast.
Felda ................-- .. ..--.-----......-- I Collier, Hillsborough, East Coast.
Pompano ......-- ..---..........-- ...----.---.. I Collier, Hillsborough, East Coast.
Manatee ....-........... -..... ...........---- Manatee, DeSoto and Lee.
Perrine ............----------........ .......----- Dade County.






AREA 3. Poorly to very poorly drained, peats and mucks.
Soil I Organic Matter Content % Principal Location

Muck ......--........ 25-65 St. Johns Marsh,
i Okeechobee.
Peat ................. 65-100 Everglades.
Peaty-Muck ...... I Mixture of peat and muck I

Loamy sands and sandy loams.










SOIL TEXTURE I SUGGESTED APPLICATION VEGETABLE CROPSo
AND CROP Rate GENERAL INFORMATION ON FERTILIZER
Lbs/Acre ANALYSIS RECOMMENDATIONS
LIGHT SAND 1,000 4-7-5 4-8-8** 5-7-5 Apply fertilizer before or at planting, in two bands,
DARK SAND 800 4-7-5 5-7-5 2-3 inches below and 3-4 inches to sides of row. (Split
MARL 1,200 3-8-8* 4-7-5 4-9-3 I application may be used.) Use double the amount of
PEAT 300 0-14-5+1% CuO+2% MnO fertilizer for lima beans.
MUCK 200 0-14-5+1% CuO+2% MnO ILime acid soils to optimum pH. On marl, spray
Peas, English I with 1% to 2 lbs. of manganese sulfate per 100 gallons
Peas, field of water if deficiency develops.
Beans, snap 3-8-8 for lima beans only.
Beans, lima I** Use double the amount for lima beans on sandy
muck.
LIGHT SAND I 2,000 4-7-5 4-8-8 Apply % fertilizer a week to 10 days ahead of C"
DARK SAND 1,500 4-7-5 5-7-5 planting and the remainder in bands when the plants
MARL 1,000 4-7-5 are half grown.
PEAT 800 i 0-8-24 0-12-16* Side-dress with 100-200 pounds per acre of nitrate
MUCK 800 0-12-16* of soda where available nitrogen is needed.
Beets Lime acid soils to optimum pH.
Carrots On marl soils suspected of manganese deficiency,
Radish I spray with 1% to 2 lbs. of manganese sulfate per 100 I
Turnips gallons of water.
Onions Apply all fertilizer prior to seeding rapidly ma-
turing crops on peat and muck soils.
LIGHT SAND 3,000 4-7-5 5-7-5 Apply % the fertilizer just ahead of planting and
DARK SAND 2,000 4-7-5 5-7-5 I the remainder when the crops are half grown.
MARL 750 1 4-7-5 4-8-6 Side-dress with 150-200 pounds per acre of nitrate t
PEAT 500 0-8-24 of soda where available nitrogen is needed. (Omit z
MUCK 500 0-12-16 late side-dressing cabbage.)
Broccoli Lime acid soils to optimum pH. On marl soils sus-
Cabbage pected of manganese deficiency, spray with 11/ to 2
Cauliflower l bs. of manganese sulfate per 100 gallons of water.
Collards For cabbage on peat soils fertilizer should include
I 0.8% CuO + 2.0% MnO + 1.0% ZnO + 0.4% B203;
and on muck soils 2.0% MnO + 1.0% ZnO + 0.4%
SBOs. For cauliflower and broccoli, include 2.0, to 4.0
Ibs. of borax equivalent per acre application of ferti-
I _____lizer.







SOIL TEXTURE SUGGESTED APPLICATION VEGETABLE CROPS
AND CROP Rate GENERAL INFORMATION ON FERTILIZER
Lbs/Acre ANALYSIS RECOMMENDATIONS
LIGHT SAND 2,000 4-8-5 4-8-8 1 Apply %/ fertilizer just ahead of planting and the
DARK SAND 1,500 4-7-5 5-7-5 remained two weeks after the plants are set.
MARL 800 4-7-5 4-8-6 Side-dress with 150-200 pounds per acre of nitrate
PEAT 500 0-8-24 of soda where available nitrogen is needed.
MUCK 500* 0-12-16 Lime acid soils to optimum pH.
Lettuce Amount doubled for sandy mucks.
Spinach
Romaine
Endive
Escarole i_
LIGHT SAND 2,200 I 4-7-5 5-7-5 4-8-8 For tomatoes, apply fertilizer before or at time of
DARK SAND 1,500 4-7-5' 3-8-8 4-8-8 planting in two bands, 2-3 inches below and 3-4 inches
MARL 1,000"* 4-7-5 4-8-6 I to the sides of the row. (Split applications may be .
PEAT 900* *0-8-24+0'.5% CuO+1% MnO used.) The use of potassium sulfate in fertilizer in-
MUCK 1,000* *0-10-10 + 0.5% CuO + stead of potassium chloride may produce better ship-
Tomato 11% MnQ ping quality or firmness of tomatoes.
Eggplant For eggplants and peppers apply 1/ or more of the -
Pepper fertilizer at planting and the remainder when crops
I are about % grown. Drill the fertilizer into the rows
Sas indicated for tomatoes.
STwo to three applications at rates equivalent to 100 o
Slbs. nitrate of soda and 25 lbs. muriate of 'otash per 5.
acre are used as side-dressing during growing period.
"** Triple this amount for tomatoes.
Doubtful if tomatoes should be planted on peats
__I or mucks.
LIGHT SAND 1,500 4-7-5 4-6-8 Apply fertilizer before or at planting, in two bands,
DARK SAND 1,200 4-7-5 4-5-7 2-3 inches below and 3-4 inches to the sides of row.
MARL 800' 4-7-5 4-6-8 For side-dressing, see tomatoes and peppers.
PEAT Lime acid soils to optimum pH.
MUCK On marl soils suspected of manganese deficiency
Spray with 1% to 2 Ibs. of manganese sulfate per 100
Cucumbers I gallons of water.
Cantaloupe Under troughs and on irrigated light sandy soils,
Increase to 2,500 Ibs. of fertilizer per acre.










0



SOIL TEXTURE SUGGESTED APPLICATION VEGETABLE CROPS
AND CROP Rate GENERAL INFORMATION ON FERTILIZER
Lbs/Acre I ANALYSIS RECOMMENDATIONS
LIGHT SAND 1,500 4-7-5 4-8-8
DARK SAND 1,200 1 4-7-5 4-8-8
MARL 700 4-7-5 4-9-3* See cucumbers and cantaloupe for fertilizer applica-
PEAT i tion.
MUCK 300* 0-8-24*
Squash For squash only.
Watermelon _
LIGHT SAND 6,000 4-7-5 4-8-8 Apply 1,000 lbs. of the fertilizer a week to 10 days
DARK SAND 4,000 6-6-6 4-8-8 I before the plants are set, and the remainder in 2 to 3
MARL 3,000 4-7-5 equal applications during the growing season.
PEAT 2,000t I 0-8-24 Side-dress with 100 to 200 Ibs. per acre of nitrate of
MUCK 2,000** 0-12-16 3-8-8* soda when needed. Lime acid soils to optimum pH. t1
Include 8 to 16 lbs. of borax equivalent per acre
Celery application of fertilizer.
For celery on sandy mucks.
** For celery on sandy muck, this amount is doubled.
I Broadcast sulfur for pH control at rate of 500 lbs.
Sfor each 0.3 unit above 5.8 on Everglades peat.
LIGHT SAND 1,500 4-7-5 Apply % of the fertilizer before plants are set, % tC
DARK SAND 1,200 4-7-5 3-8-6 I 6 weeks after plants are set, and /s when the first
MARL 700 4-7-5 fruit is setting.
PEAT Top-dress with 100 pounds per acre of sulfate of
MUCK ammonia with the third application of fertilizer.
Strawberries








SOIL TEXTURE SUGGESTED APPLICATION I VEGETABLE CROPS
AND CROP I Rate GENERAL INFORMATION ON FERTILIZER
_Lbs/Acre ANALYSIS RECOMMENDATIONS
Apply fertilizer before or at time of planting in 2
LIGHT SAND 1,200* 4-7-5 5-7-5 4-12-6* bands, 2-3 inches below and 3-4 inches to the sides of
DARK SAND 1,200 4-7-5 5-7-5 the row.
MARL 1,000 4-7-5 Side-dress with 2 applications, using 200 pounds per
PEAT 800 0-10-10 + 1%CuO + 2%MnO acre of nitrate of soda and 50 pounds per acre of
MUCK 800** 0-10-10 + 1%CuO + 2%MnO muriate of potash, where available nitrogen is needed.
Make application just prior to tasseling.
Sweet corn I I Lime acid soils to optimum pH.
Okra Include 10 Ibs. per acre of zinc sulfate where "white P
I I bud" is suspected.
Okra responds to extra applications of organic
I fertilizers.
I Side-dress with a total of 500 Ibs. per acre of 10-
S0-12 made in 2 applications for light sands on East
i Coast.
I ** For corn on muck 2-10-10 may be used instead of O
1 ___0-10-10.
LIGHT SAND 2,500-3,000 4-7-5 4-5-7 6-8-8 Apply fertilizer not less than 2 inches away from the .
DARK SAND 2,000 4-7-5 5-7-5 seed piece, in bands on both sides of the row and level
MARL 1,500-1,800* 4-7-5 4-8-8 2-8-6 with the seed.
PEAT 750 0-8-24 Generally, 25-40% of the nitrogen should be from
MUCK 750 0-8-24 organic sources, Y3 of nitrogen from nitrate source.
Moisture control is essential for maximum yields. 2.
Careful control of the soil reaction is essential for
Irish potatoes I quality potatoes.
SOn marl soils suspected of manganese deficiency,
spray with 1% to 2 lbs. of manganese sulfate per 100
I gallons of water.
Present practice on many old potato farms is to
apply 500 to 750 lbs. per acre of Cyanamid to control
SSclerotinia sclerotiorum before planting, then 900 to
S1,200 lbs. per acre of 0-12-10, 0-16-10 or 2-14-10 +
I 2% MgO + 2% MnO at planting. Excess nitrogen in-
creases difficulty of control of late blight. The 2-8-6
I gives results as good as or better than 4-7-5 or 4-8-8
I on old potato land after summer leguminous cover
Crops.









GEDIL COL
6 6














S1 Imperfectly to poorly drained, sands f -L

noncalcareous materials S'^o Wa^ 1 !L Y2
2 Imperfectly to poorly drained, sands
-- and loamy sands over calcareous 1 ----- ^ w \ R\
LLA



LAK







IN[I )





B^ 4 w ell to 'aode ately we! ^i:i sad ',/!/ I' I !\il N,
5 Wmelletl to soewa ecssvly drained, ad
s and and loamy sands '' ,o}

-16 Somewhat excessivetly to poorly to moderately sands.
SWpeorl to pery poorly drained, sands


SPovrl phosvyphatic limestned -- -----'-"- L,
and mucks



I ID OkJ ob,,-
ar e 4 Well to node ately wel ;ra ineei, sandy I
loa ms'and .oa my sands 'rj
5 Well to some7Dhat excessively drained, Ii r~ UI
sands and loamy sands
1 Ig Somewhat exe es siv ely to moderately ii!WA E
well drained sands


S_2
7 We.ll to imperfectly drained, sands
over phos phatic ii mestone caml-;- ------
O Cypress and gum swamps; scrub or
dry sands



BROVIR
eo 1 E





SOIL TEXTURE [ SUGGESTED APPLICATION FIELD CROPS
AND CROP Rate GENERAL INFORMATION ON FERTILIZER
Lbs/Acre ANALYSIS RECOMMENDATIONS
MINERAL SOILS I 300-500 J 4-10-7 6-8-4 6-8-8 4-8-8 Apply fertilizer in bands at time of planting. Side-
Corn, field I dress with 100-175 lbs. per acre of ammonium nitrate
i or equivalent 35 days after planting.
MINERAL SOILS i 300-500 4-10-7 6-8-4 6-8-8 4-8-8 If corn is planted with a legume, in alternate rows,
Corn + Legume 0-14-10* the legume should be fertilized at or before planting
I with 150 to 200 lbs. per acre of 0-14-10.
Lime acid soils to optimum pH every 4 to 5 years.
Apply 10 lbs. per acre of zinc sulfate where "white -
_bud" is suspected.
MINERAL SOILS 300-400 f 4-10-7 4-7-5 Use grain drill and seed oats at rate of 2 to 3 bushels
Oats per acre. Apply fertilizer at planting time.
STop-dress with 100 lbs. per acre of nitrate of soda
or equivalent in Dec. and again about Feb. for good .
_spring grazing.
ORGANIC SOILS 300-400* I 0-8-24 0-8-16 Disk in fertilizer just ahead of planting.
MINERAL SOILS 300 5-10-5 4-10-7 On peats and mucks include 15 lbs. per acre of
Establishment of I copper sulfate, 25 lbs. per acre of manganese sulfate
Grass Pasture I and 15 Ibs. per acre of zinc sulfate.
IFor pangola grass on mineral soils include 15 lbs.
I per acre of copper sulfate.
_Lime acid soils to optimum pH.
LIGHT SANDS 500-600 0-14-10 3-12-12 2-14-10 Apply fertilizer as for grass establishment. On S"
DARK SANDS 500-600 0-14-10 1 light sands it may be profitable to use 3-12-12 or 2-14-
Establishment of 10 fertilizer instead of 0-14-10. In South Florida, in-
Grass + Legume -I clude 20 lbs. per acre of copper sulfate and manganese
I sulfate, 10 lbs. per acre of zinc sulfate and borax.
_Lime acid soils to optimum pH.
MINERAL SOILS 400-500 6-6-6* Fertilize annually in February. Relime acid soils
Maintenance of I to optimum pH every 4 to 5 years.
Grass Pasture Top-dress with 30 Ibs. nitrogen per acre in June
SI or July and 300 lbs. per acre of 10-0-10 in August or
_I September.
MINERAL SOILS 400-500 I 0-14-10 Fertilize annually in October. Relime acid soils to
Maintenance optimum pH every 4 to 5 years. Top-dress with extra
Grass + Legume nitrogen in July when needed.
ORGANIC SOILS 1,000* 0-8-24 On organic soils 300 lbs. muriate of potash and
MINERAL SOILS 1,500-2,000 | 4-7-5 4-10-7 500 lbs. basic slag or rock phosphate.
Sugarcane I Apply % of the fertilizer at first cultivation and the
S___remainder when the cane is waist high.






ROLLING UPLAND SOILS

AREA 4. Well to moderately well drained, sandy loams and loamy sands AREA 5. Well to somewhat excessively
Soils Principal Location drained, sands and loamy sands.
L.S. S.L. I L.S. to S.L.* I Soils I Principal Location
Norfolk Very extensive. Sands I
Ruston I Very extensive. Orangeburg Scattered throughout area.
ITifton I Walton and Okaloosa. Ruston Scattered throughout area.
I Marlboro I Small areas in northwest. Norfolk I Very extensive.
Faceville I Limited to Jackson, Gadsden, Holmes.
SCarnegie I Walton and Okaloosa.
I Magnolia I Jefferson and Gadsden.
SGreenville I Jackson, Jefferson, and Leon. AREA 6. Somewhat excessively to mod-
I Red Bay I Scattered throughout area. erately well drained sands.
Susquehannal Small scattered areas. Soils I Principal Location
Gilead I Small areas.
I Cuthbert ISmall areas. Sands I
I Orangeburg Scattered throughout area. Lakeland Very extensive.
SL Eustis I Lake County.
Loamy sands to sandy loams. Blanton Scattered areas.
Orlando Orange, Lake, and Alachua.


AREA 7. Well to imperfectly drained,
sands over phosphatic limestone.
SWAMP OR SCRUB Soils Principal Location
L.S. to S.L. I
AREA 8. Cypress and gum swamps; scrub or dry sands. Gainesville I Alachua, Marion, Hernando,
I Levy.
Fellowship I Alachua, Marion, Hernando.
Hernando I Found throughout area.
Arredondo I Alachua, Marion.
Kanapaha I Alachua.













SOIL TEXTURE SUGGESTED APPLICATION VEGETABLE CROPS
AND CROP Rate GENERAL INFORMATION ON FERTILIZER
Lbs/Acre ANALYSIS RECOMMENDATIONS
HEAVY SOILS 800 4-7-5 4-6-8
LOAMY SANDS 1,200 4-7-5 4-5-7
DEEP SANDS 1,500 4-7-5 4-6-8
Cantaloupe See watermelon for fertilizer application.
HEAVY SOILS 1,200 3-8-8* 4-7-5 4-9-3 Apply fertilizer before or at planting in 2 bands, 2 '
LOAMY SANDS 800 4-7-5 5-7-5 to 3 inches below and 3 to 4 inches to sides of row.
DEEP SANDS 1,000 4-7-5 4-8-8* 5-7-5 Use double the amounts of fertilizer for lima beans.
Lime acid soils to optimum pH.
Peas, English 3-8-8 for lima beans only.
Peas, field
Beans, snap
Beans, lima
HEAVY SOILS 1,000 I 4-7-5 4-8-8 5-7-5 For tomatoes apply fertilizer before or at time of '
LOAMY SANDS 1,500 4-7-5 3-8-8 4-8-8 planting in 2 bands, 2 to 3 inches below and 3 to 4
DEEP SANDS 2,200** 4-7-5 5-7-5 4-8-8 inches to sides.
For eggplants and peppers apply % or more of the
Eggplant fertilizer at planting and the remainder when crops 2
Tomatoes** are about % grown. Drill the fertilizer into the rows
Peppers as indicated for tomatoes. to
"** One-half muriate and one-half sulfate of potash "
Smay be best, except on salty lower East Coast where
all sulfate is necessary.
Two to 3 applications at rates equivalent to 100 lbs. ;
of nitrate of soda and 25 lbs. of muriate of potash per
Iacre are used as side-dressing during the growing
Period.








SOIL TEXTURE | SUGGESTED APPLICATION VEGETABLE CROPS
AND CROP Rate I GENERAL INFORMATION ON FERTILIZER
Lbs/Acre ANALYSIS RECOMMENDATIONS
HEAVY SOILS 1,800 4-7-5 4-8-8 Apply fertilizer not less than 2 inches away from
LOAMY SANDS 2,000 4-7-5 5-7-5 seed piece in bands on both sides of row and level
DEEP SANDS 3,000 4-7-5 4-5-7 with seed.
Generally, 25-40% of the nitrogen should be from
Potatoes, Irish organic source.
Moisture control is essential for maximum yields.
Careful control of soil reaction is necessary for
__________I quality potatoes.
HEAVY SOILS 750 4-7-5 4-8-6 Apply Y the fertilizer just ahead of planting and
LOAMY SANDS 2,000 4-7-5 5-7-5 I the remainder when the plants are half grown.
DEEP SANDS 3,000 4-7-5 5-7-5 Side-dress with 150-200 pounds per acre of nitrate
of soda or equivalent. (Omit late side-dressing to '
Cabbage prevent loose-heading.)
Lime acid soils to optimum pH.
HEAVY SOILS 700 3-8-8 Apply fertilizer in 2 bands, before or at time of
LOAMY SANDS 800* 4-7-5 3-8-8 i planting, 2 to 3 inches below and 3 to 4 inches to the
DEEP SANDS 1,000* 3-6-10 3-8-8 sides of row.
Include 8 to 16 pounds of borax equivalent per acre
Potatoes, sweet application of fertilizer.
*This amount should be doubled if crop is grown
for early market.
HEAVY SOILS 700 4-7-5 Apply fertilizer before or at planting, in 2 bands,
LOAMY SANDS 1,200 4-7-5 4-8-8 5-7-5 2 to 3 inches below and 3 to 4 inches to the sides of
DEEP SANDS 1,500 4-7-5 4-8-8 5-7-5 row.
Two to three applications at rates equivalent to 100
Watermelon l bs. nitrate of soda and 25 lbs. muriate of potash per
Sacre are used as side-dressing during growing period.
On sandy soils suspected of manganese deficiency,
Spray with 1%/ to 2 Ibs. of manganese sulfate per 100
gallons of water.
h-Q










00


SOIL TEXTURE SUGGESTED APPLICATION FIELD CROPS
AND CROP I Rate I GENERAL INFORMATION ON FERTILIZER
Lbs/Acre ANALYSIS RECOMMENDATIONS
MINERAL SOILS 500-600* 0-14-10 0-10-10 2-14-10 Disk in fertilizer 10 days ahead of planting.
Sweet Clovers Lime is essential for all clovers and especially sweet 3
White Clover clover. Apply lime on acid soils to optimum pH.
Red Clover (K) To establish on light sands use 2-14-10 or 3-12-12.
Crimson Clover
Black Medic _
MINERAL SOILS 300-400 0-14-10 The use of fertilizer for lupine appears desirable -
Swhere no fertilizer or small amounts have been applied
Lupine, bitter to previous crops. Where 500 lbs. per acre or more
Lupine, sweet of a complete fertilizer was applied to crops grown
Hairy indigo the previous spring, lupine may be grown without
fertilizer.
Disk in fertilizer 10 days ahead of planting.
MINERAL SOILS 400-500* 0-14-10
Cowpea
Velvet bean Disk in fertilizer 10 days ahead of planting.
Kudzu *For soybeans 300 pounds per acre of 3-12-12 may
Crotalaria be used.
Soybean_
MINERAL SOILS 600-700 4-10-7 4-7-5 1 Apply Y of the fertilizer at first cultivation and
Sugarcane I the remainder when the cane is about waist high.
MINERAL SOILS 300-400 0-10-20 0-8-24 Apply fertilizer in two bands, 2 inches below and 3 *
inches to the sides of the row.
Peanuts To soils that produce pops, apply 400 to 500 pounds n
per acre of gypsum (landplaster) when peanuts begin
_to peg.










SOIL TEXTURE SUGGESTED APPLICATION I FIELD CROPS
AND CROP Rate I GENERAL INFORMATION ON FERTILIZER
Lbs/Acre ANALYSIS I RECOMMENDATIONS
MINERAL SOILS 300-400 4-10-7 4-7-5 Apply fertilizer at planting time.
Oats I Top-dress with 100 to 200 lbs. per acre of nitrate
Rye i of soda or equivalent in Dec. and again in Feb. for
I good spring grazing.
MINERAL SOILS 400 0-14-10 3-12-6 2-10-4 Apply fertilizer at planting time.
Oats and Lespedeza Top-dress with 150 pounds per acre of nitrate of
soda or equivalent.
SANDY LOAMS 1,400 3-8-8 3-8-10 3-9-9 In December, apply 2 lbs. per sq. yd. of 4-9-3 fertil-
LOAMY SANDS 1,600 3-8-8 3-8-10 3-9-9 izer to the seedbed.
SANDS 1,800 3-8-8 3-8-10 3-9-9 Apply fertilizer in bands, 2% at or before planting
Tobacco, brightI special tobacco fertilizer and the remainder when the plants start to grow.
SANDY LOAMS 2,000 4-4-8 tobacco fertilizer Apply fertilizer as for bright tobacco. Z
Tobacco, shade Apply about 1,000 lbs. per acre of cottonseed meal "I
and about 10 tons of cow manure. If manure is not 1`
Available, then increase the amount of fertilizer by /s.
MINERAL SOILS 300 5-10-5 4-10-7 .
Grass, pasture Disk in fertilizer just ahead of planting.
establishment Lime acid soils to optimum pH.
LOAMY SANDS to
SANDY LOAMS I 500-600 3-12-12 0-14-10
DEEP SANDS 500-600 3-12-12 2-14-10 Disk in fertilizer just ahead of planting.
Grass + Legume Lime acid soils to optimum pH.
pasture
establishment I


I-L










0

SOIL'TEXTURE SUGGESTED APPLICATION I FIELD CROPS
AND CROP Rate I GENERAL INFORMATION ON FERTILIZER
Lbs/Acre ANALYSIS RECOMMENDATIONS
MINERAL SOILS 400-500 6-6-6 Fertilize annually in February. Top-dress with 30
Slbs. N per acre in June or July and 300 Ibs. per acre o
Grass, pasture of 10-0-10 in August or September.
maintenance ___Relime acid soils to optimum pH every 4 to 5 years.
MINERAL SOILS 400-500 0-14-10 Fertilize annually in October. Top-dress with 30
Grass + Legume l bs. N per acre in June or July and 300 lbs. per acre
pasture maintenance of 10-0-10 in August or September.
Relime acid soils to optimum pH every 4 to 5 years. C
MINERAL SOILS 300-500 4-8-8 4-10-7 0-14-10* Apply fertilizer in bands at time of planting.
Side-dress with 150 Ibs. per acre -of ammonium
Corn, alone nitrate or equivalent 35 days after planting.
Corn, after legume If corn is planted with peanuts and velvet beans in
alternate rows, the legume should be fertilized with
Corn + peanuts and 150 to 200 lbs. per acre of 0-14-10.
velvet beans Lime acid soils to optimum pH when necessary.
Apply 10 lbs. per acre of zinc sulfate if "white bud"
is suspected.
MINERAL SOILS 600-800 4-10-7 4-8-8 Apply fertilizer in bands, 2 inches below and 2 inches
Sto the sides of the row, at or before 'planting.
Cotton Side-dress at chopping time with 150-200 lbs. per
acre of nitrate of soda.
On very sandy soils supplement fertilizer with 50
Sto 100 lbs. per acre of muriate of potash.
MINERAL SOILS 300-400 4-10-7 4-7-5 0-14-10* Apply fertilizer as for corn.
Side-dress with 100 to 150 lbs. per acre of nitrate
Grain sorghum of soda or equivalent at 30 days and every 6 weeks
Cattail millet thereafter.
If crops are to follow a winter legume, then apply
S300 to 400 lbs. per acre of 0-14-10 fertilizer.








Soils and Fertilizers for Florida Crops 21

DEFINITIONS
SOIL TYPE A soil which is relatively uniform in all its
profile characteristics, that is, the succes-
sive layers wherever' found.
SOIL TEXTURE Refers to the fineness or coarseness of soil
particles. A soil is made up of a mixture
of different-sized particles. The largest
STONES particles in a soil are Stones, but these are
not considered part of the soil fabric.
Particles smaller than stones are called
GRAVEL Gravel. The next three fractions in order
SAND, SILT AND of decreasing size of particles are Sand,
CLAY Silt and Clay.
Sand particles may be coarse, medium,
fine and very fine. However, the sand
particles are separate grains visible to the
unaided eye. On the other hand, silt and
clay particles are usually clumped to-
gether in small aggregates, and the indi-
vidual particles are visible only under a
microscope.
TEXTURAL CLASS Such as sand, fine sand, loamy sand, sandy
loam, fine sandy loam, sandy clay loam,
indicates the predominant particle size in
a soil. A sand is a soil composed mainly
of sand particles, but it also contains small
amounts of silt and clay particles.
HEAVY SOILS Are soils which contain large amounts of
silt and clay. The name refers to the diffi-
culty of working them and not to actual
weight.
LIGHT SOILS Are soils which are composed largely of
the sand fractions and the name indicates
the ease with which they are worked.
MINERAL SOILS Refers to soils composed largely of mineral
matter, sand, silt and clay.
ORGANIC SOILS Refers to soils composed largely of organic
matter, such as peat and muck.
PEAT Soils which are composed largely of par-
tially decomposed plant materials and
relatively little (less than 35 percent) of
mineral matter.







22 Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

MUCK Soils which contain 25 to 65 percent of
organic matter.
FERTILIZER Refers to the amounts of nitrogen, phos-
ANALYSIS phoric acid and potash contained in the
fertilizers as, for example, 4-8-8. The
figures represent the percentages of the
constituents in the fertilizer in the order
named above.
NITROGEN The first figure in the fertilizer analysis
refers to the nitrogen content. Nitrogen
is supplied in the fertilizer in a variety of
materials, such as sodium nitrate, am-
monium nitrate, ammonium sulfate, urea,
tankage, fish scrap, cottonseed meal, castor
pomace and sewage sludge.
PHOSPHORIC ACID The second figure in the fertilizer analysis
refers to phosphoric acid-which is not an
acid at all, but is the chemist's way of re-
ferring to the necessary element of phos-
phorus that is required by every living
cell.
,POTASH The third figure in the fertilizer analysis
refers to potash and likewise is not what
it is called. The figure represents K20
(potassium oxide) but the element potas-
sium is the important plant food con-
stituent.
MINOR ELEMENTS Refers to those elements which are re-
quired by plants in relatively small
amounts, such as manganese, zinc, copper,
boron and molybdenum. Iron, magnesium
and sulfur are sometimes included in the
group.
LIME Usually refers to ground agricultural
limestone or hydrated lime, though strictly
speaking it is neither, but refers to calcium
oxide (CaO).
SOIL ACIDITY Usually means a deficiency of bases, prin-
cipally calcium, in the soil. Calcium to
neutralize soil acidity is supplied in lime.
pH Is a measure of the acidity or alkalinity of
the soil. pH below 7.0 indicates increas-








Soils and Fertilizers for Florida Crops 23

ing acidity. The most favorable pH for
plant growth, availability of plant food ele-
ments and microbiological action is re-
OPTIMUM pH ferred to as optimum pH. Obviously this
will vary with different plants and on dif-
ferent soil types. It is higher for a well
buffered silt loam well supplied with or-
ganic matter than for a poorly buffered
sand low in organic matter. pH 5.4 to 6.2
should include most crops and soils in
Florida. However, there are certain ex-
ceptions. For example, potatoes are
grown successfully on the marls at pH
8.0. Azaleas and camellias do better in a
moderately to strongly acid soil than in a
neutral to alkaline soil, but they will usu-
ally do better at pH 5.0 than at pH 4.0.








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