• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Historic note
 Introduction
 Two types of self-feeders
 Advantages of the self-feeder
 Precautions to be observed
 Importance of mineral feed
 For pig club members
 Regarding rations














Group Title: Bulletin - University of Florida. Division of Agricultural Extension ; no. 20
Title: The self-feeder for pork production
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00026358/00001
 Material Information
Title: The self-feeder for pork production
Series Title: Bulletin
Physical Description: 8 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Highfill, L. R
Publisher: University of Florida, Division of Agricultural Extension
Place of Publication: <Gainesville Fla.>
Publication Date: 1919
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Swine -- Equipment and supplies   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by L.R. Highfill.
General Note: "May, 1919".
Funding: Bulletin (University of Florida. Agricultural Extension Division)
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00026358
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002569498
oclc - 47285201
notis - AMT5801

Table of Contents
    Historic note
        Historic note
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Two types of self-feeders
        Page 3
    Advantages of the self-feeder
        Page 3
    Precautions to be observed
        Page 3
    Importance of mineral feed
        Page 4
    For pig club members
        Page 5
    Regarding rations
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida






Bulletin 20


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN
AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL
EXTENSION AND UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT
OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATING
P. H. ROLFS, Director



THE SELF FEEDER FOR PORK

PRODUCTION
By L. R. HIGHFILL*
The self-feeder is especially adapted to "finishing off" hogs
that are ready for a 60 to 90 day feeding period. The use of
the self-feeder for the production of breeding hogs is probably
more limited than in the production of pork. Since the self-
feeder provides a constant supply of feed, it would be expected
that this method of feeding would have a tendency to produce


Fig. 1.-Self-feeder in use on a Florida hog farm
*Working cooperatively with the Bureau of Animal Industry, U. S.
Dept. of Agr., in Swine Extension Work.


May, 1919






Florida Cooperative Extension


a short, chunky, fat hog rather than one with plenty of stretch
and frame development so necessary to the breeding hog. How-
ever, some breeders report satisfactory results from the use of
the self-feeder for pigs up to four or five months of age. It


/" P/a /,f.


Fig. 2.-Type "A" self-feeder, suited to pig club members


would be a fairly safe conclusion that the most satisfactory
results from the self-feeder will be found in the production of
pork.
It is generally accepted that hogs will thrive best when they
can secure those feeds that will best satisfy their appetites.
Experiments indicate that the hog will balance its own ration
if given access to sufficient quantities of various feeds supplying
the necessary nutritive elements. If the self-feeder is kept
constantly supplied with such feeds, it naturally follows that
the hog will do the proper mixing. Since no two hogs require
exactly the same proportion of various feeds, by the use of a
self-feeder each hog can have a properly balanced ration.


ix L,







The Self-Feeder for Pork Production


TWO TYPES OF SELF-FEEDERS
There are two types of self-feeders in general use. One
requires the feed to be mixed before being fed; the other is
provided with compartments for each kind of feed. It is a very
simple matter to make partitions in any of the types of feeders,
dividing them into as many compartments as desired. When the
different feeds are supplied separately, the self-feeder must be
divided into compartments, or else a self-feeder provided for
each kind of feed.

ADVANTAGES OF THE SELF-FEEDER
It is as a labor saving device that the self-feeder is probably
of the most value. To keep it supplied with feed and to give
it daily inspection, requires only a small portion of the time that
would be necessary to hand-feed the
same number of hogs. The self-
feeder must be looked over daily to
see that the feed does not clog in I
the vent thru which it passes into
the trough, but this requires only a
few minutes of time.
Another advantage of the self- \
feeder is that by its use the average
person may supply as good a bal-
anced ration as the most skilled
hand-feeder. i
Several e, perirnents have indi-
cated that the self-feeder, while q
using more feed, results in more
gain per po,'nd of feed consumed.
This is one of the very important -
points that .should be taken into --/ 6
consideration. Fig. 3.-Type "A" showing
adjustable slide
PRECAUTIONS TO BE OBSERVED

In border that the self-feeder may be used for a variety of
feeds, the opening thru which the feed passes to the trough
shou'1d be provided with some means whereby it can be regulated.
The accompanying plans of self-feeders show an adjustable
sl .de, consistilng of a board running lengthwise of the feeder,







The Self-Feeder for Pork Production


TWO TYPES OF SELF-FEEDERS
There are two types of self-feeders in general use. One
requires the feed to be mixed before being fed; the other is
provided with compartments for each kind of feed. It is a very
simple matter to make partitions in any of the types of feeders,
dividing them into as many compartments as desired. When the
different feeds are supplied separately, the self-feeder must be
divided into compartments, or else a self-feeder provided for
each kind of feed.

ADVANTAGES OF THE SELF-FEEDER
It is as a labor saving device that the self-feeder is probably
of the most value. To keep it supplied with feed and to give
it daily inspection, requires only a small portion of the time that
would be necessary to hand-feed the
same number of hogs. The self-
feeder must be looked over daily to
see that the feed does not clog in I
the vent thru which it passes into
the trough, but this requires only a
few minutes of time.
Another advantage of the self- \
feeder is that by its use the average
person may supply as good a bal-
anced ration as the most skilled
hand-feeder. i
Several e, perirnents have indi-
cated that the self-feeder, while q
using more feed, results in more
gain per po,'nd of feed consumed.
This is one of the very important -
points that .should be taken into --/ 6
consideration. Fig. 3.-Type "A" showing
adjustable slide
PRECAUTIONS TO BE OBSERVED

In border that the self-feeder may be used for a variety of
feeds, the opening thru which the feed passes to the trough
shou'1d be provided with some means whereby it can be regulated.
The accompanying plans of self-feeders show an adjustable
sl .de, consistilng of a board running lengthwise of the feeder,







The Self-Feeder for Pork Production


TWO TYPES OF SELF-FEEDERS
There are two types of self-feeders in general use. One
requires the feed to be mixed before being fed; the other is
provided with compartments for each kind of feed. It is a very
simple matter to make partitions in any of the types of feeders,
dividing them into as many compartments as desired. When the
different feeds are supplied separately, the self-feeder must be
divided into compartments, or else a self-feeder provided for
each kind of feed.

ADVANTAGES OF THE SELF-FEEDER
It is as a labor saving device that the self-feeder is probably
of the most value. To keep it supplied with feed and to give
it daily inspection, requires only a small portion of the time that
would be necessary to hand-feed the
same number of hogs. The self-
feeder must be looked over daily to
see that the feed does not clog in I
the vent thru which it passes into
the trough, but this requires only a
few minutes of time.
Another advantage of the self- \
feeder is that by its use the average
person may supply as good a bal-
anced ration as the most skilled
hand-feeder. i
Several e, perirnents have indi-
cated that the self-feeder, while q
using more feed, results in more
gain per po,'nd of feed consumed.
This is one of the very important -
points that .should be taken into --/ 6
consideration. Fig. 3.-Type "A" showing
adjustable slide
PRECAUTIONS TO BE OBSERVED

In border that the self-feeder may be used for a variety of
feeds, the opening thru which the feed passes to the trough
shou'1d be provided with some means whereby it can be regulated.
The accompanying plans of self-feeders show an adjustable
sl .de, consistilng of a board running lengthwise of the feeder,






Florida Cooperative Extension


and adjusted by wing bolts. Such a device permits feeding any
kind of grain or ground feeds.
If the feeds are fed separately, the self-feeders must be
watched closely to see that each kind of feed is constantly sup-
plied. This is im-
portant, both from
the standpoint of
gain per pound of
A ,feed and economy
2 of gains.
; It is unsatisfac-
|e tory to take hogs
C ,from a light feed,
Sand by the use of
,n the self-feeder, im-
v" mediately give them
S"X ." access to all the
feed they will con-
Fig. 4.-Cross section self-feeder type "B". A, sume. It is neces-
ship lap; B, 1-in. x 8-in. adjustable; C, 7/16-in. sary to gradually
x 3-in. slot in board; D, one section for each
compartment. get them on a full
feed, and this can
be done by some hand-feeding for some seven or ten days. After
the hog has been brought up to a heavy ration he will not over-
eat, tho he has access to any quantity of feed.
With the use of the self-feeder, as is the case when feeding
by hand, it is absolutely necessary to have plenty of water within
reach of the hogs at all times. Shade and other necessary con-
veniences should not be neglected if the best results are to be
secured from any system of feeding.
It will be seen from the accompanying drawings that the
self-feeder consists briefly of a hopper for holding the feed,
below which is a trough into which the feed flows from an ad-
justable opening. The hopper is designed to hold sufficient feed
for several days. It should be at all times well covered so as to
protect the contents from the weather, and it is best to keep it
under a shed. It is a good plan to build the self-feeder on skids
so that it can be easily moved from place to place.

IMPORTANCE OF MINERAL FEED
Particular attention should be given to providing the mineral
portion so necessary in the ration of the hog. In many cases,






The Self-Feeder for Pork Production


even where the feeder has a general idea of the place carbohy-
drates and protein have in the ration, little thought is given to
mineral matter. Often the result is a lack of thriftiness and an
unreliable appetite in the case of fattening hogs. In the case
of the brood sow, she is often restless, and frequently will eat
her pigs to satisfy the cravings of an abnormal appetite. If the
self-feeder is used for no other purpose, and is kept supplied
with this kind of feed, it is a valuable investment. This mineral
feed should be placed in a compartment by itself, and not allowed
to become mixed with the other feeds.
A good mixture to keep. supplied at all times is: One
bushel each of charcoal and hardwood ashes; salt, eight pounds;
air-slaked lime, four pounds; sulphur, four pounds; pulverized
copperas, two pounds. Mix the first five ingredients thoroly.
Dissolve the copperas in hot water and sprinkle over the mixture;
then mix thoroly and place in the self-feeder.

FOR PIG CLUB MEMBERS
The pig club boy will find the self-feeder especially good for
feeding his young pigs. The self-feeder shown in Fig. 2 is very
simple in construction and is adapted to the needs of the pig
club boy. This self-
feeder can be placed
in one corner of the
lot, and with the use
of a few planks
placed across from
the two adjacent
sides of the fence
the other hogs can
be easily kept away.
The bottom plank
will need to be
placed high enough
from the ground so
that the pigs can go
under the self-feed-
er. Begin feeding
the pigs some shorts
or similar feed, as
soon as they will
eat. When it comes Fig. 5,-Type "B" self-feeder






Florida Cooperative Extension


time to wean them they will go right ahead eating from the
self-feeder, and will in no wise be stunted as is sometimes the
case when suddenly removed from the sow.


2,.
i ,'


;E- FK --tgl- .5


Fig. 6.-Cross section type "C" self-feeder

*If the pigs show a disposition to lie around the self-feeder
and not feed on the pasture, it will be advisable to allow them to
get to the self-feeder for only an hour or two, two or three times
daily. Framework and not fat is the object in feeding for the
first few months of the pig's life.

REGARDING RATIONS
Some Florida farmers are feeding a fattening ration of
about 50% each of corn and peanut meal. In order to get the
hogs to eat the feeds in this proportion, it is necessary to do the
mixing before the feeds are placed in the self-feeder. This is an
example to show that where the farmer doubts the wisdom of
letting the hog balance his ration, the feed can still be supplied
thru a self-feeder. Frequently it may seem more economical to
force hogs to eat certain feeds in different proportions to those







The Self-Feeder for Pork Production


they would naturally choose if given free access to these feeds,
separated.
The kinds and proportions of feed supplied, regardless of
the system of feeding, will depend upon the cost and availability
of those feeds. The probable market price at the time the hogs
will be ready to sell will also be taken into consideration.
The following rations, which have been found satisfactory
by a number of hog growers, may be conveniently fed thru a
self-feeder:


Fig. 7.-Type "C" self-feeder


SUGGESTED RATIONS FOR FATTENING HOGS
Nutritive
Ratio
Ration No. 1. Shelled corn, 100 pounds; peanut meal, 12.5 pounds 1:6.2
Ration No. 2. Shelled corn, 100 pounds; tankage, 11 pounds......... 1:6.3
Ration No. 3. Shelled corn, 100 pounds; peanut meal, hulls in-
cluded, 20 pounds.....................--------- -....... ...-.. 1:6.7
Ration No. 4. Shelled corn, 100 pounds; tankage, 5 pounds; pea-
nut meal, hulls included, 16% pounds.................. 1:6.3







Florida Cooperative Extension


SUGGESTED RATIONS FOR PIGS FROM TWO TO SIX MONTHS
OF AGE
Ration No. 1. Shelled corn, 100 pounds; wheat shorts, 40 pounds;
tankage, 20 pounds-.............................. ----- 1:4.6
Ration No. 2. Shelled corn, 100 pounds; wheat shorts, 100 pounds;
peanut meal, no hulls, 20 pounds----.....----....................... 1:4.7
Ration No. 3. Shelled corn, 100 pounds; ground oats, 75 pounds;
tankage, 25 pounds---.... ................... .... .. 1:5
Ration No. 4. Shelled corn, 100 pounds; wheat shorts, 100 pounds;
tankage, 12 pounds........... ........................ 1:5
Ration No. 5. Shelled corn, 100 pounds; tankage, 12.5 pounds...... 1:6
It is preferable to have the corn ground or cracked, es-
pecially if it is to be fed to young pigs. When feeding it in the
self-feeder, along with other feeds, it is best to have it ground
or cracked.
In order to simplify the table above so that it may be fairly
well applied by the farmer who has no scales handy, the following
approximate table is given:
1 gallon peanut meal, no hulls, weighs about..................................- 4 lbs.
1 gallon shelled corn, weighs about... ..---....---...----- ..-..---7 lbs.
1 gallon wheat shorts, weighs about.......----.. ..--------.....--.3 lbs.
1 gallon tankage or meat meal, weighs about--.......--.----.. ----....7 lbs.
1 gallon ground oats, weighs about-...........-------- ---....---23 lbs.

In calculating the amount of feed that will be necessary to
supply a given number of hogs for a period of time, it is
generally accepted that a hog will consume a quantity of feed,
daily, weighing from 3 to 4 percent of its live weight.

LUMBER REQUIRED FOR TYPE "A" SELF-FEEDER
26 pieces 1"x3" matched flooring..........................-------------- long
3 pieces 1"x6" ship lap---.... .......... ....................2 8" long
2 pieces 1"xl" ....---..------- ---.-------.3' long
5 pieces 1"x6" ship lap---...... --..... -----. .-------.-.2' 6" long
2 pieces 1"x3" ...................---------------- ...-- 1' 6" long
2 pieces 1"x3" ......------..----- .......-----..--- ....2' 6" long
2 pieces 2"x6" .--.....--------....- ---.......- ------2' 6" long
2 pieces 1"x6" -----..--------.....------- .--- ---1' 6" long
3 pieces 2"x6" _-..-...-------. ...-- ...--...... .........-- -- --.....-------- 2' 6" long
1 pair 6" strap hinges. Thumb screws on half-inch bolts.
LUMBER REQUIRED FOR TYPE "B" SELF-FEEDER, SIX FEET LONG
1"x8" ship lap---................ .---------- ----160 board feet
2"x4" framing ..-...--.. ------- ......- ---------- 40 board feet
2"x6" framing and runners............ -----------------. 18 board feet
1"x8" for adjustable slide................... ...........------- 8 board feet
Three 6" strap hinges.
Wing bolts for each compartment.
LUMBER REQUIRED FOR TYPE "C" SELF-FEEDER, SIX FEET LONG
2"x4" framing ..-....-.... -------..--............... 48 board feet
2"x6" framing .. ...........---------- ------- 28 board feet
1"x8" ship lap...................................----- .... 248 board feet
1"x8" for adjustable slide---....-----....... ------- 8 board feet
Three 6" strap hinges. Thumb screws on half-inch bolts.




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